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Preview: Queen City Survey

Queen City Survey



Observations and overviews of Cincinnati



Updated: 2017-10-01T05:28:21.543-04:00

 



Queen City Survey

2009-11-01T07:37:32.938-05:00

The End

Yes, Queen City Survey is ending. Off to do other things. I may spin off ‘Raise the Rutherford’ and ‘March(itecture) Madness’ in some manner. And Queen City Survey may live again in some form at some point in the future. But for now it is time to concentrate on other projects. Take care of the Queen City. Vote 'No on 9' and vote 'Yes on 6' for starters this Tuesday. I am still going to be paying attention.



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-31T14:45:29.192-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes Month

Hayes & the Civil War
Bonus: ‘These are My Jewels’


Hayes called his years of military service during the Civil War the best years of his life. The seven-part series in honor of his birthday visited six locations associated with Hayes’ service to the Union.


I can think of no better way to end Rutherford B. Hayes Month than with a trip to my favorite Rutherford B. Hayes statue (that I know about). It is actually a statue of Hayes along with six other Ohioans – William Tecumseh Sherman, U.S. Grant, Salmon P. Chase, James A. Garfield, Edwin Stanton and Phillip Sheridan – on the grounds of the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus.

The statue is called “These are My Jewels”. It was designed by Levi Scofield who also did the spectacular Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Public Square in Cleveland. The name comes from a wealthy Roman mother, depicted at the top of the monument, who told another woman that her real wealth, her real ‘jewels’ were her sons who had served in the military.

The statue then depicts sons of Ohio who had contributed to the Union effort during the Civil War in both battle and politics. It was first exhibited at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. However, as designed it originally had only six figures. Hayes was not included! But before it was moved to Ohio and erected on the Ohio Statehouse grounds, the then Governor William McKinley raised additional money to add Hayes to the monument. McKinley had served under Hayes in the Ohio 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Hayes had recently passed away in 1893.(image) (image) (image) (image) (image) (image)
Raise the Rutherford! is a continuing, slightly humorous series to raise awareness of Rutherford B. Hayes and erect a statue of him in Cincinnati.

References:
The Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center
Including the Dairy and Letters of Rutherford B. Hayes
The Ohio Statehouse



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-31T14:25:26.494-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes MonthHayes & the Civil WarPart VII: ConclusionHayes called his years of military service during the Civil War the best years of his life. This now seven-part series in honor of his birthday will visit four locations associated with Hayes’ service to the Union.As Hayes remarks in his letter to his wife after Cedar Creek, fighting was generally over in the Shenandoah. And Cedar Creek was Hayes’s last battle. In January 1865, he was promoted to brigadier general. In March of 1865, Hayes was brevetted a Major General "for gallant and distinguished service during the campaign of 1864 in West Virginia and particularly at the battles of Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, Virginia". But in April 1865, Hayes was supposed to lead a raid on Lynchburg, Virginia, however Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Grant on April 9, 1965. And Lincoln was assassinated on April 14. And there was no need for the raid. The fighting of the Civil War was basically over.Hayes was officially mustered out of service on June 8, 1865. Having been elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Cincinnati, he prepared to go to Washington to begin the next phase of his life.Rutherford B. Hayes, taken 1861, from the Hayes Presidential CenterAnd thus ends Rutherford B. Hayes Month.Here is a summary of all of the 'Hayes & the Civil War' posts:Part I: Camp ChasePart II: Battle of South MountainPart III: Battle of Buffington IslandPart IV: Battle of Second KernstownPart V: Battle of Third WinchesterPart VI: Battle of Cedar CreekPart VII: ConclusionThere is so much more that could have been said about Hayes and his military service during the Civil War. I left much out, including many interesting details.First and foremost, I left out many battles in which Hayes fought with the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. This includes his first battle, Carnifax Ferry, West Virginia, and a number of other battle sites in present day West Virginia. A whole ‘Hayes in West Virginia’ trip may be in order. (Though ‘The Education of Rutherford B. Hayes’ is certainly on the list at some point as an excuse to visit Harvard again.)So I also left out how he had been appointed Colonel of the 79th Ohio Infantry Volunteers in 1862, but he never assumed that position and stayed with the 23rd Ohio once appointed their Colonel.23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regimental Flag from the Ohio Historical Society ExhibitsBut I also left out a bunch of little details . . .- Like I simply find it fascinating that his wife Lucy and the children would come visit him while the 23rd was in camp, mostly in West Virginia. A man at Cedar Creek indicated that for ranking officers it was easier for family to come to the camp instead of leaving so regimental business could continue.- Hayes and Lucy even conceived a child, George, while the war was going on. (He would died in 1866.) That child was named after George Crook his commander. And one child, Joseph, died while visiting Camp White near Charleston with his mother. (Joseph & George are buried in Spring Grove. Check out this post from last year.)- Another interesting side-notion was it never really donned on me that fighting sort of took a break in wintertime.- And I simply find it fascinating that Hayes would have been 42 by the time fighting had ended in 1865. Yes, 42! President William McKinley for instance was 18 when he enlisted and 22 when the war ended.Next:Bonus!Raise the Rutherford! is a continuing, slightly humorous series to raise awareness of Rutherford B. Hayes and erect a statue of him in Cincinnati.References:The Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential CenterIncluding the Dairy and Letters of Rutherford B. HayesFight for the Colors, The Ohio Battle Flag Collection. Ohio Historical Society Exhibits[...]



