Subscribe: Firefighter Blogs - The Latest on Firefighter Nation - My Firefighter Nation
http://my.firefighternation.com/profiles/blog/feed?xn_auth=no
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language:
Tags:
alarm task  battery  chief  episode  fire service  fire  firefighter  firefighters  job  new  service  start  task force 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Firefighter Blogs - The Latest on Firefighter Nation - My Firefighter Nation

Firefighter Blogs - The Latest on Firefighter Nation - My Firefighter Nation





Updated: 2018-04-25T10:10:41Z

 



The Physiological & Mental Stressors of Fighting Fire

2018-04-23T12:15:52.000Z

We now know, with certainty, that fire is not necessarily our worst enemy on the fireground. Its by-products are! Whether you’re a career, volunteer or paid-on-call firefighter, means that you can no longer approach what you do as a casual job or hobby.

In this, our 51st episode of “5-Alarm Task Force,” Chief Anthony Correia joins us to discuss the specific physiological and mental stressors of fighting fire. His explanation begins with your visceral and mental response to…

We now know, with certainty, that fire is not necessarily our worst enemy on the fireground. Its by-products are! Whether you’re a career, volunteer or paid-on-call firefighter, means that you can no longer approach what you do as a casual job or hobby.

In this, our 51st episode of “5-Alarm Task Force,” Chief Anthony Correia joins us to discuss the specific physiological and mental stressors of fighting fire. His explanation begins with your visceral and mental response to a dispatch, through your actions and your body’s physiological responses on the fireground and what occurs when you think you’ve finished.

Chief Correia paints for you with a “broad stroke of the brush” to cover some of today’s most important characteristics of firefighters, including your wellness, fitness, fitness-for-duty, your mental and emotional health and the Cancer Initiative.

Join us for this very important examination of what we face when we do the job we love to do! Tune in at http://www.dalmatianproductions.tv or on iTunes, Google Play or Spotify!

 




From Chief Johnnie Coonrod

2018-04-17T21:35:50.000Z

(image)  

(image)  




Personal Duty Standards

2018-04-17T14:55:23.000Z

Being former military I have a deeply ingrained sense of duty and commitment so I hope this doesn't drive people away, I have seen discord in different departments and jobs caused by drama llamas and the Im special attitudes! (and if anything sours my temper it's that type of Bull crap)

As far as being in a fire department you take an oath to serve and protect your department and its members, and contention in the ranks has no place there

we are better than that

For me…

Being former military I have a deeply ingrained sense of duty and commitment so I hope this doesn't drive people away, I have seen discord in different departments and jobs caused by drama llamas and the Im special attitudes! (and if anything sours my temper it's that type of Bull crap)

As far as being in a fire department you take an oath to serve and protect your department and its members, and contention in the ranks has no place there

we are better than that

For me being part of a fire departments allows me to extend my duty to my community! I am proud to serve in any capacity i can, Although i have a busy life I gladly do what i can.

I set my personal standards high and always strive to stick to them.

I will not hold anyone up to my standards but urge them to set their own standards high.

I will gladly teach safety and responsibility to anyone whether they are a child or adult.

I do not believe that anyone is stupid but only uninformed and have not been given the opportunity or information that they should have.

the public and their children should never be afraid of the fireman or police and any officer or fireman whose actions cause concern or fear amongst the public is bad for the services.

Im a great believer in services hosting open house and attending school or public safety functions to teach and or guide the public along the path of safety and responsibility

even churches are great places for public safety seminars

these are great opportunities to attract new members or juniors




Our 50th Episode of "5-Alarm Task Force" and It's for YOU!

2018-04-12T19:54:06.000Z

If I asked you what is the most important character trait for a firefighter, what would be your answer? Bravery? Strength? Stamina? They all sound imperative, right? Perhaps, but there is more to it than those. What could outrank those three aspects?
Our guest on this, our 50th episode, is Captain/Instructor Chris Baker. In this podcast, Chris explains that it is your desire, no,…
If I asked you what is the most important character trait for a firefighter, what would be your answer? Bravery? Strength? Stamina? They all sound imperative, right? Perhaps, but there is more to it than those. What could outrank those three aspects?
Our guest on this, our 50th episode, is Captain/Instructor Chris Baker. In this podcast, Chris explains that it is your desire, no, hunger to learn, that will dictate the type of firefighter you are or will be. And mind you, this has nothing necessarily to do with climbing rank.
Chris' resume demonstrates that he "practices what he preaches." Moreover, he teaches it, as well. So join us as Instructor Baker, discusses education in the fire service, mentoring and what he sees for the future firefighter.
Tune in our our website at www.dalmatianproductions.tv, or you can find us on iTunes, Google Play and Spotify!
Enjoy and we'd love to hear from you!



THE HIPSTER SOLUTION

2018-04-10T11:30:57.000Z

(image)

NEW Fire Rescue Magazine illustration: The Hipster Solution.
 
Having some fun with another Off Duty Rule cartoon at the expense of our…

(image)

NEW Fire Rescue Magazine illustration: The Hipster Solution.
 
Having some fun with another Off Duty Rule cartoon at the expense of our man-bun brethren. All's good... live and let live!
 
STAY FIRED UP, but keep the saw warm just in case!
 
____
 
To see more Drawn By Fire, go to:



Finding a New Fire Chief - Do We Look Within or From Outside?

2018-04-09T17:00:57.000Z

The Chief of Department - a position that many firefighters aspire to and others...well, let's just say they don't aspire to. Yet, when there's a vacancy at the top, someone must be brought onboard to "steer the ship!"
Just like in other businesses, those directed to find a new chief have two ways to choose from:
1. Hire…
The Chief of Department - a position that many firefighters aspire to and others...well, let's just say they don't aspire to. Yet, when there's a vacancy at the top, someone must be brought onboard to "steer the ship!"
Just like in other businesses, those directed to find a new chief have two ways to choose from:
1. Hire someone already working or volunteering for the department, or
2. Open the position to candidates from outside the department.
Which one should we choose?
Our guest, retired Chief Phil Johnston, doesn't pretend to know which method will best suit your needs. However, what he does know is the pros and cons of both methods.
Additionally, he provides both types of candidates with many of the tools and hints that each candidate should consider to provide them with the best chances in their efforts.
Interested? Then tune in to this episode of "5-Alarm Task Force" and GOOD LUCK! Join us at www.dalmatianproductions.tv



Learn More About One of the Fire Service's Best Protectors & Protector

2018-04-03T22:16:26.000Z

Our latest episode of "5-Alarm Task Force," is now available, featuring Mr. Steve Austin of the Cumberland Valley Volunteer Fireman's Association. We focus on "struck-bys," those incidents when first responders have been hit and injured or killed while working a busy highway or roadway call.
Find our podcast on our website,…
Our latest episode of "5-Alarm Task Force," is now available, featuring Mr. Steve Austin of the Cumberland Valley Volunteer Fireman's Association. We focus on "struck-bys," those incidents when first responders have been hit and injured or killed while working a busy highway or roadway call.
Find our podcast on our website, http://www.dalmatianproductions.tv, or on iTunes, Google Play and Spotify! Just search for 5-Alarm Task Force!



