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Appalachian History



Stories, quotes and anecdotes.Stories, quotes and anecdotes from Appalachia, with an emphasis on the Depression era



Last Build Date: Mon, 11 Dec 2017 12:18:49 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2010 Dave Tabler
 



The Animals from the Wild Visit, and Ms. Cat Stays

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 05:00:00 +0000

I think it was the ninth night, I was told, that the wild animals came in from the forest, fields and desert. Some had traveled a long way. They came in late at night when everybody was asleep. They didn’t want to scare people. They came in quietly to see the Son of Heaven, baby […]

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Book Selection: ‘Plott Hound Tales: Legendary People and Places Behind the Breed’

Fri, 08 Dec 2017 11:47:45 +0000

Bear hunting was what the Plott clan and their legendary hounds enjoyed most –and young Jack Edwards could not wait until he was old enough to accompany the men on his first bear hunt. Jack was only ten years old at the time of the famous Branch Rickey Hazel Creek Hunt in 1935.

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Gathering in the mistletoe

Thu, 07 Dec 2017 05:00:43 +0000

Frank Slake (right) and Ray Stratton gathered holly and mistletoe in the hills near Lerose, KY for Christmas 1907 when they worked for the K. & P. Lumber Company established there. Full caption at Owsley County Historical & Genealogy Society.

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John Henry was hammering

Wed, 06 Dec 2017 05:00:00 +0000

“John Henry was hammering on the right side, The big steam drill on the left, Before that steam drill could beat him down, He hammered his fool self to death.” —stanza 7 from one of the earliest written copies of the John Henry ballad, prepared by a W. T. Blankenship and published about 1900. He’s […]

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The name of George L. Carter became famous in all Virginia

Tue, 05 Dec 2017 05:00:13 +0000

Upon his father’s small farm [in Carroll County, VA], George L. Carter, the first of nine children, was born not long before the war; and though apparently physically unfitted to endure the labors of the field, he had the resolution of his father, and during the spring, summer and autumn worked on the farm, and […]

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I tried to get her to sing all the song

Mon, 04 Dec 2017 05:00:00 +0000

John Jacob Niles composed the Appalachian influenced Christmas carols The Carol of the Birds, The Flower of Jesse, What Songs were Sung, Jesus, Jesus, Rest Your Head, and Sweet Little Boy Jesus. I Wonder As I Wander, one of his most popular carols, illustrates the working methods of this inveterate collector of homegrown musicality: “I […]

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The Creek Indians of Boiling Spring, AL

Fri, 01 Dec 2017 05:00:00 +0000

“Boiling Spring” The Anniston Times, December 30,1932 by Bessie Coleman Robinson Our county abounds in beautiful springs, but no other surpasses Boiling Spring in beauty. It is located on the Manning Christian Place, originally called the Caver Place, situated in the Choccolocco Valley a few miles east of Oxford. In early days this spring gushed […]

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Blackburn went to the serpent box and got the two copperheads out

Thu, 30 Nov 2017 10:00:00 +0000

As the day was coming to a close and the evening was drawing on people started to the church. They came from the hollows and mountains where they lived. That night Lester Raines took two copperheads that Blackburn had caught early that week for the church service. Lester had a hole dug out in the […]

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I closed my eyes and bent my head to receive the stroke of the tomahawk

Wed, 29 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

On the 8th of March, 1782, William White, in sight of Fort Buckhannon [ed.-in modern day Upshur County, WV], was shot from his horse, tomahawked, scalped and lacerated in the most frightful manner by the Indians. White’s companions Timothy Dorman and his wife were captured. After the killing of White and capture of the Dormans, […]

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The number of railroad accidents made the need for a hospital strongly felt

Tue, 28 Nov 2017 05:00:46 +0000

“The Western Maryland Hospital, the first institution of its kind in Allegany County, was erected on Baltimore Avenue to minister to the suffering. The building stands there as a monument to the public-spirited women who made the hospital possible. “In 1888, thirty five years ago, a group of Cumberland women, realizing their duty to fellow […]

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"Their bodies were covered with the wreckage of logs"

Mon, 27 Nov 2017 05:00:00 +0000

The 1912 Barranshe Run mishap was one of the more dramatic log train wrecks in West Virginia history. As the Nicholas County story became legendary, Cherry River Boom and Lumber Company‘s runaway train gained additional notoriety as the subject of a local blind poet, who supported himself by selling copies of his works for a nickel on […]

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Divining for water

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 10:00:00 +0000

Water witching (rhabdomancy) is very common in West Virginia. According to a study done about fifty years ago, at that time there were twenty-five thousand practicing water witches in this country. The actual practice of divining with a forked stick, as we know it, began in the late fifteenth or early sixteenth century in Germany. […]

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