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Appalachian History



Stories, quotes and anecdotes.Stories, quotes and anecdotes from Appalachia, with an emphasis on the Depression era



Last Build Date: Fri, 02 Dec 2016 11:32:02 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2010 Dave Tabler
 



Dashing through the snow

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 05:00:00 +0000

Stephens’ “Book of the Farm” (1840) says “Winter is the especial season of man – our own season. It is the intellectual season during which the spirit of man enables him most to triumphantly display his superiority over the beasts each day that perish.” In winter, the countryman plays a conqueror who sets forth each […]

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Double murder in Vinton County, part 2

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 05:00:00 +0000

…continued On November 11, 1926, young neighbor Manville Perry noticed the living room door of William and Sarah Stout’s farmhouse open, and was shocked by the sight he saw. He ran to a nearby coal mine and called for several miners to accompany him back to the farm. Mrs. Stout’s body lay in front of […]

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Double murder in Vinton County, part 1

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 05:00:00 +0000

The last time she saw William Stout, the man missing, he was mending fences here at his Axtel Ridge place, Inez Palmer told the sheriff. She’d heard her boyfriend’s father had headed out west, and was acting strangely before he left Vinton County. Maude “Sheriff Maude” Collins and her deputy Ray Cox followed the trail […]

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A body can take comfort in layin’ herself out on the quiltin’ of patch quilt

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 05:00:00 +0000

“I’m proud to see you,” said Aunt Cynthy. “Go in, ef you can get in for the children, or ef you are willin’, we can talk right hyar. I couldn’t miss the first good quiltin’ weather this spring. All winter I piece and patch, me and the gals, and when pretty weather comes I set […]

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The Wildcats vs. The Vols

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 05:00:42 +0000

Perhaps you thought the UK Wildcats-UT Vols football rivalry is a recent phenomenon? This photo from the Abe Thompson photograph album, circa 1920-1923, in the University of Kentucky’s archives, suggests otherwise! The handwritten caption below the photo reads “KY vs Univ. of Tennessee at Knoxville.” Note the lack of any enclosed stadium; Neyland Stadium, though […]

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Oh, to return once more to the days when…

Fri, 25 Nov 2016 05:00:00 +0000

“Oh, to return once more to the days when they made real country sausage and souse meat! Where grandpa and grandma smoked their long-stemmed clay pipes and would light them by dipping a live coal from the old fireplace. “Let’s go into the big house and sit by the fire and see the old-fashioned dog-irons […]

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 12:10:20 +0000

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Do you remember Grandma’s lye soap?

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 05:00:00 +0000

“Hog killing was a value for rendering out your lard and make your cracklings and we use the scraps to make soap out of. The way we made lye was everybody had an ash hopper. It’s a big square box and you put all your ashes in it that you take out of the fireplace. […]

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I studied medicine because it was a challenge, and I wanted to know

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 05:00:30 +0000

“I went on to Columbia University, as I had planned. I was just a year late. But Mother promised that I could go on and do graduate work. So, I went on up to Columbia University. I did work in Bacteriology. “And then, I hadn’t known much about hospitals or laboratory work, but then I […]

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Hog-Butchering Day

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 05:00:00 +0000

“Butchering conjures up the image of a country diet laden with generous servings of ham, shoulder, tenderloin, bacon, sausage and spareribs. The restocking of our primary source of hog meat began every spring with the selection of four shoats. Their pre-slaughter fattening schedule coincided with cutting and shucking corn, hand-husking ears of golden grain, and […]

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Virginia and Pennsylvania wrestle over western borders

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 05:00:54 +0000

“[Virginia governor] Lord Dunmore concluded to settle the boundary line dispute with Pennsylvania by forcibly taking possession of Pittsburg, or Fort Pitt, and attaching it to the colony of Virginia. “In 1771 the Colonial troops had been withdrawn from Pittsburg, and Fort Pitt was abandoned, so that in 1774 when John Connolly, sent by Lord […]

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Cornbread or beaten biscuits? Breaking the food code

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 05:00:13 +0000

This 2005 interview with Dr. Elizabeth Engelhardt of the University of Texas/Austin ran in that school’s Office of Public Affairs newsletter. Full article here. When you sit down to your Thanksgiving meal next week, will the dressing on your plate be made with cornbread or wheat bread? Will it have oysters or sausage or chestnuts? When […]

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