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Appalachian History



Stories, quotes and anecdotes.Stories, quotes and anecdotes from Appalachia, with an emphasis on the Depression era



Last Build Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2017 12:42:16 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2010 Dave Tabler
 



Bringing in a live bear

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 12:42:16 +0000

We took him up and laid him down on the truck, and he was dead as a hammer. Choked him to death; that last spell there. We had a pole in there about as big as his leg. Well, the old bear weighed about a hundred and seventy-five pounds, I'd say. But he was dead.

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Mountain songs and sayings have living reality

Wed, 26 Jul 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The convenient and pithy term for the mountain people of Kentucky, “our contemporary ancestors,” does not indicate the origin of the customs, beliefs, and peculiarities which persist among them. For they too had ancestors. These were, for the most part, British, and of the soil. Just as today many a mountaineer has never been ten […]

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The porches were screened but the coal dust still came in

Tue, 25 Jul 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Moore Hollow boomed during 30’s and 40’s By Lois Kleffman Jackson County Sun [KY] Date Unknown What was it like in Moore Hollow after the mines got started? Luther Powell of Sand Gap says, “It was booming. New York didn’t have any more business than Moore Hollow. You could sell any piece of coal you […]

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Bank Night at the Met

Mon, 24 Jul 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The Metropolitan Theatre in Morgantown, WV is one of that city’s best examples of Neo-classical Revival architecture. The 1,300 seat theatre opened on July 24, 1924 with “seven acts of vaudeville sent by the BF Keith Amusement Company from its New York Office.” Over the years Gene Autry, Peggy Lee, Count Basie, the Andrews Sisters, […]

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We would have to just do everwhat she wanted us to do

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 05:00:00 +0000

“Well, of course, we had to help with the housework, all . . . we had to do the sweeping and the dishwashing and the scrubbing of floors. We . . . we just had wood floors, no . . . with no paint on ‘em, no nothing on ‘em, and . . . and […]

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We can still see the townhouse, changed long ago to solid rock, but the people are invisible and immortal

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 05:00:17 +0000

Long ago, long before the Cherokee were driven from their homes in 1838, the people on Valley river and Hiwassee heard voices of invisible spirits in the air calling and warning them of wars and misfortunes which the future held in store, and inviting them to come and live with the Nûñnë’hï, the Immortals, in […]

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The over-wrought child requires quiet methods

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Bulletin of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Immigration, published in Richmond, distributed statewide July 1921, Bulletin No. 166, p. 74 “Have you studied this subject seriously—the nervous child?” Should there be one rigid rule for the training of all children? I am convinced that there should not. And if there is one exception it […]

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The Swamp Rabbit engineer had to back up a mile to retrieve a lost cow-catcher

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 05:00:58 +0000

GREENVILLE OF OLD by Charles A. David Greenville News [SC] July 18, 1926 You may name your boy Percival, Algernon, or Montmoresst, but if some chap at school dubs him “Sorrel-top,” “Bully,” or “Buster,” the nick-name will stick and his real name forgotten. So it has been with this little railroad–its owners christened it the […]

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Francis Scott Key’s descendants in western Maryland

Mon, 17 Jul 2017 05:00:30 +0000

In 1870 Alice Key Howard [the author’s aunt], a daughter of Mrs. Charles Howard, bought from a man named Stabler a four room hunting lodge with separate kitchens, standing in a dense grove of oaks, many of whose survivors still surround the present house. Even in my memory there was an oak grove with a […]

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He wears the breeches but the lady has the brains

Fri, 14 Jul 2017 05:00:00 +0000

John Wesley Langley resigned from Congress (R., Kentucky 10th Congressional District) in January 1926, after losing an appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States to set aside his conviction on charges of conspiracy to violate the Volstead Act. He’d been caught trying to bribe a Prohibition officer and sent to the federal penitentiary […]

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Was it murder? Or a heart attack?

Thu, 13 Jul 2017 05:00:00 +0000

“I went up to Wise that night along with my cousin and not meaning no harm,” testified Edith Maxwell at her murder trial. “Along in the evening Raymond Meade came along and said he would give me a lift back to my house in Pound. There was some more people in the car with him […]

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They’d get up and swing around on the trapeze

Wed, 12 Jul 2017 05:00:00 +0000

“Well, I’ll tell you, I came from up in Washington County. Washington County, Ohio. Lived up in the country there with my grandmother. My mother died when I was a little fellow and I lived with my grandmother. Lived up there in the country and all you could see was the steamboats. There was nothing […]

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