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All Discussions Tagged 'economy' - Hispanic professional society & diversity job fairs at NSHP.org





Updated: 2018-04-26T04:10:40Z

 



Hispanics' Daily Spending Well Above U.S. Average

2014-12-11T19:48:13.015Z

Gallup Poll published the "Hispanics' Daily Spending Well Above U.S. Average" story wherein they discuss how Hispanics compare to other ethnicities regarding the amount of money they spend on a daily basis. After reading the story, I tried to come up with something smart to say, but was unable to because I am unsure how these numbers can be interpreted and used. The article…

Gallup Poll published the "Hispanics' Daily Spending Well Above U.S. Average" story wherein they discuss how Hispanics compare to other ethnicities regarding the amount of money they spend on a daily basis. After reading the story, I tried to come up with something smart to say, but was unable to because I am unsure how these numbers can be interpreted and used. The article relates the findings with President Obama's executive action of deferring the deportation of millions of immigrants, yet I find the question of the potential effect vague because we don't know what the criteria was to determine who is considered a Hispanic, e.g. were they born in the US and if so, how far back did their forefathers arrive in the US; are they citizens or not; what are their values; do they speak Spanish; etc.


What I do think can be concluded is that those Hispanics who were polled have greater confidence in the US. In other words, because Hispanics spend more, I think they feel safe spending their earnings knowing they will earn more money in the future. Quite contrarily, other ethnic groups may feel apprehensive about the economy and therefore are more cautious with their expenditures. Could we extrapolate and state that, based on these findings, the Hispanics who were polled are more optimistic about their life in the US than those of other ethnicities? Or perhaps they feel safer, happier? Or is it that they value things and ideals—like living the moment—differently than other ethnicities?




2013 Hispanic Values Survey: How Shifting Religious Identities and Experiences are Influencing Hispanic Approaches to Politics

2013-09-30T17:55:22.081Z

Executive Summary Affinity for the Republican Party and the Democratic Party Hispanics are three times more likely to identify as affiliated with the Democratic Party than with the Republican Party. Half of Hispanics identify with the Democratic Party (50%), compared to 15% who identify with the Republican Party. Roughly 1-in-4 (24%) Hispanics say they are politically independent.When asked to provide top-of-mind associations of the Republican… Executive Summary Affinity for the Republican Party and the Democratic Party Hispanics are three times more likely to identify as affiliated with the Democratic Party than with the Republican Party. Half of Hispanics identify with the Democratic Party (50%), compared to 15% who identify with the Republican Party. Roughly 1-in-4 (24%) Hispanics say they are politically independent.When asked to provide top-of-mind associations of the Republican Party and Democratic Party, Hispanics offer significantly more negative comments about the Republican Party than the Democratic Party. Nearly half (48%) of the associations Hispanics volunteered about the Republican Party were negative, about 4-in-10 (42%) were basically descriptive or neutral, and about 1-in-10 (11%) were positive. By contrast, more than one-third (35%) of the associations Hispanics volunteered about the Democratic Party were positive, 42% were basically neutral or descriptive, and 22% were negative.The Democratic Party has a significant perception advantage over the Republican Party across a range of attributes.  For example, 43% of Hispanics say the phrase “cares about people like you” better describes theDemocratic Party, compared to 12% who say it better describes the Republican Party. Notably, about 3-in-10 (29%) say the phrase describes neither party, and 13% say it describes both parties.Less than 3-in-10 (29%) Hispanics report that they feel closer to the Republican Party than they did in the past, while nearly two-thirds (63%) of Hispanics say the same about the Democratic Party.At this very early stage in the 2014 election cycle, Hispanic likely voters report preferring Democratic congressional candidates to Republican congressional candidates by a 2-to-1 ratio (58% vs. 28%). Among likely Hispanic voters, a majority (54%) say they would be less likely to support a candidate who opposes immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship for immigrants who are currently living in the country illegally. One-in-four (25%) say they would be more likely to vote for such a candidate, and 19% report that the candidate’s views on immigration would make no difference in their vote.The Changing Religious Profile of HispanicsA majority of Hispanics identify as Catholic (53%), one-quarter (25%) identify as Protestant—nearly evenly divided between evangelical Protestant (13%) and mainline Protestant (12%)—and 12% of Hispanics are religiously unaffiliated. Few Hispanics (6%) identify with a non-Christian religion.When comparing today’s Hispanic adults to their childhood religious affiliations, Catholic affiliation drops by 16 percentage points (from 69% to 53%). Evangelical Protestant affiliation has increased by 6percentage points (from 7% to 13%), while the percentage of those claiming no religious affiliation has increased by 7 percentage points (from 5% to 12%).Hispanics generally have a more favorable impression of the current head of the Catholic Church than of the Church itself, although this favorability gap is smaller among Catholics. Nearly 7-in-10 (69%) Hispanics have a favorable view of Pope Francis, compared to 54% who have a favorable view of the Catholic Church. Among Catholics, more than 8-in-10 (84%) have a favorable view of the current pope, and roughly as many (81%) have a favorable view of the Catholic Church.Political Priorities and Immigration ReformLike Americans overall, Hispanics are most likely to rank jobs and unemployment (72%) as a critical issue facing the country today. However, n[...]



