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Gluten A Go Go - Gluten-Free



Exploring gluten-free cooking and baking my way through the Culinary Institutes Baking and Pastry book



Last Build Date: Fri, 11 Aug 2017 08:21:36 PDT

 



Compassion & Life

Mon, 16 May 2011 09:42:00 PDT


My post for yesterday's post in support of the Day of Compassion, got waylayed by my own little challenge...I locked myself out of the house. Sigh.....I rushed out of the house thinking that I had put my keys in my pocket, when in reality they were still inside hanging in the lock. Right where I can see them...hanging there....mocking me....sigh.

Some of us have been there and done this before (mumble...mumble...I have....). It is still one of those moments you could do without.

However, it was one of those moments that I will treasure, because of my neighbors. They watched out for us, while we waited to get back inside. The hugs they gave us when all was well, were truly special.

Each day, we have an opportunity to reach out to someone else...to give a hug, buy local, volunteer with a community organization, give a donation to your local Food Bank or the Red Cross or the Salvation Army. Consider visiting your local pet shelter or contact an animal rescue group and adopting a pet. Check in on an elderly neighbor and visit.

Compassion...it's priceless.



Happy Mother's Day

Sun, 08 May 2011 14:39:00 PDT



Happy Mother's Day!


I hope you have a wonderful Mother's Day with your families or friends.  My family has banned me from the kitchen, so my husband can work his magic at the barbecue grill (He's our resident "Fire King".). He's treating me to his grilled chicken thighs basted in honey, gluten free soy sauce and Green's Dubbel Dark Ale (yep, it's gluten free). He's also fixing a bountiful offering of grilled fresh squash and corn.

I wouldn't be a Mom if it wasn't for my husband...my "Fire King," and my very own geek love. We found each other, discovered friendship and slowly fell in love. Over the years, our love grew and we added a son to our little family. As he grew, our love for him and each other grew even more. We decided to add another little one to our family several years later and were blessed with a daughter.

Parenthood has been a wild ride of joy, agnst, love, panic, hope, worry and pride for the children we cherish. They are growing into beautifully honorable people that I'm delighted to know and love. So, from the bottom of my heart, thank you my dearest "Fire King" for our son and daughter.

Note: In the Houston area, you can find Green's Pale and Dark Ale at Whole Foods. Bard's Tale can be found at Spec's Liquor Stores.



Sweet Potato Muffins & Jamie Oliver

Sat, 30 Apr 2011 14:28:00 PDT

As I mentioned in my last post, it feels like I'm trying to get back into baking and breadmaking. For me, it's an odd thing to say since I've been baking and breadmaking since I was sixteen. As my previous posts have shown, our multiple moves last year played havoc with my daily kitchen fix.  While in reality, I'm actually baking a good bit. I'm busy making multiple batches of scones, biscuits, muffins and foccacia to fuel our two teenagers, who are working their way out of their current shoe size.All of the hassle, the packing, the storage, the temporary apartment, and finally moving has truly been worth it. We're living closer to our families now, than we have in the past 20 years. At that time, we were living in Wichita and it wasn't that far to come to Houston. Years later, when work moved us from Washington, D.C. to New York, it turned out to be quite the journey. Our youngest was a toddler when we moved to New York and she didn't believe that a kid's car seat was anything anyone should sit in for any length of time. I think I've sustained some hearing loss from that period in our lives.Recently, I was at our branch of the Houston Public Library and I came across a copy of Jamie Oliver's book, Jamie at Home: Cook Your Way To The Good Life.  The book is gorgeous with many inspiring photos of his garden and the food he makes from his crops. One of the photographs that caught my attention was for Butternut Squash Muffins with a Frosty Top. This muffin is the type that my teens love. They quickly gravitate towards these when they are hunting through the kitchen for something satisfying and filling to eat. I tweaked Jamie's recipe a little by reducing the amount of sugar since I was using sweet potatoes and by topping them with a light citrus gel.If you'd like to see this recipe in metric, click here.Enjoy!Jamie's Muffins3 whole sweet potatoes, baked, peeled, mashed4 large eggs, whisked1 tsp sea salt2 1/2 tsp baking powder1 tsp ground cinnamon1 1/4 cup cane sugar1 cup brown rice flour1/2 cup oat flour (you can also use millet, corn, sorghum, etc)1/2 cup sweet rice flour (you may also use tapioca, corn or potato starch)1/2 cup arrowroot starch (you may also use one of the other starches)1 tsp chia seed meal or 1 tsp xanthan/guar gumOptional: 1/2 cup chopped pecans or walnutsGel1/4 cup orange juice1/4 tsp vanilla flavoring2 tsp agar agar powder (you may use gelatin)2 - 3 Tb cane sugarPreheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place about 15 to 18 silicone muffin cups on it. You can also use parchment paper lined muffin tins as well. In a medium bowl, add the liquid ingredients, including the mashed sweet potatoes and blend. In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients and throughly combine. Slowly, add the liquid ingredients and quickly blend together. Spoon the batter into the muffin cups and bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Allow to cool a little bit before topping with the citrus gel and zest.In a small saucepan, combine the orange juice, sugar and agar agar or gelatin powder. Cook until the mixture begins to thicken, then add the vanilla flavoring. Remove from the heat and pour into a bowl for serving.[...]



Happy Easter!

Sun, 24 Apr 2011 20:35:00 PDT


I hope you had a wonderful day with friends and family. Our family had an Easter celebration with a barbecue, Easter egg hunts for the little ones and, of course, the very necessary chocolate bunnies. My terrific sister-in-law made sure ours were gluten free.

We finished the work on our house and the air quality is significantly better. Thankfully, our son's asthma has calmed down being in a better home environment. My husband and I are really releaved at how much better he feels. Up next on our home list is wood rot. It's one of the dubious joys of living in a humid environment.

We've really enjoyed living in Houston. We're still trying to get things figured out, such as which doctors to use, where to get the car fixed and where to get your suits dry cleaned. We're making progress though and we've even managed to start building relationships with new physicians.

Our neighborhood has scoodles and scoodles of dogs and cats. It seems like everybody has a dog or two and maybe a cat or two. Some folks even have the additional menagerie of rabbits, lizards, mice and hamsters. We've got the lone Shetland Sheepdog. Her wish is that the neighbors would all let their rabbits loose, so she'd have something fun to chase. In her opinion, these cats are way, way too cranky for spontaneous bouts of joy.

I've got my pantry stocked and I've started baking again. I've been busy churning out muffins, bread (the current favorite is biscuits) and focaccia. Plus, a few batches of cookies for good measure. One of my favorite things is to walk into my house and it smells of the foods we love to eat.

More to come...



Off With A Bang

Wed, 05 Jan 2011 09:02:00 PST


It's finally ours! We've partially moved into our new house, actually we're camping in it while we have some work done. We're tackling the things that it's easier to do when you've not yet moved into a house. So, we're putting in hardwood floors upstairs and then having all the floors refinished, a new tankless water heater and recirculator and a radiant barrier. There are more things on our list, but they can come later.

Right now it's loud and noisy. There are hammers banging, carpet tack strips being pulled up and the plumbers yelling back and forth from the attic to the second floor. Our dog is having a grand time running back and forth trying to see what everyone is doing, that is until the plumbers started drilling a large hole in the attic. Now, she's on high alert for any new sounds of potential disaster.



