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Preview: Comments on: Readers, We Want Your Mystery Meditations!

Comments on: Readers, We Want Your Mystery Meditations!



The Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group



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By: Barb

Tue, 12 Jul 2011 14:26:35 +0000

As a fan of Mankell, Larsson, and Nesbo, I'm always looking for new Scandinavian mystery/thriller writers. My Swedish nephew is a huge fan of Anna Jansson and highly recommends her work. Unfortunately, none of her many mysteries have been translated into English (though they are in Spanish and French). Any chance that Knopf might get a translator to work on them?



By: Shirley

Fri, 03 Sep 2010 19:31:58 +0000

After Stieg Larsson . . what is there? Where do you go from there? I'm so sorry the guy died before he could write MORE!



By: David Machlowitz

Thu, 15 Jul 2010 17:17:39 +0000

Hornet's Nest is further proof that, for all the shouting about the death of print and old media, news of a great read--even if set in an unlikely locale and by an unknown author--will spark a stampede to bookstores just like in the age of Gone With The Wind. Now, if Dennis Lehane and George Pelecanos will go back to concentrating on mysteries, American writers can reassert their leadership in combining thrills with sociology. Finally, readers should not let the popularity of Scandanavian thrillers make them shy away from British novels as passe. John Harvey, Kate Atkinson and Val McDermid will show you that British writing is no longer about a tidy death in a tidy garden with a tidy solution.