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Appalachian History



Stories, quotes and anecdotes.Stories, quotes and anecdotes from Appalachia, with an emphasis on the Depression era



Last Build Date: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 09:28:53 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2010 Dave Tabler
 



Eats 2,000 mosquitoes a day?

Tue, 22 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

America’s most sociable bird is getting ready to pack up and head south for the winter in the next couple of weeks. That would be the purple martin (Progne subis), whose usefulness was already recognized in Appalachia by the early Cherokees, who hung bottle gourds horizontally on long poles to attract them. Not only did […]

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We spoke just Italian at home

Mon, 21 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

“My parents were Italian immigrants, and they settled in West Virginia, where my father came over at the age of seventeen, where he was a bookkeeper. He came over as a bookkeeper for an Italian, Mr. Fucci [sic], who was building a railroad through a great part of West Virginia at the time. [ed. note: […]

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The house that makes broomsticks stand on end

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

GO to Mystery Hill at Blowing Rock, NC! SEE people stand on 45-degree angles! WATCH water roll uphill! Mystery after mystery! America loves Mystery Spots. Irish Hills, MI, also has a Mystery Hill. Lake Wales, FL, has Spook Hill. California has the Mystery Spot in Santa Cruz. Mystery spots of land, often known as gravity […]

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The preacher threw the dirt out of Unatsi’s grave and robbed it

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:00:52 +0000

STORY OF A CHEROKEE INDIAN FAMILY   CHARACTERS Hogbite [‘hogbite’] His wife Zetella [‘crane’]. Their daughter, Unatsi [‘snow’]. Their baby boy, name unknown. In 1835 the blacksmith Hogbite and his wife, Zetella, with their daughter Unatsi, fourteen, and their baby boy, six months old, crossed the Nantahala mountains to Franklin. On their return in the […]

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You really had to work to keep them molasses

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

“[My grandparents] had a molasses mill; they made molasses. I used to help make them, too. [They made molasses to sell.] And they made for people. They’d make molasses for six weeks or longer at a time, every day except Sunday. Sometimes they didn’t make them on Saturday. It was usually five days a week. […]

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The flood trapped people before they knew what was upon them

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The Mountain Eagle WHITESBURG, LETCHER COUNTY, KENTUCKY. THURSDAY JUNE 2 1927 “16 KNOWN DEAD IN FLOOD” The death list of the terrific storm which swept Letcher County Sunday night has mounted to sixteen, with reports coming in which indicate that it may reach twenty. Property damage cannot be estimated. Homes are destroyed, livestock and poultry […]

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We have canned 113 cans of corn and several beans

Mon, 14 Aug 2017 05:00:58 +0000

Fletcher, N.C. Dec. 12, 1932 Mrs. Rosalee Gibson, Vonore, Tenn. Dear Mother, I had a letter from Seth this morning. I was glad to hear from you all. This leaves us all very well, hoping it will find you all the same. I have just neglected to write as I should have. And I think […]

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The Klan comes a calling

Fri, 11 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Forest City, N.C. August 15, 1928. Dear Friends, You have been vouched for as a man who is thoroughly American, Protestant to the core, a law abider and lover of our Constitution, and one who has had the welfare of our country close to your heart. As such you are invited to attend a Lecture […]

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Who Was Here When I Got Here

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 05:00:17 +0000

The following are reminiscences of the Cloverdale, GA community by Brody Hawkins, who was born there in 1927 (d. 1998) and lived there all his life.  These are his memories of the families who lived in Cloverdale when he was a child. When I got here, we had three doctors in the community, Dr. Middleton, […]

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A national treasure almost lost forever

Wed, 09 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Maxine Broadwater was just 5 years old when she helped her brothers destroy the glass negatives so they could turn their late uncle’s photography studio into a chicken house. Luckily for us they didn’t finish the job. Leo J. Beachy (1874-1927) is thought to have taken ten thousand photographs a year on five inch by […]

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Acid rain devastates Tennessee’s Copper Basin

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

In August 1843, a Tennessee gold prospector working on Potato Creek discovered a reddish-brown and black decomposed rock that contained deep red crystals; his “gold” turned out to be red copper oxide. At the time, this copper deposit was one of the world’s largest finds. The Hiwassee Mine opened in 1850, and within 5 years […]

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I don’t ever seem to be able to get away from groceries

Mon, 07 Aug 2017 05:00:00 +0000

“So you wonder why I have spent the last ten years of my life behind this meat counter,” said Jack Gallup. “You think I ought to be doin’ something better, do you? Well, I’ll tell you. For one thing, I never would study in school and I dropped out at the end of the fifth […]

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