Subscribe: All Discussions Tagged 'immigration' - Hispanic professional society & diversity job fairs at NSHP.org
http://network.nshp.org/forum/topic/listForTag?tag=immigration&feed=yes&xn_auth=no
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language:
Tags:
american  app  couple app  couples  hispanic  immigrants  immigration reform  immigration  new  people  petitions  reform  year   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: All Discussions Tagged 'immigration' - Hispanic professional society & diversity job fairs at NSHP.org

All Discussions Tagged 'immigration' - Hispanic professional society & diversity job fairs at NSHP.org





Updated: 2018-04-20T15:55:07Z

 



Immigration Concerns and Fear in the Houston Hispanic Community

2017-03-06T17:09:31.773Z

Good Morning everyone! 

I attended a presentation given by 2 immigration lawyers this past Friday. You may have seen the story on Univision's Friday news at 10 P.M.They will be sending me their presentations shortly- it includes a brief overview of immigration terms as well as the most recent developments under the new administration. 

I work closely with families and we received a guide on what to say while giving them advice on what to do during this time. There are also…

Good Morning everyone! 

I attended a presentation given by 2 immigration lawyers this past Friday. You may have seen the story on Univision's Friday news at 10 P.M.They will be sending me their presentations shortly- it includes a brief overview of immigration terms as well as the most recent developments under the new administration. 

I work closely with families and we received a guide on what to say while giving them advice on what to do during this time. There are also recommendations on what they can do to prepare their families in case something happens and their family unit is separated. Info on free or low cost legal help is also included. 

The attorneys gave us their permission to spread the information in order to reach as many families as possible in hopes of easing some of the fear and anxiety in a lot of our communities.

If you would like me to forward you the information once I receive it, please leave your email address in a comment. 

Thanks!!




H-1B FILING SEASON (FOR THE 2017 DEADLINE ON APRIL 1ST) GETS INTO FULL-SWING FOR H-1B EMPLOYERS AND PROSPECTIVE H-1B EMPLOYEES

2017-01-13T16:14:01.301Z

H-1B FILING SEASON (FOR THE 2017 DEADLINE ON APRIL 1ST) GETS INTO FULL-SWING FOR H-1B EMPLOYERS AND PROSPECTIVE H-1B EMPLOYEES By: David Nachman, Esq., Michael Phulwani, Esq. and Ludka… H-1B FILING SEASON (FOR THE 2017 DEADLINE ON APRIL 1ST) GETS INTO FULL-SWING FOR H-1B EMPLOYERS AND PROSPECTIVE H-1B EMPLOYEES By: David Nachman, Esq., Michael Phulwani, Esq. and Ludka Zimovcak, Esq., - Immigration Lawyers at the NPZ Law Group, P.C. (New Jersey, New York, Indiana, and Affiliated offices in Canada & India)   Based on the current predictions, given the new Republican Administration, the U.S. economy will rebound. What does this mean for the immigration practitioners, professionals, and prospective H-1B employers and employees? Assuming that the economy performs as projected, it is highly likely that we will once again, as we did in 2016, witness the H-1B lottery (technically referred to as “Random Selection Process”) during April 2017. To better prepare for the H-1B cap, this article endeavors to summarize a few practice pointers which every prospective H-1B employer and employee needs to know. Limited Numbers: Not 65,000; There Are Only 58,200 Regular H-1B Visas. The current annual cap on the H-1B category is 65,000. However, all H-1B nonimmigrant visas are not subject to this annual cap. Up to 6,800 visas are set aside from the cap of 65,000 during each fiscal year for the H-1B1 program designed specifically for the Nationals of Chile and Singapore. Unused numbers in the H-1B1 pool are made available for H-1B use for the next fiscal year. Thus, in effect, only 58,200 H-1B visas are granted each year with the exception of the 20,000 additional H-1B visas which are reserved for individuals who have received master’s or higher degrees from a U.S. college or university. In an upcoming article, we will discuss, in detail, whether or not every master’s degree from a U.S. academic institution qualifies an individual for the H-1B master’s cap. Because of the limited number of H-1B visas, employers should identify individuals who would need H-1B sponsorship. This will allow sufficient time for petition preparation, including the time required to file and receive certification of the Labor Condition Application (LCA), Form ETA 9035. Thus, formulating a strategy for an H-1B Petition is a key to hiring an H-1B employee for the next United States and Citizenship Services (USCIS) fiscal year which begins on October 1st, 2017. How Long Will USCIS Accept H-1B Petitions? It is preferable, not mandatory, to submit H-1B Petitions on April 1st, 2017. The answer to the question “how long USCIS will accept H-1B Petitions?” depends upon how many H-1B Petitions USCIS will receive during the first five (5) business beginning on, April 1st, 2017. If USCIS receives a sufficient number of H-1B petitions during the first five (5) business days, an announcement will follow from USCIS about the Random Selection (“H-1B Lottery”) process. If, however, USCIS does not receive a sufficient number of H-1B petitions to reach the statutory cap for fiscal year (FY) 2017-2018, during the first five (5) business days, it will keep accepting H-1B Petitions until it announces a “final receipt date” for new H-1B petitions. It is beyond the scope of this article to discuss how USCIS conducts the Random Selection (“H-1B Lottery”) process. We will address this topic, in detail, in a separate article. Refrain From Filing Multiple H-1B Petitions For the Same Employee. An employer may not file more than one H-1B petition for each prospective employee during the fiscal year. A prospective employee who qualifies for the “Master’s Cap” of 20,000 cannot file two (2) petitions to encompass the regular H-1B and the Master’s H-1B. This limitation also precludes an employer from filing multiple petitions for different jobs for the same employee but does not preclude related employers (e.g., parent and subsidiary companies or affili[...]