March 2018, Remember Them!

2018-04-01T20:22:37.000Z

(image)  This month of March 2018 has been a very hard month for us in the fire service. We have lost several of our brothers and sister through out the country. We pause to remember them, FL Hollywood FD FF Daryel Richards, GA Cobb County FD FF Stacey L. Boulware,…

(image)  This month of March 2018 has been a very hard month for us in the fire service. We have lost several of our brothers and sister through out the country. We pause to remember them, FL Hollywood FD FF Daryel Richards, GA Cobb County FD FF Stacey L. Boulware, FDNY FF Michael R. Davidson, OH Madison Township-Kunkle FD AC Rodney Baker Jr., PA York City FD FF Zachary Anthony and FF Ivan Flanscha, TX New London FD M.V. Hudson and Ellinger VFD FF Larry Marusik, WV Pratt VFD FF Thomas Craigo and FF Michael Edwards, all who died on the job. We also remember FDNY LT Christopher J. Raguso and FM Christopher T. Zanetis, who both died in a helicopter crash serving in Iraq. Also FDNY FF Thomas Phelan and FF Keith Young, who both succumbed to 9/11 related illnesses. Our thoughts, prayers and condolences go out to their families, friends and extended families within their respective departments. May their sacrifices not go in vain, please keep them always in your heart as we do our job, remember anything that may have come out of this and please be careful and stay safe always! Honor them all and let them know that we've got it from here!




Smoke - What's In It?

2018-03-27T23:41:09.000Z

OK, so you're a firefighter. You've seen smoke, you've smelled smoke and you may have swallowed a "snoot-full." How was that for you? Yet how much do you know about it? No, not it's behavior, but what's in it! Chief Robert Fling returns to underscore his first visit, "FACEPIECE ON!" And if you're still one of those cowboys who think a firefighter isn't a "real" firefighter until he/she gets their "snoot-full," you're wrong and maybe DEAD wrong.…
OK, so you're a firefighter. You've seen smoke, you've smelled smoke and you may have swallowed a "snoot-full." How was that for you? Yet how much do you know about it? No, not it's behavior, but what's in it! Chief Robert Fling returns to underscore his first visit, "FACEPIECE ON!" And if you're still one of those cowboys who think a firefighter isn't a "real" firefighter until he/she gets their "snoot-full," you're wrong and maybe DEAD wrong. Listen in and pay attention to what Chief Fling teaches us about smoke, what it does and what it can do. Then, go take a look at your family and tell them you don't need to wear your SCBA!
Catch our podcast at http://Bit.ly/DalmatWeb or search for "5-Alarm Task Force on iTunes or Google Play!



Tragic Week In The Fire Service

2018-03-27T22:30:00.000Z

(image)

It doesn’t matter if you are active or retired, career or volunteer, instructor or student.

“When one hurts. We all hurt. That’s who we are.” - Ryan Pennington…

(image)

It doesn’t matter if you are active or retired, career or volunteer, instructor or student.

“When one hurts. We all hurt. That’s who we are.” - Ryan Pennington

Thoughts and prayers for all the families and also for the fire department family members.

Photo Credit: California Fire Foundation




This is Who We Are and What We Do!

2018-03-22T20:43:59.000Z

I do my podcast, "5-Alarm Task Force," for you - my brothers and sisters in the fire service. Today's society is so different than when I grew up. Sometimes, that makes our job tougher. Just look what we have to do to help our communities understand how vital and precious sprinklers are in, at the very least, every new residential structure; not too mention commercial…
I do my podcast, "5-Alarm Task Force," for you - my brothers and sisters in the fire service. Today's society is so different than when I grew up. Sometimes, that makes our job tougher. Just look what we have to do to help our communities understand how vital and precious sprinklers are in, at the very least, every new residential structure; not too mention commercial buildings too! And our jobs have changed drastically in the 30-plus years since an injury took me off the line. We used to be fire departments that ran with an ambulance if they needed extra help. Now, WE run the rescues and EMS calls and wonder when and if a fire call will come in.
Nevertheless, the oath we take and the badge we carry tell us that we have a job to do. This job didn't reach out and pull us in, we went looking for it, whether your career, volunteer or paid-on-call. WE made the choice! No matter how simple the call, when someone in our community dials 9-1-1, he/she is reaching out to us in a time of need. It may be a big "nothing" to us, but it wasn't to him/her when they needed us.
WE are a team and we are ALL professionals! Not just in our own firehouses and departments, but wherever we go. We know we can knock on the door of any firehouse in this great nation of hours and we'll be welcomed inside and we'll sit there and talk shop, maybe have a cold drink, a cup of "joe" or even a meal.
And now we're learning that this job could hurt or even kill us, in ways most of us never dreamed of. But there are a lot of good people out there who are dedicated to helping firefighters avoid these poisons and carcinogens. And heaven forbid, we do get the terrible diagnosis, there are those who will fight, tooth and nail, to heal us and get us back on the job.
We are a special breed, as we run in where everyone else is running out. But remember, we're still human and this job can take a hell of a toll on us sometimes. DON'T be afraid to reach out for help. There are many who have dedicated themselves to helping us.
We are America's bravest - we are dedicated - we are FIREFIGHTERS!



FireBot- New Product to extinguish residential stovetop fires

2018-03-19T02:29:26.000Z

FireBot, a low cost device that automatically activates in case of a fire to properly extinguish a stovetop fire.

Able to attach to the range hood, unseen, battery operated like a smoke alarm, triggered by an out of control fire, which activates fire suppressant to extinguish any type of fire.

 

A solution for 50% of all home fires, which start on stovetops, numbering over 116,100 per year costing more than 500 lives, 5,540 injuries, and 1.1 billion dollars in…

FireBot, a low cost device that automatically activates in case of a fire to properly extinguish a stovetop fire.