Affirmation & Change

Wed, 29 Dec 2010 14:14:00 PST



As 2010 moves on, my family and I will have ended our most mobile year. We began the year living in Michigan, where my husband was working on a long term project for a client. His firm offered us a terrific opportunity to relocate from New York to Texas.

We packed our bags in Michigan, unloaded and reloaded everything in New York. Gave away lots of stuff, sold our house and put the remaining stuff into storage. Loaded one car on a UHaul auto transport and towed it to Texas.

On the way, we visited with family and the UHaul repair mechanic, lived in hotels, dodged a tropical storm, and got a scenic detour due to closure of the interstate in East Texas. Not to mention all the money we spent with Amazon and iTunes to refill our iPods with new media for the trip.

While we looked for a new home here in Houston, we got reacquainted with apartment life. I rediscovered the knowledge that I need the stove needs to vent outside not back into the kitchen.

After three months of looking, we found the house for us. We move into our new home on New Year's Eve, just in time to celebrate the New Year.  Our new home has the perfect kitchen for cooking, togetherness and celebrations. I can't wait to move in and start a pot of black-eyed peas for good luck!

More joys came our way this year. We visited all five of the Great Lakes, celebrated our 20th anniversary and our daughter's 11th birthday at Niagara Falls. Our son finally grew taller than his Dad...he past me by several years ago. And I celebrated my fifth anniversary of being cancer free.


It has been a joyously full year for us, full of travel and good health, transitions, old and new homes, friendships and family connections celebrated and reaffirmed.



Merry Christmas

Fri, 24 Dec 2010 11:56:00 PST


Merry Christmas!

From my family to yours~

May your day be filled with abundant joy,

Love, laughter and thankfulness~


Natalie





Happy Thanksgiving

Thu, 25 Nov 2010 06:26:00 PST



Happy Thanksgiving!

From our home here on the Gulf Coast, I hope everyone has a joyous holiday filled with laughter, love and joy.

Natalie



Houston - Heat, Houses & Pots

Wed, 13 Oct 2010 13:49:00 PDT


Thank you for all the kind messages about moving, selling our house and surviving the process. Our lives have been swept up in one whirlwind after another until last week. All our neighborhood research and house hunting focused in on a great house in a really lovely area. We put forth our best offer, but we weren't able to come to terms with the owner. So, we're back to the house hunt. 

While looking for that special house that appeals to all of us, we've been living in a furnished corporate apartment near downtown. It has been a lot of fun being so close to so much activity, great food, museums and more. Coming out of New York, we were driving everywhere, I'm sad to say...even four blocks down the road. The heat was more than our bodies could take those first few weeks, in fact our poor Sheltie hasn't stopped shedding yet.

We're settled in our apartment, although I'm having a bit of a challenge getting used to cooking in an apartment. The kitchen has a built-in microwave that also functions as a hood vent. I've discovered that it doesn't vent outside, it just filters whatever it pulls through and leaves this lovely greasy stain on the cabinets. It puts a real crimp in using the self-cleaning cycle on the oven as well, since the ceilings have all those well placed smoke/fire alarms and sprinkler heads. Needless to say, I've gotten friendly with the oven cleaner can again.

I packed up a mini-kitchen set up for the apartment, when we were packing up our house. Currently, we don't have any house prospects on our horizon, so it looks like temp living is going a bit more long term. In the kitchen equipment our leasing company provided, they gave us some Anchor Hocking baking dishes, but they gave us a set of pots and pans where the nonstick coating is very scratched up.

This is actually the opportunity I've been looking for...an excuse to upgrade my pots and to get a nice enameled cast iron dutch oven or cocotte. I've been looking at All-Clad, Tramontina, Le Creuset and Staub. Does anyone have a favorite set of pans or are your favorites based on the individual piece? Or on something different?



A Transfer & Selling Our House

Sun, 01 Aug 2010 16:05:00 PDT


After we got home from Michigan, my husband and I started our annual planning of what house projects do we tackle this year. When your house is 83 years old, there is always a project waiting to be done. With our never ending list in our hands, we decided to do some outside painting, work on the chimney and line the sewer pipe with one of those new sleeve thingies. Everything was moving along pretty smoothly, we had Roto-Rooter in the basement lining the sewer, the chimney mason was slinging concrete and contractors wandering around giving us estimates on the painting we want done. And then it happened...

"Hey babe!" calls my husband, "They want us to move."

"Oh yeah? Where to?" I ask. "Back to Michigan?"

"Umm...no...they say Houston," he replied.

"Well, it probably won't happen," I said.

"Actually, they've got the funding to move us. Umm...I guess we need to sell the house," he murmured.

Smarty pants that I am...I thought I could handle baking, blogging, getting our house ready to sell, showing it, selling it and the hundreds of things it takes to get all this done.  I was so wrong...

I discovered several things about myself during the last few months. First of all, I am not in any way shape or form related to the Energizer bunny.  Second, caffeine is not a replacement for sleep...yeah, I had to learn this one yet again. You'd think college would have cemented it for me, but no...I had to learn it one more time. Third, I discovered I can be quite testy when not so great/not great/bad things happen beyond just the standard 3 in a row...like when it's in the multiples of 3, say 3x7. Now, it was probably a side effect of all that Espresso I was inhaling. But, holy cow! There just has to be an end to all the loonier aspects of moving.

I've been able to get back to doing a little baking, now that we have a closing date set for our house. I've been baking a lot of muffins and scones to get us through the breakfast house. It's really hard to do baking that's very involved, as I had to keep the kitchen scrupulously clean.

However, I did discover the morning the house went on the market just how long a gluten free sourdough starter will last without feeding in the refrigerator...30 days. That's it... On day 29, it will look and smell fine, but on day 30 watch out...a weird white fuzz will cover your starter and funky acetone aromas will take over. 
And no...the smell doesn't depart from your fridge easily...

more to come...



Focaccia (B&P42)

