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Preview: paizo.com Top Sellers in Super Genius Games

paizo.com Top Sellers in Super Genius Games



paizo.com Top Sellers in Super Genius Games



Published: 2013-07-17T01:53:40Z

Updated: 2013-07-17T01:53:40Z

 



The Genius Guide to the Death Knight (PFRPG) PDF ($3.99)

2012-05-08T17:44:53Z

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The death knight is a champion of the grave, serving to spread the power of death throughout the lands of the living. Most death knights are the chosen warriors of gods of undeath and decay, evil psychopaths who desire nothing more than to see the “mistake” of life replaced by the glorious, unchanging “blessing” of undeath. Though unquestionably evil, these death knights are often confused as to why anyone would wish to be alive, since life is a condition that leads to hunger, exhaustion, pain, and suffering. Undeath is the perfect state of existence, but even normal death is obviously better than struggling through a life. To these death knights, they are bringing a gift to all living creatures, even if they have to do it one murder at a time.

However, a very few gods of true death also empower death knights specifically to preserve the sanctity of the grave and oppose the forces of the undead. Though the gods of repose have many names in many cultures, the death knights often refer to their divine sponsors as “the Grey Mistress” and see her as a personification of the state of death itself. To these death knights death is a calm, cool mistress who eventually envelops all things, and undeath is an insult to her. Though such death knights have little care for the living, and are not of good alignment, they can sometimes serve as allies to life-loving champions who must oppose a powerful undead force. Though they see life as a lesser state of being than death, they also see it as a temporary one and know their Grey Mistress will eventually enwrap all living things in her pale embrace.

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The death knight is a champion of the grave, serving to spread the power of death throughout the lands of the living. Most death knights are the chosen warriors of gods of undeath and decay, evil psychopaths who desire nothing more than to see the “mistake” of life replaced by the glorious, unchanging “blessing” of undeath. Though unquestionably evil, these death knights are often confused as to why anyone would wish to be alive, since life is a condition that leads to hunger, exhaustion, pain, and suffering. Undeath is the perfect state of existence, but even normal death is obviously better than struggling through a life. To these death knights, they are bringing a gift to all living creatures, even if they have to do it one murder at a time.

However, a very few gods of true death also empower death knights specifically to preserve the sanctity of the grave and oppose the forces of the undead. Though the gods of repose have many names in many cultures, the death knights often refer to their divine sponsors as “the Grey Mistress” and see her as a personification of the state of death itself. To these death knights death is a calm, cool mistress who eventually envelops all things, and undeath is an insult to her. Though such death knights have little care for the living, and are not of good alignment, they can sometimes serve as allies to life-loving champions who must oppose a powerful undead force. Though they see life as a lesser state of being than death, they also see it as a temporary one and know their Grey Mistress will eventually enwrap all living things in her pale embrace.




Sorcerer's Options: Beyond Bloodlines (PFRPG) PDF ($3.99)

