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Preview: All Discussions Tagged 'Latino' - Hispanic professional society & diversity job fairs at NSHP.org

All Discussions Tagged 'Latino' - Hispanic professional society & diversity job fairs at NSHP.org





Updated: 2018-04-20T21:04:39Z

 



LatPro Announces 2015 Scholarship Finalists – help us choose one winner!

2015-06-12T20:30:22.218Z

Please visit LatPro Learn and cast your vote.

Please visit LatPro Learn and cast your vote.




Top 100 Colleges for Hispanics

2015-05-29T20:06:32.866Z

The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine has published a list of the Top 100 Colleges for Hispanics. You can learn more about the colleges here.

The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine has published a list of the Top 100 Colleges for Hispanics. You can learn more about the colleges here.




LatPro Scholarship Deadline April 30th

2015-04-20T16:32:20.593Z

Time is running out. If you are interested in applying for LatPro's $3,000 Scholarship, visit the 'WHAT THEY DON'T TEACH' blog and follow the instructions.

Time is running out. If you are interested in applying for LatPro's $3,000 Scholarship, visit the 'WHAT THEY DON'T TEACH' blog and follow the instructions.




UNM's Combined BA/MD Degree Program

2015-02-18T19:20:00.982Z

The shortage of physicians in New Mexico encouraged the University of New Mexico to develop a Combined BA/MD Degree Program wherein high schools students obtain a baccalaureate degree that, if completed successfully, will reserve them a seat in the UNM School of Medicine. Latino High School students who have an inclination with the sciences should consider the Combined BA/MD Degree Program as it will not only prepare them academically, but also train them to serve communities with…

The shortage of physicians in New Mexico encouraged the University of New Mexico to develop a Combined BA/MD Degree Program wherein high schools students obtain a baccalaureate degree that, if completed successfully, will reserve them a seat in the UNM School of Medicine. Latino High School students who have an inclination with the sciences should consider the Combined BA/MD Degree Program as it will not only prepare them academically, but also train them to serve communities with diminishing populations of Latino physicians. A particular issue lies within the Latino community, wherein patients with limited English-language skills feel apprehensive of visiting doctors who do not speak Spanish, unlike other Latinos with a stronger proficiency in English.


High School students interested in the Combined BA/MD Degree Program can learn more about it here: Combined BA/MD Degree Program




Hispanics and Education: a Texas-Sized Challenge for States

2015-01-29T19:33:36.178Z

AUSTIN, Texas – Manuel Ramirez was the first in his family to get a college degree, and it wasn’t easy.

His parents, who brought him to the U.S. illegally from Guanajuato, Mexico, when he was 8 years old, made just enough to get by with day labor and house cleaning. They could not afford to pay their son’s roughly $10,000 tuition at the University of Texas at Austin, so Manuel earned extra money as a server in restaurants, coloring hair at a spa, translating Spanish, working in a rock…

AUSTIN, Texas – Manuel Ramirez was the first in his family to get a college degree, and it wasn’t easy.

His parents, who brought him to the U.S. illegally from Guanajuato, Mexico, when he was 8 years old, made just enough to get by with day labor and house cleaning. They could not afford to pay their son’s roughly $10,000 tuition at the University of Texas at Austin, so Manuel earned extra money as a server in restaurants, coloring hair at a spa, translating Spanish, working in a rock quarry and building fences at a ranch.

Click here to continue reading.

Source: The Pew Charitable Trusts




Do you have a Latino heart?

2014-09-30T19:02:26.082Z

In an article posted on The News Gazette, Esther Cepeda discusses the heterogeneity of the Hispanic Population in the US. She delves on the politics of immigration, and how some Hispanics do not abide the idea that every illegal immigrant should be awarded citizenship. She argues this is their right, and doing so is part of the Hispanic identity. She states,…

In an article posted on The News Gazette, Esther Cepeda discusses the heterogeneity of the Hispanic Population in the US. She delves on the politics of immigration, and how some Hispanics do not abide the idea that every illegal immigrant should be awarded citizenship. She argues this is their right, and doing so is part of the Hispanic identity. She states, "Their [Hispanics] strength lies in their diversity, and they're better off being a messy reality than a mythical monolith."

