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WWF - Climate change news



News, publications and job feeds from WWF - the global conservation organization



 



Seven Member States call for more EU climate ambition

2018-04-25Wed, 25 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

(image) Today, ministers from France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, Finland, Portugal and Luxembourg working on climate change called for a "strategy to consider raised levels of ambition of the EU and to present pathways, towards net zero greenhouse gas emissions in accordance with the Paris agreement".

Commenting on the ministers' statement, Imke Lübbeke, Head of Climate and Energy at WWF European Policy Office, said:

"EU countries are waking up to what the Paris Agreement means. France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, Finland, Portugal and Luxembourg have realised that the EU's climate targets are nowhere near what's required. Others need to stop dragging their heels and get on board. The EU must aim for net zero emissions by 2050 at the latest. In this way it will act on a global emergency, gain credibility on climate, and reap the economic and social opportunities offered by our energy-efficiency and renewables-based future. "

More information:
Imke Lübbeke, iluebbeke@wwf.eu, +32 2 743 88 18
Sarah Azau, sazau@wwf.eu, tel: +32 473 573137


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'Business unusual' must be the mantra in Bonn as UN climate talks resume next week

2018-04-25Wed, 25 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

BERLIN, Germany (25 April 2018) - As the 2018 climate talks kick off under the auspices of the UN next week, 'business unusual' must be the mantra delegations need heard resoundingly in Bonn, says WWF. Speaking ahead of the start of the meeting, Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, WWF's global climate and energy programme leader, said the window of opportunity to keep global temperature rise below 1.5°C if fast closing. "It will take an unprecedented effort by governments, non-Party actors and people to keep global temperature rise to below 1.5°C. That's why 2018 has to be the year we step up our climate action. We can no longer afford to keep doing things at the pace and scale we've been doing. Now we need 'business unusual' tactics to drastically scale up our efforts to reduce emissions," he said. The Talanoa Dialogue being championed by the Fiji Presidency during this year's climate talks is important because it should inspire countries to look at new ways they can enhance their efforts, said Pulgar-Vidal. This is particularly critical as countries must agree to table revised national climate action plans with the UN by 2020 under the Paris Agreement. The national decision-making processes to do so should start now. Pulgar-Vidal also highlighted the role of non-Party actors in contributing toward 'business unusual' action. Cities and business, among many others, are making incredible efforts to align themselves to the Paris Agreement goals and we hope the momentum we are seeing, including for the Global Climate Action Summit, taking place in September in San Francisco, triggers deeper commitments from national governments. Already, more than 389 global companies have committed to take action and set science-based targets, he said. The entry into force of the Kigali Amendment of the Montreal Protocol in January next year offers countries another opportunity to scale up action through targets to phase out super greenhouse gases and short-lived pollutants like hydrofluorocarbons. Another indication that countries are serious about their climate action ambitions would be if the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol (called the Doha Amendment) could enter into force by COP24. It commits developed countries to reducing emissions in the period before 2020. "The strong take-up of these actions by countries in the coming months will send a clear signal that there is the necessary commitment by governments to step up and do more to reduce emissions," said Pulgar-Vidal. Notes for Editors:1. WWF's expectations for the negotiating session taking place in Bonn next week are:Ensuring pre-2020 implementation and ambitions are fulfilled, including the entry into force of the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol by COP24; spurring efforts of non-Party actors to align with the Paris Agreement temperature goals; and to ensure that the committed financial support of $100 billion per year by 2020 is delivered in full.Ensuring the Talanoa Dialogue sends a clear political signal that countries will step up and revise their climate action plans to be aligned with the Paris Agreement targets;Ensuring that the rules being negotiated under the Paris Agreement include an effective and durable review and ratchet mechanism to ensure Paris Agreement climate goals are met.2. COP24 takes place in Katowice, Poland in from 3-14 December this year. For further information, contact:  Mandy Jean Woods mwoods@wwfint.org  [...]


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MEPs bolder than Commission on sustainable finance

2018-04-24Tue, 24 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

(image) The European Parliament voted in committee in favour of bold measures on sustainable finance today.These include getting financial authorities to check if financial portfolios are aligned with the Paris Agreement on climate change, and making investors take their clients' wishes on environmental and social matters into account.

These measures go a step further than those included in the European Commission's action plan of 8 March. They show that MEPs want to move further and faster to redirect private finance in Europe towards activities which are fully sustainable.

Sébastien Godinot, Economist at WWF European Policy Office said:

"MEPs have laid out an ambitious plan for how we can make Europe's finance contribute to a truly sustainable economy. The Commission should take these recommendations into account when it drafts legislation on financial issues in the coming months. It is also now over to Member States to support these plans and make the EU into a first-mover in redirecting financial flows to help and protect people and planet."

The Parliament's  Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee was voting on an 'own initiative' report. They notably voted in favour of:
  • European Supervisory Authorities using climate scenario analysis to check if portfolios of financial institutions are aligned with the Paris Agreement on climate change;
  • Investors being required to ask clients and beneficiaries for their  environment and social preferences and take these into account;
  • Mandatory climate disclosure for corporate reporting, building on the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures.
  • Climate disclosure for all retail financial products, such as retail saving funds proposed to households.

WWF calls on the European Commission to include these measures in its upcoming legislative proposals, on the European Parliament to support the report in plenary when it votes on 28 May (TBC), and on the EU Council to retain the measures when it comes to negotiate the individual legislative files.

The European Commission is expected to publish its first legislative proposals as outlined in the action plan on 23 May (TBC). These will cover an EU sustainable taxonomy (a list of which sectors and projects are sustainable) and investors' duties regarding sustainability.

