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Texas Visual Art News & Reviews



Updated: 2017-12-16T13:41:20Z

 



TX Craft Artists: the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft Wants You!

2017-12-16T11:55:54Z

The Houston Center for Contemporary Craft (HCCC) has announced an open call for its annual CraftTexas exhibition. Now in its tenth year, the exhibition will feature...
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CraftTexas 2018 juror, Jennifer Scanlan. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Scanlan.

The Houston Center for Contemporary Craft (HCCC) has announced an open call for its annual CraftTexas exhibition. Now in its tenth year, the exhibition will feature works made by contemporary craft artists from across the state. This year’s show is juried by Jennifer Scanlan, the Curatorial and Exhibitions Director at Oklahoma Contemporary in Oklahoma City.  The deadline to apply is April 30, 2018, and the exhibition will run from September 28, 2018 to January 13, 2019. Three artists included in the show will receive a $1000 Award of Merit prize. For more information about the application process, see below.

Eligibility requirements:
— The artist must be living in Texas
— The artist must be working in clay, fiber, glass, metal, wood, and found/recycled materials
— The works submitted to the exhibition must be available for the duration of the show
— Crated work must fit through a 4′ x 8′ door, and actual work may not exceed 200 pounds in weight
— The work cannot have been exhibited at HCCC in the past

To submit an application, go here.

 

 




F.C.C. Votes to Repeal Net Neutrality

2017-12-16T06:20:00Z

Earlier this week, the US government’s Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to repeal net neutrality. Passed in 2015 under the Obama administration, the net neutrality... Read More(Image: Tom Brenner / The New York Times) Earlier this week, the US government’s Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to repeal net neutrality. Passed in 2015 under the Obama administration, the net neutrality regulation allowed stronger government oversight of telecommunication companies, claiming that high-speed internet service could be regulated as a utility and should be available to all Americans. After the rule was enacted, telecom and cable companies sued, saying that the FCC overstepped the bounds with the new rules. In layman’s terms, net neutrality means that an internet service provider cannot manipulate the data it’s providing. This means that provider companies have to give you access to all websites at the same speeds — they aren’t allowed to censor or cap Netflix while allowing Hulu to run uninterrupted. Similarly, the rule means companies can’t charge you extra for access to certain websites. The graphic below demonstrates a hypothetical pricing system charged by telecom companies if net neutrality regulations were not in place: Imagine having to pay an extra five dollars a month in order to access the content on Glasstire. Source. (Click to enlarge.) In January, after Donald Trump was sworn in as president, he named Ajit Pai the new chairman of the FCC. Pai was appointed to the organization in 2012 by then-president Barack Obama. When net neutrality came to a vote in 2015, Pai was against it, claiming that the FCC was trying to fix a problem that didn’t exist. Since then, there has been talk of a possible repeal, which culminated last Thursday, December 14, with the FCC voting 3-2 to eliminate the rule. Pai was never shy about his position on the repeal: his profile on the FCC’s website spells out his “regulatory philosophy”: “Consumers benefit most from competition, not preemptive regulation. Free markets have delivered more value to American consumers than highly regulated ones. No regulatory system should indulge arbitrage; regulators should be skeptical of pleas to regulate rivals, dispense favors, or otherwise afford special treatment.” The repeal will not go into effect immediately, and several groups have said they plan to challenge the repeal in court. According to the New York Times, major telecom companies “have promised consumers that their experiences online would not change” after the repeal. On Friday, December 15, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said that he plans to force a vote on the FCC’s repeal using the Congressional Review Act. In order to overturn the FCC’s repeal, this motion would need the approval of the Senate, the House, and the president. Both Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and president Donald Trump backed the organization’s decision to repeal the rule. To learn more about net neutrality, go here. To learn more about its repeal, go here. To watch John Oliver’s humor-laden educational segment about net neutrality, go here. [...]



