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The Dervish House by Ian McDonald

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

With the tight, cinematic precision of a Hitchcock thriller, this book introduces us to a near-future Istanbul and to the lives of the characters who work and live in one of the oldest buildings in the city. Over the course of five heat-wave infested days, the characters lives are drawn together in ways that none of them could have anticipated.



The Fire Lord's Lover by Kathryne Kennedy

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

The story takes place in an alternate 1724, where two centuries earlier, elves took over England and magically boarded it off from the rest of the world. Within the magical walls, elves have been dallying with their human "animals" while being ruled over by an immortal evil-overlord. This premise is just as engaging than it sounds.



Solid by Shelly Workinger

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

We have nearly one hundred kids with unknown special, genetic designed abilities or attributes. The inoculations of the pregnant mothers were done by your stereotypical mad scientist and his work was carried on by your stereotypical niece who wanted to make his name good. And of course he took his secret to the grave and that makes everyone's job harder.



The Woods Out Back by R.A. Salvatore

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Gary Leger has a boring life, a dead-end job, and not much of a future. But that's before he's kidnapped by a leprechaun name Mickey McMickey and expected to wear the armor and carry the broken spear of a long-dead king as he undertakes an epic quest through the land of Faerie.



Hull Zero Three by Greg Bear

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Ship is the penultimate achievement of human technology. It consists of three colossal vessels, each one twelve kilometers long, and each tethered to a central moon-sized chunk of ice and rock to provide the elemental materials necessary for a long space voyage. Ship is the human race's attempt to reach, and colonize, far distant planets. But somewhere during the centuries-long voyage, something went terribly wrong.



Transcendence, Part 1: The Demon Wars by R.A. Salvatore

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Marching forward to begin book six of this seven volume series, Transcendence tells the story of the second Ranger trained at the same time as Adryan Wyndon, who became king of Honce-the-Bear in the last book. Brynn Dharielle was rescued by elves after her parents were murdered by the Behrenese. The Behrenese have been enslaving Brynn's race and her purpose as a Ranger is to free her people and start a revolution.



The Golden Apples of the Sun and Other Stories by Ray Bradbury

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

In this short story collection, Ray Bradbury shows us the full range of his abilities, covering everything from science fiction to fantasy, horror to psychological thriller, and almost everything in-between. Originally published in 1953, this latest edition contains 32 short stories from the master story teller.



The Fall by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

The creation of this trilogy has turned out to be a haunting affair. The Strain (the first book in the trilogy) introduced the horror world to a different view of vampires, along with the seven "Ancients" that are the leaders of the vampires. Maintaining their anonymity for centuries, why do they now become public and seek to potentially wipe out their food source forever? The secret lies behind The Master.



Factotum by D.M. Cornish

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Factotum is the third and final installment of The Foundling's Tale (formerly The Monster Blood Tattoo), being the chronicles of Rosamund Bookchild. The author has taken the flavour of the 18th century and added monsters, alchemy and bio-engineering from Dr. Frankenstein's wildest dreams. Having seen Rosamund travel to his apprenticeship in the first and serve his country in the second, we now see him entering into service as the Factotum of Europe, a famous monster hunter.



Shades of Gray by Jackie Kessler and Caitlin Kittredge

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

All of the leading characters from Black and White are back for more, and are joined by a host of newcomers. This time around the story is split into three strands, one in the past and two in the present. The sequences set in the past deal with the original Squadron superheroes, their lives, loves and the reasons for their ultimate downfall.



Interzone #229, July-August 2010

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

This issue continues the UK magazine's recent tradition of featuring short story writers virtually unknown to North American readers, with styles and viewpoints distinctly different than those seen in most US and Canadian magazines and anthologies. It also continues to be the best designed current science fiction magazine.



Blackout and All Clear by Connie Willis

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

In Blackout/All Clear, we revisit the mid-21st Century Oxford University time travel program featured in The Doomsday Book and To Say Nothing of the Dog, where historians make routine forays into the past in order to study it. For those familiar with the earlier Oxford books, there are some familiar faces, most notably Professor James Dunworthy, who heads the time travel program. But a new group of historians takes center stage.



