Subscribe: Comments on Indian Food Rocks: Relax with Ammini's Paal Paayasam
http://indianfoodrocks.blogspot.com/feeds/7124485710730580457/comments/default
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
cooked  long  make  manisha  matta rice  milk  much  paal paayasam  paal payasam  paal  paayasam  payasam  rice  rose matta  sugar 
Rate this Feed
Rating: 2.5 starRating: 2.5 starRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Comments on Indian Food Rocks: Relax with Ammini's Paal Paayasam

Comments on Indian Food Rocks: Relax with Ammini's Paal Paayasam





Updated: 2017-12-16T11:04:55.835-07:00

 



Dear Manisha,The paal payasam looks most appetizin...

2007-05-31T23:23:00.000-06:00

Dear Manisha,
The paal payasam looks most appetizing! Ammini's recipes are the latest craze in my kitchen. One question though - Is there any way to avoid having to remain by the stove to keep stirring the pot? Also, what do you think would happen if we used partially cooked rice instead of cooking the rice in the milk? Can you please tell me why this is done? Someone told me that cooking the rice in the milk enhances the flavour and the taste of the payasam. Please clarify.



Sreeja, welcome! And thank you so much for your de...

2007-04-20T18:27:00.000-06:00

Sreeja, welcome! And thank you so much for your detailed comment. You may have just told me how my mother used to make kheer in the pressure cooker! I have a lot of questions for you. But before that I need to add that that there were two times that I made paal paayasam according to Ammini's recipe when I did add the sugar before the rice was fully cooked and the rice did not cook beyond that point. I simmered and stirred for almost an hour each time. So I am a bit flummoxed.

Do you cook the rice along with the other ingredients, under pressure? Or without the lid? Could it be that the sugar is already caramelized that it does not interfere with the cooking of the rice?

What are the ingredients in ambalappuzha paayasam? I hope you'll come back to tell me more!



I always make pal paayasam by boiling rice, sugar ...

2007-04-20T09:11:00.000-06:00

I always make pal paayasam by boiling rice, sugar and milk together. To get the pink hue, first pressure cook milk in low flame the with sugar for around 30 minutes after the first whistle. After this I add rice/vermicilli and more sugar if needed. The pressure cooked milk condenses a lot and turns a deep rich pink colour. So if you wish you can add a little more milk. Rice **always** gets cooked despite the addition of sugar. I think the secret to best payasam is not to add water at all. many people i know first cook the rice/vermicilli in water then add milk and sugar which gives a totally different taste.

My mom makes this in uruli with long hours of stirring and her ari payasam is the BEST I have ever eaten including ambalappuzha payasam.

When the milk condenses, the usual taste/smell of milk goes away and as you say, it tastes good even without elaichi. I love to eat the solidified milk left at the uruli edges. that tastes even more divine than the payasam.



Anjali, I read you were on vacation. Good! I hope ...

2007-03-27T13:18:00.000-06:00

Anjali, I read you were on vacation. Good! I hope you're rested and rejuvenated. If not, you can always make paal paayasam. :-D

Anita, you are always way way way ahead of me!

But it's a great way of paying oneself a compliment! ;-)



Very clever - so, now, who is the smarter one agai...

2007-03-27T03:20:00.000-06:00

Very clever - so, now, who is the smarter one again?



Manisha how are you? I'm here after long. I had se...

2007-03-26T22:17:00.000-06:00

Manisha how are you? I'm here after long.

I had seen these pictures on the flickr stream and knew this post would be interesting. I don't care much for kheers but now I crave to cook it for the fun you mentioned but only once Dad is here with me again.



Shilpa, tilapia is not native to the US. It was br...

2007-03-26T17:37:00.000-06:00

Shilpa, tilapia is not native to the US. It was brought here from Africa and is farm-raised. When I first ate tilapia here, I was convinced it could not be the same flavorful fish we used to eat in Kenya! But it's cheap, doesn't fall apart, has next to no mercury as it is farm-raised, is rich in omega-3 and presents a viable option to cod or wild salmon, even though it is not as flavorful. I use tilapia for most of my fish curries.

I tried standing at the seafood counter at the Asian market recently and I just couldn't go through with the process. So like, Pel and Anita, I too would be a vegetarian if I had to kill my own meat or fish. So instead I bought some frozen blue mackerel, not knowing what I am going to do with them!

I gave up sugar in my tea a long time ago. My palate hated adjusting to the difference in the sweetness of sugar between the US and India. One day I forgot to put sugar in our tea. We drank it, liked it and never went back. I hung on to sugar in my coffee till about a year ago. No more. I'm free!