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-30T23:32:14.113-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes MonthHayes & the Civil WarPart VI: The Battle of Cedar CreekHayes called his years of military service during the Civil War the best years of his life. This now seven-part series in honor of his birthday will visit four locations associated with Hayes’ service to the Union.The Battle of Cedar Creek took place on October 19, 1864. This was Hayes’ last combat, the battle that included ‘Sheridan’s Ride’, and a Union victory that many note signaled the end of major combat in the Shenandoah Valley and sealed Lincoln’s re-election.Again, Hayes’s regiment is part of an Army led by U.S. Major General Phillip Sheridan to purse and defeat Jubal Early’s Confederate Corp. It is now October and they have been in pursuit and fighting in a series of battles and campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley since being called from West Virginia in July 1864.At Cedar Creek approximately 32,000 Union men and 21,000 Confederates battle around the town of Middletown, VA where Early initiated a surprise attack. The Union was ultimately victorious. However after near defeat in the morning, it was Phillip Sheridan’s ride from Winchester some 17 miles north that rallied the troops in an afternoon counterattack and secured victory. (See previous post on Sheridan’s Ride.)Hayes’ brigade however is generally only involved in the early part of the battle as they were one of the first forces under fire. They get decimated by the Confederates and have to retreat back north of the town of Middletown. They do give the Union enough time to vacate their headquarters at Belle Grove. Hayes is slightly injured in the battle and his horse is killed. Here is an excerpt from Hayes’ letter to Lucy, online at the Hayes Presidential Center:CAMP AT CEDAR CREEK NEAR STRASBURG, VIRGINIA, October 21, 1864.MY DARLING: . . . As usual with me I had some narrow escapes. While galloping rapidly, my fine large black horse was killed instantly, tumbling heels over head and dashing me on the ground violently. Strange to say I was only a little bruised and was able to keep the saddle all day. (Mem.:--I lost all my horse trappings, saddle, etc., including my small pistol.) I was also hit fairly in the head by a ball which had lost its force in getting (I suppose) through somebody else! It gave me only a slight shock. -- I think serious fighting on this line is now over.Affectionately ever, your R.For a more text-book description of the entire Battle of Cedar Creek, click here for the Civil War Preservation Trust’s (CWPT) battle summary and here for link to the battlefield map. And click here for a further summary of the battle from the National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program.I visited the Cedar Creek Battlefield as part of the Battle of Cedar Creek 145th Anniversary Reenactment on October 17 & 18th. This event, sponsored by the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation, is held annually the weekend closest to the anniversary of the battle. I had never been to a reenactment before. There were a series of events that took place both days in addition to the battle reenactment which was only a portion of each day. One could walk around the camps, watch demonstrations, and attend lectures and a home tour. The main event of Saturday (when it rained) was the first part of the battle which included the Confederate attack. Sunday afternoon (which was overcast) included the Union counterattack.Reenactment PhotosThe Heater HouseViews of Cedar Creek CampsBelle Grove Plantation – The Isaac Hite family home, his first wife was Nelly Madison, James Madison’s sister. It is a National Historic Landmark and a National Trust property.The view south from Belle GroveRamseur Monument – Remember Ramseur?To view MANY more photos of my photos from the Battle of Cedar Creek 145th Anniversary Reenactment, click here. To view more photos from the Belle Grove Plantation, click here.Cedar Creek is fighting the encroachment of nearby development, including a massiv[...]