2011-06-15T14:11:03Z

Sorcerers are set apart from most other spellcasters by being creatures with vast and growing natural magic powers, closer in concept to monsters than the sages of study and learning epitomized by wizards or the agents of divinity that make up the ranks of clerics, druids, inquisitors, oracles and paladins. Even witches and bards are normally presented as drawing on power that originates outside them (from a patron or the power of music, respectively), rather than having power grow from within them. Only sorcerers are commonly presented as having truly innate magic powers which are the legacy of a mystic heritage or special destiny. The strongest indications of this legacy are the powers granted by a sorcerer’s bloodline. Each bloodline affects a sorcerer’s spells known, class skills, potential training (in the form of bonus feats), special powers, and even how the sorcerer casts spells (as modified by bloodline arcana). Bloodlines are an awesome, flexible, flavorful element of the sorcerer class. As a result, nearly all efforts to create new rule variants for sorcerers do so by creating new sorcerous bloodlines. That’s fine, as far as it goes. But is that the only way to make sorcerers different? Should these heroes who have magic itself coursing through their veins not have access to any special abilities beyond what their heritage powers grant them? Why can’t sorcerers learn to use their innate spells in whole new ways, develop weird quirks of magic power, or have alternate class abilities similar to the archetypes of other classes? In short, why can’t a sorcerer’s options go beyond bloodlines? Sorcerer’s Options: Beyond Bloodlines is designed to expand the alternate rules that can be used to make two sorcerers different, even if they select the same bloodline. It does this by presenting arcane endowments (special powers available only to sorcerers, representing quirks in their inherited powers), sorcery spells (arcane spells available only to sorcerers), and alternate class powers built on the model of class archetypes (first presented in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Advanced Player’s Guide).Sorcerers are set apart from most other spellcasters by being creatures with vast and growing natural magic powers, closer in concept to monsters than the sages of study and learning epitomized by wizards or the agents of divinity that make up the ranks of clerics, druids, inquisitors, oracles and paladins. Even witches and bards are normally presented as drawing on power that originates outside them (from a patron or the power of music, respectively), rather than having power grow from within them. Only sorcerers are commonly presented as having truly innate magic powers which are the legacy of a mystic heritage or special destiny. The strongest indications of this legacy are the powers granted by a sorcerer’s bloodline. Each bloodline affects a sorcerer’s spells known, class skills, potential training (in the form of bonus feats), special powers, and even how the sorcerer casts spells (as modified by bloodline arcana). Bloodlines are an awesome, flexible, flavorful element of the sorcerer class. As a result, nearly all efforts to create new rule variants for sorcerers do so by creating new sorcerous bloodlines. That’s fine, as far as it goes. But is that the only way to make sorcerers different? Should these heroes who have magic itself coursing through their veins not have access to any special abilities beyond what their heritage powers grant them? Why can’t sorcerers learn to use their innate spells in whole new ways, develop weird quirks of magic power, or have alternate class abilities similar to the archetypes of other classes? In short, why can’t a sorcerer’s options go beyond bloodlines? Sorcerer’s Options: Beyond Bloodlines is designed to expand the alternate rules that can be used to make two sorcerers different, even if they select the same bloodline. It does this by presenting arcane endowments (special powers available only to sorcere[...]



Houserule Handbooks: Spell Points (PFRPG) PDF ($4.99)

2012-08-21T20:40:54Z

Welcome to Houserule Handbooks: Spell Points, the first in a series of products presenting some of the houserules used at Super Genius Games. Each of these products is designed to introduce a carefully balanced, developed, and playtested version of a popular houserule for campaigns using the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook. Houserule Handbooks aren't for everyone, and should always be considered "alternate" rules, only for use if a GM and players all want to add something different to a campaign. In the case of Spell Points, the alternate rule is a system to allow all spellcasters to fuel their spells with a pool of spell points, not requiring any spell preparation, and allowing a spellcaster additional flexibility by using a lot of spell points to fuel a few high-level spells, or gain extended staying power by restricting casting to a larger number of lower-level spells. Further, the system is designed only for actual spellcasters, ignoring the spell-like abilities of monks and the infusions of alchemists as dissimilar enough to not need the same kind of spell point houserules. These considerations drive all the design decisions that follow, so if the system as described doesn't sound like your cup of tea, this product likely isn't for you. Spell Points Spell points are a resource used to cast spells, as opposed to using the normal rules of spell slots and spell preparation. Rules are given for spell points in general, and then specific rules for each spellcasting class. Every spellcasting class can use spell points. A campaign may only use spell-point characters (at the GM's discretion), or both spell-point and normal versions of classes may exist (in which case the decision to be a spell-point spellcaster must be selected when the first level in a spellcasting class is taken). A character cannot take levels in both a spellpoint and non-spell-point version of the same class (treat using spell points as a kind of archetype for spellcasting classes). The Author Owen K.C. Stephens is an experienced and well-known game designer, with credits dating back to the late 1990s for games that focus on fire-breathing lizards and laser swords. He has worked with numerous role-playing game companies, has more than 250 RPG credits, and is currently the Lead Developer of Super Genius Games.Welcome to Houserule Handbooks: Spell Points, the first in a series of products presenting some of the houserules used at Super Genius Games. Each of these products is designed to introduce a carefully balanced, developed, and playtested version of a popular houserule for campaigns using the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook. Houserule Handbooks aren't for everyone, and should always be considered "alternate" rules, only for use if a GM and players all want to add something different to a campaign. In the case of Spell Points, the alternate rule is a system to allow all spellcasters to fuel their spells with a pool of spell points, not requiring any spell preparation, and allowing a spellcaster additional flexibility by using a lot of spell points to fuel a few high-level spells, or gain extended staying power by restricting casting to a larger number of lower-level spells. Further, the system is designed only for actual spellcasters, ignoring the spell-like abilities of monks and the infusions of alchemists as dissimilar enough to not need the same kind of spell point houserules. These considerations drive all the design decisions that follow, so if the system as described doesn't sound like your cup of tea, this product likely isn't for you. Spell Points Spell points are a resource used to cast spells, as opposed to using the normal rules of spell slots and spell preparation. Rules are given for spell points in general, and then specific rules for each spellcasting class. Every spellcasting class can use spell points. A campaign may only use spell-point characters (at the GM's discretion), or both spell-point and normal versions of classes may exist (in which case the [...]