Able to attach to the range hood, unseen, battery operated like a smoke alarm, triggered by an out of control fire, which activates fire suppressant to extinguish any type of fire.

 

A solution for 50% of all home fires, which start on stovetops, numbering over 116,100 per year costing more than 500 lives, 5,540 injuries, and 1.1 billion dollars in damages.

See Details at www.startengine.com/firebot(image)




What the Hell is the Fire Service Becoming?

2018-03-18T20:54:18.000Z

Over 2 years ago, I wrote a post discussing what I felt was happening to the Fire Service and the next generation of firefighters and medics. I just wanted to post it again because I feel it is still relevant and it’s a problem that looks to continue and get worse. I am also seeking feedback and solutions.   From 22 July 2015 ”What the hell is the fire service coming to? It is supposed to be a brotherhood / sisterhood. Well, thanks to the “new”… Over 2 years ago, I wrote a post discussing what I felt was happening to the Fire Service and the next generation of firefighters and medics. I just wanted to post it again because I feel it is still relevant and it’s a problem that looks to continue and get worse. I am also seeking feedback and solutions.   From 22 July 2015 ”What the hell is the fire service coming to? It is supposed to be a brotherhood / sisterhood. Well, thanks to the “new” generations of of wanna be firefighters (FF) trying to join what once was a true, strong brotherhood, the traditions of the fire service are, unfortunately, coming to a quick end. The “new”generation of FFs, are for the most part, are nothing more then “whiney, know it all smart ass kids who want everything handed to them on a silver plate without having to work for anything”. They think they are entitled to everything. The “new” generation of FFs have no idea what the meaning of “to have someone’s back is”. They are only in it for themselves. This generation of “kids” throw themselves into issues that they have no reason to be involved in and become the frontline on the gossip train. If these “new wanna be” FFs want a career in the fire service it is not a good way to start. These FFs are pretty much a bunch of ass-kissers who end up looking like idiots and dumbasses. In the fire service, your reput6tation is almost everything to you. Being known as an idiot or ass-kisser could lead you to a career that ended before it ever began. When you have only been in the fire department for about a year, and you are known as one the afore mentioned, you can pretty much kiss any career aspirations good bye. The fire service is known as a group of family and friends and it seems everyone either knows you or knows of you. Word travels fast in the fire service and no one wants to work with tbese young firefighters with a bad “know it all “attitude.   The fire service has been known for its brotherhood and taking care of its own when help is needed. For those that have no pride or could care less about traditions of the fire service  they will find out very quickly that when they  start to need help or assistance on a task, help will be hard to find. Why is this? To put it simply, they have probably pissed someone or a group of veteran FFs off.   As I mentioned earlier, it seems that everyone in the fire service seems to practically know or know of someone in the fire service. Again, reputations are everything. If these “new” firefighters are trying to get a job, the Department they have applied for has already done some unofficial background checks about you from people who know you. One bad recommendation or phone call can kill your chances of becoming a FF instantly. Today’s “new” firefighters are too young and dumb to realize that. They will learn the hard way when they keep getting black balled from Departments they have applied to for employment.    To sum this up, there are many veteran firefighters who are more than willing to work with the “new” generation of firefighters  and pass on the traditions of the fire service and most importantly teach them what brotherhood really is all about. Unfortunately, a lot [...]



The Future Firefighter: Fire Engineering Blog Talk Radio Episode 1761

2018-03-17T01:00:00.000Z

Building the Unbreakable Future… Building the Unbreakable Future Firefighter “If you quit you will regret it for the rest of your life. Quitting never makes things easier.” – Admiral William H. McRaven Our guest was supposed to be Ryan Pennington from Jumpseat Training LLC. However, Ryan had a last minute schedule change and he is teaching a firefighter safety and survival course during the recording of this show. I will look forward to the opportunity of welcoming Ryan back on the show in the future. I would like to congratulate Ryan’s son and nephew for recently receiving their career positions in the fire service. Talking with Ryan over the last few months regarding mentoring his son and nephew through their hiring process has been a rewarding experience. ENTRY LEVEL FIREFIGHTER HIRING PROCESS “The hiring process is like running a marathon, it is not a sprint.  It is more like sprinting a marathon.” – Christopher Baker During this episode we're going to cover the application phase of the entry-level future firefighter recruitment process and how to be an unbreakable candidate, as you progress through the hiring process. Topics will include the entry-level firefighter application process, resume and cover letter, physical agility test including the CPAT, the written exam, the panel interview and the background process including the medical examination. Please send your questions via email regarding the entry-level firefighter hiring process to thefuturefirefighter@gmail.com and I will respond and assist you in this process.   APPLICATION: I would like to start the show off with a statement “don't give up!” As you progress through the application process you have to remember this throughout the process and this process requires a certain level of endurance. Typically on average the candidate will take about 4 to 4 1/2 years to receive a permanent career position in the fire service. Speaking from my own experience that is about what it took me to receive my dream career position in the fire service. Please don't give up, keep going through the application process and fill out every application. Print out the job description and the minimum requirements and make sure that you meet those minimum requirements to apply for those positions. Review the job description and study the knowledge skills and abilities (KSA’s) that are required for each position. In order to receive the position of a future firefighter you have to first apply and it is a lengthy process. Most entry-level firefighter applications currently are online and there are several websites to apply for these positions: https://www.governmentjobs.com https://www.fctconline.org https://www.nationaltestingnetwork.com https://www.calopps.org https://www.usajobs.gov The days of filling out applications on paper are obsolete and now several agencies have utilized technology to expedite their application process. One helpful tip is to save your information in a word document and you can cut / paste this information into these online career websites when you are creating your profile. Review the job announcement and job description specifically the information related to the job performance review standards (JPR’s) and the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA’s) for each position. Only apply for positions that you meet the minimum requirements in the job announcement. If you have any doubts and or questions, contact the hiring official for each specific agency to clarify these questions regarding the minimum requirements. Make sure you have a keen eye for attention to detail. Several of these items are highlighted in both the job announce[...]