President Obama's decision on immigration

2014-11-21T18:50:14.828Z

President Obama's decision to allow up to five million people living in the US without proper documentation ‘come out of the shadows’ without the fear of being deported is currently being analyzed, judged, criticized and even condemned. I presume that people who are against President Obama’s actions have valid arguments, perhaps the most compelling being that this decision is unlawful. Even though one of America’s strengths is its legal system, what good are laws to those alienated people…

President Obama's decision to allow up to five million people living in the US without proper documentation ‘come out of the shadows’ without the fear of being deported is currently being analyzed, judged, criticized and even condemned. I presume that people who are against President Obama’s actions have valid arguments, perhaps the most compelling being that this decision is unlawful. Even though one of America’s strengths is its legal system, what good are laws to those alienated people who have been working for the past ten or twenty years, paying their taxes, and contributing to America’s economy and society? Many of them arrived in the US with a proper visa and thereafter worked without one, but they did this out of need, a need many American citizens cannot understand because they have not faced similar circumstances. And for good, hardworking people, staying without proper documentation is humiliating, unworthy, and just as President Obama suggests, forces them to live in the dark. 

 
It is a catch twenty-two, wherein decent American citizens do not have the opportunity to get to know and understand the plight of immigrants who do not have the proper documentation to work in America. In other words, once a person has been deemed an ‘illegal immigrant’, American citizens who have not met them on a personal level may begin to associate negative thoughts and feelings which may be true for some, but not for the majority of the ‘illegal immigrant’ population. When referred to 'illegal immigrants', American citizens may envision 'felons', gang members and criminals who are not the core of people this decision will benefit. Perhaps this decision will not only allow hard working immigrants to finally not fear being deported, but also serve as a much-needed catalyst for American citizens to learn more about the cultures, lifestyles, languages, point of views and values of good, hardworking people willing to sacrifice life in their homeland for a better future.




Do you have a Latino heart?

2014-09-30T19:02:26.082Z

In an article posted on The News Gazette, Esther Cepeda discusses the heterogeneity of the Hispanic Population in the US. She delves on the politics of immigration, and how some Hispanics do not abide the idea that every illegal immigrant should be awarded citizenship. She argues this is their right, and doing so is part of the Hispanic identity. She states,…

In an article posted on The News Gazette, Esther Cepeda discusses the heterogeneity of the Hispanic Population in the US. She delves on the politics of immigration, and how some Hispanics do not abide the idea that every illegal immigrant should be awarded citizenship. She argues this is their right, and doing so is part of the Hispanic identity. She states, "Their [Hispanics] strength lies in their diversity, and they're better off being a messy reality than a mythical monolith."

