Subscribe: fastweb
http://www.fastweb.com/feed/articles.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language:
Tags:
amount  award  college  high school  high  learn  scholarship  scholarships  school  student  students  tax  time  women 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: fastweb

fastweb



fastweb Recent Articles



 



Students Participate in School Walkout for Victims of Florida Shooting

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 09:56:00 -0800

Embed from Getty Images

Enough is enough. That’s the message that Florida students had for lawmakers, the media and anyone else who would listen when they staged a walkout on February 20, nearly a week after the massacre at a Florida high school that left 17 dead and 15 injured.

Students from West Boca High School walked the 11 miles from their school to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the site of the terrible tragedy, to express their solidarity with victims as well as their desire for gun control and stricter school safety laws, according to the Sun Sentinel.

These students were just the first of many from Florida schools that plan to stage walkouts in response to the events that unfolded last week. So far, these events have been supported by administrators and county officials alike.

Tracey Clark, spokeswoman for Broward County public schools told the Sun Sentinel, ““Over the past few days, it has come to our attention that students are promoting and possibly participating in student-led walkouts and other gatherings. [The district] encourages peaceful and lawful protest only.” The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office as well as the Broward County Sheriff also monitored the student walkout to ensure the safety of the students, reports The Huffington Post.

Naturally, high school students, their parents and teachers and administrators are concerned for their safety, and these walkouts and marches are building momentum toward a nationwide event that will support the right to attend school safely, according to March for Our Lives.

The big march will take place in Washington D.C. on March 24; however, there are Sister Marches popping up all over the country. Like the Florida high school walkouts, March for Our Lives is a student-led movement that pledges students “will no longer risk their lives waiting for someone else to take action to stop the epidemic of mass school shootings that has become all too familiar.”

Though the movement is student-led, the youths behind the event are getting some big-name, adult-sized support. Earlier this week, George and Amal Clooney donated $500,000 to the March for Our Lives organizing efforts in the names of their two twin children, with pledges that the famous couple would also attend the national march in Washington D.C., reports CNN. It wasn’t long before Oprah Winfrey matched the donation. Since then, Steven Spielberg and Kate Capshaw have jumped on board.

In the face of tragedy, these students are using their voices to create dialogue about real change that affects the safety of schools all over the country. What’s more, they’re providing a platform and a space to get anyone and everyone involved.

For information on a March for Our Lives event in your area of the country, visit the March for Our Lives Facebook page.




Senators Race to Finalize Dreamer Legislation Before March 5 Deadline

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 07:29:00 -0800

With the March 5 deadline for the end of DACA looming, Dreamers are literally running out of time for a chance to remain in the U.S. However, two Senators are springing into action by presenting a bipartisan bill to Congress to help save Dreamers. John McCain, a Republican from Arizona, and Christopher A. Coons, a Democrat from Delaware, presented a bill on February 5 that would grant permanent legal status to Dreamers as well as heighten security around the U.S. border, according to The Washington Post. Though not the first piece of DACA legislation to be introduced and debated amongst the parties and politicians, McCain and Coons are hoping that their bipartisan approach will provide a clean start to the dialogue and pass the Senate before the deadline. In addition to the Senate bill, the House of Representatives has a similar bipartisan bill with 54 co-sponsors on both sides of the aisle. So what’s the hold up? Some conservatives as well as President Trump do not want to pass DACA legislation without more funding for a border wall, reports The Washington Post. In fact, shortly after the bill was introduced, President Trump tweeted: Any deal on DACA that does not include STRONG border security and the desperately needed WALL is a total waste of time. March 5th is rapidly approaching and the Dems seem not to care about DACA. Make a deal!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 5, 2018 The Senate bill seeks to address the most pressing concerns, writes The Washington Post, which are saving Dreamers and better security at the border. However, the security detailed in the bill is limited to drones and other forms of technology to help monitor the situation. It does not provide funding for Trump’s infamous wall – and that seems to be where the trouble lies. At a time when politics seems so divided, it’s wonderful to see bipartisan support for Dreamers – let’s just hope it’s enough to get the rest of Congress and the President on board before March 5. As always, Fastweb will provide updates on the DACA program, relevant legislation and the fate of Dreamers. UPDATE: Last week, the Senate spent nearly every day debating DACA and border security, finally voting on a bipartisan bill on Thursday, February 15. However, the bill failed along with a White House bill to increase federal deportation authority and end the diversity visa lottery, according to CNN. It is reported by other Senators that the White House is largely responsible for blocking the bipartisan bill. Fortunately, there is still hope for Dreamers. As it stands now, two court cases in California and New York are blocking the end of DACA on March 5, which is supported by President Trump. The Hill reports that "existing beneficiaries are allowed to apply to renew their two-year DACA permit, which shields them from deportation and allows them to work or go to school in the U.S." The same article also states that Speaker Paul Ryan hopes to vote again -- and resolve -- the issue in March. [...]



Scholarships for Women

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 07:28:00 -0800

Did you know that March is Women's History Month? This month, we're celebrating by highlighting unique scholarships for amazing female students. Scholarships for women are offered to celebrate not only the achievements and accomplishments of the many great women who have paved the way to this modern day, but also to further the educational opportunities of young women of future generations. Once of the best ways to honor such extraordinary women of the past is to take advantage of the opportunities awarded for your future - opportunities that, without their hard work, determination and efforts, would not be available to you today. Scholarships are given for all different reasons. For example, some are based on race, ethnicity and, of course, gender. Gender became one of these categories because of the dedication women of the past who fought for equal educational opportunities for women. And, while many still believe there's progress to be made, one of the best ways to do so is by taking your future into your own hands and seizing such opportunities. Many celebrate fierce females by awarding remarkable women in certain fields of study or through various organizations which focus on different aspects, such as women’s studies, the empowerment of women and endowments specifically left to female students. Also, check out more information on financial aid, specifically for female students. It's another great resource for any female looking for helpful ways to pay for school. To help better organize your scholarship search, please note that the following awards for female students are listed according to deadline, with the earliest deadline appearing at the top of the page. Deadlines that vary will appear at the bottom of the list. As deadlines pass, opportunities will be refreshed as often as possible. Here are some great scholarship opportunities that celebrate the true meaning of those who fought for women's equality by enhancing the lives of women through educational opportunities: Women in Leadership Scholarship Deadline: 3/07/18 Available to: High School Seniors through College Freshmen Award Amount: 4 Awards of $2,500 The Women in Leadership Scholarship is available to women who are residents of Nebraska or the Ozark area of Missouri. You must be a senior in high school who is planning to graduate in the spring of 2018 in order to be considered for this award. Academic achievement, leadership qualities, extracurricular activities and work experience are also considered. Learn more about the Women in Leadership Scholarship. Chicana/ Latina Foundation Scholarship Program Deadline: 3/31/18 Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: 35 Awards of $1,500 The Chicana/ Latina Foundation Scholarship Program is open to women of Chicana / Latina heritage who reside and attend school in select counties in Northern California. Undergraduate students must have completed 12 semester units and have a minimum GPA of 2.5 to be considered for this award. Graduate students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. Learn more about the Chicana/ Latina Foundation Scholarship Program . The Future is Female Scholarship Deadline: 6/29/18 Available to: Female students; High School Seniors through Graduate Students, Year 5 Award Amount: $3,000 The Future is Female Scholarship is available to female students. You must be a U.S. citizen and have a minimum 3.0 GPA to be eligible for this award. You must also answer five short essay questions. Learn more about the The Future is Female Scholarship. Jeannette Rankin Foundation Scholarship Deadline: Varies Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: Varies The Jeannette Rankin Foundation Scholarship is available to female students who are age 35 or older. You must be a low - income student pursuing a technical / vocational education, associate's degree, or first bachelor's degree at a regionally or ACICS accredited school to be eligible for this award. Learn more about the[...]