Wed, 17 Mar 2010 19:11:00 PDT

For the last three months, we've been living and working out of a temporary home in Michigan. My husband's on location contribution to a project here is nearing it's end. So, we've been trying to cram in all the Great Lakes tourist destinations that we can manage. This past weekend, we headed off to the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore on Lake Michigan.  We had a lot of fun climbing hills, falling into the snow, banging up our knees, and taking pictures.  Then we headed off to the lakeshore to look for rocks and fossils, plus seeing the lighthouses. Last, we cruised the coastline of the Grand Traverse Bay and looked at all the different birds frolicking in the frigid water. I do have to admit that our little trips have been a bit challenging to coordinate. When you travel with  kids, our dog and our various food issues, it can feel like a major war campaign just to go on a weekend getaway not to mention the two week vacation. We've been spoiled by the abundance of pet friendly hotels that are abundant on the eastern seaboard and in the south. Little did we realize that heading out into the forest lands of Michigan, that our hotel search would be more troublesome than our gluten free food planning.I did use a couple of resources for this trip that proved to be pretty helpful, the Bed Bug Registry and Trip Advisor. I even used Google images to check for pictures of hotels, motels, plus bed & breakfast locations. After a great deal of searching, I located a family and pet friendly hotel in Traverse City, the Baymont Inn & Suites. It was a perfect lodging point for our trip and there were plenty of restaurants to try and negotiate a gluten free meal.  If you come out to Michigan to visit the Great Lakes, be aware that many lodging locations and tourist destinations are closed for the winter. The National and State Parks are mostly open, but have limited accessibility due to heavy snowfall. If you are interested in cross country skiing, snow shoeing or snow mobiling these are great destinations. Otherwise, you'll need to wait until there is enough of a thaw to allow for easier access to the trails. To get us on the road, I made a loaf of focaccia drizzled with olive oil. fresh oregano and dotted with Kalamata olives. It was the perfect type of road food, easy to handle and not messy to eat. Delicious!Enjoy!RecipeProtein ContentOriginal Amount: 43.94 gGF Amount: 43.302 gBiga15 g brown rice flour (1.35 g)14 g sweet rice flour (0.84 g)14 g arrowroot starch (0.042 g)22 g almond meal (4.4 g)20 g white bean flour (4.3 g)1 g instant dry yeast (120 - 130 degrees F/48 - 54 degrees C)50 ml water 10 ml agave sweetFinal Dough50 g brown rice flour (4.5 g)40 g sweet rice flour (2.4 g)40 g arrowroot starch (0.12 g)73 g almond meal (14.6 g)50 g white bean flour (10.75 g)6 g chia seed meal4 g agar agar powder12 g instant dry yeast7 g sea salt126 g biga (from above)15 g agave syrup23 g olive oil135 ml water (120 - 130 degrees F/48 - 54 degrees C)Optional Toppings: fresh herbs, olives, roasted tomato slices, sauteed garlic or onion slices. Biga Directions In a medium sized bowl, combine the flours, water, agave syrup and yeast. Mix together, making sure the mixture is smooth. Cover the mixture or transfer to a container and allow to ferment at 75 degrees F/24 degrees C for 18 to 24 hours. When the biga is ready to use, it will have risen and receded, yet also look bubbly.Final Dough Directions 1. In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients with the exception of the salt and yeast. Hold the salt out, so it can be added later in the mixing. Place the yeast into a small container, add the water and a little bit of the agave syrup. Stir to ensure the water mixes through th[...]



A Biga & A Sourdough Starter - Baking & Pastry Week 21

Mon, 15 Mar 2010 19:15:00 PDT

A Sour StoryThis week I'm wrapping up my exploration of bigas and moving on to sourdoughs. I'm going to make a couple of different types of sours, starting with one that is light colored and mild flavored like one made from bread flour.  The second will be stronger in flavor more like a rye flour. The final sour will be a whole grain style made with a stronger alternative flour, i..e. buckwheat, amaranth, teff, etc.This first sour is mild and slightly colored and flavored with corn flour or an extra fine ground corn meal. It will take five days before your sour is ready to be made into a loaf of bread. When you measure out your flours to begin the starter, go ahead and measure out the rest of the flours for each feeding. Then your feeding process will be quick and easy.If you are having trouble getting your culture started, you can add a grape, apple slice, onion or potato pieces. You can even use the water from boiling potatoes for your water in the recipe. I like using a mixture of flours in my sourdough starters, as I think you get a more vibrant culture.  Once your sourdough culture has been established, you will need to feed it again once the dough has risen and then recedes from it's previous feeding.Enjoy!Sourdough Starter RecipeDay 1 & 260 ml water (80 degrees F/27 degrees C)10 g brown rice flour (0.9 g)13 g sweet rice flour (0.78 g)10 g corn flour (not corn starch) (0.81 g)13 g almond meal (2.6 g)10 g white bean flour (2.15 g)2 ml agave syrupMix the ingredients together and then cover.  Allow to sit for 24 hours at 75 degrees F/24 degrees C. On Day 2, check to see if the water and flours have separated. If they have stir them together, cover and allow the sour to sit another 24 hours.Day 3Note: The image above is of this starter at Day 3.60 ml water (80 degrees F/27 degrees C)56 g sour (from Day 1 & 2)10 g brown rice flour (0.9 g)13 g sweet rice flour (0.78 g)10 g corn flour (not corn starch) (0.81 g)13 g almond meal (2.6 g)10 g white bean flour (2.15 g)2 ml agave syrupTake 56 g of the sour from Day 1 & 2, discard any excess sour. Add the water and the flours for the first feeding combining thoroughly. Cover and rest for 24 hours at 75 degrees F/24 degrees C.Day 460 ml water (80 degrees F/27 degrees C)113 g sour (Days 1 - 3)10 g brown rice flour (0.9 g)13 g sweet rice flour (0.78 g)10 g corn flour (not corn starch) (0.81 g)13 g almond meal (2.6 g)10 g white bean flour (2.15 g)2 ml agave syrupTake 113 g of the sour from Day 3, discard any excess sour. Add the water and the flours for the second feeding combining thoroughly. Cover and rest for 24 hours at 75 degrees F/24 degrees C.Day 5120 ml water (60 degrees F/16 degrees C)56 g sour (from Day 4)35 g brown rice flour (3.15 g)35 g sweet rice flour (2.1 g)30 g corn flour (2.43 g)40 g almond meal (8 g)30 g white bean flour (6.45 g)2 ml agave syrupTake 56 g of the sour from Day 4, discard any excess sour. Add the water and the flours for the first feeding combining thoroughly. Cover and rest for 4 hours at 75 degrees F/24 degrees C, before using this sour to make a loaf of bread.What Am I Baking?Focaccia made with a biga (egg free & dairy free)Brown Rice & Corn Sourdough (egg free & dairy free)Shopping ListBrown Rice Flour (Fine or Superfine Grind)Sweet Rice Flour (also called glutinous rice flour)Arrowroot StarchCorn FlourAlmond MealHigh Protein Flours, such as: Soybean, White Bean, Black BeanWhole Grain Flour, such as: Buckwheat, Millet, Sorghum, Quinoa, TeffInstant Dry YeastBinding Agents, such as: Xanthan or Guar Gum, Chia Seed Meal, Agar Agar PowderOlive OilResources Flours & Binding Agents: Authentic Foods, Barry Farm, Bob's Red MillInstant Dry Yeast: Barry FarmAgave Syrup: Wild Organics, Native SeedsEqu[...]



Ciabatta (B&P41)