Nexus Graphica: a column by Rick Klaw and Mark London Williams

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Here's the now traditional Nexus Graphica year-end wrap-up, where Rick Klaw and Mark London Williams present the top half of their "ten best" list for the year. As Mark has noted before, since reviewing is entirely subjective, there are doubtless other "bests" out there they've missed -- but they go on what they've read, what's been sent to them, etc. This past year, their differing tastes were heightened since they were sent almost entirely different books these past 12 months, rarely getting the same things from the same publishing houses.



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Rick took a break from watching old Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers movies to watch the two six-hour Sci-Fi Channel Dune movies. He'd seen and enjoyed them when they first aired. They hold up well on a second viewing, thanks to excellent acting, scripts by John Harrison that are mostly true to the books, outstanding musical scores, and special-effects that aren't bad.



How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe by Charles Yu

Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Charles Yu is a young writer whose first collection Third Class Superhero, gained a lot of praise in literary circles. But he's one also a guy who grew up reading Isaac Asimov. He has professed admiration for the likes of Richard Powers, who writes literary novels -- but also sometimes SF, and almost always scientifically-engaged work. So, what is How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe? Actually, that's an interesting question.



The Very Best of Charles de Lint by Charles de Lint

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Charles de Lint was writing Urban Fantasy before that genre was infiltrated by vampires and gritty streets. His Urban Fantasy introduces a magical realism to the world, spirit magic seeping into the cement environments mankind has built and most of the stories selected for this volume reflect that interest. His urban fantasy is set in the vibrant city of Newford and its environs, which allows him to look at his magic in a variety of different neighborhoods and social strata.



Deadman's Road by Joe R. Lansdale

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

If you ever met Reverend Jebidiah Mercer in some book by Joe R. Lansdale, I'm sure you loved that character at first sight. So, the good news is that the whole package of stories featuring the Reverend are now collected in one volume courtesy of the smart people at Subterranean Press.



The Wolf Age by James Enge

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

We find Morlock in Wuruyaaria: the city of werewolves. The story begins with Morlock being captured by a band of werewolves and subsequently imprisoned. Eventually, Morlock befriends a few fellow prisoners and, soon finds himself in the middle of a political power struggle. To complicate matters, other unseen forces are at work and are using Morlock and the city of werewolves as pawns in a much larger game.



UnderKingdom: Disco Goblins vs. The Machine by Jonathan Culverhouse

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

This is not the book you expect it to be, given the title and cover art. The cover looks like something just waiting for a 10-year-old boy to add fighter jets shooting things. The title sounds like a discount video game bought for that same boy, that he never ever played. It, therefore, came as a great shock that what's inside was wonderful.



Black and White by Jackie Kessler and Caitlin Kittredge

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Iridium is a super villain for political reasons, in command of Wreck City and maintaining loose order by wielding light-based powers. Jet is the Lady of Shadows, sponsored hero of New Chicago, with the ability to call up and manipulate a dark force, which can be bent to many uses. Jet and Iridium first met at superhero school and became best friends. Until life pushed them in opposite and opposing directions.



The Girl With No Hands and Other Tales by Angela Slatter

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

An Australian author who spins beautiful yarns in a musical, fascinating narrative style, her enticing stories are set in a magical world in which reality is colourful and fascinating, made of that elusive, precious substance of which dreams are made. This collection of sixteen enchanting fairy tales for grownups is penned by this incredibly talented writer.



Yellow Rose of Texas: The Myth of Emily Morgan by Douglas Brode

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Emily Morgan aka Emily West may, or may not, have been in General Santa Anna's tent at the Battle of San Jacinto, able to alert the attacking Texican forces where their adversary was. And she may, or may not, have been the direct inspiration for the ballad "Yellow Rose of Texas."" In any case, the author takes the print-the-legend approach, and who are we to question the wisdom of a John Ford movie?



Aurealis, #43

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

In the latest issue of the now venerable Australian magazine Aurealis, there are the usual features: Patricia L. O'Neill's science column (this one, "Xtreme Science: A Feast for the Census", is about the huge colonies of little beasties we can host), an interview with Trudi Canavan (conducted by Kate Forsyth), and book reviews by Keith Stevenson. But Rich's focus is on the fiction.



Ascendance, Part 2: The Demon Wars by R.A. Salvatore

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

As fate would have it, Aydrian crosses paths with Marcalo De'Unnero, the former Bishop of Palmaris, who has been possessed and is the man that murdered Aydrian's father. De'Unnero begins plotting against Jilseponie, who is now Queen of Honce-the-Bear, in the land of Corona. De'Unnero's plan is to put Aydrian on the throne, topple the church and put himself back in power.



Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Leo Graf would be one of the first people to tell you that he's just an engineer. A very skilled and accomplished engineer, for sure, but otherwise just an ordinary middle-aged man. He has been summoned by his employer, GalacTech, to travel to the remote space station known as the Cay Habitat, and to teach safety inspection and welding to a new bunch of workers there. When he arrives, he's shocked to discover that the workers are not your average students.



The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack by Mark Hodder

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Taking inspiration from one of the most enduring mysteries of the Victorian age and weaving it into a tale of time travel and history unmade the novel includes appearances by many celebrities of the day like nursing pioneer Florence Nightingale, a very young Oscar Wilde, naturalist Charles Darwin, and the poet Algernon Swinburne. In lead role is the explorer and writer Sir Richard Francis Burton. Part steampunk, part alternate history, with a liberal dollop of detective thriller, it is a melting pot that has the potential to produce something tasty, or a nauseating mess.



Jupiter, Issue 28, April 2010 / Issue 29, July 2010

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

With the release of the two latest issues of the nice British pure SF magazine Jupiter, issue XXVIII is subtitled Autonoe and XXIX is subtitled Thyone, Rich wonders what the subtitles will be in the happy event that Jupiter publishes more than 63 issues. He thinks the April issue, Autonoe (XXVIII), is one of the strongest numbers of this magazine to date.



Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Vampires, Demons, Clockwork Men, Shape Shifters, Faeries, Evil Humans, and even Werewolves; these creatures make up the Downworlders, beings or persons who are in part supernatural in origin. On the other hand, we have the Nephilim who swear their lives to fighting the Downworlders. These are humans who use magic in many forms to fight their battles against evil. They call themselves Shadowhunters.



Nexus Graphica: a column by Rick Klaw and Mark London Williams

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Similar to their previous Nexus Graphica best of the year columns, the selections showcase the difference between the tastes of Rick Klaw and Mark London Williams. Of the twenty titles chosen, ten by each, only two titles made both lists. For comparison purposes, they shared three books last year and two in 2008. Vive la difference! Rick Klaw is hosting the first (or last... depending on your perspective) five selections with Mark London Williams returning in two weeks to announce the remainder.



New Arrivals compiled by Neil Walsh

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

This time we're looking at the latest in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series (co-authored by Brandon Sanderson), as well as new titles from Eric Brown, Ian Esslemont, Anne McCaffrey & Elizabeth Ann Scarborough, Stephen Donaldson, L.E. Modesitt Jr., Karl Schroeder, and many others.



Watching the Future: a column by Derek Johnson

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

It seems like only yesterday that Halloween was upon us. But a month later, we come to the holiday that many take far more seriously, the one in which people invest far more emotion and economics. Bah, humbug. There are movies that Derek does like to pop into his DVD player during the holidays, and that, given very little fudge factor, actually fit as Christmas movies. In that spirit, he has decided to list ten of those, each of which he feels is worthy of being considered "Christmas movies."



Babylon 5.1: TV reviews by Rick Norwood

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

December is the cruelest month, at least as far as new content on television goes. Even if you watch everything, there are only 14 new episodes airing. Rick's recommendations: Smallville, Sanctuary, and Doctor Who.



Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Rick has seen Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 twice now, and enjoyed it more the second time than the first. The action sequences, of which there are many, are not as exciting as those in, for example, Unstoppable, the runaway train film. But it is extremely good.



Bearings: Reviews 1997-2001 by Gary K. Wolfe

Wed, 1 Dec 2010 11:00:00 GMT

Two things are different between this volume and its predecessor. In the first place, trivially, this volume carries an introduction by Peter Straub. No famous name introduced Soundings, and to be honest no famous name was needed to introduce it. Wolfe is well enough known and respected in his own right, and it's likely that there aren't many people buying a collection of science fiction book reviews who would need to be told who Gary Wolfe is or why this volume is a good thing.



RSS Feeds

Sat, 1 Jan 2005 11:00:00 GMT

After constructing our first RSS feed, it soon became apparent that the size of files could grow quickly. We decided to separate them into smaller ones, breaking them up by month. On this page you will find RSS feed files for all of our content beginning with January 2005.