Further information:
Sébastien Godinot
Economist
WWF European Policy Office
sgodinot@wwf.eu
+32 489 461 314

Sarah Azau
Senior Communications Officer
WWF European Policy Office
sazau@wwf.eu
+32 473 573 137


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EU Member States must get behind higher renewables and energy efficiency targets

2018-04-18Wed, 18 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

Brussels, Belgium - 18 April 2018What's happening:EU energy ministers are meeting informally in Sofia, Bulgaria on 19 April. On the agenda are the level of the 2030 renewable energy target, and the level and the nature (binding/indicative) of the energy efficiency target.  Imke Lübbeke, Head of Climate and Energy at WWF European Policy Office commented:"Higher 2030 targets are essential to start bringing the EU in line with the Paris Agreement. The EU leaders have called for a long-term climate strategy to meet the Paris objectives. If Member States now commit to higher 2030 targets for renewables and energy efficiency, it will prove they mean business on climate action in the shorter term as well as the longer term. "The Council must support 35% targets for both energy efficiency and renewables, in line with the European Parliament, at the very least. If this happens, the EU will have taken a small but significant step towards upholding its Paris commitment to keep temperature rise to 1.5°C, and patching up its climate leadership."More information:The renewable energy and energy efficiency directives, and their 2030 targets, are about to be finalised in trilogue discussions between the EU Council and Parliament. The original target levels - 27% renewables and 30% efficiency - were agreed by EU Heads of State before the more ambitious Paris Agreement on climate change was signed. While the European Parliament supports 35% targets for both - the EU Council has stuck to the original levels. This means the Council is not in line with the EU's Paris Agreement climate commitments.However, some Member States, such as Sweden and France, are now supporting higher targets (see graphic below). What's more, last month EU Heads of State and Government called for a long-term EU climate strategy in line with the Paris Agreement, to be produced by early 2019. The meeting in Sofia is a chance for Member States to build upon this growing support for upholding Paris and increasing climate action by boosting the backbone of such action: renewables and energy efficiency. The formal Energy Council on 11 June will be another opportunity to raise ambition.More information:The next trilogue meetings are scheduled as follows:Energy Efficiency Directive: 16 May and 30 MayRenewable Energy Directive: 17 May and 29 May Member States' positions (April 2018) - Energy efficiency target for 2030Download hereThe picture maps Member States' positions on the 2030 energy efficiency target ahead of the Informal Energy Council in Sofia, according to WWF best understanding. The exact voting weight of each country can be found in the EU Council Voting Calculator.On 26 June, the Energy Council adopted its General Approach on the Energy Efficiency Directive in which Member States supported a 30% energy efficiency target (see here) without specifying its nature (binding/indicative).However already at that Council, seven Member States (France, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg, Portugal, Sweden) submitted a statement calling for higher ambition in the course of negotiations (page 10 here).France, Denmark, Germany, Luxembourg, Portugal and Sweden all support a binding energy efficiency target. Sweden is now supporting a 35% energy efficiency target in line with Parliament's position (here) and France is also said to be able to support a target up to 35%. Portugal, Luxembourg and The Netherlands, without specifying a number, are recorded to support a higher target than what was agreed in the General Approach. Denmark and Germany have as official position 30% binding, but are unlikely to block higher ambition.To our knowledge, the other EU Member States have not so far indicated that they will be able to move beyond the position agreed in the Council General Approach on the Energy Efficiency Directive on 26 June 2017. Also, it is worth recalling that on that occasion, Hungary, Latvia, Poland, Romania and Slovakia voted against this weak position and that Bulgaria, Slov[...]


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Global Shipping Sector Steps Up, Sets Climate Targets And Bans Use Of Heavy Fuel Oil In Arctic

2018-04-13Fri, 13 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

LONDON, UK (13 April 2018) - In a landmark step forward for the goals set out in the Paris Agreement, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) today agreed to climate targets for the sector, as part of its first comprehensive greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reduction strategy. The global maritime regulator also agreed to ban heavy fuel oil in the Arctic, a region on the frontline of the impacts of climate change, and to tackle the growing problem of ocean plastics. Climate TargetsThe agreement on climate targets comes after years of negotiations in the IMO's Marine Environment Protection Committee, and two years after the world lauded the approval of the Paris Agreement, which did not regulate shipping emissions. The IMO agreement calls for a strategy for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the global shipping sector, with a target of 50 per cent emissions reductions by 2050 from 2008, and efforts to achieve complete decarbonization of the sector. While it is short of the 70-100 per cent emission reductions that the Pacific islands and many other countries called for, the goal marks a promising step forward by the shipping sector to play its part in limiting warming to 1.5°C. Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, leader of WWF's global climate and energy programme, said: "This is very welcome news, a good first step and an important policy signal. Shipping is responsible for more than 2 per cent of global emissions, and this is growing. The agreement today is an opportunity to bend this curve to align with the Paris Agreement, but it needs to translate into urgent action - now." Mark Lutes, WWF senior global climate policy advisor, said the decision sends a strong signal to the shipping industry and fuel suppliers that they need to scale up investments in new technologies and their rapid deployment, including alternative fuels and propulsion systems. "The next five years are crucial, and action must start with bold decisions at the next IMO meeting later this year. They must agree on measures that can be implemented immediately, like upgrading efficiency standards for new ships, sourcing low and zero emission fuels, and stimulating a reduction in ship speeds, which translates directly to greater efficiency and low fuel use." Heavy Fuel OilAnother area of progress was the IMO's move towards a ban of heavy fuel oil (HFO) in the Arctic. Given the severe risks a heavy fuel oil spill poses to polar environments, the IMO has already banned its use and carriage in the Antarctic. Member states committed to take into account the impacts of a ban on communities in the Arctic. Andrew Dumbrille, WWF-Canada sustainable shipping specialist, said: "It's not a question of 'if' but rather 'when' a ban on HFO should be put in place. With the Arctic facing growing risks from oil spills and black carbon emissions from ships, the marine sector needs to quickly transition away from polluting fuels like HFO. WWF calls on member states to make every effort to adopt and rapidly implement a ban by 2021, without burdening communities with the costs."          Ocean PlasticThe IMO also agreed to take action on shipping's contribution to the increasingly severe issue of global plastic and microplastic pollution.Dr. Simon Walmsley, WWF's Senior Advisor, Arctic Sustainable Development, said: "Although this is a global issue, significant amounts of plastic end up in the Arctic due to the Northerly converging currents. We are pleased that fishing vessels are included to address things like abandoned, lost or discarded fishing gear. It is critical that the IMO is successful in ending shipping's contribution to this significant pollution source. Through this action plan on plastics the IMO is acknowledging the important role it plays in helping achieve global sustainable development goals." ---ends--- FOR EDITORSGlobal shipping and aviation [...]