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-23T22:43:19.103-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes MonthHayes & the Civil WarPart V: The Battle of Third WinchesterHayes called his years of military service during the Civil War the best years of his life. This now six-part series in honor of his birthday will visit four locations associated with Hayes service to the Union.The Battle of Third Winchester or Opequon took place on September 19, 1864. It is called ‘Third Winchester’ because two previous battles had taken place around the Northern Virginian town of Winchester in 1862 and 1863.After Kernstown, one of Lt. General Jubal Early’s brigades burns the town of Chambersburg, PA, on July 30, 1864. U.S. Major General Phillip Sheridan was then given command of all Union forces in the Valley, replacing Hunter, following the defeat at Kernstown and the burning Chambersburg. Union forces reenter the Shenandoah and at Third Winchester, approximately 39,000 Union men under Sheridan and 15,000 Confederates do battle on the north side of town. The Union was victorious and pushed the Confederates south through the town of Winchester.Hayes describes the battle in a letter to his Uncle Sardis, again online at the Hayes Presidential Center. Here is an excerpt:HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA, September 26, 1864.“DEAR UNCLE:--You have heard enough about our great victories at Winchester and Fisher's Hill. I will say only a word. No one man can see or know what passes on all parts of a battle-field. Each one describes the doings of the corps, division, or what not, that he is with. Now, all the correspondents are with the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps and the cavalry command. General Crook has nobody to write him or his command up. They are of course lost sight of. At Winchester at noon, the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps had been worsted. In the afternoon, General Crook (who is the brains of the whole thing) with his command turned the Rebel left and gained the victory. The cavalry saved it from being lost after it was gained. My brigade led the attack on the Rebel left, but all parts of Crook's command did their duty. The Sixth Corps fought well, the Nineteenth failed somewhat, and the cavalry was splendid and efficient throughout. This is my say-so.“My division entered the fight on the extreme right of the infantry, Merritt's splendid cavalry on our right, and Averell still further on our right. We ended the fight on the extreme left. The Rebels retreated from our right to our left, so that we went in at the rear and came out at the front, my flag being the first into and through Winchester. My division commander was wounded late in the fight and I commanded the division from that time. It is the Second, General Crook's old division . . .”Sincerely, R.Note: Hayes mentions the Battle of Fisher’s Hill. It is about 20 to 25 miles south-southwest from Winchester. I didn’t have enough time to visit.Hayes is credited with leading his men south across a muddy creek called Red Bud Run. Crook’s Corp, the unit to which Hayes was attached, flanks the enemy’s left and the Confederates retreat. Hayes however is also credited with saying of the battle, "To stop was death. To go on was probably the same; but on we started again." Markers near Red Bud Run describe the action of Hayes and the 23rd Ohio.For a more text-book description of the entire Battle of Third Winchester, click here for the Civil War Preservation Trust’s (CWPT) battle summary and here for link to the battlefield map. And click here for a further summary of the battle from the National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program.I visited Third Winchester on a cloudy and cold Friday afternoon. It did not make for good photos. There are 5 miles of trails with interpretive signage describing the battle along the trail, all contained on land owned by the CWPT. Standing at the very creek Hayes crossed (although not in the same location) and trying to imagine what it was like was rather moving actually.The Confederate Flank Trail – Hay[...]