What caught my attention was a quote attributed to New Mexico Attorney General Gary King, who is running for governor. He paraphrased Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farm Workers, as follows. "She [Huerta] said you can't go out there and just vote for somebody for governor because they have a Latino surname, she said you have to look at them and find out if they have a Latino heart."

What exactly does a Latino (and/or Hispanic) heart mean? Does it always side with Latinos (and/or Hispanics) in polarized arguments? Perhaps a Latino (and/or Hispanic) heart stands up for specific values like family, community, kindness, etc.

What do you think?




Life in between

2014-02-24T18:05:20.041Z

Have you ever felt—or thought—that you were happier in another country, more specifically, the country you grew up in? Now that many Latin American countries are thriving—granted there are some exceptions—do  you think about going back to your home country? I grew up in Peru and after finishing high school moved to the US to attend St. Mary's University. While in college, I decided to return to Peru after graduation; I imagined I'd find a well-paying job with my American degree. Though I was…

Have you ever felt—or thought—that you were happier in another country, more specifically, the country you grew up in? Now that many Latin American countries are thriving—granted there are some exceptions—do  you think about going back to your home country? I grew up in Peru and after finishing high school moved to the US to attend St. Mary's University. While in college, I decided to return to Peru after graduation; I imagined I'd find a well-paying job with my American degree. Though I was offered a couple of jobs that could have potentially turned into a successful career, after a couple of years in Peru I decided to go back to America and pursue the writing career I had dreamt of. Five years later—living in the US and working as a writer—I longed to go back to Peru; I missed my family, friends, dog, the food, and walking the streets that made me feel I was home. So I moved to Peru and though I did feel I was back home, after a few years part of me missed America. Perhaps it was either its orderliness or the perception of having more opportunities to succeed, not only professionally but also personally, that motivated me to go back to US, once again. Now I feel as if I juggle life in the American Peruvian hyphen, holding on to the best of the two countries and avoiding the worst of what they have to offer. Is this too much to ask for? Have you ever felt of going back to a country you left, but haven't done so because of responsibilities or the fear of failure? If so, how have you managed to let go of your other life?




Immigration Reform 2013 News: Studies Show Immigrants Help Boost the US Economy, Create More American Jobs

2014-01-08T14:36:12.635Z

Research proves that immigration and economic progress go hand in hand. Contrary to fears that immigrants will take American jobs and make unemployment even worse, studies show that mending our broken U.S. immigration system would actually help end America's job crisis.

Like Us on Facebook



One reason why open immigration policies would create more jobs for more Americans is because immigrants tend to be more entrepreneurial and innovative than native-born Americans, and are…

Research proves that immigration and economic progress go hand in hand. Contrary to fears that immigrants will take American jobs and make unemployment even worse, studies show that mending our broken U.S. immigration system would actually help end America's job crisis.
Like Us on Facebook

One reason why open immigration policies would create more jobs for more Americans is because immigrants tend to be more entrepreneurial and innovative than native-born Americans, and are twice as likely to start businesses.

While immigrants make up 13 percent of the U.S. population, they account for nearly 20 percent of small businesses owners and are responsible for more than 25 percent of all new business creation and related job growth, the National Journal reports.

According to a 2012 study from the Fiscal Policy Institute, immigrant-owned small businesses employed nearly five million Americans in 2010 and generated an estimated $776 billion in revenue. Plus, the Partnership for a New American states that more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or first generation Americans.

In addition, immigrants are also responsible for launching half of the nation's top startups which account for virtually all net new job creation, according to the Kauffman Foundation.

In 2011, immigrants received more than 75 percent of almost 1,500 patents awarded at the nation's top 10 research universities, while most of the patents were in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Tim Rowe, founder of the Cambridge Innovation Center in Cambridge, Mass., told the Wall Street Journal that "our immigration policy is built around the notion that we have to protect American jobs. But we've got it backward. We're threatening the creation of new jobs by preventing these incredibly talented entrepreneurs from overseas from coming here and building their businesses here."

