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Comments for Aesthetic Complexity



Research and experiment in visual and auditory complexity by Guy Birkin



Last Build Date: Sat, 12 Aug 2017 15:34:24 +0000

 



Comment on Mozart stretched and chopped by Guy

Sat, 12 Aug 2017 15:34:24 +0000

I do appreciate - thank you.



Comment on Mozart stretched and chopped by pgilmblog

Mon, 07 Aug 2017 03:15:29 +0000

(not MY project, just one I thought you'd appreciate . . .)



Comment on Mozart stretched and chopped by Guy

Sun, 06 Aug 2017 18:36:28 +0000

Hello. I've updated the links. Not sure if the player works, but the file should be downloadable via the link. Your project is interesting - dauntingly long.



Comment on Mozart stretched and chopped by Philip GILMAN

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 18:39:40 +0000

The link to the audio does not play? This is an old post, does that limk need updating? Thx!! and see https://9beetsuperstretch.bandcamp.com/album/day-1



Comment on Encoded Message by around sounds

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 13:57:00 +0000

[…] The above definition allows noise into the physical visible realm, and beyond. TCF’s best examples of this noise encryption are stunning, focusing on digital data and the possibility to manipulate it. Personal details obtained by hacking become the background to a collage sculpture, a photo of violence against protesters becomes audio. […]



Comment on Encoded Message by Encryption and TCF | around sounds

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 13:56:58 +0000

[…] The above definition allows noise into the physical visible realm, and beyond. TCF’s best examples of this noise encryption are stunning, focusing on digital data and the possibility to manipulate it. Personal details obtained by hacking become the background to a collage sculpture, a photo of violence against protesters becomes audio. […]



Comment on Present Shock by Alex

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 10:38:13 +0000

interesting blog. ciao.



Comment on Encoded Message by TCF’s command line called TCFX – Can you break the code!!! | Thirst4Beats

Thu, 21 Apr 2016 00:47:14 +0000

[…] Things start to get really interesting, when doing a little more research with that release according to the label there are hidden keys in the track’s titles that unlock the full meaning of the work. Up for cracking a few codes well one smart punter managed to decode his last track on his album which reveals a photo of a polictical protest in Greece which is amazing. Guy Birkin of Aesthetic Complexity explains his findings here in Encoded Message […]



Comment on The Sound of Air (part 1) by Guy

Mon, 21 Mar 2016 23:13:16 +0000

I've looked into HRTF a bit - computational and price costs were prohibitive at the time. Good idea to try some reverb too - I've tinkered with convolution reverb, using a woodland IR, but for this application you'd ideally need an IR of a big sound over a big area ... oh, like a thunderstorm - could use a thunder crack as an IR. I'm going to try that now! As you say, software sim would be ideal. I guess that kind of approach is what I'm aiming at really - modelling the process rather than just recreating the sound.



Comment on The Sound of Air (part 1) by Mike Max

Sun, 20 Mar 2016 03:47:41 +0000

Ah yes. Spatial placement. You could try ending the chain with an HRTF panner like Wave Arts Panorama, which will allow you to automate the movement of the sound through the stereo field (not just XY like standard LR, or even 5.1 or 7.1 pan, but also Z, or height). Maybe also add an outdoor reverb at the end of that using Altiverb or Speakerphone to give it that subtle but detectable presence in space. The other parameters sweeping the spectrum are somewhat random due to phase cancellations caused by environmental reflections. But the 3D pan should be a smooth sweep, and reverb settings should be static at the end of the process. That's probably as close as you'll get without actually creating a software simulation of an outdoor space that will calculate ray-cast RT60 for densities and materials of surfaces on the fly, as well as doing the math for changes in air density and atmospheric pressure between the listener position and the source to be applied to the source as a filter. Of course at that point, you'd need a really powerful computer if you wanted it to run in real time, or without significant latency.