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Preview: UC Berkeley Events Calendar

UC Berkeley Events Calendar



Campus-wide event listings from the University of California, Berkeley



 



People Made These Things: Connecting with the Makers of Our World, thru Dec 17
Why do we sometimes know a lot about who made things, and why do we sometimes not? Why does it sometimes matter to us, and why might it sometimes not? These are the questions that will be raised in the exhibit that will inaugurate the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology’s renovated Kroeber Hall Gallery. The Museum will display objects from the collection that urge visitors to think critically about how perceptions of makers have varied in different times and distant places. Objects such as ancient Peruvian jars, Tibetan Buddhist paintings, and Wedgwood china tell diverse stories of makers whose identities are obscure; a Yoruba divining tray, Karuk Indian baskets, and colorful Guatemalan textiles embody rich personal accounts of craftsmanship. Visitors are invited to reflect on the makers of their lives and share their stories. The exhibit will incorporate objects contributed by community members that illustrate the theme's relevance to everyday life. The newly redesigned space, replete with warm woods and comfortable seating areas, creates a pleasing environment for audiences of all kinds.

The exhibit will open April 3. All visitors will receive free admission from April 3 to April 9.



In-Between Places: Korean American Artists in the Bay Area, Sep 13-Dec 10
In-Between Places (사이에 머물다) is the story of Korean American artists and their dreams, featuring new work by: Jung Ran Bae; Sohyung Choi; Kay Kang; Miran Lee; Young June Lew; Nicholas Oh; Younhee Paik; and Minji Sohn.

The artists featured in In-Between Places reveal the reality and complexities of being Korean artists in America. Since the beginning of the Korean diaspora, Korean Americans have continued to occupy the in-between spaces of ambiguous identity. Existing bi-culturally, without the affirmation of belonging or permanence, Korean-Americans are only now beginning to strive for prominence with art that is definitive in stating that Korean-Americans are still Korean.

In-Between Places is the first exhibition to clearly claim that Korean Americans are Koreans, and simultaneously, that Korean American art is Korean art. The reality of Korean American art is that is not considered to be Korean in Korea. Conversely, Korean American art is not considered to be American in the United States. This exhibition will formulate a new strategy to acknowledge Korean American experiences of history, culture, and art in the Bay Area, a location that has served as a gateway for Korean culture and a bridge between Korea and the West.

The exhibition will showcase the artists’ diverse range of media, including: painting, sculpture, ceramics, video, performance, textiles, and installation art. Keeping true to their unique identities, the works created for the exhibition will lead to new definitions of the artists as Korean Americans working in Northern California, and will allow visitors to reflect on the intricacies of cultural identity.

Organized by the Mills College Art Museum, In-Between Places is curated by independent curator Linda Inson Choy (a specialist in contemporary Korean art) and Consulting Curator Hyonjoeng Kim Han, Associate Curator of Korean Art at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. The exhibition will be accompanied by an academic catalogue that will include an essay on the history of Korean American artists in the Bay Area by Mills College Professor Mary-Ann Milford; an essay on the historical context of Korean contemporary art by Consulting Curator Hyonjeong Kim Han; and artist interviews with Linda Inson Choy.



The Russian Revolution Centenary: 1917-2017, thru Jan 8, 2018
This exhibition is dedicated to the centenary of the Russian Revolution that took place in October of 1917. The exhibition will take place in the Moffitt Library, and it will highlight several print-items from the revolutionary times.



Ecocity Berkeley: Thirty Years On, thru Dec 16
In 1987 Richard Register released his first major book, Ecocity Berkeley: Building Cities for a Healthy Future, inserting “ecocity” into the urban planning lexicon. Using Berkeley as a test bed, he promoted a new vision for urban development; his ideas and drawings presaged a number of contemporary design elements, tuning architecture and urban design to nature’s and human needs and desires. This exhibit explores his inspiring vision and its international influence.