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Finland to ban coal from 2029

2018-04-11Wed, 11 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

(image) The Finnish government has just announced it will ban the use of coal in energy production by law, from 2029.

WWF has responded to this good news.

WWF-Finland CEO Liisa Rohweder said:
'The Finnish Government's decision to ban coal deserves a strong support. However, it is essential that the government ensures that energy from coal burning is replaced by the development of new technologies that allow for genuinely sustainable energy production and improved energy efficiency. The planned increased role of the Finnish forests as a source of material for energy production would result in the reduced capacity to serve as a carbon sink. In the worst case, this would correspond to the annual emissions of the entire transport sector compared to the situation where forest felling remained on the same level as currently. So a sustainable alternative to coal is vital to consider as well.'

Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, leader of WWF's global climate and energy programme, said:
'The Powering Past Coal Alliance, of which Finland is a member, says that coal phase-out is needed by no later than 2030 in the OECD and EU28, and no later than by 2050 in the rest of the world if we are to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. So this progressive action by Finland must be welcomed. And it must be a signal to other governments that they need to take bold climate actions as well. 2018 must be the year we step up our efforts to reduce emissions, not only with an eye to actions beyond 2020, but also on what we can do right now. Getting out of coal is a big and transformative shift and just the kind of action we need now.'


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EU climate momentum can be ramped up as ministers meet

2018-04-09Mon, 09 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

Brussels, Belgium - 9 April 2018What's happening:On 10-11 April EU Environment ministers are meeting informally in Sofia. On Wednesday 11th, they will discuss climate and energy issues: specifically, the Paris Agreement ​rulebook ​and the Talanoa Dialogue* (see agenda).Why it matters:While it's an 'informal' Environment Council, it will be crucial in setting up Member State positions on the Paris Agreement on climate change 'rulebook' and the Talanoa Dialogue* ahead of the formal Environment Council in June.It also comes at a time of increased EU momentum on climate: it's the first relevant EU meeting since Heads of State and Government called for a long-term EU climate strategy in line with the Paris Agreement last month. It's a chance for ministers to build on that request, as well as to commit to developing their own long-term climate plans. Progressive Member States such as the Netherlands and France have now also said that the EU must increase its 2030 climate and energy targets and this is an opportunity for them to reinforce their support.Comment from Imke Lübbeke, Head of Climate and Energy, WWF European Policy Office:"There is an exciting sense of growing momentum on climate action in Europe. This meeting is a chance for EU ministers to use their leaders' call for a long-term climate strategy as a springboard for increased domestic and European action. They must ensure a net zero emissions goal for 2050 at the latest is at the heart of the EU strategy and that our 2030 goals are revised upwards to reflect it. They should also rapidly get to work on their own ambitious long-term climate plans."The formal EU Environment Council will take place on 25 June 2018.What else is happening?Also, although this is not officially on the agenda, the meeting is also an opportunity for EU Environment Ministers to address the controversial issue of planned development in Bulgaria's Pirin National Park. WWF is asking them to call on the Bulgarian host government to live up to its legal commitments under the EU Nature Directives and protect this Natura 2000 area and UNESCO World Heritage Site from illegal logging and construction. Following a series of demonstrations across Bulgaria and European capitals, campaigners will also be present at the Council building in the morning of 10 April.*For an explanation of the rulebook and Talanoa Dialogue, please see below.More information:Which EU countries support a more ambitious EU 2050 climate target?So far, only France and the Netherlands openly support more ambition at EU level than the current 80-95% emissions reduction target. Others like Portugal, Germany, Sweden, Luxembourg, Belgium, Denmark and Slovenia are also in favour of an ambitious long-term strategy. To date, only three EU Member States have submitted their own long-term emissions strategies to the UNFCCC portal: the Czech Republic, France and Germany.What is the Paris Agreement 'rulebook'?The aim of the 'rulebook' is to standardise the way countries account for and report on their climate pledges. The rulebook needs to be done by the end of 2018, according to the Paris Agreement's timeline.What is the Talanoa Dialogue?The Talanoa Dialogue (formerly the 'Facilitative Dialogue') came out of the Paris Agreement.  It was primarily set-up to begin a 'stocktake' of efforts to reduce emissions. The Fiji COP Presidency added the extra element of bringing a range of stakeholders into a discussion as to what must be done. It tries to answer three questions: Where are we? Where do we want to go? How do we get there? In 2018, the EU is expected to hold two regional Talanoa Dialogue meetings with stakeholders, alongside the UN Talanoa Dialogues (June 14th and October). Other EU institutions will be holding meetings in the Talanoa style including the European Economic and Social Committee on April 23rd.WWF believes the Dialogue can play a critical role i[...]


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Historic ruling for forests, people and climate action in Colombia

2018-04-06Fri, 06 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

(image) Yesterday, in a historic ruling, Colombia's Supreme Court recognized the Colombian Amazon as a subject with rights and ordered the government to develop urgent actions, within the next four months, to protect it and ensure its conservation and sustainable management, including strict measures to reduce deforestation. 

The decision is the result of a lawsuit brought forward by 25 children and young adults from different regions of the country, with support from Dejusticia, in January 2018 explaining how future generations will be the ones to face the worst effects of climate change and demanding that the government must halt deforestation completely and guarantee their involvement in the development of a plan to achieve this objective.

In addition to setting a legal precedent, the lawsuit and ruling demonstrate the important role people and institutions like courts can play in furthering action on climate change and biodiversity loss.

Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, leader of WWF's global climate and energy programme, said: 
​"The Colombian Supreme Court's decision to recognize the Colombian Amazon as a subject with rights is a landmark step forward - for forests, climate action and people. For too long, we have taken from nature, continually and carelessly, and now the time has come to say enough! By protecting the rights of the Colombian Amazon to be free from deforestation, the court ruling not only protects the incredible biodiversity it contains and the communities that depend on it, but also safeguards one of our planet's best defences against climate change. This is a promising first - and 'right' - step toward creating a resilient, climate-safe future for people and nature."