The Genius Guide to Horrifically Overpowered Feats (PFRPG) PDF ($3.99)

2012-03-30T17:56:59Z

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This product is a bad idea. It contains a wide array of feats that are, as the title suggests, horrifically overpowered. The only way these feats can be considered “balanced” is that they can make any character horrifically overpowered, so allowing them all into a campaign gives all the players (and monsters, and NPCs, and even minions) a chance to be ridiculously super-powered. And as long as everyone is super, it’s all balanced out, right?

No, we know. Just... run with it a second, okay?

We’re not suggesting any GM should allow these feats into a campaign. In fact, we advise against it. Seriously, the whole product is called “Horrifically Overpowered Feats,” which seemed like a dead giveaway that we’re not encouraging anyone to use these rules. The product is even being released on April 1st, 2012. April 1st. Get it?

Of course a GM can add these to a campaign. It’s a bad idea, but the feats are all mechanically sound (in that they follow the normal format of feats and work with the normal rules of the game), and their effect on a character’s abilities is clearly spelled out. It’s just that these feats have a significantly greater impact on a character’s overall effectiveness than any feat in the game’s official rules. Heck, they have a significantly greater impact than any feat Super Genius Games has ever published. They do much more than a feat is supposed to do. They do so much, in fact, that there’s no way to grant the benefits these feats represent without making whatever character receives them much, much more powerful than characters are supposed to be.

In many ways, these feats are classic bad examples, doing exactly the sorts of things feats shouldn’t. If you ever design a feat you expect to work in a normal campaign and it looks a lot like one of these feats, that’s a clear sign you’ve done something wrong.

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This product is a bad idea. It contains a wide array of feats that are, as the title suggests, horrifically overpowered. The only way these feats can be considered “balanced” is that they can make any character horrifically overpowered, so allowing them all into a campaign gives all the players (and monsters, and NPCs, and even minions) a chance to be ridiculously super-powered. And as long as everyone is super, it’s all balanced out, right?

No, we know. Just... run with it a second, okay?

We’re not suggesting any GM should allow these feats into a campaign. In fact, we advise against it. Seriously, the whole product is called “Horrifically Overpowered Feats,” which seemed like a dead giveaway that we’re not encouraging anyone to use these rules. The product is even being released on April 1st, 2012. April 1st. Get it?

Of course a GM can add these to a campaign. It’s a bad idea, but the feats are all mechanically sound (in that they follow the normal format of feats and work with the normal rules of the game), and their effect on a character’s abilities is clearly spelled out. It’s just that these feats have a significantly greater impact on a character’s overall effectiveness than any feat in the game’s official rules. Heck, they have a significantly greater impact than any feat Super Genius Games has ever published. They do much more than a feat is supposed to do. They do so much, in fact, that there’s no way to grant the benefits these feats represent without making whatever character receives them much, much more powerful than characters are supposed to be.

In many ways, these feats are classic bad examples, doing exactly the sorts of things feats shouldn’t. If you ever design a feat you expect to work in a normal campaign and it looks a lot like one of these feats, that’s a clear sign you’ve done something wrong.