Fire Service Cultural Variations

2018-03-14T15:01:16.000Z

The fire service culture of an “aggressive” nature in its current form may be attributed to dominant ideologies and the subsequent societies that have developed. In order to further identify best practices we must first investigate cultural diffusion and the elements that are allowed to reside within… The fire service culture of an “aggressive” nature in its current form may be attributed to dominant ideologies and the subsequent societies that have developed. In order to further identify best practices we must first investigate cultural diffusion and the elements that are allowed to reside within the profession. In taking a deeper look into formal and informal norms, we can hopefully learn more about self, and how our individual roles of socialization can positively or negatively impact the future of the fire service. It has been said many times, the fire service is a people centered, outcome driven organization and as such we must further our understanding of culture, social structure, interaction, and deviance. Our recognition of who we are as individuals and the relationships between social forces will undoubtedly shape our social imaginations. AggressivenessAlthough the fire service has many long standing traditions that are generally accepted worldwide, the adjective of aggressive is very subjective depending upon geography. There are certainly two sides to this discussion and depending upon which country, state, or local organization we belong to; the significance of place is vital to understand. “To put it simply, place matters. Our position relative to others shapes our access to resources and influences the options available to us” (Witt, J., 2016, p. 3). The greatest resource in the fire service is our people. Our people come from many different backgrounds and cultures. As we try to funnel so many varying perspectives into a singular mindset or professional worldview, we may be inadvertently secluding best practices and perspectives. In a recent trade magazine article, the author opines about what the word aggressive actually means within the context of firefighting. “The word aggressive conjures a level of pride for some and liability and injuries for others” (Rhodes, 2018, para 1). The author further explains the subjective adjective by segmenting informed intelligent actions as opposed to ill-informed decisions based from a perspective of ego. On the opposite side of the ongoing debate is what has been commonly called the “safety culture.” It can be said the mere whisper of the word safety implies cowardness. Now many pundits, on both sides of the debate, will offer up their talking points but fail to properly articulate their frame of reference. Sociologists refer to this phenomenon as the consequence of difference. We must pay further attention to the analysis of social power. It is vital to understand how social power plays an enormous role in shaping the how and why of our actions. The fire service in most recent years is relying on scientific data to improve upon our delivery service(s). Whether it be in our emergency medical service, community risk reduction, cancer prevention, mental health, or even our extinguishment methodologies; empirical evidence is challenged on a daily basis. Some of the brightest individuals will say that everything depends on context. Many of the arguments offered up contain very little empirical data to support a frame of reference which leaves nothing more than anecdotal explanations. Perhaps Abraham Maslow was spot on in his assessment that “if the only tool we have in our toolbox is a hammer, everything will appear to be a n[...]



UAS - Unmanned Aerial Systems, aka Drones, in Public Safety

2018-02-27T20:10:56.000Z

Listen to our latest podcast with Chief Emeritus Charles Werner of the Charlottesville VA Fire Dept., as he discusses the use of UAS - Unmanned Aerial Systems or drones in public safety. Even if your agency is already using one, make sure it is following all federal regulations. They can literally be a lifesaver! Go to our Dalmatian Productions website

Listen to our latest podcast with Chief Emeritus Charles Werner of the Charlottesville VA Fire Dept., as he discusses the use of UAS - Unmanned Aerial Systems or drones in public safety. Even if your agency is already using one, make sure it is following all federal regulations. They can literally be a lifesaver! Go to our Dalmatian Productions website




2008 Toyota  Prius small battery episode!

2018-02-27T19:55:34.000Z

2008 Toyota  Prius small battery episode! After dinner at 7:00 PM, I jumped in my 2008  Toyota  Prius car and pushed start button. Felt  that I did not push brake enough to start car so pushed start button second time and pushed again with brake pushed. All dash board light illuminated and stayed on with engine check light, as usual they go away immediately and engine runs in another 40 seconds. So I pressed start button to shut down and repeat start three four times.… 2008 Toyota  Prius small battery episode! After dinner at 7:00 PM, I jumped in my 2008  Toyota  Prius car and pushed start button. Felt  that I did not push brake enough to start car so pushed start button second time and pushed again with brake pushed. All dash board light illuminated and stayed on with engine check light, as usual they go away immediately and engine runs in another 40 seconds. So I pressed start button to shut down and repeat start three four times. Engine check light did not go away... Turn on ceiling light of car and repeat start procedure but engine check light did not go away and ceiling light of car start deeming. Smell started coming near passenger side like rotten eggs. I came home did net search for the problem find few post for rotten eggs smell but no one says that its small battery problem. So thought, I  should buy scanner to get code of check engine light, There was only engine check and airbag light on, on the dash board.    Called for jump start...they did not come up to 10:30 PM. Gave call at 10:45 PM if I still need Jump start? I schedule for morning...I could not slept very well, little back pain started because of stress in morning! In morning car was totally dead. Not dashboard display at all. Nothing happens if I push start button. Even no engine check light. Jump start guy came around 7:45 AM and he gave jump start. I start the car and all dashboard display came as normal. No engine check light. Aftermarket hybrid Battery supplier/installer friend from Virginia also confirmed that this is small battery problem. Jump start guy said do not think you do not have problem, you still have problem and you need jump start better drive to dealer or any garage.  I planned to go to dealer, but decided to check with Advance auto parts people for small battery, so could not get busted by dealer for diagnostic charge and they will drag to big battery replacement with asking price $4500. Advance auto parts guy checked for small battery and showed scanner message that replace battery. In process asked to shut down car and it was dead.  Advance auto parts guy gave jump start and I started car again . Everything was normal and drove to dealer just mile away from there. Asked them to change small battery.  My small battery which died was dated 08/12 means installed in August 2012, after I bought the car.  They gave $212 price. id not provide enough warranty info, did not tell me which battery they are going to put. May be my fault. As I was thinking that I did not kept room for them to drag me to panic for big battery replacement, felt good so did not ask. Labor to install battery was $136. They gave me 10% discount as I used them first time. SO after tax I spend $316. Advance auto parts people did not have Prius battery on stock and installation required professional skills, but they give you names of Professional small and big battery installer and you can call and make deal for installation. I hope this will help someone who is not sure which battery is bad in Toyota Prius 2008 and around models.[...]



New Technology for First Responders

2018-02-26T18:33:48.000Z

Just finished the first of two very interesting interviews with Chief (ret) Charles Werner of the Charlottesville Fire Dept. regarding new technology for first responders. Today's episode is about UAS, aka drones. There is no doubt that these units will be a "game changer" for all first responder agencies.

On Thursday, Chief Werner will join us again to discuss new 3-D technology that will allow an IC to see exactly where in a structure firefighters are.