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-23T22:06:47.719-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes MonthHayes & the Civil WarPart IV: The Battle of Second KernstownHayes called his years of military service during the Civil War the best years of his life. This now six-part series in honor of his birthday will visit four locations associated with Hayes service to the Union.The Battle of Second Kernstown took place on July 24, 1864. It is called ‘Second Kernstown’ because a previous battle had taken place generally in the same area, over the same ground in 1862.A bit of background . . . In early July 1864, Lt. General Jubal Early’s Confederate Corp invaded Maryland and threatened Washington, DC. The Army of West Virginia including the brigade to which Hayes is attached is called east from West Virginia. They become involved in a series of Campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864 under General David Hunter to find and defeat Lt. General Jubal Early’s Confederate Corp.At Second Kernstown, approximately 10,000 Union men under Brigadier General George Crook and 13,000 Confederates under Jubal Early do battle near the town of Kernstown, Virginia, just south of Winchester. The Confederates were victorious and pushed the Union Corp across the Potomac River to Maryland. Hayes gives a concise description of the battle and retreat in his diary, online at the Hayes Presidential Center. It reads:“ . . . Sunday (24th), defeated badly at Winchester near Kernstown by Early with a superior force. My brigade suffered severely. Rebels came in on my left. Poor cavalry allowed the general to be surprised. Seven miles. All [that] night marching, twenty-two miles, to Martinsburg. My brigade covered the retreat. Retreated from Martinsburg; turned on Rebels and drove them out. Monday night to Potomac at Williamsport, [Maryland], twelve miles, a severe, sleepy job. Camped on Antietam near battle-ground.”Many histories make note of this battle because future President Rutherford B. Hayes, commanded a brigade that directly fought against a division commanded by Kentuckian John C. Breckinridge, a former senator (1861) and Vice President of the United States (1857 – 1861).For a full summary of the battle from the National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program, click here. The battle is important as it is the last Confederate victory in the Shenandoah Valley.I visited the Kernstown Battlefield Park on an overcast Saturday morning. Formerly the Pritchard-Grim Farm, it has been preserved by the non-profit Kernstown Battlefield Association. Fighting took place around this very farm and to the south around Opequon Church. A series of markers on the property describe all the battles fought on and near this site. On Pritchard’s Hill, north of the main house, there is a marker devoted to Hayes and Breckinridge. It is noted on the Hayes Presidential Center website that “. . . his stand at the stone wall saves Crook's army.” Part of the stone wall is still there. However Hayes was generally east of this particular location.View from Pritchard’s HillView looking up Pritchard’s HillPritchard HousePritchard HouseCross-country runners at the Kernstown Battlefield ParkAlong the wallTo view more of my photos from the Battle of Second Kernstown, click here.Interesting Non-Hayes Fact: The Samuel & Helen Pritchard family was living in the home at the time of the battle. It became a hospital for the Union wounded and dead after the battle. Among the dead was Col. James Mulligan, shot near the wall by a sharpshooter under command of Major General Stephan R. Ramseur. It is said Mulligan died in Helen Pritchard’s arms two days after the battle. Ramseur, part of Early’s Army, will be killed at the Battle of Cedar Creek. Mulligan was buried in his home town. But many of the U. S. dead from this and other battles in the Shenandoah were buried in Winchester National Cemetery. To view photos from Winchester National Cemetery, click here.If you are interested in helping [...]