Get Lucky with Scholarships

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 07:10:00 -0800

Are you ready to get lucky? It doesn’t just take luck, though, it take effort in the forms of applications, essays, videos and more. Remember, the more you apply, the better your chances that your scholarship luck will change. We’ve highlighted great scholarship opportunities for you to test your luck, show off your talents and, hopefully, win a scholarship! Create-a-Greeting Card Scholarship Deadline: 3/01/18 Available to: Ages 14 and Older Award Amount: $10,000 The Create-A-Greeting Card Scholarship Contest is open to currently enrolled high school and college students in the United States. To enter, you must design a holiday, get well, or birthday greeting card and submit your work to be judged. Your photo, art, or graphics submitted must be your own original work and you must be at least 14 years of age to be eligible for this award. Get more information on the Create-a-Greeting Card Scholarship . Doodle 4 Google Contest Deadline: 3/02/18 Available to: Maximum Age 18 years Award Amount: 5 Awards from $5,000 to $30,000 The Doodle 4 Google Contest is open to students in grades K through 12. To enter, you must create a Google doodle that tells the world “What I see for the future.” Get more information on the Doodle 4 Google Contest . AFSA High School Essay Contest Deadline: 3/15/2018 Available to: High School Freshmen through High School Seniors Award Amount: $2,500 The AFSA High School Essay Contest is open to high school students. To be considered, in a 1,000 - to 1250 - word essay, you must identify two cases - one you deem successful and one you deem unsuccessful - where the U.S. pursued an integrated approach to build peace in a conflict - affected country. Learn more about the AFSA High School Essay Contest . Live Deliberately Essay Contest Deadline: 3/15/18 Available to: Ages 13-21 Years Award Amount: 3 Awards of $250 The Live Deliberately Essay Contest is open to all students aged 14 - 21. You must submit an essay of no more than 750 words based on the prompts listed on the sponsor's website. This year's prompts will ask you to consider a time in your life when you pursued a path that was “narrow and crooked,” but felt like it was the right path for you. In what ways are/were you able to, as Thoreau advises, walk that path with “love and reverence?” How has navigating that path shaped you into the person you are becoming? Learn more about the Live Deliberately Essay Contest . $2,500 Easy Scholarship: Make a Sign and Fame a Friend! Deadline: 3/15/18 Available to: Maximum Age 25 Years Award Amount: 2 Awards of $2,500 You can win an easy $2,500 scholarship by making a sign to encourage your friends to follow their dreams. Even better, your friend will ALSO be entered to win a $2,500 scholarship. Simply make a sign, upload a photo of your friend with the sign, and you’ll both automatically enter to EACH win $2,500 scholarships. Win-win! Learn more about the $2,500 Easy Scholarship: Make a Sign and Fame a Friend!. Live Más Scholarship Deadline: 3/18/18 Available to: Ages 16-24 Award Amount: 100 Awards from $5,000 to $25,000 The Live Más Scholarship is available to innovators, creators, and dreamers between the ages of 16 and 24. To be considered, you must create and submit a video of up to two minutes in length that tells the story of your life's passion. Learn more about the Live Más Scholarship. Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship Deadline: 4/01/2018 Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: 6 Awards from $1,000 - $5,000 The Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship is available to high school juniors and seniors and full-time undergraduate students. To be considered, you must create a 25 or 55 second video that discourages distracted driving, specifically texting while driving. Learn more about the Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship . Project Yellow Light Radio Scholarship Deadline: 4/01/2018 Available to: Colleg[...]



Industries in Need of Women + Scholarships for Each

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 10:19:00 -0800

Some careers tend to be male-dominated, but that’s about to change. At least in the case of the below industries, which are now hiring more female employees than ever. In fact, they’re actively seeking females to join the fields! Hire More Women In Tech states that “companies in the bottom quartile both for gender and for ethnicity and race are statistically less likely to achieve above-average financial returns than the average companies in the data set (that is, bottom-quartile companies are lagging rather than merely not leading).” According to The Washington Post and NPR, these are the industries that females may want to look into, because they’re going out of their way to recruit women and create more diverse workplaces. Check out fields in need of females and a scholarship within each: Construction OSHA reports that the number of women in construction has increased substantially since 1985. Yet, women represent only 9% of the construction workforce. Over 800,000 women are currently employed in every area of construction, from managerial and administrative to laborers, electricians and plumbers, according to OSHA. Check out this scholarship within the field: National Association of Women in Construction Scholarship Deadline: Varies Available to: College Juniors through College Seniors Award Amount: Varies The National Association of Women in Construction Scholarship is available to female junior and senior students at the University of New Hampshire. You must be interested in a construction-related field to be eligible for this award. Learn more about the National Association of Women in Construction Scholarship. Trucking Back in the day, females likely stayed away from a career within the trucking industry because it took time away from their families. However, this is changing, with the field growing from 4.5% women to 6% in just five years, states CNBC. What’s more, truck companies want to hire more women. The options for women within the field, in driving positions as well as dispatch, management, sales, and other jobs are more open than ever before – with women earning salaries that rival their male counterparts. Check out this scholarship within the field: Lawrence Transportation Systems Scholarship Deadline: 4/15/18 Available to: College Freshmen through College Sophomores Award Amount: $500 The Lawrence Transportation Systems Scholarship is available to students at Blue Ridge Community College. You must be a resident of Staunton, Waynesboro or Augusta County and have a minimum GPA of 2.0 to be eligible for this award. Selection is based on good academic standing and financial need. Get more information on the Lawrence Transportation Systems Scholarship. Law Enforcement Any person, male or female, who is dedicated and hard-working would be an asset within the law enforcement field. However, the field is male-dominated and has been for some time – the U.S. Department of Justice reports that female police officers only account for about 13 percent of America’s police force. However, there is much discussion surrounding the strong advantages to having both genders represented within law enforcement. As a result, many females looking to become police officers likely have careers awaiting them – they just need to apply. Check out this scholarship within the field: Joseph Rebovich Memorial Scholarship Deadline: Varies Available to: College Freshmen through College Sophomores Award Amount: $500 The Joseph Rebovich Memorial Scholarship is open to students at Mesabi Range Community and Technical College, Virginia Campus. You must be majoring in law enforcement, have a minimum 3.0 GPA, and be involved in school and community activities to be eligible for this award. Get more information on the Joseph Rebovich Memorial Scholarship. Manufacturing Females are valued within the manufacturing industry, even though they currently make up a third of the field, [...]