Rob Lilleness, president and chief executive of software developer Medio Systems in Seattle, Wash., added that immigration restrictions often force new companies to outsource jobs. "We have to look at India, or Argentina, or Vietnam, or China because there's not enough H-1B visas," he said.

One of the chief concerns of the Republican Party is to focus on boosting the economy and creating American jobs. Yet, by failing to pass comprehensive immigration reform for yet another year, House Republicans may not only be hurting immigrants, but they may also be hurting the country's economy.

Author: Selena Hill

Website: Latino Post




Immigration reform possible this year

2014-01-03T17:35:30.851Z

Politics is the art of getting re-elected.Goodness knows, we’ve seen that axiom play out in Illinois of late, where raw self-interest heavily directed every move by almost every elected official — and would-be elected official — in cutting the deal last month to fix the state’s public employee pension mess. Now the same self-serving calculus appears to be serving the nation well in creating promising political conditions to pass comprehensive immigration reform. This,… Politics is the art of getting re-elected.Goodness knows, we’ve seen that axiom play out in Illinois of late, where raw self-interest heavily directed every move by almost every elected official — and would-be elected official — in cutting the deal last month to fix the state’s public employee pension mess. Now the same self-serving calculus appears to be serving the nation well in creating promising political conditions to pass comprehensive immigration reform. This, finally, could be the year.Democrats have long favored cutting a single big deal — Hispanic voters are, by and large, their voters. Now Republicans, waking to the realization that their days as a national party are numbered if they don’t broaden their appeal, are showing an uncharacteristic eagerness to tackle the problem, too.The GOP prefers a piecemeal approach, one that we fear could be nothing more than a way to avoid the most radioactive reforms; but the approach taken matters less than the essential result reached — a path to citizenship for the 11 million illegal immigrants now living among us.The election-year calendar works in favor of reform. After the March primary elections, Republicans in all but the most severely gerrymandered districts may be more willing to sign onto immigration reform, looking to appeal to more moderate voters in November. For a few brief months, they may be more amenable to the entreaties of their own party’s national leaders.John Boehner’s growing backbone works in favor of reform. The House speaker’s open disgust with ideologically militant tea party groups, who he now says have “lost all credibility,” is a strong sign he’s ready to buck them on immigration reform. The man is still embarrassed that he allowed the tea party faction of his caucus to shut down the federal government last year.But a better sign yet that Boehner is serious about immigration reform was his recent hiring of Rebecca Tallent, a prominent adviser on the issue to Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who has long backed immigration reform.Mitt Romney’s failed presidential run in 2012 works in favor of reform. Romney picked up only 27 percent of the Hispanic vote, a big reason he lost to President Barack Obama. And while conservatives may be right in saying that immigration reform alone won’t instantly transform Hispanic Democrats into Hispanic Republicans, it’s important to note that Romney also fared poorly among women voters and independents who were turned off by the GOP’s callous stand on immigration.Here’s what we worry about: cherry-picking. The danger of Congress taking a piecemeal, rather than comprehensive, approach to immigration reform is that Republicans will push through the easy stuff, such as doing more to secure the nation’s borders and increasing the number of visas for highly educated high-tech workers, leaving Democrats no bargaining chips to accomplish the tough stuff.Obama can’t allow a piecemeal approach to immigration reform to become a half-baked approach. The most essential measure outlined in a bill passed by the Senate last summer — a path to citizenship for 11 million people here illegally — must be the foundation for all upcoming negotiations. That Senate bill was supported by both the Democratic and Republican senators from Illinois.At the same time, the painful reminder of those[...]