Mary Lou Higgins, Director, WWF-Colombia, stated:
"WWF has been working for more than a decade on identifying the main climate related risks for the Amazon biome, as well as designing and implementing "nature-based solutions" to tackle them. For this reason, WWF celebrates the historic decision taken by the Colombian Supreme Court of Justice which reflects the crucial role non-state actors can play in the battle against deforestation and climate change. We are certain this decision will be key for ensuring the effective protection of the Amazon and catalyzing Colombia´s fulfillment of the Paris Agreement, as long as it is accompanied with a solid strategy which ensures effective participation of state and non-state actors in its implementation, for which we commit our full support."

 


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Letter to Juncker: Next EU budget must enhance climate action and sustainable development

2018-04-05Thu, 05 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +0000

Brussels, Belgium - 5 April 2018Today, a broad group comprised of business associations, civil society, think tanks and other organisations have urged the President of the European Commission, through a joint open letter, to make the future EU budget fully compatible with the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development goals. On 2 May, the European Commission is due to publish its general proposal on the spending priorities of the next EU budget after 2020.The letter* calls upon President Juncker to significantly increase the current 20% climate action share of the EU budget, to climate proof the entire budget by excluding fossil fuels and to ensure that EU funds add to Member States' efforts to achieve the 2030 and 2050 climate objectives.Climate change is increasingly perceived by European leaders as a global threat that the EU budget, the so called Multiannual Financial Framework, should address. On 22 March at a Conference on Sustainable Finance, the European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker stressed that the EU must go further towards aligning financial flows with climate objectives. At the same event, French President Emmanuel Macron called for the next EU budget to earmark 40% of its spending for climate action and the ecological transition.These declarations add to the growing momentum in favour of more funds for climate action. Earlier in March, 14 environment ministers advocated for a climate-friendly EU budget that rules out fossil fuel subsidies, and the European Parliament agreed to substantially raise the climate action spending target.Wendel Trio, director of Climate Action Network (CAN) Europe, said: "It is clear for us that the future EU budget must live up to the huge challenges posed by climate change. EU institutions cannot claim that they are doing everything they can to comply with the Paris Agreement whilst continuing to fund fossil fuels. At the same time, the EU budget has a huge untapped potential to catalyse the clean energy and mobility transition.""A credible EU budget must address the common and long term challenges Europeans are faced with: climate change is one of them.""Higher European climate and energy targets for 2030, particularly in less developed regions, will only be met if they are supported by a 40% climate action spending target and if all fossil fuel subsidies are phased out."ENDSContacts: Sarah Azau, WWF European Policy Office, sazau@wwf.eu, Tel +32 473 573 137Markus Trilling, CAN Europe Finance and Subsidies Policy Coordinator, markus@caneurope.org, Tel +32 484 056 636Nicolas Derobert, CAN Europe Communications Coordinator, nicolas@caneurope.org, +32 483 62 18 88Note to editors:* The letter is accessible here. It has been signed by 31 organisations:Association of European Renewable Energy Research CentresCarbon Market WatchCEE Bankwatch NetworkCenter for the Study of DemocracyCentre for Transport and EnergyChance for BuildingsClimate Action Network (CAN) EuropeClimate AllianceDeutsche Umwelthilfe e.V. / Environmental Action GermanyDeutscher Naturschutzring (DNR) e.V.DENEFFE3GEnergy CitiesEuropean Alliance of Companies for Energy Efficiency in BuildingsEuropean Alliance to Save EnergyEuropean Association for ElectromobilityEuropean Environmental Citizens Organisation for StandardisationEuropean Heat Pump AssociationEuropean Insulation Manufacturers AssociationEuropean Partnership for Energy and the EnvironmentFernForum Ökologisch-Soziale MarktwirtschaftGlopolis Green Budget EuropeKyoto ClubPolska Zielona Sieć / Polish Green NetworkRomanian Association for Promoting Energy Efficiency in Buildings Slovak Association of Photovoltaic Industry and Renewable Energy Sources (SAPI)Transport & EnvironmentWWF European Policy OfficeZaļā brīvība / Green Liberty LatviaQ[...]


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Arctic sea ice second lowest on record

2018-03-23Fri, 23 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000

(image) The National Snow and Ice Data Centre announced today that the extent of the winter sea ice in the Arctic this year is the second lowest ever recorded.

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet resulting in rapid, irreversible change for the species who live there. In the next few weeks, the polar bears of Svalbard, Norway will emerge from their dens with their cubs. As part of the Barents Sea region, these bears are experiencing the fastest loss of sea ice recorded throughout the Arctic.

Polar bears are intelligent and adaptable, but Svalbard may be warming faster than they can adjust. This April, scientists at the Norwegian Polar Institute will head out on the ice to check on the bears' health and the impacts a warming climate are having on their survival.

Learn more about the impacts of climate change on the polar bears of Svalbard.

Quote from Melanie Lancaster, WWF Arctic Programme's Senior Specialist, Arctic species:
"Polar bears are found only in the Arctic and have spent tens of thousands of years adapting to their icy home.  Loss of sea ice is the biggest threat to their survival," says Melanie Lancaster. "Lower winter sea ice due to climate change is a reminder to us all of the urgent need for action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions."

About WWF's Arctic Programme:
WWF's Arctic Programme coordinates WWF's work in the Arctic through offices in seven Arctic countries with experts in circumpolar issues like governance, climate change, shipping, oil and gas and polar bears.

For more information:
Leanne Clare, Sr. Manager Communications, lclare@wwfcanada.org +1 613-232-2535


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EU leaders ask for long-term climate strategy