Sun, 07 Mar 2010 07:11:00 PST

Like many people who love to cook, I've got a thing for cookbooks, especially old ones. I go through old bookstores, thrift shops and even the collections of my family and friends looking for old treasures.A while back I checked out the cookery section at Project Gutenberg, but didn't find anything all that interesting. Time makes all the difference in the world, especially when transferring old books into a digital format. Yesterday, I was back at Project "G" oogling their selection and they do have some nice ones available in the cookery section of the bookshelf.  They have a variety of ways to download the books and some versions even have the images as well. I tested the Adobe EPUB and the Read Online formats and both worked very well.There are some old gems in this collection like The Women's Institute of Cookery (vols. I - V), The White House Cookbook and The Cook's Decameron: A Study In Taste, Containing Over Two Hundred Recipes For Italian Dishes. There are quite a few interesting recipes to be found in this collection, especially one for Starvation Soup.  It's found in The Belgian Cookbook (1915), a  book of recipes provided by Belgian refugees of World War I.With many old cookbooks, you will have to guess at the quantities required for a recipe. They might tell you to use an equal amount of almonds and sugar or use phrases like "...reckon the quantities as follows." These types of recipes give you the chance to really get a feel for the look, texture and taste of a baked good. Although, it can be frustrating sometimes when you have to try and figure out equal weights of eggs, butter, flour and sugar. If you're looking for something really yummy to go with this very good loaf of ciabatta, check out a recipe for Roman Sauce from The Cook's Decameron. It calls for nutmeg, raisins, lemon, herbs, pine nuts or almonds, burnt sugar in an espagnole or brown sauce. For our dinner, I ended up choosing the classic tomato sauce with basil and garlic served it over brown rice pasta and meatballs. To finish it off, I served Chocolate and Drambuie Tiramisu, the latest Daring Baker Challenge recipe, along with a cup of organic Espresso. Delicious.Enjoy!RecipeProtein ContentOriginal: 29.12 gGluten Free: 28.63 gBiga20 g brown rice flour (1.8 g)15 g sweet rice flour (0.09 g)15 g arrowroot starch (0.045 g)20 g almond meal (4 g)22 g white bean flour (4.73 g)1 g instant dry yeast50 ml water (120 - 130 degrees F/48 - 54 degrees C)10 ml agave syrupFinal Dough25 g brown rice flour (2.25 g)22 g sweet rice flour (1.32 g)20 g arrowroot starch (0.06 g)30 g almond meal (6 g)35 g white bean flour (7.525 g)12 g instant dry yeast6 g chia seed meal4 g agar agar powder7 g sea salt126 g biga (from above)130 ml water (120 - 130 degrees F/48 - 54 degrees C)15 ml agave syrupBiga DirectionsIn a medium sized bowl, combine the flours, water, agave syrup and yeast. Mix together, making sure the mixture is smooth. Cover the mixture or transfer to a container and allow to ferment at 75 degrees F/24 degrees C for 18 to 24 hours. When the biga is ready to use, it will have risen and receded, yet also look bubbly.Final Dough Directions 1. In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients with the exception of the salt and yeast. Hold the salt out, so it can be added later in the mixing. Place the yeast into a small container, add the water and a little bit of the agave syrup. Stir to ensure the water mixes through the yeast. Allow the yeast to proof for 2 to 3 minutes.2. Add the yeast mixture, biga, the rest of the agave syrup and blend together. Just before the dough comes together, sprinkle in the salt and then continue blending until a soft ball forms. Note: This dough should be a little wetter or looser than [...]



Rosemary Bread (B&P40)

Mon, 01 Mar 2010 07:11:00 PST

The beauty of a biga is the rich slightly fermented flavor they give a loaf of bread. The depth of flavor is intensely satisfying when you eat these loaves. The first time I made this loaf, I didn't allow the biga to mature to the full 18 hours. Instead I stopped it about 8 hours, because I really needed a loaf of bread for my dinner party.The resulting bread looked and tasted good, but that extra something was missing. So, I made it again and allowed the biga to ferment for 24 hours. Wow! The biga had a heady wine-like aroma and gave the bread that little extra boost it needed.I made an Italian style dinner for my guests and everyone loved the bread. It doesn't need anything extra to go with it, maybe some butter. However, it's simply wonderful to eat all on it's own.Enjoy!RecipeProtein ContentOriginal: 40.3 gGluten Free: 39.72 gBiga10 g brown rice flour (0.9 g)10 g sweet rice flour (0.6 g)10 g arrowroot starch (0.03 g)15 g white bean flour (3.225 g)12 g almond meal (2.4 g)1 g instant dry yeast32 ml water (120 - 130 degrees F/48 - 54 degrees C)10 ml agave syrupFinal Dough50 g brown rice flour (4.5 g)40 g sweet rice flour (2.4 g)40 g arrowroot starch (0.12 g)60 g almond meal (12 g)63 g white bean flour (13.545 g)12 g instant dry yeast6 g chia seed meal4 g agar agar powder5 g sea salt2 g rosemary, coarsely chopped9 g olive oil24 ml milk or alternative milk132 ml water (120 - 130 degrees F/48 - 54 degrees C)15 ml agave syrupBiga DirectionsIn a medium sized bowl, combine the flours, water, agave syrup and yeast. Mix together, making sure the mixture is smooth. Cover the mixture or transfer to a container and allow to ferment at 75 degrees F/24 degrees C for 18 to 24 hours.  When the biga is ready to use, it will have risen and receded, yet also look bubbly.Final Dough Directions1. In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients with the exception of the salt and yeast.  Hold the salt out, so it can be added later in the mixing.  Place the yeast into a small container, add the water and a little bit of the agave syrup. Stir to ensure the water mixes through the yeast.  Allow the yeast to proof for 2 to 3 minutes.2. Add the yeast mixture, biga, the rest of the agave syrup and blend together. Just before the dough comes together, sprinkle in the salt and then continue blending until a soft ball forms. Note: This dough should be a little wetter or looser than other types of doughs. 3. Since this dough is looser, I made a foil frame so the bread would turn out the right shape. Take a long strip of aluminum foil and fold it lengthwise until it is 2 inches/5 cm wide. Fold up 1/2 inch/1.3cm from one long edge, but don't make a hard crease in the foil.  Ease the foil around until the ends over lap and can rest one inside the other. Work the corners until the fold lays flat and you have a rounded edge rectangle. Let the sides ease out rather than be straight up and down. (See the picture above.)  Gently line this frame with parchment paper, so you can reuse the frame for the ciabatta (the next B&P recipe). 4. Place the dough in the center of a sheet of parchment paper that has been sprinkled with arrowroot starch. Gently pat the dough out into the frame, but don't press it into the sides or corners. The loaf should still have rounded sides. Take a sharp knife to one corner of the dough and score from that corner to each of the other 3 corners (see the photograph at the top of the post). Slide the frame onto a parchment paper covered cookie sheet and place in a warm location to rise for 2 hours.4. Place an oven proof bowl filled with water on the bottom shelf of the oven. Then place a baking stone on the top shelf. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F/232[...]