What caught my attention was a quote attributed to New Mexico Attorney General Gary King, who is running for governor. He paraphrased Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farm Workers, as follows. "She [Huerta] said you can't go out there and just vote for somebody for governor because they have a Latino surname, she said you have to look at them and find out if they have a Latino heart."

What exactly does a Latino (and/or Hispanic) heart mean? Does it always side with Latinos (and/or Hispanics) in polarized arguments? Perhaps a Latino (and/or Hispanic) heart stands up for specific values like family, community, kindness, etc.

What do you think?




Hispanic literature to commemorate

2014-03-25T17:44:27.715Z

Nostalgia makes me wish I were back in the country I once called home. Sometimes I’ll remember the family gatherings in my great uncle’s house—even on Sunday afternoons, my parents, uncles and aunts played cards while having drinks, and then, when the mood struck, they danced until midnight. I’d play soccer or board games—or look for some alternative form of entertainment—with my cousins, so everyone had a good time.



Perhaps nostalgia is not the best word to describe the…

Nostalgia makes me wish I were back in the country I once called home. Sometimes I’ll remember the family gatherings in my great uncle’s house—even on Sunday afternoons, my parents, uncles and aunts played cards while having drinks, and then, when the mood struck, they danced until midnight. I’d play soccer or board games—or look for some alternative form of entertainment—with my cousins, so everyone had a good time.


Perhaps nostalgia is not the best word to describe the feeling; sometimes I find myself laughing at the different situations and events that I experienced when I was younger. I presume it all depends on the words or images that evoke specific memories. Perhaps this is why I find literature so nourishing. Books not only help me see things from specific perspectives, but also recall my past.


I enjoy a book more when I’m able to imagine what the author meant thanks to my personal occurrences. This is why I think literature—and in my case Hispanic literature—creates a bond between the reader and the author; the different characters and places are the means that strengthen (and also weaken) this link. Because I grew up in Peru, the books written by Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Mario Vargas Llosa and the more contemporary Jaime Bayly, hit distinct chords in my psyche. Yet I’m also fascinated by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Colombia) and captivated by Julio Cortazar (Argentina) because I find the language they write to be proverbial.


Do you agree that reading Hispanic Literature helps us conserve our identity and heritage? What authors/books make you reflect on who you are as a Hispanic or Latino?




New book authored by my friend, Juan R. Rivera: "Survived Vietnam: The Story of How I Beat the Odds"

2013-12-16T14:25:41.818Z

Written by Juan R. Rivera, this is a personal story of survival and success as told by an American soldier who survived the Vietnam War and recovered in military hospitals from life-threatening injuries. It is a revealing and emotional story that takes you through intense combat action in the swamps of Vietnam's Mekong Delta River area. It focuses on one man's strong will to survive against all odds through the power of the All Mighty.

Juan R. Rivera was born in Fajardo, Puerto Rico.…

Written by Juan R. Rivera, this is a personal story of survival and success as told by an American soldier who survived the Vietnam War and recovered in military hospitals from life-threatening injuries. It is a revealing and emotional story that takes you through intense combat action in the swamps of Vietnam's Mekong Delta River area. It focuses on one man's strong will to survive against all odds through the power of the All Mighty.

Juan R. Rivera was born in Fajardo, Puerto Rico. In the early 1960s, he moved with relatives to Passaic, New Jersey.  In 1966, he was drafted for military service in the United States Army. He served a tour of combat duty in the Republic of South Vietnam, where he was wounded twice in separate combat actions. His combat decorations include the Purple Heart, Bronze Star Medal with letter “v” device, Air Medal, Army Commendation Medal with letter “V” device, Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm Unit Citation, Vietnam Service Medal with 2 bronze service stars, National Defense Service Medal, Combat Infantryman Badge 1st Award, and Expert Badge with Rifle Bar.
Mr. Rivera was hospitalized at various military hospitals for nearly a year for treatment of wounds received in combat.

Following his medical discharge, he returned to school and obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from Montclair State University and a Juris Doctor degree from Seton Hall University, School of Law, in New Jersey.  Subsequently, he obtained two additional degrees and two Professional Certificates from Northern Virginia Community College in Virginia.Following his graduation from law school, Mr. Rivera served as a Legal Consultant and Business Representative to various U.S. firms in Latin America. Subsequently, Mr. Rivera became a Foreign Service Officer in the U.S. Department of State. Finally, he joined the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) as a clandestine operative.  He served various domestic and foreign tours of duty with the CIA, including a tour of duty as CIA liaison to the Commander of the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Florida.