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-16T01:00:00.995-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes MonthHayes & the Civil WarPart III: The Battle of Buffington IslandHayes called his years of military service during the Civil War the best years of his life. This now six-part series in honor of his birthday will visit four locations associated with Hayes’ service to the Union.The Battle of Buffington Island, Ohio, took place on July 19, 1863, and is the only major battle of the Civil War fought in Ohio. Here three future Presidents: Hayes, Garfield, and McKinley were sent to capture John Morgan’s raiders. At the Battle of Buffington Island (not really an island but located on Ohio soil across from the island in the Ohio River), 3,000 Union men found and fought with 1,700 Morgan’s Raiders. It was a clear Union victory but as gunboats also patrolled the Ohio River, Morgan and about 400 men escaped during the night.Hayes wrote in his diary, online at the Hayes Presidential Center, following the battle: “. . . We got over two hundred prisoners. Everybody got some. No fight in them. The most successful and jolly little campaign we ever had.” Hayes and his men went back to West Virginia after the battle while others pursued Morgan. Morgan was captured shortly after on July 26, 1863, in Salineville, Ohio.For a full summary of the battle from the National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program, click here.The Battle of Buffington Island State Memorial is a four acre park in Portland, Ohio commemorating the battle. It includes a stone monument and a series of markers, giving details of the battle. In the park is also an Indian mound. I was there on a rainy Labor Day.South of the memorial is also a marker in honor of Major Daniel McCook, of the Fighting McCook’s from Carrolton, Ohio. The patriarch of one side of the McCook family (his brother John the other), Daniel was 65(!) when he died in the Battle of Buffington Island. This marker notes the approximate site where he was killed. He is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery along with other family members including sons and nephews.McCook plaque at the Buffington Island State MemorialMcCook Monument looking north toward Portland, OHOhio River at PortlandA study was done by Gray & Pape for the State of Ohio to investigate the preservation of additional land and improvements to publicly held land around the Portland, OH area related to the battle. Read the report here.Next:Parts IV & V: The Battle of Second Kernstown and Battle of Third WinchesterRaise the Rutherford! is a continuing, slightly humorous series to raise awareness of Rutherford B. Hayes and erect a statue of him in Cincinnati.References:The Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential CenterIncluding the Dairy and Letters of Rutherford B. HayesNational Park Service American Battlefield Protection ProgramOhio Historical Society - Battle of Buffington Island State Memorial The Fighting McCook’s, Ohio History CentralThe Battle of Buffington Island, Ohio History Central[...]



We Will Not Be Moved!

2009-10-13T00:24:01.819-04:00

So according to this post, this home could be purchased and moved. Potentially out of the city, out of the state, or out of the country. This cannot happen.(image)
3800 Reading Road is reported to have been designed by architect Matthew Burton for William O'Dell and completed in 1919. Burton's family was actually involved in the development of Avondale and in fact there is a street named 'Burton' for the family there. The Burton's were also related to the Mitchells (according to W. Langsam). Yes, 'Mitchell' of Mitchell Avenue fame. Members of the Mitchell family lived in Avondale and both the Rose Hill neighborhood and the Dakota neighborhoods in Avondale were deleveloped by them. Burton also designed the wonderful Frank Enger House at Dakota and Marion Avenues in Avondale (Langsam).

3800 Reading Road was eventually used as The Jewish Center for a time, beginning in 1935.



Oktoberfestivities

2009-10-11T14:39:17.767-04:00

I realized I never posted pictures from Oktoberfest weekend . . .(image) (image) (image)
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Walking Tour: Woodburn Avenue

2009-10-11T13:02:25.298-04:00

East Walnut Hills

Join ARCHITREKS for a walking tour of East Walnut Hills. From the website:
"Join us at the Parkside Cafe at 1026 E. McMillan Street on Saturday, October 31 at 10:00 a.m. for a tour of East Walnut Hills. This will be a presentation of a 'work in progress' and will be offered for a nominal fee of $5. HELP US DEVELOP THE TOUR. This tour may be as long as two hours because we want your design feedback. Sites will include parts of East McMillan Street, DeSales Corner & the Woodburn Neighborhood Business District, and the Uplands Local Historic District."