Top 5 Jobs with the Widest Gender Pay Gap

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 12:58:00 -0800

(image)

Equal pay for equal work: It’s a no-brainer, right? Apparently, it’s not – at least if we’re judging by what’s going on with women’s wages across the nation.

According to Pew Research Center, women earned just 83% of what men earned according to their most recent data.

While the wage gap has improved within the last few decades, progress is slowing down. In fact, a report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research details how progress in narrowing the gender pay gap as well as gender integration of occupations has plateaued within the past decade.

The underlying causes vary from industry and occupational differences to the unexplained. Industry differences and occupational differences are the main drivers with the most potential effect on the gender wage gap.

It’s important to note that aspects like education and union membership don’t even factor into this wage gap – in fact, they have an adverse effect on the gap. That means that women applying for the same jobs are usually equally or more educated and qualified than their male counterparts.

While it may take a while to resolve the issue all together, it can be helpful for women to determine which industries are more likely to have broader pay gaps between genders.

Take a look at the top five jobs with the widest gender pay gaps, according to Monster:

5. Chief Executive Officer

Difference in pay between genders: 15%

4. Portfolio Manager

Difference in pay between genders: 15%

3. Human Resources Recruiting Director

Difference in pay between genders: 20%

2. Real Estate Broker

Difference in pay between genders: 23%

1. Sales Consultant

Difference in pay between genders: 27%

Though there are those industries in which women do not currently make the same as their male counterparts, there are jobs in which women actually make more or equal to what men make in what are actually pretty male-dominated fields. Monster highlights a few of these:

1. Systems Engineer

Female Median Annual Salary: $72,300

Male Median Annual Salary: 71,500

2. Electrical Engineer

Female Median Annual Salary: $66,000

Male Median Annual Salary: $66,000

3. Mechanical Engineer

Female Median Annual Salary: $61,000

Male Median Annual Salary: $60,400

4. Videographer

Female Median Annual Salary: $39,300

Male Median Annual Salary: $38,800

5. Computer Repair Technician

Female Median Annual Salary: $31,500

Male Median Annual Salary: $31,500

While rankings and lists are fun to read, it’s important to remember that this is an average representation. That means that not all jobs within industries listed above will have a significant wage gap in every position throughout the country. However, it’s beneficial for women in various industries to become educated on such issues in order to demand equal pay from their employers.




Unique, Silly & Fun Scholarships

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 07:38:00 -0800

Weird. Wacky. Outlandish. Some of the most ridiculous things in life are what you take notice of. The same goes with scholarships. Some of the best are also some of the silliest, weirdest, oddball awards that often get a "I can get an award for what?!" type of reaction. This is exactly why they’re worth celebrating. Here are some of Fastweb’s all-time favorite take-notice scholarships. These fall under the silly, outlandish and how’d-they-come-up-with-that? category of scholarship opportunities that may make you think or, perhaps, look twice. They make you wonder exactly who is applying for these scholarships and how on earth can you meet them? But, at the end of the day, a scholarship is a scholarship! And these are nothing short of awesome. You never know, one of the following awards could be perfect for you! If so, you are our hero. Project Yellow Light Radio Scholarship Deadline: 4/01/2018 Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: 2 Awards of $2,000 The Project Yellow Light Radio Scholarship is available to high school juniors and seniors and full - time undergraduate students. To be considered, you must record a radio recording of exactly 20 seconds that discourages distracted driving, specifically texting while driving. Learn more about the Project Yellow Light Radio Scholarship . Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship Deadline: 4/01/2018 Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: 6 Awards from $1,000 - $5,000 The Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship is available to high school juniors and seniors and full - time undergraduate students. To be considered, you must create a 25 or 55 second video that discourages distracted driving, specifically texting while driving. Learn more about the Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship . Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest Deadline: 4/02/2018 Available to: High School Juniors through College Seniors Award Amount: 3 Awards of $1,000 The Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest is available to high school juniors, seniors and full-time college students. You must submit a 30 to 60 second video on YouTube that will convince others not to text and drive in order to be considered for this award. Learn more about the Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest . E-Waste Scholarship Deadline: 4/30/2018 Available to: High School Freshmen through Graduate Students, Year 5 Award Amount: $1,000 The E-waste Scholarship is available to high school, undergraduate or graduate students. You must submit a short statement that completes the sentence "The most important reason to care about e-waste is..." and be U.S. citizen or legal resident to qualify for this award. Learn more about the E-Waste Scholarship. Paradigm Challenge Deadline: 5/01/2018 Available to: Maximum Age 18 Years Award Amount: 100 Awards from $500 - $100,000 The Paradigm Challenge is open to students up to the age of 18. You may work in a team or alone in creating an original and creative way to reduce waste in homes, schools, communities, and / or around the world. Entries may come in the form of posters, videos, inventions, messages, community events, websites, mobile apps, or anything else that will help save lives. Additionally, you must submit a brief statement of your idea (140 characters or less) in order to qualify for this award. Learn more about the Paradigm Challenge . Andrew Flusche Scholarship Contest Deadline: 6/30/2018 Available to: High School Seniors through Graduate Students, Year 5 Award Amount: $500 The Andrew Flusche Scholarship Contest is available to high school seniors and students currently enrolled in a college or university. You must create a public service advertisement video (PSA) which portrays the correct way of interacting with a police officer during a traffic stop, or any other enc[...]