Mr. Rivera retired from the CIA in late 2006, and he remained in the Tampa area.  Following his retirement, he worked as Adjunct Professor at the University of South Florida and Eckerd College, both in Tampa. In addition, he published two books about his favorite pastime, the game of dominoes. Currently, he has other literature works in progress, serves as political advisor to various political candidates, and volunteers his time to senior community centers in the Tampa area.

Available at www.survivedvietnam.com




Immigration reform supporters kick off hunger strike

2013-11-13T15:50:43.778Z

Faith leaders joined immigrant rights advocates Tuesday at the nation’s capital to launch a 40-day hunger strike to pressure the House leadership to pass immigration reform legislation before the end of this year.The fasters participating in the hunger strike say they intend to send a clear message:    “We will not stand for politics as usual when families are being torn apart. We are prepared to risk and put our bodies on the line until Congress puts all 11 million… Faith leaders joined immigrant rights advocates Tuesday at the nation’s capital to launch a 40-day hunger strike to pressure the House leadership to pass immigration reform legislation before the end of this year.The fasters participating in the hunger strike say they intend to send a clear message:    “We will not stand for politics as usual when families are being torn apart. We are prepared to risk and put our bodies on the line until Congress puts all 11 million aspiring Americans on the path to citizenship.”The hunger strike, which is being called “Fast for Families,” will take place on the National Mall where a tent has been set up.The tent will serve as a place for prayer. Inside it is an altar to remember those who’ve died while attempting to cross the border into the United States, as well as spiritual symbols that represent the unity for immigration reform.Rev. Jim Wallis, president of Sojourners, a Christian organization focused on social justice, explained at a press conference inside the tent on Tuesday: “For people of faith, this is not a political issue, but a moral one. And for Christians, how we treat 11 million undocumented people, the ‘strangers’ among us is how we treat Christ himself.”Meanwhile, Alvin Herring, director of training for PICO National Network, told reporters that even though he feels immigration reform is close to becoming a reality, “we have a ways to go yet for the hardest climb is before us.”    “That is why we are fasting and praying — to develop the spiritual energy to make this last momentous time,” Herring said.The Senate passed its own comprehensive immigration bill in June. But efforts to pass immigration reform legislation have been slow in the House even after supporters have been building momentum through recent civil disobedience actions.House Republicans prefer to tackle immigration reform piece-by-piece. So far, the House Judiciary Committee, which will hold a hearing on Wednesday over a biometric entry-exit system, has approved several immigration bills but none of them have been brought up to the House floor for a vote.Fasters refuse to wait any longer for immigration reformSome Republicans warn that there isn’t enough time left in the legislative calendar to address immigration reform legislation this year, but the fasters say they refuse to wait any longer.    “We refuse to dwell on the frustrations of ‘wait,’” the fasters said in a statement explaining why they are fasting. “We rise with [immigrant families] and declare our moral obligation, grounded in the words of God spoken through the prophets, to move the compassion of elected leadership in the House, and to inspire a resilient movement to cease the deportations, suffering, sorrow and fear and usher a new structure of laws for the good of our country men and women and the sake of our values.”The fasters include more than a dozen immigrant rights advocates and faith leaders. One of them is Rev. Samuel Rodriguez. He is the president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, which represents more than 40,000 churches and is considered the nation’s largest Christian Hispanic organization.Rodriguez and Eliseo Medina, former secretary treasurer of the SEIU, are among the four fasters who wi[...]



Pompousness Trumps Journalism

2013-08-31T21:05:52.205Z

     A journalist's product are the stories they tell. Whether we like it or not...what we put out there people take as truth. Journalists are authority figures with great power and influence. We must responsibly and jealously protect our credibility and integrity...without it, we lose the trust of the community we serve. 

    Here's an example of how an opportunistic journalist cut corners for personal gain at the expense of losing credibility:

    …

     A journalist's product are the stories they tell. Whether we like it or not...what we put out there people take as truth. Journalists are authority figures with great power and influence. We must responsibly and jealously protect our credibility and integrity...without it, we lose the trust of the community we serve. 

    Here's an example of how an opportunistic journalist cut corners for personal gain at the expense of losing credibility:

    http://hugo4nahj.blogspot.com/2013/08/pompousness-trumps-journalism.html