Exhibition Committee: David Eifler, Richard Register, Julie Le DenMat, Jason Miller



Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument, thru Dec 17
This investigation of the editorial process behind Parks's photo-essay "Harlem Gang Leader" reveals unspoken conflicts between photographer, editor, subject, and truth.



Miyoko Ito/ MATRIX 267, thru Jan 28, 2018
Discover the singular vision of a Berkeley-born artist whose paintings explore both exterior and interior landscapes.



Repentant Monk: Illusion and Disillusion in the Art of Chen Hongshou, thru Jan 28, 2018
Chen Hongshou is a major figure in Chinese art of the late Ming and early Qing dynasties. This exhibition explores his visually compelling work and his response to the turmoil of his times.



Veronica De Jesus/ MATRIX 268, thru Feb 25, 2018
De Jesus's memorial portraits honor artists, writers, and diverse cultural figures, testifying to the fact that each life is valuable and worthy of recognition.



Buddhist Realms, thru Apr 22, 2018
This presentation showcases exquisite examples of Buddhist art from the Himalayan region.



On the Hour/ Hayoun Kwon, thru Dec 29
Commissioned for BAMPFA’s outdoor screen, Kwon’s imaginative digital animation evokes a woman who transformed her apartment into an aviary.



Art Wall: Karabo Poppy Moletsane, thru Jul 15, 2018
Moletsane’s vibrant, large-scale portraits for the Art Wall draw on both traditional African visual culture and Afrofuturism.



Fiat Yuks: Cal Student Humor, Then and Now, thru Jun 3, 2018
Let there be laughter! This exhibition features Cal students’
cartoons, jokes, and satire throughout the years selected
from their humor magazines and other publications.



Practical Qualitative Data Analysis in ATLAS.ti [PC Version 8], Dec 9-10
This workshop will provide both a conceptual background and practical experience in computer assisted qualitative data analysis (CAQDA) using ATLAS.ti. The workshop begins by examining core elements of CAQDA, regardless of methodological orientation, discipline/profession, or platform. After instruction in the fundamental aspects of CAQDA, the course turns to the logic of the ATLAS.ti program, and how it can function as a tool for CAQDA. The workshop consists of both instruction and hands-on exercises in ATLAS.ti. By the end of the course, participants will have all the conceptual and practical tools necessary to employ ATLAS.ti in their current or future projects involving qualitative data. The workshop will be limited to 15 participants so that everyone receives individual attention.



To the Letter: Regarding the Written Word, thru Jan 28, 2018
This exhibition crosses cultures and centuries to bring together works that activate the expressive and aesthetic potential of letters and words.



Matin Wong: Human Instamatic, Oct 6-Dec 10
This retrospective surveys the career of "one of our great urban visionaries" (New York Times), from Northern California to New York and back.



Garden Holiday Pop-Up Shop, Dec 7-10
Come have a fabulous time finding beautiful and unusual gifts for the holidays at our special holiday shopping party in the Garden’s Julia Morgan Hall. Choose from a unique selection of gifts from local vendors as well as unique hand-crafted gifts from the Garden. Proceeds from your holiday purchases will directly benefit the Botanical Garden.



UC Gill Tract Community Farm Open Hours, Nov 5-Dec 10
The UC Gill Tract Community Farm is open to the public every Sunday-Thursday. Everyone is welcome! Please enter through the gate on Jackson St or the gate at San Pablo and Marin, during open hours.

Sunday 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Monday 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
Tuesday 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Wednesday 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
Thursday 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Farm Stand @ San Pablo Gate
Sunday 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm



Holiday Pop-Up Shop, Dec 2-10
Join us at the Berkeley Art Studio for our annual Holiday pop-Up Shop! Great handmade gifts made by local artists. It's like Etsy in real life!
(Note: hours are Noon-10pm Mon-Fri, Noon-5pm Sat/Sun)



Docent-led tour, thru Jan 4, 2018
Join us for a free, docent-led tour of the Garden as we explore interesting plant species, learn about the vast collection, and see what is currently in bloom. Meet at the Entry Plaza.