The first episode will be…

Just finished the first of two very interesting interviews with Chief (ret) Charles Werner of the Charlottesville Fire Dept. regarding new technology for first responders. Today's episode is about UAS, aka drones. There is no doubt that these units will be a "game changer" for all first responder agencies.
On Thursday, Chief Werner will join us again to discuss new 3-D technology that will allow an IC to see exactly where in a structure firefighters are.
The first episode will be available this week. Watch for the announcement and make sure you add it to your "must listen" list!




RETHINK FIRE DRILLS MY ASS

2018-02-16T23:36:49.000Z

The Ohio Sheriff that thinks there is a need to change the manner in which fire drills in schools are conducted may be a hell of a good sheriff, but he lacks the understanding of fire behavior, fire spread and the many children that have sacrificed their  lives so we have current fire drills and fire alarms  in place in schools.  The systems and codes we have in place did not happen by accident - they were brought abut by deaths - a lot of deaths. THEY WERE PAID FR BY THE DEATHS OF HUNDREDS…

The Ohio Sheriff that thinks there is a need to change the manner in which fire drills in schools are conducted may be a hell of a good sheriff, but he lacks the understanding of fire behavior, fire spread and the many children that have sacrificed their  lives so we have current fire drills and fire alarms  in place in schools.  The systems and codes we have in place did not happen by accident - they were brought abut by deaths - a lot of deaths. THEY WERE PAID FR BY THE DEATHS OF HUNDREDS OF CHILDREN AT SCHOOLS THAT BURNED

With experience as a (retired/disabled) Police Chief and now the volunteer Chief of the Fire Academy of ND, I have a clear understanding of the whole picture which unfolded Tuesday with regard to a fire alarm being involved.  When Evil wishes to commit an act, Evil will do whatever it takes to commit such an act.  Example - all the TSA people checking us like bandits when all it takes is a dedicated idiot with a clean record to work for an airline and throw one extra "suitcase" in with the baggage he has loaded and hidden and that airplane will fly like a brick.  It is a fact, Evil people will do WHATEVER IT TAKES" to get the job done.  To now even think of subverting a system that has saved thousands of students when fires occur will only take time from the fire service spending their time on current needed projects to fight the stupidity of changing a good thing due to one Evil son of a bitches actions.

If I lived in that Sheriff's county, I would already have a recall petition circulated because of the S###

SHOW about to begin.  Some politicians that do not know what WE know will certainly look over his ill fated proposal.  

The WORST thing that cold happen is this stupidity gain traction - and it is our job to let it stop RIGHT NOW.

Darrell Graf, Chief of Police (retired/lod disabled) Medina, ND Police Dept.   Chief - Fire Academy ND




THE DAY AFTER

2018-02-15T18:58:48.000Z

The “dawn of a new day” is supposed to allow us to start fresh from whatever troubles we underwent the day before. Sadly, today that notion holds no water. Whether you live here in South Florida as we do, or you live “off the grid” and you heard the news on amateur radio, today the sunlight is obscured by the ethereal gun smoke that still hangs over our community where this tragedy occurred and that also drifts over our society as another mass shooting occurs.   We will soon… The “dawn of a new day” is supposed to allow us to start fresh from whatever troubles we underwent the day before. Sadly, today that notion holds no water. Whether you live here in South Florida as we do, or you live “off the grid” and you heard the news on amateur radio, today the sunlight is obscured by the ethereal gun smoke that still hangs over our community where this tragedy occurred and that also drifts over our society as another mass shooting occurs.   We will soon hear to “facts” from proponents of the rights accorded by our Second Amendment and from those that demand absolute gun control. Again, subsequent to Columbine, University of Virginia, Sandy Hook, Orlando and Las Vegas, those who the citizens have elected will take sides as thy always do, but in all likelihood, will produce little action, if any at all.   I started enjoying the hobby of target shooting in junior high school, when I joined the rifle club. Starting with pellet rifles, then moving to a .22 caliber and finally to an M-1 over the two years, I worked my way up and received my medal as a marksman. Years later, I spent two different school years studying in Israel, 1972-1973 and 1975-1976. While there, I often visited an indoor target range and learned to shoot various caliber handguns, several long guns and the famous, Israeli Uzi. Remember, at this time, every young man and woman at age 18, was required to enroll in the Israeli Defense Forces for three years and open weapon carrying was a common site in Israel, on the streets, in restaurants and even movie theaters.   I spent four years in the suburban area outside Greensboro NC, where I began my fire service avocation in a volunteer fire department in the mid-to-late 1970’s. Many of my colleagues there, were hunters, responsible hunters, some using rifles and shotguns, other using bows and arrows. I even went hunting once or twice. We got “skunked,” but enjoyed ourselves anyway.   When I moved to upstate New York in the early 1980’s for a new job, I felt that due to the substantial amounts of money I handled each week, I wanted to apply for a gun permit. At that time, New York State had some of the strictest laws in this country regarding procuring a concealed weapon’s permit. Each permit application had to be submitted to a judge in the appropriate county, who would review the applicant’s background and decide if the answer would be “YES” or “NO.” That process could be completed in a week or take months. In my case, it took about a month.   Was I upset that I had to wait? Not in the least? Did I have an immediate and overwhelming need to defend myself that should allow me to receive an expedited issuance of my permit? No. I simply waited until I received the permit in the mail and then went to the sporting good store, where I had selected my handgun several weeks prior to receipt of my permit.   I had actually joined the NRA while in 7th grade. We did so as part of the rifle class. And I kept up that membership unti[...]



The Firefighter Cancer Initiative - Broward County FL

2018-02-15T01:52:55.000Z

We have just published our latest podcast, "The Firefighter Cancer Initiative in Broward County FL." Guests include Alberto Caban-Martinez, DO, PhD and Natasha Schaefer-Solle, PhD from Univ. of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Care Centers and...Asst. Chief Todd Leduc and Frank Correggio from the Broward County Sheriff's Office Fire-Rescue Services. We hope that you'll listen and learn, then pay it forward to your friends & colleagues.Beat cancer…
We have just published our latest podcast, "The Firefighter Cancer Initiative in Broward County FL." Guests include Alberto Caban-Martinez, DO, PhD and Natasha Schaefer-Solle, PhD from Univ. of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Care Centers and...Asst. Chief Todd Leduc and Frank Correggio from the Broward County Sheriff's Office Fire-Rescue Services. We hope that you'll listen and learn, then pay it forward to your friends & colleagues.Beat cancer before cancer beats YOU!
You can find our podcast on our website at Bit.ly/5AlarmPodcast, on our podcast host at Bit.ly/5-AlarmTFPodcast and on both iTunes and Google Play.