Bullet Points: 7 Time Thief & Time Warden Feats (PFRPG) PDF ($1.00)

2011-12-30T00:50:41Z

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Sometimes rules supplements read like the world-setting bible of frustrated novelists. While solid world-building is a useful skill, you don’t always need four paragraphs of flavor text to tell you swords are cool, magic is power, shadows are scary, and orcs are savage. Sometimes a GM doesn’t have time to slog through a page of history for every magic weapon. Sometimes all that’s needed are a few cool ideas, with just enough information to use them in a game. Sometimes, all you need are bullet points.

#1 With A Bullet Point is a line of very short, cheap PDFs each of which gives the bare bones of a set of related options. It may be five spells, six feats, eight magic weapon special abilities, or any other short set of related rules we can cram into about a page. Short and simple, these PDFs are for GMs and players who know how to integrate new ideas into their campaigns without any hand-holding, and just need fresh ideas and the rules to support them. No in-character fiction setting the game world. No charts and tables. No sidebars of explanations and optional rules. Just one sentence of explanation for the High Concept of the PDF, then bullet points.

The High Concept: Seven feats designed to augment the options and utility of time thieves and time wardens (from The Genius Guide to the Time Thief and The Genius Guide to the Time Warden).).

The feats included are:

  • Aevum Mastery
  • Alternate Self
  • Last-Second Save
  • Mote Mastery
  • Opportune Blow
  • Precognition
  • Timely Detonation

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Sometimes rules supplements read like the world-setting bible of frustrated novelists. While solid world-building is a useful skill, you don’t always need four paragraphs of flavor text to tell you swords are cool, magic is power, shadows are scary, and orcs are savage. Sometimes a GM doesn’t have time to slog through a page of history for every magic weapon. Sometimes all that’s needed are a few cool ideas, with just enough information to use them in a game. Sometimes, all you need are bullet points.

#1 With A Bullet Point is a line of very short, cheap PDFs each of which gives the bare bones of a set of related options. It may be five spells, six feats, eight magic weapon special abilities, or any other short set of related rules we can cram into about a page. Short and simple, these PDFs are for GMs and players who know how to integrate new ideas into their campaigns without any hand-holding, and just need fresh ideas and the rules to support them. No in-character fiction setting the game world. No charts and tables. No sidebars of explanations and optional rules. Just one sentence of explanation for the High Concept of the PDF, then bullet points.

The High Concept: Seven feats designed to augment the options and utility of time thieves and time wardens (from The Genius Guide to the Time Thief and The Genius Guide to the Time Warden).).

The feats included are:

  • Aevum Mastery
  • Alternate Self
  • Last-Second Save
  • Mote Mastery
  • Opportune Blow
  • Precognition
  • Timely Detonation




The Genius Guide to the Mystic Godling—Giant-Sized Edition (PFRPG) PDF ($3.99)

2010-06-01T20:26:34Z

A mortal with the blood of a god flowing through her veins—a hero with one foot in the world of man and the other in the realm of the divine. This concept was explored in the best-selling Genius Guide to the Godling, but that material hardly exhausted the subject. The godlings in that first volume focused on flesh and blood, brawn and brains, striding the world as paragons of human endeavors. They did not, however, touch on the idea of godlings whose affinities lie closer to the mystical world—channeling their connections to divinity into magical effects that no mortal spellcaster could ever equal. The Genius Guide to Mystic Godlings expands the concept of semi-divine characters to include those whose godly heritage manifests itself through magics and spellcasting. These godlings do not fit as readily into the ordinary world. Mortals can sense the power they wield and sometimes find it unsettling. Even the godlings themselves have an uneasy relationship with their own powers—some finding their earthly bodies barely up to the task of containing so much raw energy. This book presents two new godling base classes, mystical counterparts to the ones from the previous book. It also contains a collection of godling spells—magic so tightly bound to the gods that only those with divine blood can wield it. In addition, there are also new godling feats, divine traits, and scion talents that can be used with these classes or the previously published mighty and clever godlings. The Genius Guide to Mystic Godlings stands on its own, containing everything you need to create semi-divine spellcasting heroes for the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. When used in conjunction with the original Genius Guide to Godlings, though, your players can create an entire pantheon of godlings, ready to prove their worth in the mortal world and then take their place among the gods. This Giant Sized Genius Guide is 18 pages.A mortal with the blood of a god flowing through her veins—a hero with one foot in the world of man and the other in the realm of the divine. This concept was explored in the best-selling Genius Guide to the Godling, but that material hardly exhausted the subject. The godlings in that first volume focused on flesh and blood, brawn and brains, striding the world as paragons of human endeavors. They did not, however, touch on the idea of godlings whose affinities lie closer to the mystical world—channeling their connections to divinity into magical effects that no mortal spellcaster could ever equal. The Genius Guide to Mystic Godlings expands the concept of semi-divine characters to include those whose godly heritage manifests itself through magics and spellcasting. These godlings do not fit as readily into the ordinary world. Mortals can sense the power they wield and sometimes find it unsettling. Even the godlings themselves have an uneasy relationship with their own powers—some finding their earthly bodies barely up to the task of containing so much raw energy. This book presents two new godling base classes, mystical counterparts to the ones from the previous book. It also contains a collection of godling spells—magic so tightly bound to the gods that only those with divine blood can wield it. In addition, there are also new godling feats, divine traits, and scion talents that can be used with these classes or the previously published mighty and clever godlings. The Genius Guide to Mystic Godlings stands on its own, containing everything you need to create semi-divine spellcasting heroes for the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. When used in conjunction with the original Genius Guide to Godlings, though, your players can create an entire pantheon of godlings, ready to prove their worth in the mortal world and then take their place among the gods. This Giant Sized Genius Guide is 18 pages.[...]