Free with Garden admission
Advanced registration not required

Tours may be cancelled without notice.
For day-of inquiries, please call 510-643-2755
For tour questions, please email gardentours@berkeley.edu or call 510-643-7265



Botanical Crafting for the Holidays, Dec 10
Come enjoy the holidays at the Garden with our fun and festive room filled with botanical craft stations. You can create a host of gifts and decorations for yourself and family for the holidays. You can make mini wreaths, nature filled globe ornaments, botanical cards and gift tags, felt birds and acorns, make your own botanically inspired gift boxes, and get creative at our succulent mini wreath station. We'll also have seasonal drinks and nibbles. Bring a friend and enjoy the afternoon at the Botanical Garden. Registration includes Garden admission and our special holiday pop-up shop in the Julia Morgan Hall.



The Passion of Joan of Arc, Dec 10
Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film focuses on the face as a landscape of the soul. Pauline Kael called it “one of the greatest of all movies.”



The Passion of Joan of Arc, Dec 10
Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film focuses on the face as a landscape of the soul. Pauline Kael called it “one of the greatest of all movies.”



Camille A. Brown and Dancers, Dec 10
Innovative choreographer Camille A. Brown's BLACK GIRL: Linguistic Play draws on the games little girls play to tell a story of black female empowerment. Brown uses African-American vernacular forms—social dancing, Double Dutch, hand-clapping games, ring shout—to explore the self-discovery and playfulness of childhood in a work the New York Times calls "by turns, clever and tender." Brown, a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, has created dances for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and Urban Bush Women and is known for imaginative works that address issues of identity and social justice.



Takács Quartet and Garrick Ohlsson, piano, Dec 10
Each time the Takács Quartet walks on stage for Cal Performances, its four players invite Berkeley audiences to experience a new dimension of this superlative ensemble's musical artistry. Returning after last season's heroic cycle of the complete Beethoven quartets, the Takács welcomes commanding pianist Garrick Ohlsson for Brahms' inventive and richly contrapuntal Piano Quintet, plus the first of Mozart's ebullient Prussian quartets and Shostakovich's brooding Eleventh Quartet.



Pour la suite du monde, Dec 10
Michel Brault and Pierre Perrault beautifully evoke the rhythms of rural life and language in this enchanting documentary about traditional customs on an isolated island in Quebec.



In the Battlefields, Dec 10
A young girl tries to befriend her aunt’s teenage maid in this keenly observed coming-of-age tale from Lebanon, set in war-torn 1980s Beirut.



Jennie Smith: New Drawings, thru Dec 15
Jennie Smith’s delicate graphite drawings combine close observation of the natural world with a deeply imaginative sensibility. Her body of work reflects a fascination with the environment, a willingness to confront ecological crises, and a determination to explore the beauty and mystery inherent in what she sees.

In her selection of drawings on display at the Townsend Center, Smith presents a new project exploring our psychic investment in our landscapes of origin. Her “biographical maps” render the ways in which individuals remember the places in which they were raised. Her creative process involves asking friends to describe a significant place where they spent time during their childhood. Smith then creates a map that gives visual expression to these memories and is a testament to the enduring effects of landscape on the psyche.

Smith, a San Francisco native who lives a short walk from the Pacific Ocean, also presents a new installment in her career-long engagement with the Northern California coastal environment. The Townsend Center exhibit includes pieces inspired by such Bay Area phenomena as the movement and sound of rattlesnake grass, and the windswept cypress trees along Lands End.

Smith received an MFA from UC Berkeley and a BFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Her work was included in the 2006 Whitney Biennial and is held in the Whitney Museum’s permanent collection. She is represented by the Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco. Her illustrated book of folk songs, The Littlest Birds Sing the Prettiest Songs, was published by Chronicle Books.