Discovering the Benefits of Extracurricular Activities

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 12:57:00 -0800

(image)

Extracurricular activities are important for your college applications, as well as rounding out your high school experience. Read on to discover the benefits and potential options for you to participate in.

Things you can do after school

Developing a routine of going to school, doing homework, sleeping, and starting over can be mind-numbing. But don't fear, there is an easy fix for this. Actually, there are many easy fixes. They come in the forms of after school activities. These activities are everywhere, they are offered by the school, as well as other places in your community.

Why should I participate?

Schoolwork can become very stressful and at times, you need something to get it off your mind. Extracurricular activities also look good to colleges. They like to know that you are doing things other than schoolwork.

Clubs

The most obvious extracurricular activity is a club. Most high schools offer a wide variety of clubs. They can range anywhere from a robotics club to a film club. These clubs can give you a fun alternative to things you learn in school. They can also be a great way to make new friends who have the same interests as you. Get out of your comfort zone and join a club that peaks your interest. There are also some ways to form clubs at your school. Clubs such as the Beta club and National Honors Societies looks very good on college applications. They require you to work very hard at your studies but also offer cool group events.

Sports

Another popular afterschool activity is sports. Sports can require a lot of work but can also be very rewarding. However, some schools often have good sports teams, making it difficult to get a spot. Another option is to join a rec league. Whether you join by yourself or with a couple of friends, it can be very fun. Also, some sports teams are no cuts meaning you will make the team no matter what. Sports can be a great way to get your mind off school while also staying in shape.

The School Play

Doing theatre can also be very fun. It takes talent to star in a high school play. But if you're just looking for some fun, playing an extra or working backstage is for you. There are normally lots of rehearsals but they can get you very close with a nice group of people.

Get a Job

A job is good for many reasons. One reason is the money. If you need money to go out with friends, or if you just want to start a college fund, getting a job can provide you with income. Another very important part of a job is that it gives you experience at a young age. Even working at a fast food restaurant can be counted as experience. Also, depending on where you decide to work, you will develop connections that can possibly help you find work after college.

Have Fun

One of the most important things in life is to enjoy your high school years while they last. After high school, you go to college, then become part of the working class. These extracurricular activities can help you enjoy high school while also helping you prepare for your fu




Waiting to Hear about College Decisions

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 12:48:00 -0800

It’s that time of the year again - a period of anxiousness, tenseness, nervousness, and restlessness. When all of these come together, that only means it’s the waiting period to hear back from college admissions. The applications have been sent, and now it’s waiting time. No doubt this is an extremely nerve wracking time for not just students, but parents and application readers. What’s a stressed out student to do during times like these? Here are a few tips to get you through the next few grueling months. Remind yourself that you’ve done all you can. This is perhaps the most important piece of advice to remember! Up until now, you’ve prepared so much by keeping up your grades and participating in extracurriculars, to make sure that your academic profile is top notch. You’ve filled out form after form after form. You’ve asked for teacher recommendations. You’ve stayed up into the late hours of the night, brainstorming creative hooks to begin your essays. Finally, you’ve submitted all you have, knowing that it’s a true representation of who you are as a student. And now, it’s time to let a complete stranger decide the next stage of your life. As unsettling as it may seem, that’s the truth. You’ve already done your part. It’s time to let someone else do theirs. So as you go through these next few months, it’s okay to feel nervous about what’s to come - but just know that you’ve done what you can and that’s really all you can ask for at this point. Stay up to date. Most, if not all colleges have some way for you to check your application. This is most always done online. While you shouldn’t check every hour, it’s a good idea to at least check in once a week, so see the status. This should provide you some brief bursts of sanity in knowing that your application has gotten to where it needs to be. Prepare yourself. Whether you get in to the college of your choice or not, it’s absolutely vital that you have all the resources you need for the next year of your life. In these next few months, make sure to take some time to apply for scholarships and the FAFSA. Even if you’ve already done this, it doesn’t hurt to apply for more! Remember, the more you apply for, the more chances you have of getting free money for college! If worst comes to worse and you don’t get accepted, at least you’ll have plenty of scholarships to get you to wherever you choose to go. And if you to get accepted - congratulations! - and you also have some extra money just in case. Focus on school. This is pretty self-evident, but what’s also pretty self-evident is senioritis - and as graduation draws nearer, so does this sickness! Keep up with your assignments, start early on your projects, and study for your tests. It will be hard to do, especially at around this time, but it is worth it. This will not only keep you occupied with something that will help you greatly in the future, but it will also keep your mind off of the anxiousness associated with waiting to hear back from admissions. Find time for you. No doubt these next few months will be very stressful. Even if you’re constantly checking your applications status, applying for scholarships or keeping busy with school, there’s still going to be those nagging thoughts in your head. You’re going to worry, regardless of how busy you keep yourself. A good way to get through this is to focus your nervous energy on something you enjoy. Whether that be going for a jog, playing an instrument, writing poetry, playing video games or hanging out with friends, always put aside some time to do something that gives you great satisfaction and happiness. You’ll come out of it with a better mindset and a positive outlook. Talk it out. Often the best way to get a grasp of our feelings is to talk it out with ot[...]