2018-03-23Fri, 23 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000

Brussels, Belgium - 23 March 2018 Last night EU heads of state called on the European Commission "to present by the first quarter of 2019 a proposal for a Strategy for long-term EU greenhouse gas emissions reduction in accordance with the Paris Agreement, taking into account the national plans" in their Council conclusions. The EU originally committed to producing a long-term emissions reduction strategy after signing the 2015 Paris climate agreement. Reacting to this, Andrea Kohl, Director of WWF European Policy Office said: "'It is encouraging that EU heads of state are finally showing leadership on climate action, over a year after ratifying the Paris Agreement. A plan for reaching net zero carbon emissions in the EU well before 2050 is needed - at the latest by early 2019 - to show industry, citizens and other countries the direction of travel, and to speed up the journey." "I urge EU governments to show that same commitment to fighting climate change when it comes to the Clean Energy Package files, for which their positions are far less ambitious than what was agreed in Paris. Hopefully the upcoming trilogues will be a chance to bring the package more in line with the Paris Agreement by increasing the 2030 climate and energy targets." More information:The UN Paris Agreement on climate change was signed in December 2015. It states:"All Parties should strive to formulate and communicate long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies, [...] taking into account their common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances."  To date, only seven countries have submitted long-term strategies to the UNFCCC portal. Three of these are EU Member States: the Czech Republic, France and Germany. In October 2017, EU Environment ministers included language on long-term strategies in their conclusions: "HIGHLIGHTS the importance of long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies as a policy tool for developing reliable pathways and the long term policy changes needed to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement; and ENCOURAGES the development thereof; WELCOMES the initiative of the European Commission and Member States to prepare an in-depth analysis of the environmental, economic and social impacts of pathways that are coherent with the long-term temperature goals of the Paris Agreement so as to inform EU political debates with a view to formulate the EU strategy in accordance with paragraph 35 of Decision 1/CP21" The European Council conclusions say: "The European Council invites the Commission to present by the first quarter of 2019 a proposal for a Strategy for long-term EU greenhouse gas emissions reduction in accordance with the Paris Agreement, taking into account the national plans."Contact: Sarah AzauSenior Communications OfficerWWF European Policy Officesazau@wwf.euTel: +32 473 57 31 37[...]


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WWF's Earth Hour to spark global awareness and action for a healthy planet

2018-03-21Wed, 21 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000

Earth Hour 2018 switch-off will take place on Saturday 24 March at 8:30p.m. local timeBrussels, Belgium - 21 March 2018On Saturday, WWF's Earth Hour is set to unite millions of people in 180 countries and territories worldwide in their commitment to the planet once again. As we face the interlinked challenges of climate change and plummeting biodiversity, the world's largest grassroots movement for the environment aims to mobilise individuals, businesses and governments to help build a healthy, sustainable planet for all.In Europe, landmarks such as the Colosseum in Rome, the Eiffel Tower in Paris and London's Westminster Abbey will switch off their lights for Earth Hour. In Brussels, the EU institution buildings will do the same and European Commissioners and MEPs have been showing their support for Earth Hour on social media.Marco Lambertini, Director General, WWF International said:"Biodiversity and nature underpin our lives, our economies, our health, our well-being, our happiness. It is the foundation of our living planet. Today, as we push the planet and its natural systems to the edge, Earth Hour is our chance to use our power, as individuals and as a collective, to demand and take action to protect this web of life in return for all it gives us".Andrea Kohl, Director of WWF European Policy Office said:"Climate change is ravaging our natural world and is a key driver of biodiversity loss. That's why we are asking Europe's decision-makers to show their support for climate action for this year's Earth Hour. The EU must uphold the Paris Agreement goal of keeping global temperature rise to 1.5°C. For this it needs to end the use of fossil fuels rapidly, starting with coal by 2030, and publish a 2050 Roadmap to show how we can get to a net zero carbon economy".In 2018, WWF and Earth Hour teams around the world will be using the movement to highlight the environmental issues most relevant in their country or region. In Colombia, people will call for the country to commit to zero deforestation by 2020. French Polynesia is expected to move to protect 5 million square kilometres of its seas to preserve ocean ecosystems. In Guatemala, citizens will raise their voice on the importance of freshwater conservation and in India, people will pledge to shift toward sustainable lifestyles.Supporters can visit connect2earth.org to share what biodiversity and nature means to them in the places they live in and find out more about it. Created in partnership with the secretariat of the United Nations Convention of Biological Diversity, the platform aims to build mass awareness on the values of biodiversity and nature by kick-starting global conversations on issues such as climate action, healthy oceans and sustainable business. The project is supported by Germany's Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety with funding from the International Climate Initiative.Notes to editors:Earth Hour website: www.earthhour.orgLink to Earth Hour's 2018 music video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZYiJLH2toY&feature=youtu.beLink to photos of previous Earth Hour events and impacts: https://hive.panda.org/Share/wdv0o80b113lxo2s2s6mk5xi6qvn185jTo know more about WWF's work on climate and biodiversity, please visit: http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/biodiversity/https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/156hPU0CXeBv1Bd5iRD8kfcBZIUiPeI34?usp=sharingFor more information, please contact:Sarah AzauSenior Communications OfficerWWF European Policy Officesazau@wwf.eu+32 473 573 137WWF International: news@wwfint.org; +65 9060 1957About WWFWWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 cou[...]


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Half of plant and animal species at risk from climate change in world's most important natural places

2018-03-14Wed, 14 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000

LONDON - Up to half of plant and animal species in the world's most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon and the Galapagos, could face local extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked. Even if the Paris Climate Agreement 2°C target is met, these places could lose 25 per cent of their species according to a landmark new study by the University of East Anglia, the James Cook University, and WWF.Published today in the journal Climatic Change and just ahead of Earth Hour, the world's largest grassroots movement for the environment, researchers examined the impact of climate change on nearly 80,000 plant and animal species in 35 of the world's most diverse and naturally wildlife-rich areas. It explores a number of different climate change futures – from a no-emissions-cuts case in which global mean temperatures rise by 4.5°C[1], to a  2°C rise, the upper limit for temperature in the Paris Agreement[2]. Each area was chosen for its uniqueness and the variety of plants and animals found there.The report finds that the Miombo Woodlands, home to African wild dogs, south-west Australia and the Amazon-Guianas are projected to be some the most affected areas. If there was a 4.5°C global mean temperature rise, the climates in these areas are projected to become unsuitable for many of the plants and animals that currently live there meaning: Up to 90 per cent of amphibians, 86 per cent of birds and 80 per cent of mammals could potentially become locally extinct in the Miombo Woodlands, Southern AfricaThe Amazon could lose 69 per cent of its plant speciesIn south-west Australia 89 per cent of amphibians could become locally extinct60 per cent of all species are at risk of localized extinction in MadagascarThe Fynbos in the Western Cape Region of South Africa, which is experiencing a drought that has led to water shortages in Cape Town, could face localised extinctions of a third of its species, many of which are unique to that region.As well as this, increased average temperatures and more erratic rainfall could become be the "new normal" according to the report - with significantly less rainfall in the Mediterranean, Madagascar and the Cerrado-Pantanal in Argentina. Potential effects include[3];Pressure on the water supplies of African elephants – who need to drink 150-300 litres of water a day96 per cent of the breeding grounds of Sundarbans tigers could become submerged by sea-level riseComparatively fewer male marine turtles due to temperature-induced sex assignment of eggs.If species can move freely to new locations then the risk of local extinction decreases from around 25 per cent to 20 per cent with a 2°C global mean temperature rise.  If species cannot they may not be able to survive. Most plants, amphibians and reptiles, such as orchids, frogs and lizards cannot move quickly enough keep up with these climatic changes.Lead researcher Prof Rachel Warren from the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at UEA said: "Our research quantifies the benefits of limiting global warming to 2°C for species in 35 of the world's most wildlife-rich areas. We studied 80,000 species of plants, mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians and found that 50 per cent of species could be lost from these areas without climate policy. However, if global warming is limited to 2°C above pre-industrial levels, this could be reduced to 25 per cent. Limiting warming to within 1.5°C was not explored, but would be expected to protect even more wildlife."   Overall the research shows that the best way to protect against species loss is to keep global temperature rise as low as possible. The Par[...]