Truce, it is! ;-)

Anita, my parents taught me well! They said if you hang out with people smarter than yourself, you will always do well. Now you know why I am a regular fixture on your blog! :-D

You guys are always welcome to use my space. Just no inane shopping stuff, no clothes and no shoes, except if it is about hiking boots or snowshoes. :-D

Shilpa, you have the makings of an event there. I made this, this and this from this blog for one meal. At least 3 dishes. Go on then, start it! Except that I won't be able to participate. My 3 dishes are usually: rice or roti, dal or meat curry or a bhaji and a quick salad.



Your kheer is definitely on for this weekend. I’m ...

2007-03-26T13:50:00.000-06:00

Your kheer is definitely on for this weekend. I’m also thinking of picking some more dishes from your blog and making a complete meal. Just like I did with Manisha’s recipes yesterday.The mutsch is cooing to me.
Other than Kehwa, I don’t think I’ve eaten Kashmiri food before, so it will be a novel experience. I can cook all this and we can discuss my results using your dear OLO’s comment space! (I’m just kidding, Manisha!)
So there is scope to reduce more sugar in my tea, looks like!



Shilpa, you go girl and make that kheer...you don'...

2007-03-26T00:07:00.000-06:00

Shilpa, you go girl and make that kheer...you don't have to take sides, I promise. I've called a truce.

On sugar in tea, over the past few years I have come from 1 t in the Indian cup to 1/3t in the Umreeki cup! It is so less that I think I might as well not add any. It is so easy to over-sweeten when there is hardly any to begin with!

(Yes! I can link!)



Yes, I used tilapia filets. They break and fall ap...

2007-03-25T10:17:00.000-06:00

Yes, I used tilapia filets. They break and fall apart easily on the tava but it was perfect in the oven.Healthy and delicious.Loved it.
I was a bit surprised about the sugar in the payasa too. I kept looking at the half cup measure to make sure that is what I used. I found it difficult to believe that it was right for us.
I went from two and half teaspoons of sugar in a small cup (not the amrica cup but indian teacup) of tea to a little less than a teaspoon in a span of six months… I gradually reduced my white sugar intake, a little at a time, week by week and the experiment seems to have worked. Now I can’t handle too sweet stuff. Slightly more sugar in something and I feel it is “matta god” like they say in Marathi!



Pel, you're the best! Thank you so much! The pictu...

2007-03-25T02:34:00.000-06:00

Pel, you're the best! Thank you so much! The pictures were kind of jinxed. The first time I had great daylight but the camera was on some wrong settings and I didn't notice till we'd wiped the bowls clean. The next time, it was overcast. Sigh. It's not easy...But I'm so glad you liked them!

Mallugirl, now that's a decision you won't regret! I'm hoping you will tell us the regional differences between vegetarian cuisine in the Malabar area where you come from and the Palakkad region where Ammini comes from.

Richa, a hearty welcome to a voice of reason! Divine, yes! That is the word. I see you have the aebleskiver pan that I dream of every night. Must buy it soon!

Musical, no! no! I am not the one trying to convert anyone to anything. ;-) This paal paayasam, though? Try it. At least once.

Shilpa, gosh! I don't know what to say! I am so glad you liked everything. And, whoa! you guys eat even less sugar than we do! Isn't it amazingly creamy and silken? BTW, who's Anita? ;-)

Did you use tilapia fillets? I haven't cooked tilapia like that and it's pretty healthy when cooked that way, don't you think?


Ranjani, welcome! Making superlative even more super is no problem in my eyes, when it comes to paal paayasam! Just don't tell Anita!



the paal payasam served at weddings is the most yu...

2007-03-24T18:37:00.000-06:00

the paal payasam served at weddings is the most yummiest (is that even a word?)..its been long since i tried it ..will try this next week , maybe.



Lunch today was swiss chard with masoor, baked til...

2007-03-24T14:24:00.000-06:00

Lunch today was swiss chard with masoor, baked tilapia (using your rainbow trout recipe) and… and…
the grand finale, paal payasam!
I was very patient with the payasam and it turned out creamy and perfect.Half cup of sugar was just right sweetness for me.
I bought one gallon of milk and one quart of heavy cream (read the recipe carefully only after buying them) Now I'm thinking of giving Anita's kheer a shot later this week.
Right now, in my house, Manisha's Indian Food Rocks rocks! Lol!



Palpayasa: OMG! another divine dessert. You ladies...

2007-03-24T01:16:00.000-06:00

Palpayasa: OMG! another divine dessert. You ladies are hell ebnt on converting me :).



it is so very true that paal payasam does not need...