Pew Study: Who are our Hispanic leaders? Muchos

2013-12-27T20:02:02.420Z

EL PASO — I was shocked to read in a recent article from the Pew Hispanic Center that 62 percent of U.S. Hispanics do not know who the most important Latino leader in the country is today. Mi gente, my people, without a leader? What a distressing thought. The best explanation I found for this anomaly is in … EL PASO — I was shocked to read in a recent article from the Pew Hispanic Center that 62 percent of U.S. Hispanics do not know who the most important Latino leader in the country is today. Mi gente, my people, without a leader? What a distressing thought. The best explanation I found for this anomaly is in an article by Juana Bordas of The Huffington Post. In her article, “Latino Leadership Follows A New Model,” Bordas says: “Latinos are forging a new model of leadership. One that is people-oriented and community-based…is not concentrated in one voice or in only a few people. Instead, Latino leadership is inclusive. It is leadership by the many.” The writer refers to a poll by the National Institute for Latino Policy showing that Latinos identified 27 distinct leaders, with Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor receiving the most votes at 20 percent. In a post-Cesar Chavez, post-Raza Unida era, history shows that Latinos know how to mobilize a community. It’s en la sangre, in our blood. When I hear my mother’s stories of family members participating in the L.A. walkouts of the 1960’s over discrimination against Mexican Americans and unequal conditions in the public schools, or my Tía’s tales of caravanning through Texas to hear Chicano activist Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales speak, I share their sense of electrifying community cohesiveness. And I know these stories of coming together as one for the greater good are not just shared by my family but by many Latinos. Whether we use a picket sign or a pen to stand up for the greater good, it’s clear Latinos come from an inclusive, people-centered culture. Nothing says this more than the popular phrase, “mi casa es su casa.” In her article, Bordas also writes that an effective leader must create an environment that encourages diverse people to work together. “Leaders must hand over the reins and shift the control from ‘I as the leader’ to ‘We the people,’” she says. “This is in sync with how Latinos are leading their communities every day… They are natural collaborators, having learned to share and to contribute to their families and community at an early age.” At an early age is right. I was lucky to live in a home that consisted of three generations of my family—my grandmother, my parents, my older sister and I. Our house always had visiting cousins, tías, and tíos coming over to see abuelita. My mother was one of seven children and so was my father therefore my extended family consisted of an uncountable number of relatives. As a child I learned to negotiate for the things I wanted, for example the last of my grandmother’s homemade coveted buñuelos. This was usually settled by breaking the last of the buñuelos into enough pieces to go around. My mother was not shy about reminding us to share. With all the laughter, playing, and running around, there was always one table big enough for everyone to sit, eat, and talk, leaving little room for selfishness. Bordas also points out that Latinos are inherently diverse. They are a culture mainly influenced by the Spanish and indigenous peoples. And many Latinos have mixed ancestry from other countries. With Latinos coming to the U.S. from 24 unique national cultures and histories, how can we expect one leader who speaks for all? Some think Hispanic, Latino, Chicano are interchangeable. I am Mexican American and I see Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Guatemalans, etc. as my fellow brothers and sisters, but it d[...]



Thanksgiving Thoughts on Our Immigrant Nation

2013-11-27T15:57:16.870Z

Thanksgiving Thoughts on Our Immigrant NationWe closed our Thanksgiving blog last year with lyrics from a song "The House That I Live In," recorded by Frank Sinatra to encourage unity and tolerance during World War II, and the following comments: America, the house we live in is a more diverse one, that it was at the outset of World War II and we believe a better one for it. The family in Norman Rockwell's Thanksgiving dining room painting was all white. Today… Thanksgiving Thoughts on Our Immigrant NationWe closed our Thanksgiving blog last year with lyrics from a song "The House That I Live In," recorded by Frank Sinatra to encourage unity and tolerance during World War II, and the following comments: America, the house we live in is a more diverse one, that it was at the outset of World War II and we believe a better one for it. The family in Norman Rockwell's Thanksgiving dining room painting was all white. Today that family could also be African-American, Latino, Indian American, multi-ethnic, gay, straight and we are certain that we are better off because of this as well. For that we are thankful. We also remember that on this Thanksgiving Day there are those without homes to live in, whether due to natural disasters such as the Super Storm Sandy, or personal circumstances. We know that because of who we are as Americans there are numerous citizens who will reach out to help them both on this day and throughout the year. That's America, the house that we live in, a nation of immigrants. That's the final reason we are thankful on this Thanksgiving Day. It struck us, given the focus on immigration throughout most of this year, that our final reason for being thankful in 2012 should be our primary one in 2013. America has always prided itself on being a nation of immigrants. The Statue of Liberty provides eloquent testimony to that with its inscription, which reads, in part:    Give me your tired, your poor,    your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,    the wretched refuse of your teeming shore.    Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,    I lift my lamp beside the golden door.The achievements and the contributions of immigrants to the nation's success over time are legion. Famous first generation American immigrants, to name just a few, include: Albert Einstein (originally from Germany), I.M. Pei (an architect from China), Joseph Pulitzer (a newspaper publisher from Hungary), Felix Frankfurter (a Supreme Court justice from Austria), Madeleine Albright (the Secretary of State from Czechoslovakia), Hakeem Olajuwon (a basketball player from Nigeria) and Saint Francis X, along with Mother Cabrini (a nun from Italy).More recently, it's been Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google, who came here from Russia, and two scientists, Elizabeth Blackburn (from Australia) and Jack Szostak (from the U.K. via Canada) who shared the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine in 2009 (along with Carol Grieder) for their chromosomal research.The list could go on and on. Add second generation immigrants to the list, it could go on almost forever. It is unquestionable that America has been the beneficiary of an unparalleled immigrant advantage, in terms of intellectual and human capital. For that we are thankful.It's not just the "brain gain," as Darrell West of the Brookings Institution puts it, that immigrants have provided to the development of America and advancing the America dream. It's also been the incalculable contributions that immigrants have made in doing the back-breaking work required to eke out a living -- to make the economy hum and make the future better for their children. For that we are thankful.One need only visit the Ellis Island Immigration Museum and its various centers to understand the magnitude and impac[...]