FotoFest Announces 2018 Biennial Artists

2017-12-15T15:06:23Z

Early this year, FotoFest announced its lead curator (Sunil Gupta) and theme (India) for its 2018 Biennial and Gupta gave a talk at Houston’s Asia... Read MorePrince V. Thomas, Ancestors II, gicleé print on metallic paper, 2017 Early this year, FotoFest announced its lead curator (Sunil Gupta) and theme (India) for its 2018 Biennial and Gupta gave a talk at Houston’s Asia Society Texas last month. Now, it has revealed the official FotoFest artists list, reports artnet News. The article reads in part: “The artists, all of Indian origin, are imagining and responding to what India means today in its myriad complexities, given its ancient culture and more recent emancipation from British colonialism,” lead curator Sunil Gupta said in a statement. The participants address a number of important issues facing contemporary India, he noted, including caste and class, gender, sexuality, religion, nationalism, and technological development. Gupta and FotoFest Director Steven Evans traveled throughout India for studio visits and have included a wide variety of photographic and new media artists. One of the very few North American artists is Houston’s own Prince Varughese Thomas. Congratulations! Below is the complete list: Indu Antony (Bangalore, India) Pablo Bartholomew (Delhi, India) Atul Bhalla (Delhi, India) Mohini Chandra (Fiji/UK/Australia) Sheba Chhachhi (Ethiopia/Delhi, India) Serena Chopra (Delhi, India) Tenzing Dakpa (Delhi, India) Sarindar Dhaliwal (Canada/Mumbai, India) Anita Dube (Delhi, India) Gauri Gill (Delhi, India) Chandan Gomes (Delhi, India) Shilpa Gupta (Mumbai, India) Shivani Gupta (Goa, India) Vinit Gupta (Delhi, India) Apoorva Guptay (Mumbai, India) Abhishek Hazra (Bangalore, India) Sohrab Hura (Delhi, India) Manoj Kumar Jain (Delhi, India) Samar Singh Jodha (Dubai, UAE) Ranbir Kaleka (Delhi, India) Rashmi Kaleka (Delhi, India) Jitish Kallat (Mumbai, India) Max Kandhola (Birmingham, UK) Roshini Kempadoo (UK/Guyana) Asif Khan (Delhi, India) Anita Khemka and Imran B. Kokiloo (Delhi, India) Sandip Kuriakose (Delhi, India) Dhruv Malhotra (Delhi, India) Arun Vijai Mathavan (Ahmedabad, India) Annu Palakunnathu Matthew (UK/USA) Uzma Mohsin (Delhi, India) Nandini Valli Muthiah (Chennai, India) Pushpamala N. (Bangalore, India) Dileep Prakash (Delhi, India) Ram Rahman (Delhi, India) Raqs Media Collective (Delhi, India) Anoop Ray (Delhi, India) Vicky Roy (Delhi, India) Vidisha Saini (Delhi, India) Hemant Sareen (Delhi, India) Gigi Scaria (Delhi, India) Mithu Sen (Delhi, India) Rishi Singhal (Gandhinagar, India) Leila Sujir (Montréal, Canada) Ishan Tankha (Delhi, India) Prince Varughese Thomas (Houston, USA) Anusha Yadav (Mumbai, India) The FotoFest Biennial, titled “INDIA: Contemporary Photographic and New Media Art,” runs from March 10–April 22, 2018. [...]



Texas Projects Receive 15 Big NEH Grants

2017-12-14T15:12:16Z

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)—like the NEA, IMLS, and other agencies—is waiting for Congress to pass a federal budget for fiscal year 2018... Read MoreThis is not the NEH logo, but the logo for the Neh! Alexandra restaurant in Johannesburg. The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)—like the NEA, IMLS, and other agencies—is waiting for Congress to pass a federal budget for fiscal year 2018 to know the fate of its funding, reports Hyperallergic. But for now, they are still up and running and have announced its final round of grants for 2017, distributing $12.8 million nationally to 253 projects. Fifteen Texas projects received awards totaling almost $700,000. “The humanities offer us a path toward understanding ourselves, our neighbors, our nation,” Acting NEH Chairman Jon Parrish Peede said in a statement. “These new NEH grants exemplify the agency’s commitment to serving American communities through investing in education initiatives, safeguarding cultural treasures, and illuminating the history and values that define our shared heritage.” Below are the Texas projects and grants. For the list of other states, visit the NEH website.   [...]



