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Appalachian History



Stories, quotes and anecdotes.Stories, quotes and anecdotes from Appalachia, with an emphasis on the Depression era



Last Build Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:26:17 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2010 Dave Tabler
 



West Virginia has not, up to the present time, done much with its scenery except to mar it

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 09:00:00 +0000

A country’s natural scenery may have a good deal more than an aesthetic value. It may be worth money, and from a business standpoint its care and improvement is frequently of great importance. Fifty million dollars go into Switzerland every year to pay the board and traveling expenses of foreigners who journey there for pleasure […]

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He hunts for work, and he is a damn fool. There is no work

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

IT IS NIGHT, and we are in this jungle. This is our home tonight. Our home is a garbage heap. Around us are piles of tin cans and broken bottles. Between the piles are fires. A man and a woman huddle by the fire to our right. A baby gasps in the woman’s arms. It […]

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The sorghum season is on!

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Kentucky and Tennessee are today the leading sorghum syrup producing states, and neither are shy about the fact. The Tipton-Haynes Historic Site in Johnson City, TN hosted a sorghum festival September 20, and over in West Liberty, KY the locals of that district celebrated their own 44th annual Sorghum Festival last weekend. Georgia has an […]

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Indoor privies for country people at Cumberland Homesteads

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Today, it’s Tennessee’s largest historic district, at approximately 11,400 acres. During the Great Depression, the Cumberland Homesteads community came into being as part of a nationwide New Deal agrarian movement to create subsistence farm communities to aid out-of-work, rural residents. President Franklin Roosevelt assigned the homesteads project to Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes. […]

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There’s a ghost in this little banjo

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 05:00:13 +0000

Although she never gained the national recognition or recording status that other banjo-playing women in Kentucky achieved, Dora Mae Wagers (1927-1998), was—as the title to her self-produced cassette proclaimed—“A Legend in Her Own Time.” For forty years she played banjo on the stage of the Renfro Valley Barndance, and was often billed as one of […]

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Ginseng, the curious rootstock

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

It’s the heart of ginseng harvesting season. The berry clusters have ripened. The leaves are yellowing. The roots are ready. But stay awhile. The best hunting is still to come, after the first hard frost. But don’t wait too long. Because of wild ginseng’s endangered status, the U.S.Fish and Wildlife Service has mandated that states […]

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They slapped handcuffs on his wrists. "I guess you’ve got me"

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

New York Times. September 15, 1912, Sunday CATCH SIDNA ALLEN BY TRAILING GIRL; Wesley Edwards Also Captured at Des Moines — His Sweetheart Gives Clue. DES MOINES, Iowa, Sept. 14. — With arms and feet pinioned in heavy irons and watched over by an armed guard, Sidna Allen and Wesley Edwards, members of the outlaw […]

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His great grandfather crossed into these hills from an Eastern State that did not please him

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 05:00:56 +0000

“THE autumn in the Hills is but the afternoon of summer. The hour of the new guest is not yet. Still the heat lies on the earth and runs bubbling in the water. The little maid trots barefoot and the urchin goes a swimming in the elm hole by the corner of the meadow. Still […]

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America’s only woman ironmaster

Tue, 12 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Nannie Kelly Wright (1856-1946) was probably the only woman ironmaster in America’s history. Wright was the daughter of the famous riverboat commodore Washington Honshell, who helped form Cincinnati’s White Collar packet line. She was said to be the second richest woman in the world during the early 1900’s. Wright hadn’t set out to become an […]

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He answered the call, not by a natural death

Mon, 11 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

‘Wright’s Fork of the long ago — McRoberts of Today’ by Burdine Webb September 4th, 1941 edition of The Mountain Eagle [KY] “A few days ago I saw Wright’s Fork and the town of McRoberts that lies along its waters, Shea’s Fork, Chopping Branch, Tom Biggs and Bark Camp– but it was a different picture […]

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You only got one pair of shoes a year

Thu, 07 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

So we lived at a . . . we was renting off of a . . . some people that owned a . . . a lumberyard there. So on Friday evening I went out to this man that run . . . owned it and run it there, him and his brother. I said […]

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General Braddock’s road through the Wilderness

Wed, 06 Sep 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Today realtors tout the Dingle neighborhood west of Cumberland, MD for its charming Craftsman houses of the early 20th century. But this placid upscale neighborhood was a fierce wilderness when Nemacolin, a Delaware chief, and Thomas Cresap, a Maryland frontiersman, first blazed a trail through here in 1749 or 1750. The trail ran between the […]

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