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Appalachian History



Stories, quotes and anecdotes.Stories, quotes and anecdotes from Appalachia, with an emphasis on the Depression era



Last Build Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 11:20:04 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2010 Dave Tabler
 



"Our time has come; we will have our rights"

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 05:00:00 +0000

When Gertrude Dills McKee of Jackson County took her seat in the North Carolina Senate on January 7, 1931, she became the first woman in the state’s history to serve in that chamber. She was sworn in ten years after Lillian Exum Clement of Buncombe County became the first female member of the state House. […]

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I won’t take a picture unless the moon is right, to say nothing of the sunlight and shadow

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 05:00:27 +0000

Born on January 15, 1864 in Grafton, WV, Frances Benjamin Johnston transcended both regional and national notions about women’s place in the 19th century to become a pioneer in American photography and photojournalism, and a crusader with her camera for the historic preservation of the Old South. Through her active encouragement of women who wished […]

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The hound that made the Plott name a legend

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 05:00:19 +0000

Plott Coon Hounds are the only breed of the original six breeds of coon hounds without British influence in their ancestry. The other five breeds can trace their ancestry back to the fox hound, but the Plott Hound is the exception. And of only four dogs known to be of American origin, it’s also the […]

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Home Guards lead to post Civil War feuds in Fentress County, TN

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 05:00:21 +0000

“No section of the great Civil War suffered so enduringly as that which was the boundary line between the sections, and no part of the boundary suffered more from devastations of war in the passing to and fro of armed forces and from the raids of marauding bands, than did Fentress County, TN. “Before the […]

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The first African-American woman to serve in a legislative body in the US

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 05:00:00 +0000

On January 10, 1928 Minnie Buckingham Harper (R-McDowell) was appointed to succeed her late husband in the West Virginia House of Delegates, becoming the first African-American woman to serve in a legislative body in the United States. Harper was appointed by Governor Howard Gore to fill the vacancy caused by the death of her husband, […]

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Let the bells peal!

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 05:00:00 +0000

There are two places in today’s Appalachia where you can hear an authentic peal of the churchbells: at Breslin Tower in Convocation Hall at the University of the South in Sewanee, TN, and at Patton Memorial Tower in St James’ Episcopal Church in Hendersonville, NC. “What are you talking about?” you may say. “Why, my […]

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The Singin’ Fiddler of Lost Hope Hollow, a persona

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Jean Thomas called him the “first primitive, unlettered Kentucky mountain minstrel to cross the sea to fiddle and sing his own and Elizabethan ballads in the Royal Albert Hall in London.” She presented to the American public a man she said spent his life in the mountains, never to come into contact with the modern […]

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Oh, I was one of Al Capone’s gang

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 05:00:00 +0000

E-d-i-g-i-o R-o-m-a-n-o. He was known as Frenchy LaRue. He was not known by his Italian name, he was known by his name of Frenchy LaRue. One afternoon the finance officer came down to my office, and this little man, he was about my size, very neatly dressed, his clothes were beginning to show wear— But […]

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Its wild spirit is true to the life of the West

Wed, 04 Jan 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Zane Grey is rightly known today as the “Father of the Adult Western.” The author wrote more than 80 books, featuring rich western imagery and highly romanticized plots with often pointed moral overtones. He’s the best-selling Western author of all time, and for most of the teens, 20s, and 30s, had a least one novel […]

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Me & Bessie went out hunting any ole time

Tue, 03 Jan 2017 05:00:56 +0000

I was borned right here in these mountains, and since I was a boy I’ve knowed ever trail within twenty-five mile. My pappy were a gunsmith afore me and he teached me the trade. Pappy were the best gunsmith in four counties, and I wouldn’t swap one of them ole muzzle-loaders fer all the britch-Ioading […]

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Did You See My Girls on the Radio?

Mon, 02 Jan 2017 05:00:00 +0000

Listen to the mill whistle. It’s Wheeling Steel. On the dawn of a new year, this is the Wheeling Steel family broadcast from the headquarter city of the Wheeling Steel Corporation, Wheeling, West Virginia, with music by the…. On January 2, 1938, It’s Wheeling Steel, a live radio program from the Capitol Theater in Wheeling, […]

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New Year countdown

Fri, 30 Dec 2016 05:00:00 +0000

Ringing out the old, ringing in the new. Everyone’s doing it tomorrow night. One New Year tradition in Appalachia is the New Year baby. The custom of using a baby to signify the New Year originated in ancient Greece, the baby symbolizing in this case not birth, but re-birth. The Germans added the twist of […]

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