Couple app: Unintentionally helps couples petitioning for green cards

2013-11-20T17:32:52.119Z

Citizens and permanent residents have found that the petition process to bring a spouse or fiancé to live in the United States as a green card holder can be arduous for couples, with some of them getting their petitions denied because they lack secondary evidence to prove their relationship is legitimate.But some couples have found a way to provide proof of their relationship with the help of a mobile app called Couple, which allows couples to form a digital timeline of their… Citizens and permanent residents have found that the petition process to bring a spouse or fiancé to live in the United States as a green card holder can be arduous for couples, with some of them getting their petitions denied because they lack secondary evidence to prove their relationship is legitimate.But some couples have found a way to provide proof of their relationship with the help of a mobile app called Couple, which allows couples to form a digital timeline of their relationship.The app functions as a private social network for couples. It allows two people who are in a relationship to exchange text messages, photos, videos and sketches. They can also send each other a “thumb kiss” by pressing their thumbs against the screen of their separate phones at the same time, leaving a thumb print and making their phones vibrate. Furthermore, couples can create to-do lists and set up reminders of important dates, such as anniversaries and birthdays.    “All of your memories and all of the things that you share with your partner are all in one place,” Oleg Kostour, co-founder of the Couple app, told VOXXI. “That’s why it has been very useful for these couples that have been trying to use it as proof of their relationship.”Kostour said that in the last few months, dozens of couples have reached out to the Couple app via email, asking for a data file of their timeline history because they want to include it with their green card petitions. One man who reached out was looking to bring his fiancé to live with him in the U.S. Data experts were able to help him by providing him with the data file of the digital timeline that he and his fiancé share through the app.How the Couple app was createdThe founders of Couple app include Kostour and four former classmates from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. All of them are in their 20s. When they got together to create the app, they never imagined it would come in handy for couples looking to bring their significant others to live in the U.S.    “It was a surprise,” said 25-year-old Koustour, referring to the unintentional use of the app by couples petitioning for green cards. “We weren’t thinking about that when we came up with the app.”He and the rest of the founders of the Couple app came up with the idea for the app while participating in a startup incubator held last year in Mountain View, Calif. The incubator was hosted by Y Combinator, a venture fund that has provide seed funding for more than 550 startups — including Dropbox, Airbnb and Reddit — since it launched in 2005.During the incubator, which lasted several months, the founders of the Couple app were away from their significant others, all of whom lived in Canada and in different parts of the U.S. The couples found themselves using various social media channels, like Facebook and Twitter, as well as other social tools, like Skype and international text messaging, in order to communicate.    “Communication was all over the place,” Kostour said. “So we decided to kind of simplify all that and put it all into one place — a mobile app.”The Couple app launched in March 2012, with funds it received from Y Combinator. The app is also backed by about a dozen other venture funds[...]