2007-03-23T13:00:00.000-06:00

it is so very true that paal payasam does not need any flavoring of elaichi/cinnamon. one of my friends(keralite) made it for us when we visited her in phoenix and it was truly divine!
thanks



wonderful explanation with photos too!!i have to g...

2007-03-23T05:44:00.000-06:00

wonderful explanation with photos too!!i have to get this book now.



Oh...I forgot to tell you I really love your photo...

2007-03-22T23:51:00.000-06:00

Oh...I forgot to tell you I really love your photos on this one...especially the one with the three little bowls... :-D



Inji, thank you so much for that! I will look for ...

2007-03-22T23:36:00.000-06:00

Inji, thank you so much for that! I will look for that rice on my next trip to the Indian store! That was you with me? When I was stirring? :-D

Pel, from the food styling point of view, yes! But not otherwise! Dew from the petals of white roses...you are a poet, aren't you?! Gosh that was beautiful!

The book is definitely very precious. It has a wonderfully simple recipe for suran (telinga potatoes) that I am very eager to try next. I really like that I haven't had to look for special ingredients in whatever I have cooked so far. And the list of ingredients in most recipes is also not overwhelming.

I will check out rose matta rice here, too.



Manisha-This is so very lovely....so very white, s...

2007-03-22T18:54:00.000-06:00

Manisha-

This is so very lovely....so very white, so very pure...

How about just topped with a single crescent-shaped piece of fresh ripe mango? no?

ok....how about garnished with the dew that in the morning settles on the petals of fragrant white roses?

I must have this book...

BTW, I visited a Thai store recently that sold rose matta rice....it was extremely expensive! So, I put it off for a bit.....



You get unakkalari in U.SLook at this post of mine...

2007-03-22T15:41:00.000-06:00

You get unakkalari in U.S
Look at this post of
mine. I make palpayasam with that.

The way you described making of the paysam, I felt I was there stirring the milk. :)



Bee, from my lesson on rice yesterday, I learned t...

2007-03-22T11:06:00.000-06:00

Bee, from my lesson on rice yesterday, I learned that rose matta is a variety of rice. It is available in Indian stores as matta rice and apparently is sold as parboiled as well as hulled without parboiling. You may also find it in the stores as Palakkadan matta rice, which means that it was grown in the Palakkad district of Kerala.

Indira has a section on parboiled rose matta rice with beautiful pictures of the rice grain, uncooked as well as cooked.


Mandira, so you did! Sorry about that! I do need to get my eyes tested! Tukda basmati was what we ate on a regular basis - and whole grain fragrant basmati was for pulaos and biryanis. It's only since we moved here that we eat whole grain basmati on a regular basis. And that is not very healthy. I am trying to change that but no-one besides me cared much for long grained brown rice. "You have to chew it too much!" was the main complaint.

Shilpa, ok, took me a while but I figured that one out! :D I used basmati but if you read Ammini's suggestion, she says any long grain rice will do. Let me know how you liked the paal paayasam.



and my confusion bit referred to your response to ...

2007-03-22T09:33:00.000-06:00

and my confusion bit referred to your response to the first comment on this post :)
I bought whole milk and cream today. Will get ready to stir tomorrow. I agree you make it all sound so appealing that I (the fan and quick and easy cooking) can’t wait to try it.
when you say long grain rice, do you mean basmati?



Manisha, I was comparing okra kadi to Okra kichadi...

2007-03-22T08:57:00.000-06:00

Manisha, I was comparing okra kadi to Okra kichadi... not paal payasam. :) Your thukda basmati strikes a cord. That is what my mom uses for making for making payesh too...



so there are two varieties of rose matta rice? par...

2007-03-22T06:20:00.000-06:00

so there are two varieties of rose matta rice? parboiled and on-parboiled? i didn't kno that. i've always seen and used the parboiled one.

manisha, the parboiled one is super starchy, like arborio.



Ammini, thank you very much for that explanation! ...

2007-03-21T23:18:00.000-06:00

Ammini, thank you very much for that explanation!

I now understand that kuthari and hand pounded unakkalari mean pretty much the same thing. And that the rice has "just the right cling" which "depends on the starchiness of the rice" without the end result being gummy. This is where the creaminess comes from.

To confirm whether the pinkish color comes from the rice or the caramelization of milk sugars (primarily lactose), I guess that can be determined by making paal paayasam the old-fashioned way but with long-grained white rice. :-D Any volunteers?


Shyam, it made me feel good! What can I tell you! And I made it more than once. I am now looking forward to making gajjar halwa the slow-cooked way.

Rahin, after eating it, the feeling is bliss! Or heaven, as Priya put it. :D