Tiramisu with Chocolate Ganache & Drambuie

Fri, 26 Feb 2010 21:12:00 PST

 The February Daring Bakers Challenge The February 2010 Daring Bakers’ challenge was hosted by Aparna of My Diverse Kitchen and Deeba of Passionate About Baking. They chose Tiramisu as the challenge for the month. Their challenge recipe is based on recipes from The Washington Post, Cordon Bleu at Home and Baking Obsession. This divine Italian dessert translates to mean ‘pick me up’, supposedly referring to the ‘kick’ provided by the strong coffee, sugar and alcohol in it!On the other hand, a slight mistake in spelling it as "Tiramuso" could end up meaning that you were "pulling a sulky face"! Classic tiramisu is made of alternate layers of espresso soaked ladyfinger biscuits and a cream made from mascarpone cheese and zabaglione (an egg custard). The perfect Tiramisu is a balance of flavors of a sweet zabaglione, strong coffee, marsala wine, creamy mascarpone cheese and the dusting of unsweetened cocoa. Tiramisu is said to have its origins in Treviso (Italy), and there are quite a few stories about how it came to be created.One story traces the tiramisu as far back as the Renaissance claiming that it was first made in honour of the visit of Grand Duke Cosimo di Medici to Tuscany. Yet another one points to the tiramisu being an adaptation of the "Zuppa Inglese" referring to the sponge cake and cream layered English Trifle.However, experts in this area generally agree that the tiramisu as we know it today, was born in the ‘70s. Some believe that the Tiramisu was created in the the Le Beccherie (a restaurant in Treviso). Others suggest that Tiramisu was first made in 1971 by an Italian baker named Carminantonio Iannaccone in a small bakery in Treviso, Italy. Thank you Deeba and Aparna for a wonderful Daring Baker challenge this month. I love challenges that expand my skills...even if gaining this skill set exasperates me. I thoroughly enjoyed making the tiramisu.I served it at a dinner party we had with some folks from my husband's work. Mr. Go Go and our guests thought it was simply fabulous, especially with the addition of the Drambuie.  Me...well...I thought it was okay, but I'm not that big on egg custard desserts. I love to make them though, because of the all the slow stirring. It's very soothing.  Although making the zabaglione took me to the mind numbing stage. After 30 minutes of stirring, I couldn't get the temperature high enough nor would the mixture thicken. In aggravation, I dumped it into a small saucepot, stirred like a speed demon and two minutes later it was finally ready.Now the ganache is another story. It's just scrumptious, especially with a touch of Drambuie added to it. There was some left in the bowl after I layered my dessert glasses and I quietly scraped the mixing bowl clean all by myself.Enjoy! Preparation Time:Tiramisu is made up of several components which can be made separately and ahead of time and put together the day before serving. Making tiramisu from scratch requires about 2 to 3 days (including refrigeration) from when you start making the mascarpone to the time the tiramisu is served. The zabaglione & pastry cream also need 4 hours to an overnight for chilling, as does the main dessert. The flavours mature after an overnight rest, and the dessert can be kept refrigerated for 2-3 days. Once assembled, the tiramisu can be frozen till you need to serve it, in case you are not serving it immediately. Equipment:A double boiler (a stainless steel bowl that fits inside a large saucepan without touching the bottom will do)Two or three large mixing bowlsWhiskA medium sized heavy bottomed panFine meshed strainer (to remove lumps from pastry cream, if any)Electric mixer, hand hel[...]



Exploring More Bigas - Baking & Pastry Week 20

Thu, 25 Feb 2010 07:02:00 PST

The Penance Post or How to iPod Your Mom In Six Easy StepsI got caught out the other day and found guilty of not just tuning out my Mom, but iPoding her. I razz my kids all the time about zoning out with their iPods. Honestly, I'm not offended, because if I wasn't driving the car or navigating us through another activity (i.e. grocery shopping), I'd be listening to my iPod too.This past Christmas, we were home visiting with my family. I was busy in the kitchen, doing the white work icing on my gingerbread house. Happily zoning out listening to a book I downloaded from our library. Everyone else in the house was off doing their own thing or watching a movie in the family room. Turns out my Mom (i.e. the kid's grandmother) was telling everyone in the family room some important stuff about the next big family get together. I was off in book and icing land and didn't hear a word of it.Last week, the kid's asked me if I had told Mimi (i.e. their grandmother) if we were going to be attending the big Spring family get together. I (of course) was puzzled by their question..."What big get together?"  Informative pair that they are, they started to let me know all about the party. Once again, I'm trying to figure out how they got to be in the know, as I'm so totally clueless about this event."Oh, Mimi told us about it," they replied. "When was that?" I ask. "Oh, that night around Christmas when everyone was over watching that movie we rented," they said. "Well, what was I doing, 'cause I don't remember this," I reply. They said, "You were decorating the gingerbread house, Mom." "Well, that explains it," I reply. "How so?" asks my son. "I was listening to a book while I iced the gingerbread," I said. "Oooooohhhhhh, you iPoded Mimi!" they popped out in unison. "You're in trouble now! We're telling Dad!" Our kid's have gotten a lot of mileage out of this transgression on my part...their Mom was caught iPoding her Mom. Priceless dirt as far as my kid's are concerned. They've told all their cousins, their friends and maybe even their grandfather. I've had emails from all my nephews and nieces asking the same question, "Is it true that you iPoded Mimi?" "Yep!" I emailed back.  "Wow! I don't suppose you lost the use of your iPod?" my 16 year old nephew asked. "I just lost my iPod Touch for two weeks, because I didn't turn in some of my homework assignments." "Well," I said, "Not turning in your homework, is kinda different than iPoding Mimi." "Yeah, I know...," he mumbled.So this post is my penance for iPoding my Mom. My family decided I should have to confess.If you're wondering how you too can iPod someone, here are six easy steps to getting it done:1. Remove the volume control on your iPod.2. Buy better ear buds.  Look at the Creative line for some nice ones.3. Find a task to do with your hands while you listen.4. Listen to something that will engross you, i.e. favorite music or book.5. Make sure that the person you are iPoding is saying or doing something worth iPoding them over.6. Be willing to pay the price for iPoding.Now that I've confessed, I'm off to bake some more in solace. I'm remaking the first loaf of ciabatta I made. It ended up turning out into something looking more like focaccia rather than ciabatta. It tasted great, but I wanted a rounded loaf not a flat one, so back to the kitchen I go.What Am I Baking?Rosemary Bread made with a biga (egg free & dairy free option)Ciabatta made with a biga (egg free & dairy free)Shopping ListBrown Rice Flour (Fine or Superfine Grind)Sweet Rice Flour (also called glutinous rice flour)Arrowroot StarchAlmond MealHigh Protein Flours, such as: Soybean, White B[...]



Cracked Rice & Potato Bread Made With A Biga (B&P39)