10+ College Scholarships for Anyone & Everyone

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 06:15:00 -0800

It's a common misconception that scholarships are only for certain students. Don't believe this myth! In reality, unique situations may qualify certain students for more scholarships, however, there are enough scholarships to go around. In fact, every student qualifies for at least one scholarship (and likely many more than that). It's true: there are scholarships for every race, gender, ethnicity, economic status, etc. - the list goes on and on. Yes, there are scholarships for everyone and we've created a list to prove it to you: Doodle 4 Google Contest Deadline: 3/02/18 Available to: Maximum Age 18 years Award Amount: 5 Awards from $5,000 to $30,000 The Doodle 4 Google Contest is open to students in grades K through 12. To enter, you must create a Google doodle that tells the world “What I see for the future.” Get more information on the Doodle 4 Google Contest . $2,500 Easy Scholarship: Make a Sign and Fame a Friend! Deadline: 3/15/18 Available to: Maximum Age 25 Years Award Amount: 2 Awards of $2,500 You can win an easy $2,500 scholarship by making a sign to encourage your friends to follow their dreams. Even better, your friend will ALSO be entered to win a $2,500 scholarship. Simply make a sign, upload a photo of your friend with the sign, and you’ll both automatically enter to EACH win $2,500 scholarships. Win-win! Learn more about the $2,500 Easy Scholarship: Make a Sign and Fame a Friend!. ScholarshipPoints $10,000 Scholarship Deadline: 3/15/2018 Available to: High School Juniors through Graduate Student, Year 5 Award Amount: $10,000 ScholarshipPoints will award a $10,000 scholarship to one lucky member this quarter. All you have to do to become eligible is become a ScholarshipPoints member and log in. It's simple, fun, and completely free! Learn more about the ScholarshipPoints $10,000 Scholarship. Live Más Scholarship Deadline: 3/18/18 Available to: Ages 16-24 Award Amount: 100 Awards from $5,000 to $25,000 The Live Más Scholarship is available to innovators, creators, and dreamers between the ages of 16 and 24. To be considered, you must create and submit a video of up to two minutes in length that tells the story of your life's passion. Learn more about the Live Más Scholarship. Project Yellow Light Radio Scholarship Deadline: 4/01/2018 Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: 2 Awards of $2,000 The Project Yellow Light Radio Scholarship is available to high school juniors and seniors and full - time undergraduate students. To be considered, you must record a radio recording of exactly 20 seconds that discourages distracted driving, specifically texting while driving. Learn more about the Project Yellow Light Radio Scholarship . Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship Deadline: 4/01/2018 Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: 6 Awards from $1,000 - $5,000 The Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship is available to high school juniors and seniors and full - time undergraduate students. To be considered, you must create a 25 or 55 second video that discourages distracted driving, specifically texting while driving. Learn more about the Project Yellow Light Video Contest Scholarship . Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest Deadline: 4/02/2018 Available to: High School Juniors through College Seniors Award Amount: 3 Awards of $1,000 The Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest is available to high school juniors, seniors and full-time college students. You must submit a 30 to 60 second video on YouTube that will convince others not to text and drive in order to be considered for this award. Learn more about the Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest . E-Waste Scholarship Deadline: 4/30/2018 Available to: High Scho[...]



The Dos and Don'ts of Tax Season for Students

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 18:38:00 -0800

(image)

This year, you don’t just have to worry about filing your taxes correctly – you have to worry about getting the best financial aid deal out of your taxes. No pressure – right?

It doesn’t have to be overwhelming or confusing; we’ve got you covered. Conquer your taxes – and make the results work to your advantage – with our do’s and don’ts of tax season.

1. Do know the difference between tax-free and tax-exempt scholarships. Scholarships fall into two categories: tax-free and not tax-free. Before you apply, ask the scholarship provider about their tax status. You don’t want to win a scholarship only to lose some of that money in paying taxes. Unless it’s more than worth it, of course.

2. Do take advantage of tax credits. There are two tax credits available to students and their families filing their taxes: the American Opportunity and Lifetime Learning tax credits. Eligible students can claim up to $2,500 with the American Opportunity tax credit; and if the tax credit pays your tax down to zero, you can have 40% of the remaining amount of the credit – up to $1,000 – refunded to you. The Lifetime Learning tax credit is worth up to $2,000, and there is no limit to how many years it can be claimed.

3. Don’t default on your student loans. Defaulting on your student loans has far-reaching ramifications, one of which is no more tax refunds. The federal government has the right to garnish your tax refund for each year you’re in default.

4. Do deduct your loan interest. As a borrower, you are eligible to deduct up to $2,500 on qualified student loans for interest paid. To be eligible, borrowers must make less than $80,000 a year – or $160,000 if married and filing jointly.

5. Do your research on student loan forgiveness and taxability. Student loan forgiveness is a huge benefit for borrowers working in certain fields. After 10 years – more of less depending on the type of service – student borrowers can have the remaining balance of their loans forgiven. However, it comes at a cost. If your student loans are forgiven, you’ll have to pay taxes on the remaining balance paid.

6. Don’t lie on your taxes. Intentional or not, mistakes on your taxes don’t just land you on the IRS watch list. They will affect your financial aid. The FAFSA asks for financial information from the prior prior tax year, meaning you could miss out completely if your taxes are pulled for review.

Filing your taxes plays a large role in formulating future financial aid. Be smart about the process, take your time and double check your financial information.

For more tax help, click here.




Internships & Fellowships for Women

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 09:52:00 -0800

March is the perfect time to highlight internship and fellowship opportunities for women – it is Women’s History Month, after all. Internships and fellowships, specifically for women, enhance the lives of females through unique educational opportunities. Here are some great internship and fellowship opportunities celebrating accomplished females: Internships for Women Woman Made Gallery Graphic Design Internship Ages: College Freshmen through College Seniors Provided by the Woman Made Gallery, the Graphic Design Internship is available to students show focus on one specific area such as communications, research, design, and artisan gallery. You must be proficient with Photoshop or similar design software; Adobe Illustrator and InDesign a plus to be considered for this position. Photographers especially welcome. As an intern, you will be responsible for numerous projects related to the Woman Made’s public relations. Learn more information about the Woman Made Gallery Graphic Design Internship. Institute for Women's Policy Research Internship Ages: Female College Freshmen through College Seniors The Institute for Women's Policy Research Internship is available to students with an interest in women-oriented policy research. In your work you will provide administrative and research support to Institute researchers through: literature reviews, data collection, designing charts, answering phones and filing. You must have strong organization skills, good interpersonal skills, interest in policy research and women's issues and experience with statistics, economics or social science through coursework to qualify for this position. Learn more information about the Institute for Women's Policy Research Internship. Women Airforce Service Pilots Internship Ages: College Freshmen through Graduate Students, Year 5 The Women Airforce Service Pilots Internship is available to female students pursuing opportunities for women’s aviation studies. You must have strong verbal and written skills and the ability to work independently and in groups. Also, you must demonstrate ability to deal effectively, tactfully and pleasantly with volunteers, staff, program participants and Museum visitors. Additionally, you must be a current EAA member or be recommended by an EAA member to qualify for this award. Interns must be at least 18 years of age by the start of the internship. Learn more information about the Women Airforce Service Pilots Internship . Ms. Magazine Internship Ages: Female College Freshmen through College Seniors Provided by Feminist Majority, the Ms. Magazine Editorial Internship is open to undergraduate female students to work with the editorial staff at Ms. Magazine's West Coast Office. You must be resourceful and have excellent research and writing skills to qualify for this award. Interns help gather and fact-check information, work on specific office projects, and participate in creating the magazine's National News section. To apply, mail or e-mail a cover letter, resume, writing sample (journalistic writing preferred), and two letters of recommendation or two references. Learn more information about the Ms. Magazine Internship. Institute for Women's Policy Research Communications Internship Ages: Female College Freshmen through College Seniors The Institute for Women's Policy Research Communications Internship is available to students with an interest in women-oriented policy research. In your work you will provide administrative and editorial support to the communications team. You will: assist with proofreading, article clipping, assist with media outreach, layout and design of fact sheets and research briefs as well as web site maintenance. You must be a detail-oriented individu[...]



