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Comments on: Argentina: falling peso, rising quality



wine talk that goes down easy



Last Build Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2018 07:58:49 +0000

 



By: If the Euro melts down, would euro wine go up? | Dr Vino's wine blog

Fri, 02 Dec 2011 18:00:03 +0000

[...] world does have a recent example of devaluation: Argentina. For those who don’t remember (see a piece of mine from the time for more details), the peso was pegged to the dollar to slay the beast of inflation, [...]



By: Jean Charles du Mer

Sat, 25 Sep 2010 17:13:51 +0000

Unlike the Chilean lands, Mendoza suffers from summer's rain and fruit fly. So thats the reason that its quality potential is under its potential. None the less, its curious how mostly Argentinean winemakers are de-facto Chilean owners. As a natural way for expading their produce. The Argentineans from Buenos Aires name Mendoza's people as "Chileans". So keep a watch on Chile Central Valley and Mendoza. They are both the same winemakers. But different processes of growing grapes. By a simple reason of rain distribution. Chile rains in winter , while Argentina rains in summer.



By: Dr Vino’s wine blog » Blog Archive » Susana Balbo, making wine in Mendoza

Sat, 07 Apr 2007 20:42:38 +0000

[...] Export markets have been essential for Susana since the concept stage of the winery. Her first winery, a short-lived venture in the early nineties, targeted the large domestic market in Argentina. Since then, exporting has become not only easier but essential. For example, when the Argentine peso collapsed in 2002 losing 75 percent of its value against the dollar, wineries with strong exports profiles actually saw their sales rise in peso terms (see my backgrounder). [...]