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Half of plant and animal species at risk from climate change

2018-03-14Wed, 14 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000

14 March 2018 - Brussels, Belgium Up to half of plant and animal species in the world's most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon, the Arctic and the Galapagos - and in Europe, the Mediterranean and the Black Sea Basin - could face local extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked. Even if the Paris Climate Agreement 2°C target is met, these places could lose 25 per cent of their species. That is according to a landmark new study by the University of East Anglia (UK), the James Cook University (Australia), and WWF.Published today in the journal Climatic Change and just ahead of Earth Hour, the world's largest grassroots movement for the environment, researchers examined the impact of climate change on nearly 80,000 plant and animal species in 35 of the world's most diverse and naturally wildlife-rich areas.For example, the report found that 30% of Mediterranean species like marine turtles and tuna are at risk of extinction even if we keep global warming to 2°C; this rises to 50% with no action. Imke Lübbeke, head of climate and energy at WWF European Policy Office, said:"Climate change is pushing our planet to a cliff-edge. Not only do rising temperatures impact people and their wellbeing directly, they threaten the ecosystems and biodiversity which are essential to human life. The EU must act to keep global temperature rise well under 2°C and to work for 1.5°C, as per the Paris Agreement, by ending fossil fuels rapidly, starting with coal by 2030. It must show it means business by publishing this year a 2050 Roadmap to take us to a net zero carbon economy".Andreas Baumueller, head of natural resources at WWF European Policy Office, commented:"The twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss are interlinked. For centuries, Europe's nature has been damaged, and climate change is adding to the pressure. Healthy ecosystems would actually help absorb and store carbon, and make our societies more resilient to the effects of climate change. This is why WWF is calling for 50% spending on climate and nature in the next EU budget -  it is an investment in our future, and essential to meeting the EU's international biodiversity and climate commitments!"Samantha Burgess, head of Marine Policy, WWF European Policy Office, said:"Oceans are amongst the first ecosystems impacted by climate change. Not only are they impacted by warmer seas, more severe storms and melting sea ice but ocean acidification is also posing a threat to life phases of key marine species and habitats such as corals."The clear danger of climate change for people, the planet and its biodiversity is why on 24 March millions of people across the world will come together for Earth Hour. They will show their commitment to protecting biodiversity and being a part of the conversations and solutions needed to build a healthy, sustainable future – and planet – for all. The global mobilisation sparked by Earth Hour also sends a clear message to business and government that there is a global will to change this trajectory.ENDSFor further information:Sarah AzauSenior Communications OfficerWWF European Policy Officesazau@wwf.eu+32 473 573 137For questions about the Climatic Change paper, contact Rachel Warren, +44(0)1603 593912 r.warren@uea.ac.uk For questions about the full WWF report, contact Jeff Price, +44(0)1603 592561 jeff.price@uea.ac.ukImpact of climate change scenarios on the Mediterranean region (percentage of species projected to be at risk of local extinction by the 2080s)The Mediterranean is among the areas most exposed to climate change. High temperatures in the future will rapidly exceed those [...]


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EU breaks new ground on sustainable finance - but more needed

2018-03-08Thu, 08 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000

Brussels, Belgium -  8 March 2018The EU has made clear its intent to become the world's leader in sustainable finance with its bold Action Plan published today. While the proposals would help more money go into sustainable sectors rather than fossil fuels, they are still not enough to align with the Paris Agreement on climate change. The Action Plan outlines important new legislation covering the disclosure of climate impacts of certain funds and indices, and Green Bond Standards. It would also make sustainability something that both investors and EU financial supervisors must take into account. However, some key recommendations of the Commission's advisory group on sustainable finance - the 'High Level Expert Group' - are missing or patchy.Sébastien Godinot, Economist at WWF European Policy Office said:"The EU will be a global trailblazer on sustainable finance if these proposals pass into law. Yet they still fall short of what the Paris Agreement and its 'well below 2°C' temperature limit require. The Commission should have gone further to ensure mainstream benchmarks - like the FTSE 100 - and retail funds have to disclose their climate impacts. We need more clarity on where financial flows are going, so we can make them work better for people and planet!"More work will be needed in the implementation phase of the Action Plan to complete the commitments and make sure they becoming binding", concluded Godinot.Pascal Canfin, Director of WWF France and member of the EU High Level Expert Group on sustainable finance (HLEG), commented:"It's now over to Member States to support the European Commission's relatively ambitious proposals and rapidly agree to their implementation. The ambition from the final HLEG report must not be weakened."Most of WWF's key asks to the European Commission on sustainable finance were included in the action plan. These are:Integration of sustainability into EU investor duties;European standards for green bonds and labels, building on an EU sustainability taxonomy  - a classification system of sustainable sectors;Investment advisers required to ask about and respond to sustainability preferences of retail clients.Following the Action Plan, the Commission will table legislative proposals based on the plan's proposals in March and May 2018. It will also set up several Technical Expert Groups to start implementing the commitments made in the plan. Further information:Sébastien GodinotEconomistWWF European Policy Officesgodinot@wwf.eu+32 489 461 314Sarah AzauSenior Communications OfficerWWF European Policy Officesazau@wwf.eu+32 473 573 137[...]