Our Podcast Keeps Growing With Some of the Best Topics & Guests!

2018-02-10T21:19:36.000Z

February 10, 2018 - We released another episode of our podcast, "5-Alarm Task Force," this morning with a longtime follower and friend, Chris Tobin. In this episode, Chris talked about the importance of multiple levels of mentoring in the fire service. Even after 8 years with his current department, he still considers himself the "rookie" in the firehouse, always seeking to learn from those with more experience. On the other side of this coin, he has recently re-established h…

February 10, 2018 - We released another episode of our podcast, "5-Alarm Task Force," this morning with a longtime follower and friend, Chris Tobin. In this episode, Chris talked about the importance of multiple levels of mentoring in the fire service. Even after 8 years with his current department, he still considers himself the "rookie" in the firehouse, always seeking to learn from those with more experience. On the other side of this coin, he has recently re-established his connection with a nearby volunteer fire department and works hard to share what he has learned to the newcomers and others there. We also discussed the importance, especially with the hustle and bustle of today's society of establishing strong mutual-aid or automatic aid agreements wherever and whenever possible. Chris shared his perspective regarding what often impedes the establishment of those close ties and how they can be overcome.

And don't forget, this Monday, we'll be sitting down with members of the University of Miami-Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Care Centers medical staff, along with Assistant Chief Todd Leduc of the Broward County Sheriff's Office - Fire/Rescue Division, to discuss the Center's work with Broward County firefighters and their cancer initiative. That podcast is scheduled for release on Thursday, February 15th.

Then on Friday, February 16th, we welcome Deputy Chief Steve Prziborowski of the Santa Clara County CA Fire Department. He will be discussing, 1. Courage Under Fire - Being the Best Officer You Can Be. 2. Prompt Others for Success and 3. Establishing Expectations & Holding Others Accountable. This podcast is schedule for release on Monday, February 19th. You won't want to miss it!

Remember, you can listen to our podcasts through our website, 5-Alarm Task Force or through both iTunes and Google Play! All podcasts can be listened via live streaming or downloaded for later enjoyment.

On a separate note, we are looking into developing a small number of apparel items with the new, forthcoming, "5-Alarm Task Force" logo. Right now, we envision some t-shirts, caps and mugs. Prices have not been set yet and we're still in the preliminary stages. We can assure you that they will reasonable! Feel free to drop us a no commitment email to Dalmatprod@Outlook.com if you may be interested!

Stay Safe!







No Room For Pessimism

2018-01-25T21:33:45.000Z

I just completed reading the book Relentless Optimism: How a Commitment to Positive Thinking Changes Everything by: Darrin Donnelly. The book is a motivational book that provides a million and one ways that positive thinking can better not only your life, but those around you as well. It uses the story of a major league baseball player that is bumped back down to the minors and his struggle to make it back to the big leagues. The book had two very memorable quotes…

I just completed reading the book Relentless Optimism: How a Commitment to Positive Thinking Changes Everything by: Darrin Donnelly. The book is a motivational book that provides a million and one ways that positive thinking can better not only your life, but those around you as well. It uses the story of a major league baseball player that is bumped back down to the minors and his struggle to make it back to the big leagues. The book had two very memorable quotes that I needed to share. 

"Be grateful for every moment you get to be out here. You're a ballplayer and any day you step onto this sacred ground is never wasted. You're part of this game. And nothing can take that away from you." -Darrin Donnelly 

Take ballplayer out and replace with firefighter. We have all felt this way stepping off the rig or walking into the bay at the beginning of our shift. Pride in not only our job, but ourselves for the sacrifices that we have made over our lifetime in the pursuit of being a firefighter. Remember everyday that you are granted the ability to run emergency calls and have a direct impact on others lives in their time of need is a blessing, because one day you will no longer have that ability. One day you too will be on the sidelines and in the stands watching the players take part in a game that you used to play. 

"Regardless of what the results are, a man can live with the fact that he gave his very best. What a man can't live with is not giving his best and wondering what would have happened if he had. What a man can't live with is growing bitter and developing a pessimistic attitude. What a man can't live with is the regret that he didn't enjoy and embrace every opportunity he was given to do what he loves because he was so caught up in thoughts about the future or the past." - Darrin Donnely 

As motivated firefighters and professionals, we all have wants. Some want to move up the ranks and become chiefs, others want to be at a certain station or on a certain crew. When these wants don't immediately transpire, we as humans can become distraught and begin to believe that it never will. If we take one day at a time and do our very best at our job, no matter what that job may be, we will be successful in every meaning of the word. This job is about doing our very best every time we show up to the station, every time the tones go off for an emergency run. There is no room in the fire service for bitterness and pessimism. Stay positive and keep fighting the fight, because one day you will no longer have that honor. 

-Lt. Michael DeStefano 




The Future Firefighter: Fire Engineering Blog Talk Radio Episode 1724

2018-01-20T21:30:00.000Z

The Future Firefighter: Episode 1724 show notes with Fire Chief Jacob McAfee from the Fresno City College - FCC Fire Academy. “The bottom line in leadership isn't how far we advance ourselves but how far we advance others.”   (Maxwell,… The Future Firefighter: Episode 1724 show notes with Fire Chief Jacob McAfee from the Fresno City College - FCC Fire Academy. “The bottom line in leadership isn't how far we advance ourselves but how far we advance others.”   (Maxwell, 1998) Excerpt from the book by John C. Maxwell, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You   I believe LEADERSHIP is influence.  It is our ability to influence and inspire others to be more and do more every day.  It should be our absolute truth to invest in the mentoring and advancement of those that come after us and anyone else who will listen.  If it is not, it is at least your responsibility as a leader to make the commitment to pass our knowledge and experience on so that we can thrive as a fire service.   Why I decided to join the fire service: After graduating from high school, I was playing College football and just being a College kid. My friend had just completed the USMC boot camp and came to visit.  By the end of the week, I had decided to join the Marines and what better occupation to do while I was in Firefighting.  I thought that sounded pretty sick!  I made the commitment to change my life and take the risk.  After Nine years of service with two deployments to Iraq, I left the military.  Overall this experience is what shaped who I am today.  From that time, I was committed to continuous self evaluation and improvement that eventually turned into a drive to lead and inspire others and organizations to be great.  I have since completed two Masters degrees, an ABD in my doctoral program and have had the pleasure of working with some great people and great organizations such as the Institute of Fire Engineers, CPSE, CA State Fire Marshal, Cal-EMA, AHA, and all of the DOD entity's from CA-NY.     My personal mission statement is: To first and foremost INVEST in people, be a servant leader anchored in core values, dedicated to influencing and inspiring others to be better every day, through leadership, passion, and mentoring. Importance of a plan: Before you can follow through with a successful plan you have to find your "WHY"! Why do you exist?  What makes you passionate?  If it is a life of service, brotherhood, sisterhood, becoming a firefighter, MAKE THE COMMITMENT!  Once you know your why and you make the commitment to your why; you can make a successful plan. I use the acronym plan ahead to stay in track with my personal and professional goals. While in a formal environment this changes however, its a good starting framework.   PLAN AHEAD Predetermine your course of action:  What is your vision/end state? Lay out your goals:  To make goals reachable use SMART goal setting.  Goals should be developed that are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and time bound. Adjust your priorities:  This is key as you move forward in the process of becoming a firefighter and doing everything it takes to improve your chances.  Honestly, I love white boards.  I like them because my priorities change daily and it allows flexibility and keeps it written down.  I also believe it[...]