How to Score a Fulbright Scholarship

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 09:43:00 -0800

Whether you dream of studying anthropology in Ghana or business in Germany, one scholarship can make it possible. Recent college graduates, graduate students and doctoral candidates with an interest in international travel and a passion for a field of study should take a look at the Fulbright Student Scholarship. Supported by the U.S. Department of State and administered by the Institute for International Education (IIE), the Fulbright Student Scholarship is the largest international exchange program for U.S. students. Awards are available in a variety of disciplines although most countries also have grants that allow applicants to shape their own projects. Projects may include university coursework, field and library research, teaching English, or a combination of these areas. The Fulbright began in 1946 from a proposal by Sen. J. William Fulbright to promote “mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries around the world.” The program awards more than 8,000 grants annually and operates in 155 countries worldwide. Fulbright Scholarship Acceptance Rate Generally, the acceptance rate for Fulbright Scholarships is 20%, although it does vary year by year but only by a few percentage points. To be eligible for the Fulbright Student Scholarship: Students must be U.S. citizens and in good health. Applicants must be a graduating college senior, BS/BA degree holder, or a master’s or doctoral degree candidate. Some Fulbright positions require proficiency in the language of the country where the project will take place. Preference is given to students who have not resided or studied for longer than six months in the country to which they are applying. Fulbright Scholarship GPA The Fulbright Scholarship does not require a certain GPA for eligibility. However, many colleges may have GPA requirements for their applicants to the Fulbright Program. With thousands of applicants each year, the Fulbright is a competitive award. If you are serious about winning, get started on your application early. For application advice, attend an IIE guidance session, which are held around the country. Talk with a local Fulbright program advisor and your academic advisor as you work on your proposal. When preparing your Fulbright proposal, consider: With whom do you propose to work? What is unique, new or exciting about your project? Where will you study or research? Why is it important to go abroad to carry out your project? Why do you want to do it? How will your project help further your academic or professional development? The Fulbright program selects winners based on: academic/professional record, language preparation, feasibility of the proposed project, personal qualifications, and extent to which the project will further the Fulbright aim of promoting mutual understanding among nations. Fulbright Application Timeline Students in college should start the process during the spring semester of their junior year. Between February and September, there are information sessions, webinars and campus events that students can attend in order to receive more info[...]



"Free" Money & Taxes

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 09:11:00 -0800

(image)

Do you know the difference between a scholarships, grant and fellowship?

Are you aware of the tax statuses of scholarships, grant and fellowship funding?

It’s important to know the differences between the types of award funding, along with any government regulations applied to student award funds.

Luckily, the majority of scholarships, fellowships and grants have built-in stipulations that require the funds to be applied to qualified expenses.

However, like it or not, some so-called “free money” is taxable and it’s important for students to understand the differences between the types of awards, as well as the qualifications for taxation.

First, the differences between the types of awards: [gate]

Scholarships are funds gifted to students studying for a degree, usually to be applied towards the student’s educational endeavors.

Scholarships do not require repayment by the student, though some sort of an application process is usually necessary.

There are scholarships for students of all ages – from kindergarten through graduate school.

Grants are usually funds awarded to students deemed eligible by specific criteria, many based on financial-need and are usually given by government entities.

Grants usually don’t require repayment by the student.

Fellowships are funds given to benefit a student’s studies or research endeavors.

All of the above options are generally considered to be “free money,” which is true – as long as it’s tax exempt.

It’s important to remember that such awarded funds are only tax exempt if the student is studying towards a degree within an eligible educational institution.

If the award recipient is not in pursuit of a degree, the award funds can be taxable.

Both athletic and academic scholarships are, in fact, taxable unless otherwise exempt for other reasons.

It also matters what the award money is spent on. There are qualified and unqualified expenses, when it comes to taxable funding.

Qualified expenses include tuition, fees, equipment such as books and supplies that are required by the educational institution.

Unqualified expenses include room and board, travel, research, equipment and supplies that are not required by the education institution.

Even if you have to work to earn the funding, such as with a fellowship, your funding is likely still liable to be taxed.

It’s essential to keep documentation and records of any scholarships, grants or fellowships given as funding for your educational endeavors.

Even if you aren't required to pay taxes on your awards, you should always claim them on your federal income tax return since schools aren't required to report them unless some sort of service is performed for the funding.

To learn more about what is or is not eligible, read Should I Claim Scholarships & Other Awards on My Taxes?

Always know your options in terms of funding - but be aware of the rules and regulations that accompany “free money.”

Do you think it’s wrong for the government to tax educational funding?




All About Tax Filing

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 08:47:00 -0800

(image)

Starting to feel completely confused about the tax-filing process?

Don't worry, you're not alone and we certainly don't blame you! After all, it is absolutely confusing!

They say “nothing is certain but death and taxes,” but, at Fastweb, we beg to differ.

We’re certain that Fastweb will always have you prepared with the necessary information to do things, like filing taxes for the first time.

The good news is that Fastweb has all the tax filing information that you'll need.

We're always here to help with easy to understand, reader-friendly information to do things, like filing taxes for the first time or discovering if your scholarship is considered taxable.

So, if you find yourself in a pickle on or before the 15th, start by looking to the helpful articles below to guide you.

The following top three articles can help you decipher your how-to's of tax-filing.

Utilize these as your top references when it comes to your award questions regarding taxes:

First-Time Tax Filing Explained

Should I Claim Scholarships & Other Awards on My Taxes?

“Free” Money & Taxes

Not anticipating a big tax refund? Fastweb has plenty of ways for you get extra money to pay for school!