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Mondi joins WWF's Climate Savers business leadership programme

2018-03-07Wed, 07 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000

Global packaging and paper group adopts 2050 science-based targets to limit global temperature rise to under 2°C.  Vienna, Austria  – Mondi Group has joined the ranks of global climate leaders by signing up to Climate Savers, WWF's climate leadership programme for businesses. The packaging and paper group commits to reduce its specific production-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 0.25 t CO2e/t production by 2050. This commitment and others made as part of its participation in the flagship programme are in line with climate science targets required to limit global temperature rise to under 2°C.  Mondi's participation in Climate Savers is an extension of a strategic global partnership between Mondi and WWF that started in 2014. The partnership focuses on promoting environmental stewardship in the packaging and paper sector. In joining Climate Savers, Mondi commits to working to further reduce GHG emissions across its entire value chain and to taking actions to positively influence the packaging and paper industry as well as policy makers. Climate Savers members aim to transform businesses into low-carbon economy leaders. Peter Oswald, Chief Executive Officer, Mondi Group says, "As a global player in the packaging and paper industry, we are part of an energy intensive sector. We've managed to reduce our specific CO2 emissions by 38% since 2004 by focusing on operational efficiency and energy efficiency. We join the WWF Climate Savers programme to reinforce our long-standing commitment to climate change mitigation and to demonstrate to the rest of our industry that using energy efficiently is not only necessary for the environment, but also good for business. We are proud to confirm our commitment to the science-based target needed to keep global warming well below 2°C for our production-related emissions." Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, leader of WWF's global Climate & Energy Practice says, "Climate change is one of the biggest threats of our future, with fundamental impacts on places, species and people everywhere.  To change things for the better, we need to start acting now. We welcome Mondi's efforts toward helping build a more sustainable business world and are happy to have them join the Climate Savers programme." To achieve its climate goals, Mondi has developed an ambitious programme to improve energy efficiency, replace fossil fuels with renewable energy, sustainably manage its forests and associated ecosystems, and source its raw materials responsibly. Mondi is also active in developing packaging and paper products that help its customers and consumers reduce their own carbon footprints. Mondi's Climate Savers agreement will run at least until the end of 2020, concurrent with phase two of its global partnership with WWF. ### Notes for Editors:Mondi's Climate Savers commitments and climate targets:Reduce scope 1 and 2 emissions*: Mondi commits to reduce production-related, absolute scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in line with evidence- based climate science targets to keep global warming below two degrees. This requires a reduction of specific production-related GHG emissions to 0.25 tonnes CO2e per tonne of saleable production by 2050. Reduce scope 3 emissions*: Mondi commits to improve data collection for its indirect GHG emissions along the value chain (Scope 3 emissions) and to set ambitious reduction targets in the field of its supply chain and transport of raw materials and products.Increase renewable energy: Mondi will investigate opportunities to increase renewable energy in a sustainable way and implement them whe[...]


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EU can lead the world in sustainable finance

2018-03-06Tue, 06 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000

(image) Brussels, Belgium - 6 March 2018

The EU has a chance to become a world-leader in sustainable finance with the European Commission's upcoming Action Plan, expected on 8 March. This would mean more money going into 'green' sectors and less into fossil fuels and areas which damage the planet and people's wellbeing.

For this to happen, the European Commission must commit in the Action Plan to reviewing or creating several pieces of financial legislation. These must cover issues such as mandatory disclosure of the climate impacts of retail funds and mainstream indices (like the FTSE 100).

Sébastien Godinot, Economist at WWF European Policy Office said:
"How money is spent has a huge impact on our planet. So we will be watching tomorrow to see whether the EU's action plan on sustainable finance lives up to its name. Notably, we need transparency on how EU private investments impact our planet and if they fuel climate change.

"If the European Commission includes mandatory climate disclosure in its Action Plan, and follows the other key recommendations made by its advisory group in January - like making sustainability something all investors must take into account,  and producing an EU classification of sustainable sectors - the stage will be set for the transformation of Europe's financial systems", added Godinot. "This could lead to billions of euros worth of environmentally friendly investments in Europe."

WWF asks the European Commission to include in its Sustainable Finance Action Plan:
  • EU mandatory climate disclosure for retail funds and mainstream benchmarks (such as MSCI World) and for companies and financial institutions;
  • Integration of sustainability into EU investor duties;
  • Integration of sustainability into EU financial supervisors' (ESAs) mandates, and ESAs to provide guidance to financial institutions on how to use climate scenarios;
  • European standards for green bonds and labels, building on an EU sustainability taxonomy  - a classification system of sustainable sectors;
  • Investment advisers required to ask about and respond to sustainability preferences of retail clients.


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'Clean coal' myth risks sabotaging EU path towards 100% renewables