Viewing hours are generally Monday through Friday, 9 am to 4 pm. The exhibit is located in a space also used for events and meetings; please call (510) 643-9670 or email in advance to confirm room availability.



The Summer of Love 50th Anniversary, thru Dec 29
Marking a 50th anniversary, Bancroft’s rare and unique collections documenting the 1967 “Summer of Love” are on exhibit in the corridor cases. Presented are images from the Bay Area alternative press, psychedelic rock posters and mailers, documentary photographs of the Haight-Ashbury scene and major rock concerts, and material from the personal papers of author Joan Didion and poet Michael McClure.



¡Viva La Fiesta! Mexican Traditions of Celebration, thru Feb 1, 2018
¡Viva la Fiesta! explores the cycle of traditional religious and
patriotic celebrations that have for centuries marked the
Mexican calendar. The exhibition draws on unique historical
representations of the fiestas and examines their relationship
to communal identities, national politics, religious practices,
and indigenous customs. These original materials, which are
preserved in the Bancroft Latin Americana Collection and date from the sixteenth century to the present, include
early baptismal records in Spanish and Nahuatl, images of
Christmas pastorelas and posadas, sermons honoring local
patron saints, and accounts of Marian devotions, such as the
annual festival of Our Lady of Guadalupe.



Certificate Program in HVAC Online Information Session, Dec 11
Acquire an in-depth understanding of HVAC systems in order to meet energy-conservation standards. An opening presentation is followed by a Q&A session.



Magic Spells | A Final Meeting, Dec 11
Join Schusterman Visiting Artist Victoria Hanna, Professor Francesco Spagnolo, and the students in his UC Berkeley course, Jewish Nightlife, for a final presentation of their work. In the course of the Fall Semester, “Jewish Nightlife” presented students with an array of learning and performance opportunities. The class studied the connections between the ritual performance of Jewish texts and the dynamics of social change across Jewish history. Students discussed the rise of Kabbalistic nocturnal rituals in the Italian ghettos during the early-modern period; the performance of Hebrew poetry and Arabic music in the Ottoman Empire; and the renaissance of piyyut (Hebrew liturgical poetry) in contemporary Israel. In addition, the class conducted field trips to Berkeley synagogues and leveraged the resources of The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life. For seven weeks, the entire class was also involved in Magic Spells, a performance series at The Magnes, curated by Francesco Spagnolo and featuring Victoria Hanna’s compositions based on Hebrew amulets in The Magnes Collection. The class will open its Final Exam to the public on Monday, December 11, from 12:30-2 pm, for a concluding session featuring songs, ideas, rituals, and, of course, Hebrew amulets. About Magic Spells Musicologist and museum curator, Francesco Spagnolo, invited Israeli performer, Victoria Hanna, to create Magic Spells, a performance series based on amulets from UC Berkeley’s Magnes Collection, in the context of his course, Jewish Nightlife (Fall 2017). Worn on one’s person or placed in homes, Jewish amulets are used at moments of vulnerability and transition, like childbirth, marriage, or illness. They feature texts including biblical verses, Psalms, divine names, and invocations of powerful figures like angels, and the biblical Patriarchs and Matriarchs. The Jewish mystical tradition, including Kabbalah, is central to these artifacts, which often also feature unique imagery. The collaboration between Victoria Hanna and Francesco Spagnolo centers on the idea that these documents can be also performed, on the basis of their textual and visual content, as unique “musical scores.” Jerusalem based artist, Victoria Hanna, is a world-renowned composer, creator, performer, researcher, and teacher of voice and language. The daughter of an ultra-orthodox rabbi, she has been greatly influenced by her childhood environment. In her work, she deploys a variety of vocal techniques in the performance of ancient and modern Hebrew texts, among them Sefer Yetzirah ("Book of Creation"), an early Kabbalistic treatise. Victoria draws inspiration from the ancient Hebrew tradition, which relates to the voice, mouth, and Hebrew letters as tools of creation. According to the Kabbalah, the world was created through the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet, each one symbolizing and relating to a specific element in the universe and in the human body, each letter an exact signal, sound, and frequency in space. Stylistically, her creations span from traditional Jewish music to new music and hip-hop. Francesco Spagnolo, a multidisciplinary scholar focusing on Jewish studies, music and digital media, is the Curator of The Magnes Coll[...]