Dali’s New Catalogue and the Wines to Drink While Reading It

2017-12-13T14:41:44Z

The Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation has completed the digital catalogue raisonné of Surrealist Salvador Dalí, reports The Art Newspaper. The 17-year project makes more than 1,000... Read MoreDalí at work. FUNDACIÓ GALA-SALVADOR DALÍ, FIGUERES, 2017. Image via Atlas Obscura. The Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation has completed the digital catalogue raisonné of Surrealist Salvador Dalí, reports The Art Newspaper. The 17-year project makes more than 1,000 works between 1910 and 1983—excluding watercolors and drawings—freely available on the English, Spanish, Catalan and French versions of the Foundation’s website. The Foundation is now working on the artist’s graphic works and sculptures, which is complicated by widespread forgeries. GALA-SALVADOR DALÍ, FIGUERES, 2017. Image via Atlas Obscura. Now, what to drink while flipping through the digital pages? Taschen has recently reissued Dalí’s 1977 “wine bible,” The Wines of Gala. Unlike his earlier companion cookbook, Les Dîners de Gala, Dalí didn’t write the text, but created 140-plus illustrations for the publication. But the authors did a pretty good job categorizing wines by emotions and experiences. The “Wines of Generosity” section includes: “You are delicious companions for television-watching and your sweetness can help us get over our disappointment when we miss a grand slam. You are the wines of cruises, of days of depression, of lovers’ rendezvous.” Taschen’s description: “The book explores the many myths of the grape, in texts and sensuous and subversive works by the artist, always true to his maxim: ‘A real connoisseur does not drink wine but tastes of its secrets.’” [...]



Houston Artist Jamal Cyrus Shortlisted for BMW Art Journey Prize in Miami

2017-12-12T20:03:59Z

Art Basel and BMW have announced that Houston artist Jamal Cyrus is on the shortlist for the upcoming BMW Art Journey prize. Cyrus, along with the two other...
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Jamal Cyrus and Inman Gallery owner Kerry Inman

Art Basel and BMW have announced that Houston artist Jamal Cyrus is on the shortlist for the upcoming BMW Art Journey prize. Cyrus, along with the two other shortlisted artists (A.K. Burns and Mariela Scafati), were selected out of the exhibitors in Positions, a section of Art Basel Miami that focuses on solo show of works by emerging artists.

To those of us in Texas, Cyrus is anything but emerging: he was born in Houston in 1973 and received his undergraduate degree from the University of Houston. He’s represented by Inman Gallery (Inman brought Cyrus to this year’s Art Basel Miami) and is a member of the artist collective Otabenga Jones and Associates, with whom he exhibited at the Menil Collection, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, and the 2006 Whitney Biennial. Otabenga Jones and Associates is also included in this year’s Prospect.4 triennial in New Orleans.

The winner of the BMW Art Journey prize will be announced early next year — the award will enable the winner to travel the world in search of inspiration or research for a project. Past winners include Abigail Reynolds, Henning Fehr and Philipp Rühr, and Samson Young.

 




Moody Foundation Steps Up Again with $1M for SMU Arts

2017-12-12T14:38:36Z

A $1 million gift from the Moody Foundation will support renovation of facilities at Dallas’ Southern Methodist University (SMU) Meadows School of the Arts, along...
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Image via SMU.edu

A $1 million gift from the Moody Foundation will support renovation of facilities at Dallas’ Southern Methodist University (SMU) Meadows School of the Arts, along with key education projects, reports SMU News.

The Moody Foundation commitment will support the first phase of a plan to renovate Owen Arts Center, transforming four floors in the north wing of the building for the Divisions of Art, Art History and Creative Computation. The project also will restore the original Meadows Museum and create a new art studio. The Meadows Museum moved from Owen Arts Center to its current location in 2001. To date, SMU has raised $17.1 million of the total $34 million project cost.

“We are pleased to be able to continue the Moody Foundation’s interest in the arts and our longstanding commitment to education research in Texas,” said Frances Moody-Dahlberg, Chairman and Executive Director.