Thu, 18 Feb 2010 21:57:00 PST

Baby StepsWhen you first start baking gluten free, there is a steep learning curve while you learn the differences between baking with and without gluten. You take baby steps towards your goal of making edible gluten free food. Then you get the hang of it and you're making breads, cakes and cookies.Later you want to spread your wings and try different recipes or convert a wheat recipe to gluten free. Once again, you're taking baby steps and discovering the joys and sorrows of gluten free baking. I felt so bad about the food I was wasting, I took a detour into learning how to compost. However, truthfully nothing takes all the sting out of having to throw out a baked good with a lot of expensive nut meal in it, not even knowing you're feeding the earth and it's critters.Those baby steps are taking me towards my goal of baking artisan gluten free bread. They took me into the romance of my quest to a glorious crusty loaf of bread filled with cracked wild and brown rice and yukon gold potatoes. Utterly delicious...satisfying.What do you need to enjoy this loaf? Maybe warm the loaf a little and add some butter. Better yet, grab a loved one and a bottle of red wine, then share the romance.Enjoy!RecipeProtein ContentOriginal: 15.81 gGluten Free: 15.40 gBiga5 g brown rice flour (0.45 g)2 g sweet rice flour (0.12 g)2 g arrowroot starch (0.006 g)2 g almond meal (0.4 g)5 g white bean flour (1.075 g)1 g instant dry yeast10 ml agave syrupSoaker6 g cracked mixed brown rice varieties6 - 8 ml waterRoasted Potatoes65 g potatoesolive oil, as neededsea salt, as neededcracked black pepper, as neededFinal Dough16 g brown rice flour (1.44 g)10 g sweet rice flour (0.6 g)10 g arrowroot starch (0.03 g)15 g almond meal (3 g)15 g white bean flour (3.225 g)________________________replaces the bread flour10 g buckwheat flour (1.45 g)10 g arrowroot starch (0.03 g)15 g almond meal (3 g)________________________replaces the whole wheat flour3 g cocoa powder (0.57 g)3 g arrowroot starch (0.009 g)________________________replaces the medium rye flour22 g instant dry yeast55 g biga (from above)65 g potatoes74 g soaker (from above)6 g chia seed meal4 g agar agar powder45 ml water (120 - 130 degrees F/48 - 54 degrees C)15 ml agave syrup3 g sea saltBiga DirectionsIn a medium sized bowl, combine the flours, water, agave syrup and yeast. Mix together, making sure the mixture is smooth. Cover the mixture or transfer to a container and allow to ferment at 75 degrees F/24 degrees C for 18 to 24 hours.  When the biga is ready to use, it will have risen and receded, yet also look bubbly.Soaker DirectionsPlace the assorted brown rice and wild rice mixture (Lundberg Family Farms) into a clean coffee grinder. Pulse until the the majority of the grains are cracked. Pour the cracked rice into a container and pour the water over it. Cover and set in the refrigerator to soak for 8 to 12 hours.Roasted Potato DirectionsPreheat the oven to 425 F/220 C. Place the cut potatoes in a cookie pan or a rectangular baking dish. Drizzle with olive oil and using a spoon or your hands coat the potatoes with the oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Bake  for 30 minutes, remove from the oven and stir the potatoes. Place back in the oven and bake for another 20 to 30 minutes or until the potatoes are soft. Allow to cool. Cut the potato wedges into bite size pieces.Final Dough Directions1. In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients with the exception of the salt and yeast.  Hold the salt out, so it can be added later in the mixing.  Place the yeast into a small container, add the water and a little bit of the agave syrup. Stir to ens[...]



Almond White Bean Lean Loaf Made With A Biga (B&P38)

Tue, 16 Feb 2010 07:03:00 PST

Quest, circa 1303, "a search for something" (esp. of judicial inquiries or hounds seeking game), from O.Fr. queste (Fr. quête), prop. "the act of seeking," from M.L. questa "search, inquiry," alteration of L. quæsitus, pp. of quærere "seek, gain, ask" (see query). Romance sense of "adventure undertaken by a knight" is attested from c.1384. The verb is first recorded c.1350. Modern Language Association (MLA): "quest." Online Etymology Dictionary. Douglas Harper, Historian. 16 Feb. 2010. .Each morning, most of us rise, get dressed, guzzle down a cup of coffee or tea and begin our search. We seek income, food, housing, safety, love and more. Each of our quests might not be along the lines a romantic grand tradition, however each one is necessary.Every day, my husband goes out and seeks to do his best for employer and his clients. Each day, I seek to do my best for my family, whether it is through loving my family, caring for our home, cooking nutritious gluten free food, meeting our Sheltie's canine needs and working on my own endeavors.Currently at Gluten A Go Go, I seek to bake artisan gluten free bread, and blog my adventure. Each conversion of a bread recipe from the CIA's Baking and Pastry tome, is a new challenge. A new opportunity to find the best artisan gluten free bread, a loaf that is airy, nutritious and doesn't fall apart when you eat it. My quest can be broken down into smaller pursuits. Each one providing me an opportunity for the thrill of victory, such as getting the yeast to rise or the bread not to crumble. Yet, each of pursuits has the opportunity to fail and each one has at various times. Sometimes these failures have been pretty spectacular and others not so much. Each time I fail, I try again. Although quite honestly I think these basic lean bread recipes have it in for me. I have to remake these recipes more than any of the others in my baking project. This version turned out beautifully and has a fabulous slightly fermented taste. It's reminiscent of ciabatta, a recipe that is coming soon.I'm slowly working my way through Baking and Pastry. My life doesn't quite accomodate the speed that  Julie Powell was able to generate while cooking through, Mastering the Art of French Cooking. It took Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle and Simone Beck, years to create Mastering the Art of French Cooking. They didn't give up. They kept seeking the best recipes. They kept cooking until they got it right.I keep at my quest.  Some days, I find the romance (see my next bread, Cracked Rice and Roasted Potato Baguette). Other days...well...dadgum...if it could go wrong...it did.At that point, I take a break and think on things. I work on my other pursuits, such as photography. I'm working on adding to my camera equipment, learning how to use it better and acting like bird paparazzi. I'm after a really nice image of a male cardinal and red hawk that are gracing the land around us. Do you have a quest?Protein ContentBiga: Original: 11.05 gGluten Free: 12.23 gDough:Original: 16.7 gGluten Free: 16.65 gBiga16 g brown rice flour (1.44 g)16 g sweet rice flour (0.96 g)16 g arrowroot starch (0.03 g)19 g almond meal (4.32 g)18 g white bean flour (4.08 g)12 g instant dry yeast50 ml water15 ml agave syrupFinal Dough22 g brown rice flour (1.98 g)22 g sweet rice flour (1.32 g )24 g arrowroot starch (0.07 g)30 g almond meal (6 g)28 g white bean flour (6.02 g)6 g chia seed meal (1.26 g)6 g sea salt4 g agar agar powder 15 g instant dry yeast126 g biga (from above)20 ml agav[...]



A Couple of Bigas - Baking & Pastry Project Week 19

Thu, 11 Feb 2010 08:01:00 PST

Making BigasA pre-ferment used in Italian bread making is called a biga. It is a mixture of flour, yeast and water that is allowed to sit and ferment for 12 to 24 hours. There is less water in a biga pre-ferment as compared to the French poolish, which has been used some of the previous B & P Project recipes. The poolish will look like a slurry when put together, whereas the biga will look a big like bread dough that's  just a bit too firm.  When you look at your biga, you're brain will tell you it needs more water, however it is the right texture.  An example of a biga pre-ferment bread that is commonly found in most bakeries is the ciabatta (coming next week). A biga gives bread a more complex flavor, almost nutty in taste.  It's aroma is richer, yet not quite like sourdough. Overall, your bread develops in more in aroma, flavor and texture when using a biga.What Am I Baking?Almond & White Bean Lean Bread made with a biga (egg free & dairy free)Cracked Rice & Potato Bread made with a biga (egg free & dairy free)Shopping ListBrown Rice Flour (Fine or Superfine Grind)Sweet Rice Flour (also called glutinous rice flour)Arrowroot StarchAlmond MealHigh Protein Flours, such as: Soybean, White Bean, Black BeanWhole Grain Flour, such as: Buckwheat, Millet, Sorghum, Quinoa, TeffInstant Dry YeastBinding Agents, such as: Xanthan or Guar Gum, Chia Seed Meal, Agar Agar PowderTomatoesOlive OilFresh GalicCracked Black PepperAssorted Brown RicesResources Flours & Binding Agents: Authentic Foods, Barry Farm, Bob's Red MillInstant Dry Yeast: Barry FarmAgave Syrup: Wild Organics, Native SeedsEquipmentCookie SheetCoffee Grinder or Food MillWhat's Going On?I was a very lucky woman and received a copy of the Culinary Institute of America's Baking & Pastry book along with their culinary dvd's from my family for my birthday and our anniversary. After watching all the DVDs, I decided to work my way through the CIA's Baking and Pastry book - of course making it gluten free. There were so many skills that I wanted to develop and work on. I hope you will be interested in sharing my journey with me.Want more?You can follow me on Twitter and on Flickr.Other Baking & Pastry Project PostsIndex of the Baking & Pastry ProjectBaking & Pastry Project #34 - Almond Buckwheat Batard with PoolishBaking & Pastry Project #33 - StollenBaking & Pastry Project Week 17 - Sponge & A PoolishBaking & Pastry Project #32 - Gugelhopf CrownBaking & Pastry Project #31 - PanettoneBaking & Pastry Project Week 16 - Holiday BreadsWant More?You can also follow me on Twitter, where I'm glutenagogo.[...]