First Time Tax Filing Explained

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 08:45:00 -0800

April 15th is fast approaching— the nationally dreaded tax day. But don’t despair. While this may represent a challenge if it’s your first time filing, it can also pay off big if you wind up with a refund. The long and short of it is, you won’t know if you’re owed a refund until you file. But completing the whole process is relatively simple and takes only a few hours. Here’s how to go about it in the easiest way possible. *Get Your Stuff Together* Here’s what you’ll need: *W-2 Form*: The most important form you’ll need is a W-2 from your employer. This is the form that tells the IRS where you worked, how much you earned, how much you paid in taxes and more. Collect a W-2 from each job you’ve had over the last year. Note: Your employer is required to send your W-2 by the end of January, so if you haven’t received it, hit up your HR department immediately. *1098-E Form*: You’re officially in the “real world” now, and unfortunately for many, that means paying your student loans. But there’s some good news. You can write off a certain amount of the interest you’ve paid on your student loans in the past year. A form 1098-E will show the IRS exactly how much you’ve paid in interest on your student loans. *Your Tuition Receipt*: Bonus: You can also write off up to $4,000 in education expenses spent over the last year—including tuition (even if you’ve already written of the student loan interest you’ve used to pay for it! Score!) So, if you’ve recently graduated, don’t miss out on this one. *Misc. receipts and other documentation* : If you work from home, travel for your job, or have dependents, you’ll be able to lower your tax bill, but you’ll need documentation to prove it. For example, did you know that if you’ve worked from home, you can write off a portion of your rent and utility bills? Save all receipts, they will come in handy in these cases. Also, if you have a child or are married, and want to file jointly or claim head of household, you’ll need the social security numbers of your “dependants”. *1040EZ, 1040, 1040A Tax Forms or Website for Electronic Filing* : You can either pick up for the forms from local places like the library, or you can file online electronically, which is the greenest, easiest and most efficient way to file. There are a number of sites that will file simple tax returns for free or charge a minimal fee. Some popular sites are TurboTax, and TaxACT. You can also file for free electronically on the IRS’ website . If it’s your first time, and you have deductions (like student loan interest, etc) you may want to use a commercial site, which is more intuitive for inexperienced tax filers and can help you find the most deductions that you qualify for. *How it works* Once you’ve got everything together, you can start filling out the forms. As complicated as the U.S. tax code is, the 1040EZ – the form most first timers will use to file—is just what its name implies: easy. Once you have your forms, you simply input the information from your W-2s into the appropriate sections. To make matters even more fool proof, each box is labeled with a corresponding number. Commercial sites like TurboTax will ask for your information and input it for you, making the process even smoother if you decide to use them. They will also alert you when you may qualify for a deduction—which means more money in your pocket that you may have missed on your own. But again, they are only worth paying for if you have deductions. *Good to Know:* * If this is your first time filing your taxes, be sure to chat with your parents or a[...]



Scholarships for Women Returning to College

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 06:00:00 -0800

More education is always a good idea. And, regardless of the reasoning behind your decision to take a break from school or to return, there are scholarships to help you hop back on the educational track. These organizations, schools and programs help support women who have the goal of returning to college. If you’re a non-traditional or returning female student, these scholarships can help you achieve your educational goals: Jeannette Rankin Foundation Scholarship Deadline: Varies Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: Varies The Jeannette Rankin Foundation Scholarship is available to female students who are age 35 or older. You must be a low - income student pursuing a technical / vocational education, associate's degree, or first bachelor's degree at a regionally or ACICS accredited school to be eligible for this award. Learn more about the Jeannette Rankin Foundation Scholarship. "Salute to Mothers" Scholarship Deadline: Varies Available to: Females, College Freshmen through College Sophomores Award Amount: $1,000 The "Salute to Mothers" Scholarship is available to female students at Bucks County Community College. You must be supporting at least one child while attending BCCC, have a minimum 3.0 GPA, and be enrolled in at least six credit hours to be eligible for this award. Learn more about the "Salute to Mothers" Scholarship. Nancy Yates Eby Scholarship Deadline: Varies Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: Varies The Nancy Yates Eby Scholarship is available to female students attending Baker College of Flint. You must be a single mother and have a minimum 3.0 GPA to be eligible for this award. Preference is given to marketing majors. Learn more about the Nancy Yates Eby Scholarship. Dr. Blanca Moore-Velez Woman of Substance Scholarship Deadline: Varies Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: Varies The Dr. Blanca Moore-Velez Woman of Substance Scholarship is available to African - American female undergraduate students. You must be at least 35 years of age and have a minimum 3.0 GPA to be eligible for this award. You must also submit a 500 - word essay on the following topic: "Challenges to the Mature Student and How I Overcame Them." Learn more about the Dr. Blanca Moore-Velez Woman of Substance Scholarship. P.E.O. Program for Continuing Education Deadline: Varies Available to: College Juniors through Graduate Students, Year 3 Award Amount: $2,000 The P.E.O. Program for Continuing Education is available to female students in the United States and Canada. You must be a citizen of the US or Canada and attend a college or university in the US or Canada. You must be within 24 months of completing your educational goal and have spent at least 24 consecutive months as a non-student during your adult life to be eligible for this award. Students in doctoral and professional degree programs are not eligible. Learn more information about the P.E.O. Program for Continuing Education. Women of Oakland University Critical Difference Scholarship Deadline: Varies Available to: College Freshmen through College Seniors Award Amount: $1,500 The Women of Oakland University Critical Difference Scholarship is available to students at Oakland University who are single heads of households and have had their education interrupted for at least one year. You must have earned at least 16 credits at the university level and have a minimum 2.5 GPA to be eligible for this award. Learn more about the Women of Oakland University Critical Difference Scholarship. Center for the Education of[...]



What’s a “Good” Score on the ACT, Anyway?

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 14:37:00 -0800

Every student wants to achieve a “good” score on the ACT, but does everyone know what a “good” score is defined as? While the answer is relative based on each individual student, for this purpose, we’re defining a “good” score by measuring against the national averages of students across the country. Keep in mind, however, that these definitions are not absolute. The goal of the exam is to help with your college admissions, so a “good” or “bad” score is relative to your college choices. Ultimately, your score only matters in comparison to the other students who are applying to the same schools. You should define your scores based on the colleges you want to apply to for admission. It’s actually quite easy to find out what the average ACT score is at any given college. Here’s how to easily figure out a college’s average ACT score: 1. Start by Googling [Name of College] ACT score. Your results will likely yield both the 25th and 75th percentiles of scores of students currently attending the score. To interpret this correctly, the 25th percentile means the lower end of the scale (25 percent of students have the listed score or lower) and the 75th percentile is the higher range (75 percent of students have the listed score or higher). 2. Take the two numbers given (the 25th and 75th percentile scores) and generate the average between the two. That will give you the average score of admitted students at that particular school. As a goal, you should aim for the 75th percentile as your target score because it means you’re likely to gain admission. While it is useful to be aware of the average score at a school, you don’t want to aim for the average but, rather, the higher end of the spectrum of the two scores shared by the college. If you’re in the 25th percentile, you’re going to have to work especially hard on the other aspects of the admissions process. Remember, for you, any score that will get you admitted into the college of your choice is a “good” score. So, what’s normal for most students? To start off, you should know that the lowest attainable score is a 1 and the highest, a 36. This scale is different than the SAT, which has a higher minimum score. What's a Good ACT Score? What is a good ACT score, anyway? The national ACT average composite score is 20. The test was created and designed to have this average score on the overall ACT exam, as well as within each ACT section. So, ranking within that area puts you right in the middle of students across America. That means that about half of the country’s students are above or below a composite score of 20. The top 25 percent of ACT exam takers achieve a composite score 24 or higher. If you score above a 24, pat yourself on the back, smarty-pants. You have achieved what most students never will! The bottom 25 percent reach a composite score of 16 or lower. Anything below a 16 is the danger zone! If you’re not happy with this score, don’t fret, you can still focus on improving it. Learn more about the ACT’s national score rankings ACT’s national score rankings on their web site. [...]