How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop, Dec 11
If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a literature review and a project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC-Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for upper-division undergraduates preparing to write a senior honors thesis, as well as those applying for graduate school or considering a career in fundraising for nonprofits.

We strongly recommend that you come to the workshop with a specific topic in mind. Your idea can be broad--we'll refine it during the workshop--but you'll get the most out of the workshop will be most useful if you can apply it to a specific area of research interest.



Residential Segregation and its Effects on Intergroup Cognition, Dec 11
In the U.S. today, racial segregation remains rampant in neighborhoods, schools, and even the workplace. Given the persistent inequity in terms of both race and social class in the U.S., my research utilizes perspectives from developmental, social, and cultural psychology to examine how features of our social and cultural contexts (e.g., racially segregated neighborhoods and classrooms) influence individuals’ thoughts and feelings about intergroup relations, and how these psychological outcomes in turn reify existing inequities. Presenting data from 5 experiments, in this talk, I will examine how racial segregation shapes both adults’ and children’s perceptions of others’ racial attitudes, and how these perceptions, in turn, allow segregation to persist. By bringing to light this bi-directional process, we can better understand why change is more difficult and slow than expected.



Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory RTG Seminar, Dec 11
Michael Artin and Barry Mazur's classical comparison theorem tells us that for a pointed connected finite type $\mathbb C$-scheme $X$, there is a map from the singular complex associated to the underlying topological spaces of the analytification of $X$ to the étale homotopy type of $X$, and it induces an isomorphism on profinite completions. I'll begin with a brief review on Artin-Mazur's étale homotopy theory of schemes, and explain how I extended it to algebraic stacks under model category theory. Finally, I'll provide a formal proof of the comparison theorem for algebraic stacks using a new characterization of profinite completions.



Dissertation Talk: Negative Capacitance Transistors: Numerical Simulation, Compact Modeling and Circuit Evaluation, Dec 11
Negative capacitance FETs (NC-FETs) are quickly emerging as preferred candidates for extremely scaled technologies for digital and analog applications. The recent discovery of ferroelectric (FE) materials using conventional CMOS fabrication technology has lead to the first demonstrations of FE based NC-FETs. The ferroelectric material layer added over the transistor gate insulator help in several device aspects, it suppress short-channel effects, increase on-current due voltage amplification, increase output resistance in short-channel devices, etc. These exciting characteristics has created an urgency for analysis and understanding of device operation and circuit performance, where numerical simulation and compact models are playing a key role.

This talk will give insights into the device physics and behavior of FE based negative capacitance FinFETs (NC-FinFETs) by presenting numerical simulations, compact models, and circuit evaluation of these devices. NC-FinFETs may have a floating metal between FE and the dielectric layers, where a lumped charge model represents such a device. For a NC-FinFET without a floating metal, the distributed charge model should be used, and at each point in the channel the FE layer will impact the local channel charge. This distributed effect has important implications on device characteristics. These device differences are explained using numerical simulation and correctly captured by the proposed compact models. The presented compact models have been implemented in comercial circuit simulators for exploring circuits based on NC-FinFET technology. Circuit simulations show that a quasi-adiabatic mechanism of the ferroelectric layer in the NC-FinFET recovers part of the energy during the switching process of transistors, helping minimizing the energy losses of the wasteful energy dissipation nature of conventional transistor circuits. As circuit load capacitances further increase, VDD scaling becomes more dominant on energy reduction of NC-FinFET based circuits.



