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Appalachian History



Stories, quotes and anecdotes.Stories, quotes and anecdotes from Appalachia, with an emphasis on the Depression era



Last Build Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 10:04:28 +0000

Copyright: Copyright 2010 Dave Tabler
 



The Indians nevertheless showed much contempt for the negro slaves

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 05:00:51 +0000

An article written about 1926 by Peter L. Livengood of Salisbury, PA, appearing in the ‘Meyersdale Republican’ that year, gives the following account of Grantsville, Maryland’s oldest inn: Little Crossings (still standing and now known as Penn Alps Restaurant & Craft Shop.) On one occasion while Mr. and Mrs. George Matthews kept tavern at Little […]

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The Laurel Creek Murders, part 2

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 05:00:00 +0000

When the fire had died, the neighbors and relatives who went through the smoking ruins of the cabin were met with a most gruesome sight: the charred bodies of Betty and Lydia and two of the children. Betty had apparently been decapitated. The investigation, led by detective A.C. Hufford of Bluefield, WV, aided by Robert […]

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The Laurel Creek Murders, part 1

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 05:00:00 +0000

On the night of September 21st, 1909, Howard Little allegedly came to visit Elizabeth E. Baker Justus and her extended family in Laurel Creek, VA and asked if he could spend the night. The family knew him and quite naturally opened their home to him. By nine o’clock, all six family members were asleep. Then, […]

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You don’t mean to go into the Dark Corner, do you?

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 05:00:30 +0000

The following piece appears in the Fall 2012 newsletter of UpCountry Friends, an organization devoted to exploring and preserving the history and culture of the upper regions of Greenville County, SC. The opening preface, by the group’s treasurer Penny Forrester, explains the back story of the main text. Thomas Robinson Dawley, Jr. toured the mountainous […]

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Holden 22 Miners Memorial Officially Dedicated

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 05:00:45 +0000

On March 8, 1960, the Holden Mine at Island Creek No. 22 in Holden, WV caught fire in the coal seam, and created a carbon monoxide gas which killed eighteen men by asphyxiation. Two miners escaped. It wasn’t the first mine disaster to occur in the southern West Virginia coal fields, and it hasn’t been the […]

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He brought the deer back to North Georgia

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 05:00:00 +0000

Deer hunting season got underway in Georgia this past Monday, September 9. It’s all too easy to forget that in the early part of the 20th century, there simply were no deer to be had in the northern part of the state. Arthur Woody never forgot that, and today’s hunters in Appalachian Georgia owe him […]

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Gertrude a la September Morn

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 05:00:00 +0000

That’s the exact caption of this photo, and while the caption dwells in specifics, the photo itself captures a universal moment that most any parent can respond to. Gertrude is the daughter of Darley Hiden & Mary Ramsey, of Asheville, NC. We don’t know the date of the picture, or who shot it, though it’s […]

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The day they hung Murderous Mary the elephant

Tue, 13 Sep 2016 05:00:00 +0000

On September 13, 1916 a five-ton circus elephant was executed, hung from a 100-ton Clinchfield railroad crane car, in the little town of Erwin, Tennessee. ‘Murderous Mary’ had killed a man, and for that she had to die. Shooting her in the four soft spots on her head would be both difficult and dangerous. She […]

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Squirrel hunting season gets under way

Mon, 12 Sep 2016 05:00:00 +0000

Squirrel hunting was and is a passion, necessity (that may be more of a was), and a sport in the hills of Virginia and Kentucky. You see it reflected in the place names: Dickenson County, VA has Squirrel Camp, Squirrel Camp Tunnel, and Squirrel Camp Branch; there’s a Squirrel Hollow in Russell County, VA; over […]

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Book Review: ‘Story of the Summersville Dam’

Fri, 09 Sep 2016 05:00:26 +0000

Betty Dotson-Lewis has written quite a few books before her latest, “Story of the Summersville Dam and The Mighty Gauley River in the Hills of West Virginia.” She’s had enough writing experience to know when “something came to me to write this book,” it was time to listen to the small voice within and get […]

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Gravely and his motor plow

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 05:00:00 +0000

Dear Sir: During the past year, I have had occasion to discuss the business situation with practically every business man in the City of Charleston and suburbs. Our very limited number of productive enterprises and our crippled coal industries are not sufficient. The trade balance is against us. What is the remedy? There is but […]

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Those men would eat like hungry men do eat, you know

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 05:00:00 +0000

“Well, we used to go to the neighbors and play cards, various different kind of games, and we popped corn. No pizzas, but we popped corn and made popcorn balls. And we made those with sorghum molasses. We didn’t waste any sugar. And we made our own sorghum molasses. I never cared all that much […]

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