We did a preliminary walk around the neighborhood yesterday so here are a few pictures to get you excited to take the tour . . .(image) (image) (image) (image) (image) (image) (image) (image) (image)



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-10T14:56:30.926-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes MonthHayes & the Civil WarPart II: The Battle of South MountainHayes called his years of military service during the Civil War the best years of his life. This five-part series in honor of his birthday will visit four locations associated with Hayes’ service to the Union.The Battle of South Mountain, Maryland, took place on September 14, 1862, and included fighting at Crampton Gap, Turners Gap and Fox Gap. Hayes’s Regiment was part of Brigadier General Jacob Cox’s Brigade under Union Maj. Gen. Jesse Reno’s Division.Hayes was initially a Major of the 23rd Ohio Volunteers. Originally sent to what is now West Virginia, the division is then sent to Maryland in early September 1862 due to Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s invasion. As it relates to Hayes, an interesting thing happens before the Battle of South Mountain on September 6, 1862. There is an incident between Hayes and Major General Jesse Reno “involving men of the 23rd taking straw from wheat stacks for forage and bedding” as they move west through Maryland.But Reno’s Divisions and in fact most of Major General George McClellan’s Army of the Potomac continued to move west from Frederick and then Middletown, MD and meet Confederate forces at Fox, Crampton and Turners Gap, Maryland between Middletown and Boonsboro. A total of 28,000 Union troops battle 18,000 Confederate troops during the Battle of South Mountain.It is at this battle that Hayes receives his most serious injury during the war. Shot in the arm, he continues fighting and leading his men until he is eventually forced to stop. His brother in law Dr. Joe Webb, the 23rd attending physician tends to the wound on the battle field before Hayes is sent to the home of Jacob Rudy in nearby Middletown, MD, to recover. Reno is actually killed in battle. The Battle of South Mountain is a Union Victory and Confederate forces are forced west. General McClellan’s Army however does not pursue and it sets up the Battle of Antietam a few days later on September 17.Hayes writes in his diary, online at the Hayes Presidential Center, on September 18 (four days after being injured) a lengthy description of the battle, his injury and the transport to Middletown. It is a fascinating account. Here are just a few small excerpts:Here he discusses what happened shortly after he was first struck: “… a few moments after I first laid [lay] down, seeing something going wrong and feeling a little easier, I got up and began to give directions about things; but after a few moments, getting very weak, I again laid [lay] down. While I was lying down I had considerable talk with a wounded [Confederate] soldier lying near me. I gave him messages for my wife and friends in case I should not get up. We were right jolly and friendly; it was by no means an unpleasant experience.”Then while lying on the ground injured and hearing the fighting subside, he recalls: “…I called out, ‘Hallo Twenty-third men, are you going to leave your colonel here for the enemy?’ In an instant a half dozen or more men sprang forward to me, saying, ‘Oh no, we will carry you wherever you want us to.’ The enemy immediately opened fire on them. Our men replied to them, and soon the battle was raging as hotly as ever. I ordered the men back to cover, telling them they would get me shot and themselves too.”In his diary he also notes that he telegraphed a few people that day including Lucy. In the days that followed, he would write letters to his mother and Uncle Sardis for example. Some of those letters are also available at the online Dairy and Letters of Rutherford B. Hayes at the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center. It should be noted that once Lucy found out he was injured she traveled to DC and then Maryland and couldn’t find her[...]



Grizzell for the Home

2009-10-05T22:31:31.538-04:00

(image) 'Five Points' by Alan Grizzell



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-04T20:30:54.485-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes Month
The Rutherford B. Hayes Birthday Celebration


Today is Rutherford B. Hayes’ birthday. But last night I hosted the 2nd Annual Rutherford B. Hayes Birthday Celebration. Well over twenty people attended. Hopefully a good time was had by all. I know I had a few too many beers and throw in a combination Un-Lucy Vodka Lemonade and Un-Lucy Lemonade Rum Slush and it made for a very sluggish morning. And the last guests didn’t leave until nearly 2:00 AM!

Birthday Cake!(image)
Some of the festivities . . .(image)
‘Pin the Beard on Rutherford’(image)
Playing ‘Hayes on Horseback’ (The point was to ride the 'horse' and then shot at target with the play dart gun scoring the most points while dressed in Hayes Civil War gear.)(image)
Kim got the Spiegel Grove plate for winning ‘Hayes on Horseback’(image)
Raise the Rutherford! is a continuing, slightly humorous series to raise awareness of Rutherford B. Hayes and erect a statue of him in Cincinnati.