Hispanic Grads More Likely to Enroll in College Than Whites

2013-05-28T16:09:43.008Z

It turns out that nearly seven in 10 Hispanic high school graduates from the class of 2012 enrolled in college in the fall, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Census data. That's two percentage points higher than the rate among whites, and six percentage points higher than the rate among blacks.

The record Latino enrollment levels signal a major increase from just a dozen years ago. In 2000, fewer than half of all Hispanic high school graduates enrolled in college the…

It turns out that nearly seven in 10 Hispanic high school graduates from the class of 2012 enrolled in college in the fall, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Census data. That's two percentage points higher than the rate among whites, and six percentage points higher than the rate among blacks.

The record Latino enrollment levels signal a major increase from just a dozen years ago. In 2000, fewer than half of all Hispanic high school graduates enrolled in college the following fall.

And while Hispanic students are still more likely than whites to drop out of high school in the first place, Latino high school dropout rates have declined by about half since 2000. Just 14 percent of Latinos between the ages of 16 and 24 were high school dropouts in 2011, compared to 28 percent in 2000.

Hispanic high school graduation rates have steadily increased along with college enrollment figures for a couple of reasons.

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Source:  ABC News  

Author:  Emily Deruy




Latinos Less Likely To Receive Unemployment Benefits Than Non-Hispanic Whites, Study Says

2012-12-21T15:52:58.970Z

Even as rightwing pundits like Ann Coulter and Bill O’Reilly paint the Latino community as over-reliant on government, a new study highlights that Hispanics often do not receive enough of the benefits they are entitled to.

Latinos are less likely than non-Hispanic whites to apply for unemployment insurance benefits or to receive them once they apply, according to the study published in the Monthly Labor Review and publicized in a briefing by the National Employment Law…

Even as rightwing pundits like Ann Coulter and Bill O’Reilly paint the Latino community as over-reliant on government, a new study highlights that Hispanics often do not receive enough of the benefits they are entitled to.

Latinos are less likely than non-Hispanic whites to apply for unemployment insurance benefits or to receive them once they apply, according to the study published in the Monthly Labor Review and publicized in a briefing by the National Employment Law Project.

Based on the 2005 supplement of the Current Population Survey of 60,000 households, the study by Alix Gould-Werth and Luke Shaefer of the University of Michigan found that only 34 percent of Latinos applied for unemployment benefits, compared to 49.5 percent of non-hispanic whites. Of those who applied, 56.8 percent of Hispanic applicants received benefits, versus 70.9 percent of non-Hispanic whites.

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Source:  Huffington Post

Author:  Roque Planas




Hispanic education: Vital to the economic success of the United States

2012-12-21T15:43:51.614Z

By the year 2050, approximately 30 percent of the United States’ population—132 million people—will be of Hispanic origin. According to Dr. Matthew Lynch, a Department Chair and an Associate Professor of Education at Langston University, Hispanic education is the key to the future success of the United States; however, a number of barriers still exist between ethnicity and higher education.

“The future of American higher education is inexorably linked to the success of Hispanic…

By the year 2050, approximately 30 percent of the United States’ population—132 million people—will be of Hispanic origin. According to Dr. Matthew Lynch, a Department Chair and an Associate Professor of Education at Langston University, Hispanic education is the key to the future success of the United States; however, a number of barriers still exist between ethnicity and higher education.

“The future of American higher education is inexorably linked to the success of Hispanic students,” Dr. Lynch told VOXXI. “Without Hispanic students, by 2050, the U. S. will be a shell of its former self; unable to maintain its once lofty enrollment figures. This will almost certainly lead to budget shortfalls and layoffs at colleges and universities around the country.”

While Hispanic education may be vital to future economic activity in the country, immigration status, the lack of knowledge and support of college education, and issues involving tuition payment are all hurdles facing potential students.

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Source:  Voxxi

Author:  Hope Gillette




Higher Rates for Blacks and Hispanics?

2012-07-12T20:30:30.389Z

At least 34,000 African-American, Hispanic and other minority borrowers paid more for their mortgages or were steered into subprime loans when they could have qualified for better rates, according to the Department of Justice. The DOJ settled a fair-lending lawsuit with Wells Fargo, the nation’s largest mortgage lender, on Thursday.

That adds up to real money – and, in some cases, real stress:

As a result of being placed in a subprime loan, an African-American or Hispanic…

At least 34,000 African-American, Hispanic and other minority borrowers paid more for their mortgages or were steered into subprime loans when they could have qualified for better rates, according to the Department of Justice. The DOJ settled a fair-lending lawsuit with Wells Fargo, the nation’s largest mortgage lender, on Thursday.

That adds up to real money – and, in some cases, real stress:

As a result of being placed in a subprime loan, an African-American or Hispanic borrower… was subject to possible pre-payment penalties, increased risk of credit problems, default, and foreclosure, and the emotional distress that accompanies such economic stress.

