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Sandman Slim by Richard Kadrey

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Eleven years before the novel begins, James Stark was a young magician learning to control and use the power and talent so evident within him. Then another magician and his followers ganged up to send James, still alive, to Hell, where he was forced to fight demons and other creatures hand to hand for the amusement of Lucifer and his minions. They also killed his girlfriend Alice, and it's that action that fuels his desire to survive and escape from Hell. Now he's in Los Angeles, determined to track down and have his revenge on those who ruined his life.



Haze by L.E. Modesitt, Jr.

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Major Keir Roget is a government operative who works for the Federation, the current government of human civilization. Its strongest roots are in the Chinese government that created the Federation as it conquered the Earth and then spread out across the galaxy. In the past, Roget was sent out as a covert operative and discovered a cell of dissidents who were plotting against the Federation. In the present, he has been sent to Haze, a planet so named because it has a shroud to protect it from intruders and apparently also from detection.



Genesis by Bernard Beckett

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The book grabs your attention. It's never boring, and its basic questions -- what separates men and machines, how can artificial intelligence be creative, at what point can AI be considered "self-aware," and how do Ideas come into being -- are cliches in the SF genre, but this book handles them nimbly and with considerable charm. If you like a compelling intellectual thrill, Genesis doesn't disappoint.



Cemetery Dance by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

A reporter is brutally murdered by someone who had been found dead two weeks earlier. Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast joins forces with NYPD Detective Vincent D'Agosta to solve the crime seemingly committed by voodoo and bring those responsible to justice.



Aliens Rule edited by Allan Kaster

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The idea of aliens among us has always been an intriguing concept but it's not quite so appealing if the aliens have the upper hand. In this collection of three short stories, humans must cope with unusual circumstances created by aliens who are in control of the situation.



Sleep Traveler by Marcus Hame

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Brenden, a moderately talented musician, has had a series of recurring dreams his entire life, one of a boy in the 1900s and the other of an amazing musical prodigy in the future year of 2020. He comes to believe that some entity is trying to communicate with him through these strange dreams.



Glass Houses by Rachel Caine

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The story in this first book of the series introduces listeners to the town of Morganville, Texas, home of Texas Prairie University. The town is populated by some strange people and even stranger yet, it is run by vampires. Each person has a sort of insurance policy that protects them from the vampires, but when children reach the age of 18, they must find some vampire family to "insure" them or risk becoming food for the vamps.



The New Space Opera 2 edited by Gardner Dozois and Jonathan Strahan

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The New Space Opera differs from the Old Space Opera mainly in displaying a generally more cynical political attitude, in being better written, and (often) in having slightly more rigorous scientific underpinnings. Which is to say, really, that it's Space Opera written from the perspective of SF writers of our time. Perhaps the only difference with Old Space Opera is that sometimes writers took it less seriously than their usual Science Fiction.



Dollhouse: Season Two: a TV review by David Newbert

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The second season of Dollhouse has begun, and there is some good news and some bad news. Good news first: the first three episodes out of the gate are everything they needed to be artistically, setting the stage for an exciting run and showing that Joss Whedon and his brain trust are back in charge. Now the bad news: these are Dollhouse's lowest rated episodes ever.



New Arrivals compiled by Neil Walsh

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

New arrivals this time feature the latest Wild Card novel from George R.R. Martin and others, re-issued classics, plus new works from Iain M. Banks, Michael Chabon, Laini Taylor, Adam Roberts, and many more.



Nexus Graphica: a column by Rick Klaw and Mark London Williams

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

And so arrives the one book -- especially the one "graphic novel-y" type book -- Mark London Williams has been waiting for all year. (Well, he wouldn't mind a look at the latest Umbrella Academy collection, either, but it hasn't shown up yet....) And that book would be the already much-discussed book of Genesis, illustrated by one of his own favorite cartoonists (as longtime readers of this column can attest): R. Crumb. Mark's reasons for waiting eagerly -- hungrily? -- for the book may not be quite the same as yours.



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Surrogates is a routine but entertaining Bruce Willis vehicle, mundane science fiction about a world where 90 percent of humanity lives through surrogates, pretty robots who transmit their senses and sensations to dormant humans.



