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Comments on: An Asset That Enjoyed Uninterrupted Price Gains



Examining the home price boom and its effect on owners, lenders, regulators, real estate agents and the economy as a whole.



Published: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 14:47:34 +0000

 



By: jeff saturday

Tue, 06 Mar 2012 23:16:21 +0000

-18



By: Professor Bear

Wed, 29 Feb 2012 12:26:28 +0000

"New homes are target marketed at Chinese and British expats who are looking to get out..." Sounds like this might be similar to Vancouver's housing market?



By: Professor Bear

Wed, 29 Feb 2012 12:24:13 +0000

"And there is NO shortage of land." Similarly in So Cal -- provided you don't mind living in the middle of a windswept Joshua Tree forest, where summer temperatures regularly exceed 120 degrees Fahrenheit. The divide of SoCal into limited inviting coastal areas and expansive forbidding desert territory very closely parallels Australian geography.



By: Professor Bear

Wed, 29 Feb 2012 12:15:02 +0000

Shortage of habitable land relative to the population size (think island / Japan / etc)



By: alpha-sloth

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 22:33:09 +0000

Wouldn't limiting immigration lower housing prices?



By: In Colorado

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 22:02:12 +0000

I wonder what BK laws are in Oz? Are mortgages non-recourse over there?



By: In Colorado

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 22:00:46 +0000

figures



By: Malfunction Junction

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 21:58:25 +0000

The Australian property bubble has been inflating for 13 years. The builders have almost total control over the supply of buildable land. New homes are target marketed at Chinese and British expats who are looking to get out, or want to diversify outside of their homeland. The end result is a bunch of towers that look like they were built out of lego blocks, and wildly overpriced suburbs. I have seen prices drop a bit on beach condos, but they still have a long way to go, and the condo fees are often $5000 a year.



By: ragerunner

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 21:35:58 +0000

“Project engineer Emma Challands would like to be in a position to retire before 40. She already has one investment property and is looking at buying another in the middle of next year. Emma plans to sell half her portfolio of properties as she goes, to pay off debt and use the rent as a passive income stream. ‘In a nutshell, my plan over the next 10 years is to buy basically two properties every year,’ she says.” I knew a lot of people in Florida during the boom that thought the same way. If her luck turns out to be the same as their luck than she will be working until she is 80 and in bankruptcy court some where along the way.



By: a brewer

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 20:06:57 +0000

actually that idea of there being no shortage of land is incorrect, as getting approval to build in / around to open areas of various cities is quite controlled resulting in an artificial shortage...nice to be on the right end of this equation, awful otherwise



By: Prime_Is_Contained

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 20:06:32 +0000

buddy of mine had the same plan…hasnt’ bought a rental property since 2005 or so. When property is relatively cheap, and the rental environment is stable, it might not be a bad plan. In the bubble days... not so much.



By: Prime_Is_Contained

Tue, 28 Feb 2012 20:04:40 +0000

which equates to $726,828 in Australian dollars. For this money, you’d be lucky to pick up a fibro cottage in Brisbane or a pokey townhouse in Newtown.” Anyone know what local rents are like in these areas?