FSA ID FAQs (Formerly Called FAFSA ID)

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 09:16:00 -0800

Here’s all of the information you need about the FSA ID, including what it is, how you get one and what you should do in case you lose it: What’s a FSA ID? The FSA ID is a username and password that allows you to electronically submit and sign your FAFSA form. It identifies you in order to access your personal information on any U.S. Department of Education websites, like your FAFSA information. Additionally, your FSA ID can be utilized to sign loan contracts and access helpful information online from U.S. Department of Education websites. Do Parents of Dependent Students Need Their Own FSA ID? YES, even if your student is “dependent” status, you will need your own FSA ID in order to sign your student’s FAFSA electronically. Dependent students need to have one legal parent sign their FSA form, so you should create a FAFSA ID as well. I’m a Parent of More Than One College Student: Do I Need a Separate FSA ID for Each? NO – as a parent, you only need one FSA ID. You’re able to use the same FSA ID to sign each of your student’s FAFSA applications. How Do I Obtain/Create a FAFSA ID? You can always get your FSA ID as you fill out the FAFSA (if you don’t have one, you will be prompted to get one), but you are also able to get it ahead of time – saving you the hassle of getting it while you’re focusing on filling out the form. How do you create one? It’s easy to create a FSA ID! 1. Create your log-in information Your log-in information will consist of your email address, a username and password. You’ll also have to verify that you’re at least 13 years old in order to proceed. 2. Enter your personal information In order to fill out this section and obtain a FAFSA ID, you’ll need to enter your social security number, name and date of birth. You’ll also be asked for your mailing address, e-mail address, telephone number and language preferences. In order to maintain security, you’ll enter answers to five “challenge” questions too. 3. Submit Once you’ve handled the first two steps, you’ll need to submit the information. Before you’re able to do this, you’ll need to agree to some terms and conditions. Then, you’ll want to verify your email address. While verifying your email address is optional, it’s recommended because doing so allows you to utilize your email address as a user login on some sites. Plus, it allows you to retrieve your password without having to answer your security questions, in case it gets lost. Will My FSA ID Ever Expire? Your username will never expire; however, your FSA ID password expires every 18 months (unless you change it beforehand). Can I Have Someone I Trust Create My FSA ID for Me? No – you should never have anyone create your information or give them your FSA ID information, no matter who it is! This is not only for security reasons, but also because you’re more likely to remember login information and “challenge” questions you’ve filled out. Sharing Your FSA ID: It’s important to remember that your FSA ID is used to sign legally-binding electronic documents. That means, it’s as valid (same legal status) as a written signature. Because of this, you should NEVER give your FSA ID or password to anyone – even if they’re just helping you fill out your FSA forms. Giving your FSA ID out to anyone can put you at great risk for identity theft, so keep it in a safe spot that only you can access. Can I Use My Email to Create More Than One FSA ID? You can only use one email address per FSA ID. If you forgot your FSA[...]



Social Media-Related Scholarships

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 07:33:00 -0800

If you’re a social media savvy student, there are plenty of scholarships you can easily apply for! Scholarship providers often add social media components to scholarships, which is right up your alley. The cool thing about these awards is that entries can vary from tweets and short-essays to creating and sharing videos and photos on your social media accounts. Whatever your preference, there’s probably a scholarship to suit your social media skills! Check out the following scholarships, which all have social media-related components: $15,000 TeenDrive 365 Video Challenge Deadline: 2/28/2018 Available to: High School Freshmen through College Freshmen Award Amount: 15 Awards of $15,000 Inspire other teens to drive distraction-free and keep the roads safe. Create a 30-60 second video for your fellow teen drivers that highlights the importance of safe driving and you could win $15,000, or one of 14 other prizes! Learn more about the $15,000 TeenDrive 365 Video Challenge . Doodle 4 Google Contest Deadline: 3/02/18 Available to: Maximum Age 18 years Award Amount: 5 Awards from $5,000 to $30,000 The Doodle 4 Google Contest is open to students in grades K through 12. To enter, you must create a Google doodle that tells the world “What I see for the future.” Get more information on the Doodle 4 Google Contest . ScholarshipPoints $10,000 Scholarship Deadline: 3/15/2018 Available to: High School Juniors through Graduate Student, Year 5 Award Amount: $10,000 ScholarshipPoints will award a $10,000 scholarship to one lucky member this quarter. All you have to do to become eligible is become a ScholarshipPoints member and log in. It's simple, fun, and completely free! Learn more about the ScholarshipPoints $10,000 Scholarship. Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest Deadline: 4/02/18 Available to: High School Juniors through College Seniors Award Amount: 3 Awards of $1,000 The Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest is available to high school juniors, seniors and full-time college students. You must submit a 30 to 60 second video on YouTube that will convince others not to text and drive in order to be considered for this award. Learn more about the Stop Texting and Driving Video Scholarship Contest. Andrew Flusche Scholarship Contest Deadline: 6/30/2018 Available to: High School Seniors through Graduate Students, Year 5 Award Amount: $500 The Andrew Flusche Scholarship Contest is available to high school seniors and students currently enrolled in a college or university. You must create a public service advertisement video (PSA) which portrays the correct way of interacting with a police officer during a traffic stop, or any other encounter, to qualify for this award. The video must be uploaded to YouTube and be no longer than three minutes long. Learn more about the Andrew Flusche Scholarship Contest. STEM Scholarship Deadline: 7/31/2018 Available to: High School Seniors through College Seniors Award Amount: $1,000 The STEM Scholarship is available to graduating high school seniors and current college students. You must demonstrate a passion for a STEM field, be planning to major in a STEM field, have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and answer a short questionnaire in order to be considered for this award. Learn more about the STEM Scholarship. CKSF Scholarship Competition Deadline: Varies Available to: High School Freshmen through Graduate Students, Year 5 Award Amount: $2,500 The CKSF Scholarships are available to high school, undergraduate, and graduate st[...]