The Genius Guide to the Godling (PFRPG) PDF ($3.99)

2010-04-06T16:36:45Z

The godling is a new character concept designed for use with the Pathfinder RPG. The godling is presented as both a base class (suitable for 1st level characters) and a prestige class (requiring characters to be higher level before taking it). The godling is a mortal hero in whose veins flows the blood of a god. Cut from the same cloth as classic ancient heroes such as Theseus (fathered by both a mortal father, Aegeus, and a divine father, Poseidon), Memnon (son of a half-nymph mortal father and the titan/goddess Eos), and Helen (the famous beauty who was the daughter of Zeus), most godlings are the offspring of a god and a mortal humanoid who drew the god’s eye. Godlings are not demigods—at least not yet—for their birth on the material plane prevents them from being classified as outsiders. Initially bound to the dust and earth of their birthplace, godlings are nonetheless more than mere mortals. They have inherited divine powers that, with time and experience, grow and allow godlings to rise and become powerful and famous heroes. (Of course there are many other possible origins of godlings—see Godlings in Your Campaign at the end of the product.) Godlings are blessed (or cursed) with lives of adventure. They are thrust into dangerous quests and major events at a young age and often spend their entire adult lives moving from crisis to crisis, sought out by those who need their help, and hunted by those who wish them harm for no reason other than to spite their godly parents. Many godlings are made aware of their inherent power early in life, and are taught to respect both its origins and the responsibility it conveys. Others have no idea why they are able to perform feats that other mortals cannot, and may think themselves to be freaks or monsters (or some odd kind of sorcerer). Godling Base Class The godling base class is for characters that begin play with their deific heritage a known and active part of their lives. These characters know they are scions of the gods and are out to prove themselves worthy heirs by engaging in adventures in the mortal world. The godling base class actually contains two subclasses—clever and mighty godlings. These options are treated as different iterations of the same class, so a character cannot multiclass as two different kinds of godling. Godling Prestige Class Not all godlings realize who and want they are at the beginning of their adventuring careers. Indeed, some receive no special powers until their divine parents acknowledge their relationship. The godling prestige class is presented as a way to allow characters to undergo a deific metamorphosis later in their lives.The godling is a new character concept designed for use with the Pathfinder RPG. The godling is presented as both a base class (suitable for 1st level characters) and a prestige class (requiring characters to be higher level before taking it). The godling is a mortal hero in whose veins flows the blood of a god. Cut from the same cloth as classic ancient heroes such as Theseus (fathered by both a mortal father, Aegeus, and a divine father, Poseidon), Memnon (son of a half-nymph mortal father and the titan/goddess Eos), and Helen (the famous beauty who was the daughter of Zeus), most godlings are the offspring of a god and a mortal humanoid who drew the god’s eye. Godlings are not demigods—at least not yet—for their birth on the material plane prevents them from being classified as outsiders. Initially bound to the dust and earth of their birthplace, godlings are nonetheless more than mere mortals. They have inherited divine powers that, with time and experience, grow and allow godlings to rise and become powerful and famous heroes. (Of course there are many other possible origins of godlings—see Godlings in Your Campaign at the end of the product.) Godlings are blessed (or cursed) with lives of adventure. They ar[...]