2018-02-26Mon, 26 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +0000

Brussels, Belgium - 26 February 2018The EU's move away from polluting coal power and towards renewable energy could be at risk due to a focus on unworkable and unproven "clean coal" technologies, NGOs are warning.The warning comes ahead of the first meetings today and tomorrow of the EU Platform for Coal Regions in Transition, which aims to "leave no region behind" in the shift away from fossil fuels.The NGOs are pleased that the European Commission finally realises coal must go and wants to help this happen in a fair and sustainable way across Europe. However, the meeting's part focus on "advanced coal technologies" - industry spin for "Slightly Lower Intensity, More Expensive" plants - is a worrying sign that the Platform's crucial goals could be sidetracked by the fallacy of "clean coal".Darek Urbaniak, Senior Energy Policy Officer at WWF European Policy Office said:"There is no such thing as "clean coal" – so how comes this myth continues to hijack efforts to move Europe beyond coal? Focusing on unworkable technologies is simply throwing time and money out of the window. Instead, the EU Platform should support coal communities in a shift away from all fossil fuels towards energy efficiency, wind and solar power."Nikos Mantzaris, Energy and Climate Policy Expert, WWF Greece added:"The citizens of Western Macedonia - one of the Platform's regions - have paid dearly, with their health, for the coal that has powered recent Greek development. The regional economy must urgently shift towards sustainable economic activities. The EU Coal Platform can be pivotal for this provided it steers away from attempts to revive "clean" coal technologies, which have failed throughout the years."Climate Action Network Europe, CEE Bankwatch, Friends of the Earth (CEPA), Greenpeace and WWF, who are all part of the Europe Beyond Coal campaign, are calling for the Platform to focus on:a sustainable transition to energy efficiency and renewablesthe shift of local economies to sustainable economic activitiessocial and economic support for workers from the coal industry through the transition.The Platform must also:ensure transparency and consultation with all stakeholders in the process of developing just transition plans for each of the coal mining regions.Not be an excuse to provide life-support to outdated, polluting or uneconomic "advanced coal" technologies.The Platform, launched by European Commission Vice-President Šefčovič in December 2017, aims to support Member States and regions as they shift away from coal towards renewable energy, in order to "leave no region behind". The first meetings of the Platform are being held on 26-27 February in Brussels. The agenda which has been circulated centres around: 1. Post-coal economy and structural transformation and 2. Eco-innovation and advanced coal technologiesMore information:See WWF's response to the launch of the PlatformWWF is running a Just Transition project in Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, and Poland, which kicked off in October 2017. Through the project, WWF is advocating for Just Transition pathways in those countries. The aim is to improve the exchange of knowledge in, and between, those countries, and engage all relevant stakeholders in a Just Transition as an acknowledged component of European, national, and regional policies. MoreWhat is the Europe Beyond Coal campaign? Civil society groups and citizens across Europe have been working together to help heal coal's social, health, environmental, and economic damage. Given the unprecedented scale of the problems we face and the short timeframe we have to fi[...]


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Soaring temperatures forecast at the North Pole as record low sea ice expected

2018-02-24Sat, 24 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +0000

As much of Europe and Russia freezes, forecasters predict North Pole temperatures could rise above 0°C this week, shattering previous records. The North Pole and parts of Greenland are expected to be almost 30°C warmer than their historical average temperatures. Parts of Germany, New Mexico and the UK are forecasted to be colder than the North Pole this weekend.The extent of Arctic sea ice coverage is normally largest in March due to winter weather in the Northern Hemisphere. As we approach this year's maximum amount, sea ice coverage is at a record low, and may break the previous record set in 2017, which was the third straight year of record-breaking lows. As of February 22, Arctic sea ice extent was 1.39 km2 smaller than average - an area more than twice the size of France.By 2040, only a thin band of ice is projected to remain in the Arctic Ocean during summer, along the northern coasts of Greenland and Canada - a region known as the Last Ice Area.WWF is calling for urgent action to protect the planet from the effects of climate change ahead of Earth Hour 2018.Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, Leader of WWF's Climate and Energy work said:"The dramatic changes we're seeing in the Arctic are not just a local problem - they're a global problem. The rapid warming and ice loss in the Arctic means rising sea levels, changes in climate and precipitation patterns, a jump in warming and severe weather events all around the world. It's a problem that demands stronger, more urgent, and more ambitious action both globally and domestically." Rod Downie, Head of polar programmes at WWF-UK said:"The Arctic is in meltdown, and wild and weird weather is happening in front of our eyes. We need to take responsibility as evidence shows us that sea ice is in severe decline due to our changing climate. We all have a role to play in cutting carbon emissions and ramping up efforts to secure a sustainable future for Arctic wildlife and people."-30-For more information please contact:Leanne Clare, Sr. Manager Communications, WWF Arctic Programmelclare@wwfcanada.org [...]


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50% for nature and climate: EU leaders must put sustainability at the core of the EU budget

2018-02-23Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +0000

As EU Heads of State and Government prepare to meet in Brussels today to discuss the political priorities of the EU's next budget, WWF calls for a clear commitment to integrating long-term sustainability across all budget lines."The next budget will be a litmus test of the EU's willingness to deliver on its international commitments on climate, environment, biodiversity and sustainable development," said Andrea Kohl, acting Director of the WWF European Policy Office."In order to achieve these, a re-balancing of environmental, social and economic aspects is needed, with sustainability mainstreamed into all relevant programmes and instruments. This is why we are calling for a mandatory spending target of 50% for climate and nature."WWF criticises the favouring of economic aspects over social and environmental matters in the current EU budget, combined with a lack of policy coherence across different sectors. Instead it calls for all programmes and funding instruments of the new budget to be brought in line with international commitments such as the Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement on climate, and the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).The organisation also pushes for a complete phase-out of environmentally harmful subsidies, and an increase funding for the Financial Instrument to the Environment (LIFE) – the only EU funding instrument for nature conservation - from 0.3% today to at least 1% of the total budget."How we spend taxpayers' money matters, and the EU budget must reflect European core values such as democracy, human rights and a high level environmental and climate protection," added Kohl. "This is what citizens care about, and this is what their leaders must deliver."The debate by EU leaders follows just a day after the European Parliament's lead committee for the EU's future budget has voted in favour of increased spending for climate action, nature conservation and other environment measures.ENDS Notes to editors:Key WWF asks:Full alignment with international commitments on climate, biodiversity and sustainable development such as the Paris Agreement on Climate, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) or the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD);Phase-out subsidies or support of actions that are harmful to the environment, biodiversity or natural resources as foreseen in the Roadmap for a resource efficient Europe;Balance economic, social and environment asks through including a mandatory spending target of 50% for climate and environment, as well as incorporating ex-ante conditionalities and binding earmarking for climate, nature conservation and environment measures across all programmatic and funding instruments ,Increase funding for the Financial Instrument to the Environment (LIFE) from 0.3% today to at least 1% of the total budget; the mid- term evaluation of the instrument showed that LIFE is efficient and provides value for money. Recommendations for sector specific policies and instruments:Reform the Common Agriculture Policy (CAP) towards a fair, effective and efficient farming policy which has as its core the objective to facilitate the transition towards sustainable food and farming systems in Europe. At least 50% of CAP funds should be ring-fenced for dedicated financing of actions related to climate, environment and nature conservation;The principles of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development must guide the use of Official Development Assistance (ODA) in the next MFF. This includes mainstreaming of climate and environment in EU external f[...]


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