The complaint also says that between 2004 and 2008, “highly qualified prime retail and wholesale applicants for Wells Fargo residential mortgage loans were more than four times as likely to receive a subprime loan if they were African-American and more than three times as likely if they were Hispanic than if they were white.”

During the same period, the complaint says, “borrowers with less favorable credit qualifications were more likely to receive prime loans if they were white than borrowers who were African-American or Hispanic.”

Wells will pay at least $175 million to settle the case; it denies any wrongdoing in settling. Bank of America agreed to pay $335 million in settling similar charges in December.

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Source:  Wall Street Journal

Author:  Janet Paskin




Latino Students are Key to Texas' Economic Future

2012-07-06T14:55:33.585Z

Texas is now home to the nation’s second-largest Hispanic state population with 9.7 million, or 38 percent of the total. In 2011, for the first time since Texas was admitted into the Union, Latinos accounted for over half (2.5 million) of the state's 4.9 million children enrolled in public schools.

Our state’s businesses and residents face a major educational challenge that can also be a great opportunity. If Texas’s economy is to remain competitive and sustainable, we must find ways to…

Texas is now home to the nation’s second-largest Hispanic state population with 9.7 million, or 38 percent of the total. In 2011, for the first time since Texas was admitted into the Union, Latinos accounted for over half (2.5 million) of the state's 4.9 million children enrolled in public schools.
Our state’s businesses and residents face a major educational challenge that can also be a great opportunity. If Texas’s economy is to remain competitive and sustainable, we must find ways to ensure vocational and higher education opportunities that prepare our future workforce to respond to business demands. The business and economic climate in Texas rests largely on the availability of a workforce that is young, growing, and well educated.
As of last year, one in five of U.S. Latinos held an associate degree or higher, compared with 44 percent of non-Hispanic whites, 57 percent of U.S. Asians and 30 percent of African Americans. Increasing the number of Latinos college graduates will be key to increasing workforce productivity and taxpayer contributions needed to maintain many of our state’s public services and needed infrastructure improvements.


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Source:  Fox News Latino

Author:  Octavio Hinojosa




U.S. Future "Unthinkable" Without Hispanic Population

2012-05-18T16:36:22.763Z

The enormous demographic growth and buying power of the Hispanic population give this community a key role in the present and future of the United States, experts in Miami agreed on Thursday.



The figures and statistics confirm that "it's going to be impossible to think about the future of the U.S. without thinking about Hispanics," emasized Leo F. Estrada, UCLA associate professor or urban planning.



With more than 50 million Hispanics in the country, a fact that makes them…

The enormous demographic growth and buying power of the Hispanic population give this community a key role in the present and future of the United States, experts in Miami agreed on Thursday.

The figures and statistics confirm that "it's going to be impossible to think about the future of the U.S. without thinking about Hispanics," emasized Leo F. Estrada, UCLA associate professor or urban planning.

With more than 50 million Hispanics in the country, a fact that makes them the largest minority in the United States - and the fastest growing - the presence of this group is always showing "areas of growth," added Estrada, who participated in the biannual conference of the Cuban American National Council.

In his comments at a session on Hispanic Demographics and Consumer Trends, Estrada analyzed figures and statistics that draw a new map of the country's demographic reality and the opportunities that are opening up for companies that know how to interpret and assimilate these changes.

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Source:  Fox News Latino






U.S. Hispanics Expected to Have Increasing Economic Impact

2012-05-10T21:25:47.253Z

The rapidly growing Hispanic population has become, and is expected to be, an even greater force in the U.S. economy.



In response to the growth of Hispanic population, retailers in recent years have started catering to Hispanics, said Jim Farrell, assistant professor of finance and economics at Florida Southern College's Barney Barnett School of Business and Free Enterprise.



Many are including aisles with Hispanic foods, targeting that market in advertising, and using more…

The rapidly growing Hispanic population has become, and is expected to be, an even greater force in the U.S. economy.

In response to the growth of Hispanic population, retailers in recent years have started catering to Hispanics, said Jim Farrell, assistant professor of finance and economics at Florida Southern College's Barney Barnett School of Business and Free Enterprise.

Many are including aisles with Hispanic foods, targeting that market in advertising, and using more Latino actors and actresses in commercials.

Because Hispanic households tend to be larger, their shopping budgets tend to be bigger.

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Source:  Chicago Tribune

Author:  Elvina Nawaguna




US Hispanics big business, says Nielsen report

2012-04-17T12:51:12.151Z

U.S. companies have been pursuing emerging markets in Latin America in recent years, but a new Nielsen report says Hispanics at home also are an important market that shouldn't be neglected.



The U.S. Hispanic population of more than 50 million now spends about $1 trillion a year and will have buying power of $1.5 trillion by 2015, according to the report. That power would land the U.S. Latino community among the world's top 20 economies.…

U.S. companies have been pursuing emerging markets in Latin America in recent years, but a new Nielsen report says Hispanics at home also are an important market that shouldn't be neglected.

The U.S. Hispanic population of more than 50 million now spends about $1 trillion a year and will have buying power of $1.5 trillion by 2015, according to the report. That power would land the U.S. Latino community among the world's top 20 economies.

Click here for more

Source:   Business Week

Author:  Mae Anderson