CANCELED: Berkeley New Music Project, Dec 11
Eco Ensemble
David Milnes, director
David Milnes leads our resident professional new music ensemble in new works by UC Berkeley graduate student composers.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

The Berkeley New Music Project is a group dedicated to the performance of new music by the graduate student composers in UC Berkeley’s Department of Music. Supported by funding from the Department of Music, Townsend Center and the Graduate Assembly, BNMP presents at least two concerts per year as part of the Hertz Hall evening concert series featuring new compositions by graduate student and faculty composers.

Led by music director and conductor David Milnes, BNMP concerts feature the Eco Ensemble, a new ensemble-in-residence sponsored by Cal Performances; the Department of Music; and the Center for New Music and Audio Technologies (CNMAT). As UC Berkeley’s principal performance outlet for performers and composers of new music, the Eco Ensemble commissions and premieres works from Berkeley’s composers. Members of the ensemble work extensively with undergraduate and graduate musicians in new music studies and are developing a comprehensive program for new music performance.

This premiere group is comprised of prominent Bay Area musicians who are passionate about exploring and performing contemporary works. Its mission is to enrich and serve the Bay Area’s cultural life through the creation, performance, and dissemination of new music by composers from Berkeley and around the world.

The Eco Ensemble’s unique collaboration with CNMAT inspires works that are informed by contemporary explorations into the intersection between science and music. The ensemble seeks to expand the possibilities for new music by working with CNMAT faculty, students and researchers to develop new instruments, new applications of technologies for composition and performance, and new modes of expression. With a focus on education for both experienced audiences and novices, the Eco Ensemble’s public outreach efforts include lectures, demonstrations, workshops, and composer residencies.



Science and Literacy Playgroup, thru May 15, 2018
Have fun and meet other families in West and South Berkeley.
For Children ages 05 and their caregivers.
Free, drop-in, snacks, circle time, arts and crafts and science activities.



The Invisible Museum: History and Memory of Morocco, thru Dec 15
Since its inception in 1962, the former Judah L. Magnes Museum distinguished itself by directing its collecting efforts outside the focus on European Jewish culture and history that was prevalent among American Jewish museums at the time. During the 1970s and 1980s, its founders, Seymour and Rebecca Fromer, actively corralled an informal team of activist collectors and supporters. Together, they were able to bring to Berkeley art and material culture from North Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent. Their legendary “rescue missions”—collecting trips aimed at retrieving Jewish cultural objects in locations where Jews had once thrived—were further complemented by careful acquisitions carried out by exploring the catalogs of major and lesser-known auction houses, and especially by visiting art dealers in Israel, where many Jews from the lands of Islam had resettled.

These collecting patterns are particularly evident in the case of the stunning holdings that document the history and memory of Jewish communities in Morocco. Acquired in tourist shops across the Moroccan centers where Jews once lived—Tétouan, Tangier, Casablanca, Fez, and Marrakech—as well as through forays into the remote locations in the Atlas mountains that separate the Mediterranean and Atlantic coastlines of Morocco from the Sahara desert, the hundreds of ritual objects, textiles, illustrated marriage contracts, and manuscripts now at The Magnes are the bearers of a narrative that is at once very ancient and extremely modern.





Heirs to a history that harkens back to antiquity, the Jewish communities of Morocco carry many layers of memory and change, from the rise of Islam to the expulsion of Jews from the Iberian Peninsula, the European colonization of Africa, and the Holocaust. Most Moroccan Jews abandoned their ancestral home en masse during the 1950s, with smaller numbers remaining through the 1960s and 70s, relocating primarily to Israel, France, and North America (especially Francophone Quebec). What they left behind, along with an important network of intercultural relations and the deep memories of their ancient presence, also included communal buildings, and, especially, many objects. Brought out of Morocco, these remainings inform today a diaspora within the diaspora, a museum of the invisible, the texture of which is preserved in public and private collections worldwide.

The Invisible Museum project started with a multi-year exploration of the Moroccan holdings of The Magnes. The resulting exhibition offers a probing insight into how cultural objects, once the cherished belongings of individuals, families, and communities, may often be abandoned in the process of migration, or sold by immigrants seeking to rebuild their lives in a new land, before they become part of a museum collection.






