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Last Build Date: Tue, 08 Jun 2010 14:11:05 +0000

 



Comment on New professionals conference by Anita Tiba

Tue, 08 Jun 2010 14:11:05 +0000

Thanks Amanda for the good work you are doing. You make us so proud.



Comment on Interns – the new slaves? by Bronagh

Tue, 06 Apr 2010 14:14:54 +0000

Really interested to read your post, Felicity. This is something that I've thought about a lot recently. We all know that internships are a really common route into work in journalism and creative industries, but I have noticed a fair few library/info internships advertised over the past while (granted, this could be because I've been more aware of the issue). I would be interested to know exactly how common internships are in the info profession. I think they can be of great value to both intern and the organisation. But as you say, interns can easily be exploited. I recently read an interesting article ( http://www.worldvolunteerweb.org/news-views/viewpoints/doc/interns-the-acceptable-volunteers.html ) which questions our use of the words 'volunteer' and 'intern'. The article suggests that "organizations and individuals vastly prefer what they think of as interns to what they consider as volunteers. We all know the negative stereotypes about volunteers. But use the label of “interns” and the perceptions change to: eager learners (though inexperienced or young), generally exploring a possible career; able to give an intensive set of hours for at least a few months; serious about their commitment and supported by a third party, such as a university faculty member; a professional responsibility to guide and mentor." I would agree with the article that many organisations attempt to professionalise the term intern, and the distinction between interns and volunteers is often unfair. For better or worse, this is the era of the prestigious unpaid internship. I was an full time unpaid library intern for several months. I doubt I'd've been so happy to take this on had the organisation advertised the position as full-time volunteer…



Comment on Good proposals by New Professionals Conference 2010 « Bethan's information professional blog

Fri, 19 Mar 2010 12:50:50 +0000

[...] a great range of papers with a very wide appeal. Chris Rhodes has blogged about the judging process here, and there’s some great advice in there for proposal writing in [...]



Comment on New professionals conference by Amanda Birungi

Fri, 19 Feb 2010 13:30:40 +0000

It can be quite daunting to even think of submitting a paper, later on learning that your once proposal has been successful. You don’t have to crack your head too hard to come up with a proposal. The sub-themes under this year’s conference maybe part of the job that you do every day. So all new professionals don’t let this opportunity for you to share your experiences pass you by! Amanda Birungi New Professionals Support Officer London & South East Divisions Career Development Group



Comment on New professionals conference by thewikiman » Blog Archive » new professionals conference, 2010

Thu, 04 Feb 2010 19:04:28 +0000

[...] was a moment, when the urbane and handsome Chris Rhodes got back to me to say they’d accepted my proposal, when I thought: “Oh God, I actually [...]



Comment on Encompass by Amanda Birungi

Sat, 19 Dec 2009 00:48:54 +0000

Tina, we can't rule out the fact that there will be new roles created as a result of the project. By this I mean, opportunities for LIS new professionals to apply for roles in fields such as project management and information management. There is a need to look at the additional benefits that come along with the start of new projects for example, for individuals involved in this case new professionals. Amanda



Comment on Twitiquette by Tina Reynolds

Fri, 18 Dec 2009 11:31:15 +0000

That's definitely true...I think people these days do tend to get upset over nothing!



Comment on Twitiquette by rhodescj

Fri, 18 Dec 2009 11:28:57 +0000

Not so sure. I think abuse is in the eye of the beholder. One man's abuse is another woman's robust criticism. I don't want to come over all libertarian here, but it is only words on a website after all. I can understand defamation from a legal perspective, and if a clear damage is caused by somebody's words, then clearly that is wrong, but MPs in particular have to realise that their bones aren't going to be broken.



Comment on Twitiquette by Tina Reynolds

Fri, 18 Dec 2009 10:23:45 +0000

I think it depends - if it is actually abusive rather than merely critical then I would be happy for people to block...



Comment on Encompass by Tina Reynolds

Fri, 18 Dec 2009 09:39:31 +0000

Amanda, What opportunities do you think it will open up for LIS new professionals who are not BME? Or indeed BME library professionals who have already qualified? Tina