You Are A Hero, Act Like One

2018-01-16T20:59:45.000Z

You Are A Hero, Act Like One   Christmas season has come and gone and the New Year has begun; A new year full of hopes, dreams, and beliefs for a better life. During the Christmas season I, like many others, had the distinct pleasure of walking the aisles at many different stores in search of the perfect gifts for nieces, my children, even the family dog. I found something very interesting in my journey for toys to brighten the faces of those I love. To… You Are A Hero, Act Like One   Christmas season has come and gone and the New Year has begun; A new year full of hopes, dreams, and beliefs for a better life. During the Christmas season I, like many others, had the distinct pleasure of walking the aisles at many different stores in search of the perfect gifts for nieces, my children, even the family dog. I found something very interesting in my journey for toys to brighten the faces of those I love. To my surprise I found that every single store I visited had fire trucks on the shelves. Fire trucks that kids could ride, fire trucks with every cartoon character imaginable riding them, fire trucks that lit up and had realistic siren sounds, and everywhere I looked there were fire trucks.             Can you imagine, in 2017 there are still fire trucks that are selling out all over the place like they have been for decades. Fire trucks and the fire department is still popular with young children. Like it or not, kids look up to firefighters and what we do. Kids want to be us.             At your last fire station tour or public education event at the school, how many of those children had not just one, but easily one thousand questions (most in the way of a story) for the firefighters? Ask a kid what they did in school yesterday and you will get a blank stare making you wonder if the kid fell asleep, now ask them when the fire department came to their school and they will burst with excitement telling you ever small detail about the fire helmet that the Lieutenant let them wear.             I see it everyday as it becomes more and more popular, “Firefighters are not heroes!” It has become an almost selling point of some politicians to preach that running into burning buildings and helping those who cannot help themselves is not a heroic act, but rather just a firefighter doing their chosen job. Ask those kids if firefighters are heroes. I promise you that the reply will always be yes.             These same kids grow up and do one of two things, become a firefighter themselves or continue to hold a place in their heart for the fire department. The trust of firefighters that is instilled in the young innocent mind of a child carries on into adulthood. How many articles and studies have you seen about firefighters being the most trusted profession in the world? I can name dozens.             Now go on your favorite online search engine and type in firefighter scandal or firefighter arrested. You will see articles written by different local news agencies almost every day. Because we have such a high level of public trust every time there is a taboo act committed by a firefighter it is somewhat of an anomaly and therefor news worthy, and you better believe that the news will go to the end of the world to show that Billy Joe that earned himself a DUI w[...]



GHOSTS

2018-01-14T17:21:07.000Z

Ghosts by Chief Jim Crawford “Which one of us are you going to tell him about?”  What a powerful question to ask a firefighter.  From the beginning of the fire service firefighters have seen sights that haunt them, and sometimes taunt them, for life.  They are… Ghosts by Chief Jim Crawford “Which one of us are you going to tell him about?”  What a powerful question to ask a firefighter.  From the beginning of the fire service firefighters have seen sights that haunt them, and sometimes taunt them, for life.  They are images that we as individual firefighters try to forget, ignore or just want to go away, forever.  But unfortunately those of us that have been given this ghost image burden will live with these horrible images for the rest of our lives.  They are burned into our minds and memories like staring at a bright light then seeing the light pattern when you close your eyes.  We will take the images home with us, to our children’s birthday parties, on Saturday date night with our significant other, to job interviews or a get together with friends.  We will take them to bed with us at the end of each day tossing and turning as we try to forget, trying to shake the image loose from our minds.  Thinking of something else only leads you back to ghosts from another scene, always there, always haunting.   As we see other disasters and tragedy on news channels, we can only think of the new ghosts that our brothers or sisters on scene will have to endure.  The brave and valiant attempts at rescue of those we are sworn to protect.  And when we have done our utmost best, stretched our oath to the very end, we will have either won or lost, there is no in between.  And it’s the losing that destroys each of us from within.  The pain, the guilt, the overwhelming sense of failure.  It can be too much to bear at times.   My many ghosts have dwelled within me through a very long career.  From infants burned into mattresses, to multiple child fatalities, those dragged from burning buildings that didn’t make it, and LODD firefighter fatalities.  From the many motor vehicle accidents where the occupants weren’t extricated in time to the victims hit by trains.  From working the body recovery team of a major commercial aircraft crash to the victims who jumped before you could throw the ground ladder.  I grew up in a fire service when you didn’t ask for help nor show any signs of grief.  I have lived with my ghosts without help and have learned how to deal with them in my own way.  My family has suffered the most through my self-help psychiatry but that is the way I was taught to deal with the ghosts.  I know better now.   Today’s fire service has many avenues to help cope with mental health.  From organized Firefighter Assistance Teams (FAST) to employer based Employee Assistance Programs (EAP).  We all must seek these avenues of help if life or our job is just too much to take.  On the other hand, we also must encourage our co-workers and friends to seek this avenue of help if they are troubled.  Keeping these important phone numbers available for yourself or others to share can be very beneficial when a crisis occurs.  Local Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD) teams are a very helpful and logical resource when a terrible tragedy occur[...]



Where Do We Go From Here?

