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Center for Internet and Society - Free Speech





 



Should Facebook Ads Be Regulated Like TV Commercials?

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 07:00:00 +0000

"But Andrew McLaughlin, the cofounder of Higher Ground Labs, a company that invests in technology to help progressive candidates, believes that platforms should suppress propaganda in ad space. “Despite their best intentions, tech companies have built systems that are so open to manipulation by bots and trolls and other techniques that they effectively reward propaganda,” he says. “Failing to tackle that problem means ceding the terrain to fraudsters, fake-news pushers, and other kinds of propagandists, who easily gain the upper hand.” It remains unclear if Facebook will adopt this or other measures. Morgan Weiland, an attorney and scholar affiliated with Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, believes that along with previous problematic content—like untrue news and hoax videos—last week’s revelations may help force tech companies to identify their values and define their role in the public discourse. “Right now they are operating in an arena where they have some, but very few, legal responsibilities,” she says. “We are going to keep seeing examples of this kind, and at some point the jig is going to be up and the regulators are going to act. Will the tech companies be the first movers and decide what they [themselves] will get to say, or will the regulators be the ones that move first?” Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis, likens the present moment to a Facebook relationship status: “It’s complicated,” he says. “The way these advertising models subject all of us and our attention to advertising, a kind of mental pollution, is unprecedented in human history. The decisions we make regarding the way that tech companies are a market for advertising affect, in a very real sense, what kind of digital democracy we are going to build.”"   Original Publication: The AtlanticDate published: September 14, 2017Focus Area: Intermediary LiabilityPeople: Andrew McLaughlinMorgan WeilandNeil RichardsRelated Topics: facebookFree SpeechAdvertising[...]



Blocked and banned by social media: When is it censorship?

Wed, 30 Aug 2017 07:00:00 +0000

"Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis, compared social networks to town squares of centuries past — an analogy social-media executives have themselves used.

 

“They are learning, unfortunately the hard way, that when you occupy a space in our society that allows people to express themselves, you need to let people express themselves equally and fairly, because that is the expectation,” Richards said. “They have tremendous effect on our lives and have become such a major part of the ecosystem of free expression and public debate that you can’t have a public campaign anymore without a Twitter or Facebook presence, and that makes them quasi-public, more like a power company or a cable company or newspaper.”"

Date published: 
August 30, 2017
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The far right is losing its ability to speak freely online. Should the left defend it?

Mon, 28 Aug 2017 07:00:00 +0000

"“Historically, the place you went to exercise your speech rights was the public square. Now the equivalent is Twitter and YouTube and Facebook,” said Daphne Keller of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “In a practical matter, how much you can speak is not in the hands of the constitution but in the hands of these private companies.”"

Date published: 
August 28, 2017
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Paddy Leerssen

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 16:25:13 +0000

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Position / Title: 
Open Internet Fellow

Paddy Leerssen is the Open Internet Fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. His work focuses on digital media and communications law, with a particular emphasis on net neutrality policy. He previously held positions at the Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, the University of Amsterdam’s Institute for Information Law (IViR), and the non-governmental organization European Digital Rights (EDRi).

Paddy holds an LL.M. from Harvard Law School, where he studied as a Fulbright Scholar. Previously, he received degrees in law from Maastricht University and the University of Amsterdam. 

Contact: 
leerssen@stanford.edu



FAN 151 (First Amendment News) Morgan Weiland Meet Ira Glasser — The First Amendment & the Liberal Dilemma

Wed, 10 May 2017 16:51:42 +0000

"“Expanding the Periphery and Threatening the Core: The Ascendant Libertarian Speech Tradition” is the title of a forthcoming article in the Stanford Law Review.

The author is Morgan N. Weiland, an attorney and PhD candidate at Stanford University specializing in speech, press, and technology law and ethics. Next year she will clerk for Ninth Circuit Judge M. Margaret McKeown. Here is how Ms. Weiland begins the abstract to her forthcoming article:

“Though scholars have identified the expanding scope of First Amendment speech doctrine, little attention has been paid to the theoretical transformation happening inside the doctrine that has accompanied its outward creep. Taking up this overlooked perspective, this Article uncovers a new speech theory: the libertarian tradition. This new tradition both is generative of the doctrine’s expansion and risks undermining the First Amendment’s theoretical foundations.”"

Date published: 
May 10, 2017



Facebook’s biggest challenge: actual reality

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 07:00:00 +0000

"“Social media companies need to think very carefully about what next steps they’re going to take,” said Malkia Cyril, executive director for the Center for Media Justice. “It’s a fine line to walk between maintaining safety and maintaining freedom of speech.”"

Date published: 
April 18, 2017
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US government drops effort to unmask anti-Trump Twitter account

Fri, 07 Apr 2017 07:00:00 +0000

"“The anonymous account holder is safe, for now,” said Jennifer Granick, the director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “Perhaps the Department of Justice has learned a lesson. Perhaps the Trump administration may try to find the poster another way, for example by monitoring the government’s INS network.”"

Date published: 
April 7, 2017
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Trump & Co. Just Picked the Wrong Fight With Twitter

Thu, 06 Apr 2017 07:00:00 +0000

"“It seems like the government lied to Twitter about why it wanted the information,” says Jennifer Granick, Director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “It’s not entitled to the information under the statutory authority it cites.”"

Date published: 
April 6, 2017
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Government seeks to unmask Trump dissident on Twitter, lawsuit reveals

Thu, 06 Apr 2017 07:00:00 +0000

"Jennifer Granick, the director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, called the government’s behavior “craven” and described the CBP summons as a “classic case of abuse”.

“For the government, a federal law enforcement officer, to not understand the very basics of protecting free speech and following the rule of law is egregious,” she said.

Granick questioned, in particular, what process could have produced the summons. “Either some low-lying people are running the asylum and issuing demands, which is dangerous,” she said, “or people at the top are approving these, which is nauseating and terrifying.”"

Date published: 
April 6, 2017
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Is Posting on Facebook a Fundamental Right?

Tue, 28 Feb 2017 08:00:00 +0000

"“That’s of importance to anyone who uses the internet and digital products and services,” says Neil Richards, a Washington University law professor who specializes in privacy and First Amendment theory.

Richards, for one, anticipates the latter. “I don’t think it’ll do much more than correct an error,” he says. “The court doesn’t want to set precedent for other cases unexpectedly without having those facts in front of it.”"
Date published: 
February 28, 2017
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