Keep it up!

 




CASP, Artist Residency in Lubbock, Now Open for Applications

2017-12-12T01:05:43Z

For the first time in a bit, Charles Adams Studio Project (or CASP) in Lubbock has opened up applications for its one- and two-year artist...
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For the first time in a bit, Charles Adams Studio Project (or CASP) in Lubbock has opened up applications for its one- and two-year artist residencies, for both recent grads and professionals. The residency is also open to other creative fields, like writing and curatorial practices. There are two spots open for residencies that could start as early as this summer.

CASP is a hub of the Hub City art scene (there is one); these are generous live-work spaces in the center of Lubbock’s cultural arts district, which hosts LHUCA and Charles Adams’ gallery, the 5 & J Gallery, Texas Tech’s satellite gallery, metal and printmaking and clay shops and facilities, and quite a bit more. This is also the center of Lubbock’s (very) popular First Friday Art Trail. Residents do pay some rent on the space, but have access to a lot.

Via CASP:

“The mission of Charles Adams Studio Project (CASP) is to serve as a cornerstone in the Lubbock Arts District through developing and sustaining a working artists’ community that actively engages the public with the arts. CASP pursues this mission in large part through the acquisition and renovation of real property within the Lubbock Cultural Arts District, creating facilities designed to provide artists with studio space, specialized equipment, and exhibition opportunities. CASP promotes an environment of creative exchange and community engagement through public workshops, demonstrations, lectures, tours, weekly studio classes, and First Friday Art Trail events, as well as through the CASP Artist-in-Residence Program, the Helen DeVitt Jones Print Studio Fellowship, and the CASP Arts Administration Fellowship.”

Deadline for applications is Feb. 2. For all the info you need on the spaces, eligibility, and how to apply, please go here.

 

 




Serious About Craftsmanship?

2017-12-11T15:04:20Z

Folks who have spent months handcrafting holiday gifts need to take an evening off and head out to West Texas for a talk by Eric...
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Folks who have spent months handcrafting holiday gifts need to take an evening off and head out to West Texas for a talk by Eric Gorges at the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts this Thursday, December 14, at 5:30pm.

Gorges is host and creator/producer of “A Craftsman’s Legacy,” seen nationally on PBS stations and the PBS Create channel. This guy is very serious about craft. Gorges travels all over to find master craftspeople from potters to welders to weavers. He is also the owner of a custom motorcycle shop, Voodoo Choppers, in Detroit.




Austin Art Icon Judith Sims to Retire

2017-12-10T13:45:51Z

The Contemporary Austin has announced that Judith Sims, the longtime director of education at the organization’s Laguna Gloria art school, will retire at the end of...
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The Contemporary Austin has announced that Judith Sims, the longtime director of education at the organization’s Laguna Gloria art school, will retire at the end of December. A graduate of UT, Sims has lived in Austin for most of her professional life and has worked for all of the iterations (and various namings) of the city’s contemporary art museum: Laguna Gloria Art Museum, Austin Museum of Art, Arthouse and, as it is currently known, The Contemporary Austin.

Sims was first hired as a program director in 1973 by the Laguna Gloria Art Museum’s (LGAM) then-director Jerry Porter. During these early years, Sims brought interdisciplinary programming to the museum and helped support local art initiatives, including the founding of the still-running Austin organization Women & Their Work. She also worked to expand the museum’s art school, which included opening a new building on Laguna Gloria’s campus in 1984.

In the 1980s, when the LGAM’s staff shrunk due to economic hardship in the city, Sims’ job expanded to include curation of film and video events for the museum. This prompted Sims to reach out and partner with Houston-based film organizations including the Southwest Alternate Media Project and Rice Media Center.

When LGAM was renamed the Austin Museum of Art in the 1990s, Sims became the organization’s co-director along with Debbie Gula. In 1999, Sims oversaw the renovation of Laguna Gloria.

After she retires, Sims will be name Laguna Gloria’s art school director emerita and will continue with the museum for a year as a consultant.