The Power of Attention: Magic and Meditation in Hebrew "shiviti" Manuscript Art, thru Dec 15
Created from the early-modern period and into the present, shiviti manuscripts are found in Hebrew prayer books, ritual textiles, and on the walls of synagogues and homes throughout the Jewish diaspora. Wrestling with ways to externalize the presence of God in Jewish life, these documents center upon the graphic representation of God's ineffable four-letter Hebrew name, the Tetragrammaton, and associate it with words and imageries that evoke mystical powers, protective energy, and angels, as well as key places and characters in Biblical and Jewish history.

Deciphering the content of a shiviti manuscript, or simply classifying it within the realm of Jewish cultural production, is a fascinating puzzle for today's scholars. Research on these documents encompasses the analysis of biblical and prayer texts, magical formulas, visual motifs, and various modalities of material culture across the Jewish world. The very presence, and use, of the shiviti in such varied contexts as individual and communal prayer, the celebration of life cycle events, and the production of (and demand for) amulets for personal and household protection, opens new paths in the understanding of the role of text in Jewish culture. The persistence of these documents in Jewish life attests to the ongoing beliefs in the power and efficacy of magic and meditation that accompany the more normative aspects of Judaism as we know it.

The exhibition highlights a selection of shiviti manuscripts, books, amulets and textiles from The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life. The display is accompanied by new media art created especially for this project by Greg Niemeyer, as well as by resources and quotations that allow viewers to penetrate the elaborate textual and visual elements, while also experiencing the inherent power of the unique cultural objects on view.



The Worlds of Arthur Szyk, thru Dec 15
Auditorium installation of high-resolution images of select collection items.

Acquired by The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life in 2017 thanks to an unprecedented gift from Taube Philanthropies, the most significant collection of works by Arthur Szyk (Łódź, Poland, 1894 – New Canaan, Connecticut, 1951) is now available to the world in a public institution for the first time as the Taube Family Arthur Szyk Collection.

Born into a middle-class Polish Jewish family, Szyk lived a life framed by two world wars and the rise of totalitarianism in Europe. A refugee, he ultimately settled in the United States in 1940. Much of his work centered on these experiences. As a miniature artist and political caricaturist, he used motifs drawn from the Bible, history, politics, and culture to pair extraordinary craftsmanship with searing commentary on a diverse range of subjects including Judaism, the American War of Independence, the Second World War, the Holocaust, and the founding of the State of Israel.

The hundreds of artworks, sketches, and painstakingly assembled illustrated books, journals, archival documents, photographs, exhibition catalogs, and memorabilia that comprise this multi-faceted collection are in the process of being examined and catalogued so that they can be made available for research, exhibition, loan, and publication. The current display of high-resolution images of select collection items in the Auditorium of The Magnes presents the public with an unprecedented insight in the many worlds of Arthur Szyk.



Certificate Program in Construction Management Online Information Session, Dec 12
Learn how the Certificate Program in Construction Management provides thorough, up-to-date preparation for effective leadership on construction projects of any size. Gain problem-solving skills to manage cost, scheduling, risk and environmental issues.



Lifting Your Spirits: Caring for the Caregiver (BEUHS171), Dec 12
Caring for a person with dementia can be one of the most stressful things we will ever do. Stress can take its toll. Learn strategies on how to successfully manage caregiving and provide a good quality of life for yourself and the person you are caring for.



Development Lunch: "Behavioral Economists and Research Transparency" and TBA, Dec 12
Seminar series for development economics students in Econ and ARE to present their research.



Study Abroad Office Hours at Educational Opportunity Program, Oct 17-Dec 12
Are you an EOP student interested in studying abroad? A Berkeley Study Abroad Peer Adviser will be holding drop-in office hours at EOP every Wednesdays 1-3pm this semester. Come learn about different programs offered, study abroad scholarships, how to apply and additional services available.