The Genius Guide to the Talented Monk (PFRPG) PDF ($4.99)

2013-06-25T19:46:09Z

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Monks are the iconic martial artists and students of esoteric mysticism of the core rules, dealing significant damage with their bare hands, leaping across battlefields, and learning exotic fighting styles and combat techniques. They are also among the most hotly debated of classes, with different groups of players envisioning them as scouts, front-line combatants, skirmishers, mystics, or self-sufficient adventurers who are mostly useful because they don’t require as much support as most classes. Of course these different ideas and play styles are sometimes mutually exclusive, and the core monk offers little customization to help build a character matching one of those concepts outside what bonus feats can be selected.

The Genius Guide to the Talented Monk rewrites the classic monk class to use talents, rather than static class abilities and bonus feats. Rather than require all monks to be masters of unarmed attacks and self-perfection, each monk can have custom-fit class abilities to match a player’s specific concept. This greater flexibility allows the monk to be the default esoteric-combat-style-oriented character without limiting it to just one or two styles of fighting. Like a rogue, a talented monk character can pick and choose from a range of similarly-powered abilities appropriate for the monk’s role, without making the class overpowered. The talented monk can still fill the same roles in a party, but can customize his combat style and abilities to fill a much broader range of concepts.

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Monks are the iconic martial artists and students of esoteric mysticism of the core rules, dealing significant damage with their bare hands, leaping across battlefields, and learning exotic fighting styles and combat techniques. They are also among the most hotly debated of classes, with different groups of players envisioning them as scouts, front-line combatants, skirmishers, mystics, or self-sufficient adventurers who are mostly useful because they don’t require as much support as most classes. Of course these different ideas and play styles are sometimes mutually exclusive, and the core monk offers little customization to help build a character matching one of those concepts outside what bonus feats can be selected.

The Genius Guide to the Talented Monk rewrites the classic monk class to use talents, rather than static class abilities and bonus feats. Rather than require all monks to be masters of unarmed attacks and self-perfection, each monk can have custom-fit class abilities to match a player’s specific concept. This greater flexibility allows the monk to be the default esoteric-combat-style-oriented character without limiting it to just one or two styles of fighting. Like a rogue, a talented monk character can pick and choose from a range of similarly-powered abilities appropriate for the monk’s role, without making the class overpowered. The talented monk can still fill the same roles in a party, but can customize his combat style and abilities to fill a much broader range of concepts.




The Genius Guide to Apeiron Staves (PFRPG) PDF ($3.99)