Almond White Bean Lean Loaf Made With A Poolish (B&P37)

Sun, 07 Feb 2010 05:10:00 PST

I'm back on the baking trail now that my flours have all arrived. Last week, I was on the hunt for flours when my order went the opposite direction from me. It put a real crimp in my making the January Daring Bakers Challenge. So, I decided to maximize my chances of getting an order by picking 3 different vendors to order from. I was able to get enough flour in to finish the DB Challenge fortunately. However it wasn't enough to go back to baking bread. All the flours finally came in and I've got bread on the menu for today.It's a truly lovely loaf of Almond White Bean Bread - a lean dough that is egg and dairy free. It has a wonderful flavor that is great as toast with scrambled eggs, a dollop of strawberry jelly or simply for eating plain.This picture is from the first set I made in early morning light. I was waiting for later in the day, for a second set, when the light would be brighter and warmer through the patio doors. The dining area contains my photo studio in our temporary home, so I got things ready and then went off to take a shower. When I was finished getting ready, I discovered my son in his search for something to eat with his scrambled eggs had absconded with the loaf. A good portion was already gone and my daughter was digging into it to add to her breakfast plate. By the time the afternoon light came around, there wasn't enough of the loaf left to take another picture.What's coming up next in my bread baking adventure? Bigas...another method of pre-ferment, which was used by Italian bakers. The biga will add a more complex flavor and larger air pockets. Well...I'm hopeful about the larger air holes, because you've got to keep on your positive thinking cap when you bake gluten free bread.  First up will be the basic lean bread, Almond White Bean.Then I'm making a Cracked Rice and Potato Loaf that has the addition of whole grains of rice in it.If you haven't tried many of the alternative flours, but you'd like to give some of them a try. Check out my latest article for the Daring Kitchen called "Playing With Alternative Flours."  It might help you over the hurdle and into trying out an alternative flour that will add a different flavor, texture or nutrition to your food.RecipeProtein ContentOriginal: 33.8 gGluten Free: 33.44 gPoolish22 g brown rice flour (1.98 g)22 g sweet rice flour (1.32 g)22 g arrowroot starch (.06 g)34 g almond meal (6.8 g)28 g white bean flour (6.45 g)12 g instant dry yeast131 ml water15 ml agave syrupFinal Dough10 g brown rice flour (.09 g)22 g sweet rice flour (1.32 g)22 g arrowroot starch (.06 g)35 g almond meal (7 g)16 g buckwheat flour (2.32 g)25 g white bean flour (5.37 g) ________________________replaces durum flour22 g  brown rice flour (1.98 g)22 g sweet rice flour (1.32 g)22 g arrowroot starch (.06 g)30 g almond meal (6 g)28 g white bean flour (6.02 g)6 g chia seed meal (1.26 g)________________________replaces bread flour15 g instant dry yeast10 g sea salt4 g agar agar powder135 ml water (120 - 130 degrees F)10 ml agave syrupDirections for PoolishPour all the dry ingredients in a medium sized bowl and blend together. Then add the water and agave syrup and stir until incorporated. Set the bowl in a warm location to rise for 30 minutes.  Directions for Final Dough1. In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients and stir together. Add the poolish, water and agave syrup and blend together until a soft ball forms.  If the dough is still too soft, add arrowroot starch by the tablespoon (1 Tb/15 ml) until the dough firms up.[...]



Nanaimo Bars - A Tribute to Canada

Wed, 27 Jan 2010 03:00:00 PST

January Daring Bakers ChallengeNanaimo Bars are a classic Canadian dessert created in none other than Nanaimo, British Colombia. In case you were wondering, it’s pronounced Nah-nye-Moh. These bars have 3 layers: a base containing graham crackers, cocoa, coconut and nuts, a middle custard layer, and a topping of chocolate. They are extremely rich and available almost everywhere across the country.Our Daring Baker Challenge this month also celebrates that the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver begin next month. The Nanaimo Bar recipe is a tasty way to welcome everyone to Canada! The January 2010 Daring Bakers’ challenge was hosted by Lauren of Celiac Teen. Lauren chose Gluten-Free Graham Wafers and Nanaimo Bars as the challenge for the month. The sources she based her recipe on are 101 Cookbooks and http://www.nanaimo.ca/. This month the challenge was a bit more difficult from the supply perspective. I usually don't have any trouble living north of New York City finding just about anything I need. However, for this challenge I'm living in central Michigan where my husband is working on a contract. There aren't any Asian groceries, so I couldn't find any sweet rice flour. The local mega box store, Meijer, does have a small gluten free section with a nice basic selection of flours. Then I found a fantastic Co-op about 30 miles away in Mt. Pleasant, the Greentree, that has a wonderful array of organic and local foods.Next, I went searching for Bird's custard powder. We began our search at the Eastman Party Store, as they said they carried a large selection of foreign foods. My husband and I imagined that it was a gourmet food store given their name, until we walked in the door. When we saw the numerous aisles of wine, beer and other alcoholic beverages, we understood the reason for the "Party Store" name. Wandering around, we found a variety of foods from around the world, including a jar of Bird's custard powder.Now all I needed was a bag of sorghum flour. Since I also needed other gluten free flours that aren't easily found locally, I placed an order to a vendor I like to order from. After carefully filling out the form and double checking the Michigan shipping address, I clicked send. When I got the tracking notification for my box, I realized that my box was headed for New York and not Michigan. That meant a little juggling with the flours I had with me to make the Nanaimo bars.When I worked on the recipe, I made an adjustment to the amount of sweet potato flour as the overall dough was basically honey flavored goo.  The extra 1/2 cup sweet potato flour, fixed the goo issue and also kept the honey flavor from being over powering in the graham crackers. The final cracker was lightly honeyed and beautifully crisp.The Nanaimo bars are fabulously rich and decadent. My family liked them cut into small squares for just a bit of sweetness.  Preparation time:• Graham Wafers: 30 to 45 minutes total active prep, 2 ½ hours to overnight and 45 minutes inactive prep.• Nanaimo Bars: 30 minutes.Equipment required:• Food Processor• Bowls• Parchment paper or silpats• Cookie sheets• Double boiler or pot and heatproof bowl• 8 by 8 inch square pan• Hand mixer or stand mixer (You may use a wooden spoon, but this makes it much easier!)• SaucepanGluten-Free Graham Wafers Recipe1 cup (138 g) (4.9 ounces) Sweet Potato Flour3/4 cup (100 g) (3.5 ounces) Arrowroot Starch1/2 cup (65 g) (2.3 ounces) Buckwheat Flour1/4 cup (56 g) (2 ounces) Brown Rice Flour1/4 cup (56  g) (2 ou[...]