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-02T22:45:48.597-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes MonthHayes & the Civil WarPart I: Camp ChaseHayes called his years of military service during the Civil War the best years of his life. This five part series in honor of his birthday will visit four locations associated with Hayes’ service to the Union.Camp Dennison & Camp Chase were recruitment and training centers for the Union Army. Men usually only remained at the camp for only a short time. After receiving a little training, the men were sent off to the war. Hayes certainly passed through Camp Dennison, situated on 500 acres in Germany, Ohio on the Little Miami Railroad near Cincinnati. Named after Ohio Governor (1860 - 1862) and Cincinnatian William Dennison, its location near Cincinnati also provided protection for city. Eventually Germany, Ohio, became known as Camp Dennison.Hayes however seems to have received his training at Camp Chase, outside Columbus. Camp Chase was named for former Ohio Governor (1856 - 1860), the then current US Secretary of the Treasury (1861 – 1864), and Cincinnatian Salmon P. Chase. During June and July of 1861, Hayes was here.While here he writes in his diary and sends letters to his wife Lucy and his Uncle Sardis. He describes for instance their training and the search for a Regimental Colonel. My favorite passage though is this excerpt from a letter at the Hayes Presidential Center where he is writing to Lucy shortly before leaving for western Virginia:CAMP CHASE, July 2, 1861.DEAREST: . . . Love to Grandma and all. Kisses for the dear boys. They will mourn the loss of their Uncle Joe. I should not be much loss to them now; when they get older I will try to help in their education. Birch, if possible, should be a soldier; Webb will do for a sailor; Ruddy will do for either or 'most anything else. I am sorry you are to be left with so much responsibility; but, with your mother's advice, do what you both agree is best and it will perfectly satisfy me.Affectionately, yours ever, RUTHERFORDQCS Note: When Hayes mentions that the boys will mourn the loss of their Uncle, it is not because he has died. It is because Uncle Joe is to be the doctor for Hayes’ 23rd Ohio Regiment and will also be leaving for service shortly. Of the three Hayes children referenced above, Webb was the only one to serve in the military and he fought in the Spanish American War.Camp Chase became a Confederate prison during the war and eventually a Confederate Cemetery was located there. All that remains today of Camp Chase is the cemetery, one of the largest Confederate cemeteries in the North. The Cemetery, located at 2900 Sullivant Avenue in the Hilltop area of Columbus, holds 2260 individual gravesites surrounded by a stone wall with a center monument erected in 1902. The camp was generally north of here to Broad Street, east to what is now Hague Avenue and west to about East Westgate Avenue.For more on Camp Chase and its history, check out two fantastic websites: Camp Chase at Forgotten Ohio and Camp Chase at GeoCities.comI visited the Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery early one Saturday morning.Some held at the prison were Confederate citizens. Notice the inscription on the tombstone above.Next:Part II: The Battle of South MountainRaise the Rutherford! is a continuing, slightly humorous series to raise awareness of Rutherford B. Hayes and erect a statue of him in Cincinnati.References:The Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential CenterIncluding the Dairy and Letters of Rutherford B. HayesOhio History Central – Camp ChaseOhio History Central – Camp Dennison[...]



VisuaLingual for the Home

2009-10-01T23:03:47.526-04:00

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Nordstrom, Fountain Square?

2009-10-01T22:51:39.429-04:00

(image) I saw this billboard and I had to laugh a little. They are using Fountain Square in the advertisement. However it clearly says, "Now Open at Kenwood Towne Centre". And had Nordstrom's really wanted their customers to walk to their store from Fountain Square, they had the opportunity at 5th & Race!



Raise the Rutherford!

2009-10-01T07:52:19.989-04:00

Rutherford B. Hayes Month
Hayes Civil War Reenactment

For those looking for a ‘Rutherford B. Hayes Roadtrip’ in honor of the President’s birthday, the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center hosts the Hayes Civil War Reenactment this weekend.(image)
The Hayes Civil War Reenactment re-creates the reunion of Hayes’ Regiment, the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry on the weekend closest to Hayes’ Oct. 4, 1822, birthdate. This year’s event, sponsored by Memorial Health Care System, takes place from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, October 3 & 4. More than 500 costumed Civil War reenactors will camp on the Center’s grounds and will participate in three reenactments of the Battle of Carnifex Ferry, a battle in which President Hayes took part, over the weekend.