The Crown Conspiracy by Michael J. Sullivan

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire... The Riyria. Most thieves steal jewels and coin; the Riyria prefer to focus on the theft of reputation and power. Last port of call for the wealthy and powerful of Medford, the small, secretive group make a profitable living off the social and political machinations of their country's elite.



Book of Shadows by Paula Brackston

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Elizabeth Anne Hawksmith, age 384, has moved once again to start another segment of her nearly solitary life. As Bess Hawksmith, a witch finder condemned her mother to hanging in England in 1628. Bess turned to Gideon Masters, a local warlock to save her from a similar fate. As the daughter of a hanged witch, she stood no chance against a village out for blood. Gideon taught her witchcraft and helped her find the power to become immortal. But he commanded a price.



Implied Spaces by Walter Jon Williams

Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Implied Spaces is an exploration of what would threaten a post-singularity humanity. The hero was a computer programmer who helped architect the singularity a thousand years ago. Now going by the name Aristide, he has taken to studying the implied spaces of the wormhole universes that humanity now creates. While doing this in a world created by World of Warcraft enthusiasts, he discovers evidence of a nefarious plot.



Bring Down the Sun by Judith Tarr

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The author has turned her hand to the Greece of antiquity in this particular novel, and her subject is Olympias, the mother of Alexander the Great, who was by all (historical) accounts a larger-than-life semi-mythological creature even back close to her own day. This is a huge canvas, and since it deals with themes so far away in time and space that it's wide open for a gifted storyteller to make their own.



Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Omen by Christie Golden

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

In the scant few years that have passed between Jedi Jacen Solo's decent into the Dark Side as Darth Caedus, the newly formed Galactic Alliance attempts to lick its wounds and return the galaxy to some semblance of peace and order. However, with Jedi Grand Master Luke Skywalker now in exile and a strange psychological plague attacking the remaining Jedis, can anyone survive? And what of the secret Sith sect hidden away for thousands of years on planet Kesh...?



Irons in the Fire by Juliet E. McKenna

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

For generations the common folk have fled Lescar in search of a better life outside fractious borders contested by ambitious dukes. If the family could not flee then they sent their children away, to protect them from the rapacious nobles who would steal away daughters for their beds and sons for their militia or for the gallows.



The Child Thief by Brom

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The story begins with a young girl whose mother has ended her own life with pills surviving each day in the shadow of a cruel stepfather who abuses her. Her terror ends the night she is rescued from her fate by a boy who enters her bedroom window to free her from her bonds. She has no idea who he is, yet she goes with him to whatever adventure he might promise. The setting is a dull area of Brooklyn, New York where all the evil and cruelty in that world seem to exist.



Illuminati - 2012 by Nishan A. Kumaraperu

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Ethan Swan, a trust fund pretty boy who also happens to be a genius with a photographic memory and black belts in multiple martial arts, goes to a lecture by his surrogate father, who gives a lecture about the Illuminati and then is ritually murdered in front of Ethan. After this, everyone starts trying to kill him.



New Audiobooks compiled by Susan Dunman

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Recent audiobook releases received by SF Site include works by Charles de Lint, Simon R. Green, R.A. Salvatore, Ray Bradbury and Margaret Atwood. At times it's more convenient (and enjoyable) to hear the latest in science fiction and fantasy.



The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Connie must move into her deceased grandmother's house in order to clean it up and prepare it to be sold. It's a strange old house, with mandrake roots growing in the yard, strange bottles lining the shelves of the kitchen, and no phone or electricity. The timing couldn't be worse, as she has just been approved to begin her doctoral dissertation. On her first day in the house she encounters a name, Deliverance Dane, and a reference to an old book of witchcraft.



Hater by David Moody

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The world appears to be tearing itself apart through sheer insanity. Seemingly normal people inexplicably react as if a switch goes off and suddenly, without warning, they try to kill anyone in their proximity. Danny McCoyne is our main witness to this destruction of society. On his way to work one morning, Danny sees a man brutally attacking an elderly lady. Although there's no apparent cause for his anger, he doesn't stop the vicious assault until he finally kills the woman by stabbing her with an umbrella.