2013-05-10T19:22:26Z

What In The World Are Apeiron (pronounced a-pay-ron) Staves? Simply put, they are to spellcasters what a magic sword is to a fighter. They are weapons of war used by the magically inclined to blast away that which ails them. Where the swordmaster passes down his blade to his favorite student, so too does the master wizard pass his apeiron stave down to his star apprentice. Apeiron staves are magical implements whose most basic function can be used without draining their magical reserves. While they are staff shaped, are magical, and have charges, that is where the comparison between an apeiron staff and a regular magical staff ends. Apeiron staves do not cast spells, but rather offer a number of augmentations to their basic effect. These augmentations do drain a separate reservoir, but even when this pool is empty, the apeiron staff can still be activated to use its basic effect. Thanks! Now That I Know What They Are, Tell Me Why I Need An Apeiron Staff? In the core rules, staves are treated as “spells-in-a-can” – a delivery mechanism for a specific number of abilities the user likely already possesses. Yes, they let you create impressive effects, but at the end of the day they are simply a different way to cast a spell. We already have potions, wands, scrolls, and a multitude of command-word items to do this. Why should the vast majority of magic item categories simply be different ways to cast a spell? That’s where apeiron staves come in. While most apeiron staves are offensively oriented, a fair number also exist to assist your allies. No longer shall a support character be faced with the question of what to do on some rounds. They can help give orders to their allies, boost their offensive capabilities, lift the burdens ailing their compatriots, and much more. Cool! Last Thing... Apeiron Is A Crazy-Weird Word, Did You Just Make It Up? Nope. The word apeiron is Ancient Greek for “infinite” or “unlimited”, or more literally “without limit” or “without end”. Perhaps its most famous user was the 6th century B.C. Greek natural philosopher Anaximander, which he used in his response to the Pre-Socratic natural philosophers of his age who were debating which element, Earth, Wind, Air, or Fire, was the basis of reality. Anaximander proposed that the basis of reality was actually the apeiron, or the infinite, and attributed a divine-like aspect to it. And so, much like how these staves create magic, he proposed that the universe was itself a creation of the apeiron. And that's why we think the name “apeiron staves” is appropriate for a type of magical staff that can continuously create a basic magic effect. Besides, it just sound cool when you can have your character say "Fear not this savage horde my friends, now that we have recovered my Apeiron Staff of the Spectral Hero, a mighty champion of legendary Mar'Kan shall fight with us this day!"What In The World Are Apeiron (pronounced a-pay-ron) Staves? Simply put, they are to spellcasters what a magic sword is to a fighter. They are weapons of war used by the magically inclined to blast away that which ails them. Where the swordmaster passes down his blade to his favorite student, so too does the master wizard pass his apeiron stave down to his star apprentice. Apeiron staves are magical implements whose most basic function can be used without draining their magical reserves. While they are staff shaped, are magical, and have charges, that is where the comparison between an apeiron staff and a regular magical staff ends. Apeiron staves do not cast spells, but rather offer a number of augmentations to their basic effect. These augmentations do drain a separate reservoir, but even when this pool is empty, the apeiron staff can still be activated to use its basic e[...]



Houserule Handbooks: Spellpoints Compilation (PFRPG) PDF ($8.99)

2013-04-25T21:43:59Z

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Welcome to Houserule Handbooks: Spellpoints Compilation, the first in a new line of compiled Houserule Handbooks. Each of these products is designed to present the full rules compiled from several Houserule Handbooks pdfs, introducing a set of carefully balanced, developed, and playtested houserules for campaigns using the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook.

While the core rules present characters with two kinds of spellcasting—spontaneous spellcasters and preparation spellcasters—their core spellcasting abilities follow the same general restrictions. While tried and true, both of these spellcasting types don’t do a very good job of modeling how spellcasters tend to work in popular fantasy fiction. The vast majority of spellcasters in stories with magic almost never complain about not having prepared the right spell for a specific encounter, or whine that they are limited in how many spells they can learn by some unbreakable mystic limit.

Inside this humble 38 page volume of Houserules is a system to allow all spellcasters to fuel their spells with a pool of spell points, not requiring any spell preparation, and allowing a spellcaster additional flexibility by using a lot of spell points to fuel a few high-level spells, or gain extended staying power by restricting casting to a larger number of lower-level spells. Further, the system is designed only for actual spellcasters, ignoring the spell-like abilities of monks and other classes dissimilar enough from true spellcasters to not need the same kind of spell point houserules.

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Welcome to Houserule Handbooks: Spellpoints Compilation, the first in a new line of compiled Houserule Handbooks. Each of these products is designed to present the full rules compiled from several Houserule Handbooks pdfs, introducing a set of carefully balanced, developed, and playtested houserules for campaigns using the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook.

While the core rules present characters with two kinds of spellcasting—spontaneous spellcasters and preparation spellcasters—their core spellcasting abilities follow the same general restrictions. While tried and true, both of these spellcasting types don’t do a very good job of modeling how spellcasters tend to work in popular fantasy fiction. The vast majority of spellcasters in stories with magic almost never complain about not having prepared the right spell for a specific encounter, or whine that they are limited in how many spells they can learn by some unbreakable mystic limit.

Inside this humble 38 page volume of Houserules is a system to allow all spellcasters to fuel their spells with a pool of spell points, not requiring any spell preparation, and allowing a spellcaster additional flexibility by using a lot of spell points to fuel a few high-level spells, or gain extended staying power by restricting casting to a larger number of lower-level spells. Further, the system is designed only for actual spellcasters, ignoring the spell-like abilities of monks and other classes dissimilar enough from true spellcasters to not need the same kind of spell point houserules.