2018-01-12T20:22:36.000Z

          It has been a difficult start to 2018 for the Fire Service. In less than one week, we lost two of our comrades. On January 3rd, Wamego KS Firefighter John Randle succumbed to his injuries suffered from a fall while returning apparatus to service. And on January 6th, Philadelphia Lt. Matt LeTourneau died as a result of a structural collapse while fighting a rowhouse fire. We mourn their loss along with their families, friends, colleagues and the entire fire service and their…           It has been a difficult start to 2018 for the Fire Service. In less than one week, we lost two of our comrades. On January 3rd, Wamego KS Firefighter John Randle succumbed to his injuries suffered from a fall while returning apparatus to service. And on January 6th, Philadelphia Lt. Matt LeTourneau died as a result of a structural collapse while fighting a rowhouse fire. We mourn their loss along with their families, friends, colleagues and the entire fire service and their sacrifice shall never be forgotten. There will be those who will hold to the belief that this is how most firefighters die in the line of duty; accidents that just cannot be predicted or avoided. They could not be further from the truth and the statistics prove that.  The recently released the LODD report for 2017. Last year, ninety-three of our comrades responded to their final alarm. However, of that number, only one firefighter's death was directly attributed to a fire. One! That equals less than one-percent (<1%) of those ninety-nine deaths! While exact cause of death determinations are still forthcoming for some, once again, it appears that most of these line-of-duty deaths were due to some form of preventable health issue.           Now the question is, how do we define preventable health issues? Personally, I break them down into two groups, the known and the unknown.           A. The Known Group: This group consists of issues that you are aware of, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated unhealthy cholesterol levels, chest pains, shortness of breath, etc. It is important to note that a number of these can also fall into the "unknown" group. However, if you are a firefighter, career or volunteer and you have had any type of a physical exam in the last 12-24 months, you know if you have been diagnosed with any of medical conditions. However, the question is, "Have you done anything to mitigate this/these issue(s)? If your answer is, "No," I'll cover that in a moment.           B. The Unknown Group: As stated above, many of the conditions stated in Group A, may still be unknown to you, except perhaps for obesity. There is NO way around that one! On the other hand, if you have not exhibited any of the common symptoms of the other issues, you may not know that you have it. Add to this list are the often asymptomatic in the initial stages of forms of cancer, certain organ ailments, bone and muscle issues and others. While a fair number of these might be detected in with a complete physical, some can still go unnoticed until they rear their ugly heads. When that happens, that will usually force you into seeking medical care.         Now, let's return to the members of the first group, Known Issues, but who have decided, for some reason[...]



Lighthouse Uniform Co. Published by Steve Cohen · 23 mins ·  For a variety of reasons, America’s Volunteer Fire Service is having serious and significant difficulty in attracting and retaining…

2018-01-11T23:51:24.000Z

Lighthouse Uniform Co. Published by Steve Cohen · 23 mins ·  For a variety of reasons, America’s Volunteer Fire Service is having serious and significant difficulty in attracting and retaining adequate personnel to handle its call needs. It was to that issue, the question was posed to one of the country’s Fire Service ‘deep thinkers’ (although he would pooh-pooh both the tag and notion). The question: Is the model for today’s volunteer fire service dying, fundamentally dead or in need of new glue? His response; “…the VFS (mirroring society at large) is in a cycle of prosperity, collectivism and secular thought that does not favor meaningful life. Without tragedy we have no heroes, without pain no joy, without need we have no giving. Our Progressive secular friends have deluded the country (into thinking) that we have no need. They have sold the masses a “Modern Family” delusion. It will implode, there will be suffering and the Volunteer Fire Service will as it has in American history several times before, be where the restorative justice begins again”. My email is steve@lighthouseuniform.com. If you would like to weigh in on this, please use my email. If you’d like to know whose thought this is, email me and I will share it with you. The picture provides a clue. [...]



Remembering 2017 - Kicking Off 2018!

2017-12-30T23:39:01.000Z

As I sit here writing this post, we're about 36 hours after the tragic fire in Bronx NY that so sadly took 12 lives. Most of us cannot even imagine losing one family remember or even one neighbor. Yet, one family lost four members, a brave soldier from our Armed Forces, home on Christmas leave, lost his life trying to rescue others, plus another seven poor souls. The probable cause of this conflagration? A young child, approximately three years old, playing with the knobs on the stove,… As I sit here writing this post, we're about 36 hours after the tragic fire in Bronx NY that so sadly took 12 lives. Most of us cannot even imagine losing one family remember or even one neighbor. Yet, one family lost four members, a brave soldier from our Armed Forces, home on Christmas leave, lost his life trying to rescue others, plus another seven poor souls. The probable cause of this conflagration? A young child, approximately three years old, playing with the knobs on the stove, while his mother showered. According to news reports, she came out of the shower, saw the smoke, grabbed her 3-year old and another baby, 2, and ran out of her first floor apartment, leaving the door open. Her apartment doorway faced the stairwell, allowing a chimney-effect as the fire roared out her door. Besides the terrible loss of life and nearly two dozen others injured, several in critical condition, our heroic brothers and sisters of the FDNY, FDNY-EMS and NYPD made amazing rescues and resuscitations. Yet, as most of us well know, the horror that they saw Thursday night will stay with them for many, many nights. Many of us are working to break the barrier of the old phrase, "Suck it up!" Today, we know the very heavy toll that these types of calls take on first responders. Yes, we know what we're getting in for when we sign up, whether as career, volunteers or paid-on-call. But that doesn't mean we are not human; that we don't have a psyche that can be hurt and damaged by repeated exposure to terrible trauma. Let this call incident provide us with two important goals as we enter the new year of 2018:1. We must strive to teach our citizens what we already know; closing a door can reduce a fire's potential, whether it be at night when we go to bed or, if we know we are the last one escaping from a fire in a structure - CLOSE THE DOOR! Remember, "fire prevention" is not just for October!2. No one, not one first responder, must bottle up their emotions after a call such as this. REACH OUT to someone you trust; be it a line officer, chief, your doctor, your clergy-person. The editor of FIREHOUSE Magazine recently said that currently, as he reviews submissions for articles, they run 4:1 being about behavioral health! FOUR-TO-ONE! What does that tell us! Now - as we look forward to kicking off 2018, we proud to announce three terrific guests who will join us on "5-Alarm Task Force." First is David Wiklanski, a career firefighter in NJ, who will discuss having and maintaining resilience in the fire service and its definition. Next, will be Nic Higgins, Founder the The Firehouse Tribune website and Twitter account. Nic, also a NJ firefighter, will discuss the purpose behind their website and, critical thinking. Finally, (so far!) Aaron [...]