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Comments on The What Ifs? that Can Derail a Deal





Updated: 2011-10-31T18:23:21Z

 



Decisions should always be made before purchase.

2017-09-26T16:39:31Z

Decisions should always be made before purchase.

Decisions should always be made before purchase.




If you start something, you always risk. There will be lots of IFS whatever you are doing. And there are...

2014-01-04T23:37:17Z

If you start something, you always risk. There will be lots of IFS whatever you are doing. And there are...

If you start something, you always risk. There will be lots of IFS whatever you are doing. And there are always people who won't appreciate what you do, so it's just better to catch up with the majority and you'll never fail!




Ardath, I'm absolutely with you on this - my only observation is that the potential to step back (albeit for...

2012-12-09T19:42:56Z

Ardath, I'm absolutely with you on this - my only observation is that the potential to step back (albeit for...

Ardath, I'm absolutely with you on this - my only observation is that the potential to step back (albeit for different reasons) exists at almost every stage in the buying decision process.

And to Pseudo Peter, a big thank you for uneducating me about the buying process. I had no idea I was so ignorant.




I agree that this Step Back stage is one that most of us are not well prepared to effectively and...

2011-11-04T14:25:07Z

I agree that this Step Back stage is one that most of us are not well prepared to effectively and...

I agree that this Step Back stage is one that most of us are not well prepared to effectively and quickly address.
The sales organization needs to anticipate the Step Back stage by working closely with the prospect and then partnering with marketing to develop the content, before the Step Back stage is reached.
There are a few ways to do this. One approach is to ask your prospect, before you get to the Step Back stage, what their buying process is for your service/product. Be sure to ask several more questions to get down to the details. Then ask who was involved in the buying process.




Hi Peter, I see you're back, under a pseudonym this time. Interesting choice. I agree with much of what you've...

2011-11-02T14:43:54Z

Hi Peter, I see you're back, under a pseudonym this time. Interesting choice. I agree with much of what you've...

Hi Peter,

I see you're back, under a pseudonym this time. Interesting choice.

I agree with much of what you've said, but I think the approach of "uneducating" people means you've not done the job of getting your information found when your prospects are looking for it. Changing minds is difficult. It's a better option to help inform opinions.

The other point that I disagree with is that what I'm proposing in my post is divorced from the buying process. If you notice in the graphic, this post is about step backs. This is after the short list is formed and buyers are working toward choosing a vendor. How can that possibly be "divorced from the buying process?"

And,instead of "uneducating" people, perhaps the approach is to be the one who builds on the information people already have to tell a better story about the opportunity/solution. Seems to me the reception would be better and more productive than trying to go backwards.




Ardath, Great insights. It is important to take a look at the complete buying and sales processes and map your...

2011-11-02T14:43:43Z

Ardath, Great insights. It is important to take a look at the complete buying and sales processes and map your...

Ardath,
Great insights. It is important to take a look at the complete buying and sales processes and map your content inventory against the stages. Only then can you truly identify the gaps!

As always, keep up the good work.




In this information rich age, everyone in a decision making position in a company receives more information on possibilities than...

2011-11-02T11:33:02Z

In this information rich age, everyone in a decision making position in a company receives more information on possibilities than...

In this information rich age, everyone in a decision making position in a company receives more information on possibilities than they can handle. White papers on this, case studies on that, webinars on the other.

So they make decisions in principle long before there is a buying process. Is this worth looking into? Is it high or low priority? The knowledge level is way higher than 5 years ago.

The old methodology - "salesperson puts an idea into play and presents it to one person, who becomes its champion within the company" - is long gone. Put something on an agenda for discussion and by the time of the meeting several people will have googled it, downloaded stuff and have informed opinions. Often the task is to "uneducate" members of the buying team who have taken as gospel stuff they found on the net.

The key to success as a vendor is raising awareness among the whole management team and making sure that when something is discussed it is your material they are holding up as a good example.

This is totally divorced from a buying process and attempting to sell at this stage will often blow the whole idea out of the water. Treating this information gathering as a lead will be counter-productive.

Intelligence is also important - knowing what everyone is likely to find on their search and how to position yourself above it. Have you googled your keywords today and worked out how to uneducate people on the information from other vendors they've found there?