Admission to the Civil War Reenactment is $3/adult and $1/children ages 6-12. Click here for a full schedule of events. Note the link is to a PDF.
Raise the Rutherford! is a continuing, slightly humorous series to raise awareness of Rutherford B. Hayes and erect a statue of him in Cincinnati.



Rutherford B. Hayes Month

2009-10-01T07:44:05.831-04:00

October 2009!

In honor of Rutherford B. Hayes’s birthday on October 4, 1822, Queen City Survey has again declared October as Rutherford B. Hayes Month. Throughout the month we will include a number of posts related to the 19th President and former Cincinnati resident.

I have a series of posts planned called ‘Hayes & the Civil War’ where I will visit locations in Ohio and beyond related to Hayes’ time fighting for the Union. There will also be the 2nd Annual Rutherford B. Hayes Birthday Celebration, complete with games, a birthday cake, and the Un-Lucy Lemonade Rum Slush and the Un-Lucy Lemonade Vodka Punch. Both proved quite intoxicating last year!(image)



Yes on 6!

2009-09-23T19:51:24.564-04:00

I got an email today from the Museum Center that yard signs for the upcoming levy are available. Click here to get one. Click here for more information on the levy renewal itself. I have added a link to the sidebar that will remain up until Election Day.(image) Honor the March(itecture) Maddness 2009 Winner by voting 'Yes on 6'!



Cincinnati’s Monday Sports Manager

2009-09-21T22:45:02.605-04:00

A good weekend for Cincinnati football

The Bearcats are now 3 – 0 after a huge 28 – 18 win at Oregon State. Then Saturday’s win propelled them even further; No. 14 in AP (up from #17) and No. 15 in Coaches’ (up from #21). A big game coming up this week at home against Fresno State. Fresno looked explosive at times in a 51 – 34 loss at home to Boise State last Friday. Their one running back had 234 rushing yards and three touchdowns. So the Bearcat defense will get another test. This Saturday’s game is at noon and is a ‘White Out’ game. It should be a sell-out.

And the Bengals won! Yes, the Bengals won at Green Bay. A friend on Facebook said he thought Palmer still looked “off”. But the defense played well and Cedric Benson ran well. And on this day, that equaled a win.

The Reds are continuing to play baseball. Big news last week I guess was the announcement of the 2010 schedule. And this Saturday has the very cool All-Access Baseball Experience. If I wasn’t going to the UC game, I’d be going to this.

In other local sports news, Cincinnati native Rich Franklin lost his UFC 103 headline match on Saturday by KO to Vitor Belfort in the first round.

See links in sidebar.



Oktoberfest Zinzinnati!

2009-09-18T21:19:58.790-04:00

September 19 & 20

(image) One of my favorite weekends all year, come on down to 5th Street for all the fun, food, and beer. Check the Oktoberfest Zinzinnati website for all the details.





Fire Station Friday

2009-09-18T20:58:29.135-04:00

Engine Co. #43

2600 Spring Grove Avenue, Camp Washington(image) Completed in 1906, it was designed by Harry Hake. According to the Cincinnati Fire Department History website, it was disbanded in 1976.



Mynt Martini

2009-09-16T23:38:33.760-04:00

(image) Just east of the passageway to 6th Street on Fountain Square . . .



Random West End - Part II

2009-09-16T23:01:39.517-04:00

Update: Old St. Joseph Church

Anne asked about what the old St. Joseph Church looked like in yesterday's post. Here is a nice image of the convent, school, rectory, and church as it looked from the Library's Cincinnati Memory Project.(image)



Random West End

2009-09-15T20:48:24.812-04:00

Three of the historic St. Joseph's School Complex(image) (image) (image) (The historic church was demolished to widen Linn Street in the early 1960s. The modern church was completed in 1965.)

Three of Hopkins Street(image) (image)
(image) (You will remember that last one as the home of Frederick Alms.)