The Professor was a Thief by L. Ron Hubbard

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Remember the days of the pulps? Those small magazines that printed short stories ranging from westerns to pirate adventures to science fiction were a staple for many readers during the first half of the 20th century. L. Ron Hubbard wrote stories that appeared in many of the pulps and now Galaxy Press is collecting those stories into audiobooks (and paperbacks) featuring 2 or 3 stories in each book. These are interesting stories to read but they're even more fun to hear.



The Dog Said Bow-Wow by Michael Swanwick

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Multi Hugo Award-winner Michael Swanwick presents sixteen short stories in this collection, some of which are loosely connected works featuring the same characters. These include the title work, which refers to the shifty human Darger, and his genetically adjusted canine companion, Surplus. There are a trio of adventures featuring the roguish duo. This is nicely versatile collection, encompassing a wide range of themes, changes of pace and variances in style.



Dollhouse: Season One

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Dollhouse is about a secret organization with the technology to erase people's memories and personalities, and then implant them with completely new mental constructs, leading to a collection of programmable people. These "actives," as they're called, are given custom-made personalities and then rented out to extremely wealthy clients to satisfy various needs and fantasies -- sexual, altruistic, or even criminal. Anyone is possible: expert safecracker, kinky dominatrix, best friend, spy, assassin...



News Spotlight -- Genre Books and Media: a column by Sandy Auden

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

From the British Fantasy Society Fantasycon, there are new releases from attendees. Mark Chadbourn on tent poles and enduring memories with Destroyer of Worlds; Pete Crowther talks about abducting the entire world in his Forever Twilight series; Andrew Hook takes on the walking dead in And God Created Zombies; debut author Rio Youers on being grumpy with Old Man Scratch; and Doctor Who writer Rob Shearman shares his thoughts on dead cats, flagellation, and his new short story collection Lost Songs for the Shy and Cynical.



Nexus Graphica: a column by Rick Klaw and Mark London Williams

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Roughly twenty years ago, it was clear that if Rick Klaw wasn't writing comics for children then he produced pornographic stories thus making him a person of questionable character and morality. Jettisoning any argument about the types of people who create erotic comics, the belief that there was only one type of comic book for adults bothered Rick. Hadn't these people heard of Maus, Watchmen, Love and Rockets, American Splendor, and countless others that were being produced by the early 90s for more mature tastes? Thankfully, this perception has changed.



New Arrivals compiled by Neil Walsh

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Plenty to choose from this time, as our new arrivals feature classic reprints from Edmond Hamilton, Glen Cook, and Steven Brust, some great new horror stories as we approach Halloween, some media tie-in books, plus the latest works from Paul McAuley, Kelley Armstrong, John Twelve Hawks, Robert Rankin, R.A. Salvatore, Charlie Huston, Mike Resnick, and many others.



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Rick, like many of us, spent some time in late September watching the new season of SF on TV for new series and those returning for another year. He looks at Smallville, FlashForward, Heroes and Dollhouse. He also gives us a list of what SF is on TV in October.



This is Me, Jack Vance! by Jack Vance

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

Jack Vance is 93 years old and has retired from writing. But this book represents one last gift to his admirers. Vance has been fairly reticent about his personal life and also about his writing. This is Me, Jack Vance! fills us in on his life story, though it has little to say about his fiction -- which Vance has long preferred to stand on its own.



Night of Knives by Ian C. Esslemont

Thu, 1 Oct 2009 11:00:00 GMT

The story describes the events that transpired on the night that Surly became the empress of the Malazan Empire and Kellanved and Dancer ascend to the pantheon of shadow realm. The tale is told through two primary characters, Temper and Kiska. Temper is a grizzled Malazan soldier stationed on Malaz isle and a veteran of the legendary Seven Cities campaign having served directly under Dassem Ultor. Kiska is a cunning young girl who has spent her entire life on Malaz Isle and knows the city inside and out.



RSS Feeds

Sat, 1 Jan 2005 11:00:00 GMT

After constructing our first RSS feed, it soon became apparent that the size of files could grow quickly. We decided to separate them into smaller ones, breaking them up by month. On this page you will find RSS feed files for all of our content beginning with January 2005.