Roasted Potato & Basil Loaf (B&P36)

Sun, 24 Jan 2010 07:00:00 PST

With my family engaged in the the movie, The Basilisk King, a made for the Syfy channel production, it appeared to be the perfect opportunity to finish this post. I've been hunting and pecking my way through it for the last two weeks, as my typing skills have been put on the sidelines. I had a close encounter with the tip of one of my Shun knives, while I was chopping vegetables. The tip of my finger took the brunt of this little accident and thankfully, it's still intact.Food production has continued around my house, due to these little doo-hickies called first aid or finger cots. In other words, it's a condom for your finger. It seals off your finger, with it's lovely bandage and antibiotic ointment, from the food you're preparing. They are perfect for ensuring food safety.  I picked up a box of 20 in assorted sizes from Meijer for about $1.50. So, outfitting your first aid kit with these won't dent the budget.Most people keep a small selection of bandages and antibiotic ointment in their medicine cabinets. If you do a lot of cooking you should consider adding a few things to your home first aid supplies. Pick up some finger cots, finger tip and knuckle bandages, iodine swabs, burn ointment and some burn free pain relieving gel. If you can find them, a few Medi-Burn bandages would be good to have on hand. Since most kitchen accidents tend to be cuts or burns, adding some of these things to your home kit should keep you covered.Once you've had that accident or you just want a wonderfully hearty loaf of bread to eat with your soup, try out this roasted potato and basil loaf.  I thought it was best when it was warm, but my daughter preferred it cold with a swath of peanut butter covering it.Enjoy!RecipeProtein Content:Original Amount - 25.35 gGluten Free Amount - 25.321 gPoolish10 g brown rice flour (0.9 g)10 g sweet rice flour (0.6 g)10 g arrowroot starch (0.03 g)15 g almond meal (3 g)15 g white bean flour (3.22 g)12 g instant dry yeast135 ml water20 ml agave syrupRoasted Potatoes126 g potatoes, cut in quartersolive oil, as needed2 - 3 g fresh basil, chopped2 g garlic, choppedsea salt, as neededcracked black pepper, as neededFinal Dough23 g brown rice flour (2.07 g)22 g sweet rice flour (1.32 g)22 g arrowroot starch (0.06 g)34 g almond meal (6.8 g)34 g white meal flour (7.31 g)8 g buckwheat flour (1.16 g)8 g arrowroot starch (0.02 g)12 g almond meal (2.4 g)12 g instant yeast9 g sugar6 g sea salt6 g chia seed meal4 g agar agar powder120 g poolish6 ml water15 ml agave syrup9 g butter, softenedDirections for Potatoes1. Preheat the oven to 425 F/220 C. Place the cut potatoes in a cookie pan or a rectangular baking dish. Drizzle with olive oil and using a spoon or your hands coat the potatoes with the oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Bake  for 30 minutes, remove from the oven and stir the potatoes. Place back in the oven and bake for another 20 to 30 minutes or until the potatoes are soft. Allow to cool.2. Cut the potato wedges into bite size pieces. Preheat a skillet on the stove top. Drizzle in a small amount of olive oil, then allow the oil to warm. Put the garlic into the skillet and allow it to cook for about 30 seconds or until blonde in color.  Sweep the garlic around so it doesn't burn. Add the potatoes and basil to the pan.  Continue to sweep around for a about a minute so the flavors are incorporated.  Remove from the heat and allow to cool.Directions for PoolishPour all the dry ingredients in a medium sized b[...]



Almond & White Bean Epi Wreath (B&P35)

Tue, 12 Jan 2010 20:38:00 PST

Winter has barely started and we've got quite a bit of snow on the ground. Every afternoon, I'm outside with the kids and the dog. One day it's a snowball fight, the next day they are battling their way up the hill only to slide back down. Our dog is always in the middle of the action chasing any flying snow. She plays a mean game of snowball, but she plays as shortstop. Her mission is to jump up and stop the balls before they can hit anyone.  It's been so cold, we bought her some Muttluks for her feet. She hasn't gotten used to them yet. Poor thing just minces around until she can manage to shake one of them off her feet. For us, cold days require a bowl of soup served with a crusty roll. After spending a few hours in the cold, there is nothing better to warm your body back up. Well, hugging the radiator works really well too.This is a wonderful loaf of bread, that smells heavenly while it's baking. It has a crackly crust that snaps nicely when you break apart the leaves. If you don't have any soup, warm your bread and serve it with a variety of cheeses. Delicious.RecipeYield: 1 1-lb epi wreathProtein Content:Original Amount: 28.34 gGluten Free Amount: 29.708 gPoolish16 g brown rice flour (1.44 g)16 g sweet rice flour (0.96 g)16 g arrowroot starch (0.03 g)19 g almond meal (4.32 g)18 g white bean flour (4.085 g)12 g instant yeast90 ml water (115 to 120 deg F/46 to 49 deg C)15 ml agave syrupDough25 g brown rice flour (2.25 g)25 g sweet rice flour (1.5 g)24 g arrowroot starch (0.3 g)30 g almond meal (7.2 g)28 g white bean flour (6.02 g)6 g sea salt6 g chia seed meal4 g agar agar powder130 g poolish30 ml agave syrup60 ml water (115 to 120 deg F/46 to 49 deg C)Directions for PoolishPour all the dry ingredients in a medium sized bowl and blend together. Then add the water and agave syrup and stir until incorporated. Set the bowl in a warm location to rise for 30 minutes.Directions for Final Dough1. In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients and stir together. Add the poolish, water and agave syrup and blend together until a soft ball forms. 2. Place the dough in the center of a sheet of parchment paper that has been sprinkled with arrowroot starch. Gently roll the dough into a cylinder about 15 in/38 cm long. Gently ease the ends of the dough together into a circle. Press the ends of the dough together. Take scissors or a sharp knife and holding them at a 45 degree angle, make diagonal cuts down the center of the ring.  Place each cut piece to the side as you cut it. Then place a parallel slice on either side of the center cut. Slide the parchment paper onto a cookie sheet and place in a warm location to rise for 1 1/2 hours.3. Place an oven proof bowl filled with water on the bottom shelf of the oven. Then place a baking stone on the top shelf. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F/246 degrees C. Slide the loaf on the parchment paper onto the baking stone. Thenspray water over the oven box and the top of the loaf. Bake for 10 - 15 minutes. Prop the oven door open and continue to cook the bread for another 5 minutes. Remove the loaf and allow it to cool before serving. What's Going On?I was a very lucky woman and received a copy of the Culinary Institute of America's Baking & Pastry book along with their DVD's from my family for my birthday. After watching all the DVDs, I decided to work my way through the CIA's Baking and Pastry book - of course making it gluten free. There were so many skills t[...]



Snow in Michigan

Thu, 07 Jan 2010 17:09:00 PST



I was at the counter, patting out the dough for pizza. I looked out the patio doors of our corporate rental patio house and this image caught my eye. The snow is coming down and slightly blurring the edges of the trees. In the middle of all this whiteness and dusk, there was Charlie Brown's Christmas tree. I had to share some love.



Happy New Year

Fri, 01 Jan 2010 06:53:00 PST



May your New Year be filled with

joy,

laughter,

&

love ~

Natalie