Dissertation Talk: How the brain explores and consolidates activity patterns to learn Brain-Machine Interface control, Dec 12
The Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) is an emerging technology which directly translates neural activity into control signals for effectors such as computers, prosthetics, or even muscles. Work over the last decade has shown that high performance BMIs depend on machine learning to adapt parameters for decoding neural activity, but also on the brain learning to reliably produce desired neural activity patterns. How the brain learns neuroprosthetic skill de novo is not well-understood and could inform the design of next-generation BMIs. We view BMI learning from the brain’s perspective as a reinforcement learning problem, as the brain must initially explore activity patterns, observe their consequences on the prosthetic, and finally consolidate activity patterns leading to desired outcomes. In this talk, I will address 3 questions about how the brain learns neuroprosthetic skill:

1) How do task-relevant neural populations coordinate during activity exploration and consolidation?
2) How can the brain select activity patterns to consolidate? Does the pairing of neural activity patterns with neural reinforcement signals drive activity consolidation?
3) Do the mechanisms of neural activity pattern consolidation generalize across cortex, even to visual cortex?

I will present the use of Factor Analysis to analyze neural coordination during BMI control by partitioning neural activity variance arising from two sources: private inputs to each neuron which drive independent, high-dimensional variance, and shared inputs which drive multiple neurons simultaneously and produce low-dimensional covariance.

We found that initially, each neuron explores activity patterns independently. Over days of learning, the population’s covariance increases, and a manifold emerges which aligns to the decoder. This low-dimensional activity drives skillful control. Next, we found that cortical neural activity patterns which causally lead to midbrain dopaminergic neural reinforcement are consolidated. This provides evidence for a “neural law of effect,” following Thorndike’s behavioral law of effect stating that behaviors leading to reinforcements are repeated. Finally, I will present results showing that basal ganglia-dependent mechanisms of neural exploration and consolidation generalize even to visual cortex, an area of the brain primarily thought to represent visual stimulus. These results contribute to our understanding of how the brain solves the reinforcement learning problem of learning neuroprosthetic skill.



Dissertation Talk: How the brain explores and consolidates activity patterns to learn Brain-Machine Interface control, Dec 12
The Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) is an emerging technology which directly translates neural activity into control signals for effectors such as computers, prosthetics, or even muscles. Work over the last decade has shown that high performance BMIs depend on machine learning to adapt parameters for decoding neural activity, but also on the brain learning to reliably produce desired neural activity patterns. How the brain learns neuroprosthetic skill de novo is not well-understood and could inform the design of next-generation BMIs. We view BMI learning from the brain’s perspective as a reinforcement learning problem, as the brain must initially explore activity patterns, observe their consequences on the prosthetic, and finally consolidate activity patterns leading to desired outcomes. In this talk, I will address 3 questions about how the brain learns neuroprosthetic skill:

1) How do task-relevant neural populations coordinate during activity exploration and consolidation?
2) How can the brain select activity patterns to consolidate? Does the pairing of neural activity patterns with neural reinforcement signals drive activity consolidation?
3) Do the mechanisms of neural activity pattern consolidation generalize across cortex, even to visual cortex?

I will present the use of Factor Analysis to analyze neural coordination during BMI control by partitioning neural activity variance arising from two sources: private inputs to each neuron which drive independent, high-dimensional variance, and shared inputs which drive multiple neurons simultaneously and produce low-dimensional covariance.

We found that initially, each neuron explores activity patterns independently. Over days of learning, the population’s covariance increases, and a manifold emerges which aligns to the decoder. This low-dimensional activity drives skillful control. Next, we found that cortical neural activity patterns which causally lead to midbrain dopaminergic neural reinforcement are consolidated. This provides evidence for a “neural law of effect,” following Thorndike’s behavioral law of effect stating that behaviors leading to reinforcements are repeated. Finally, I will present results showing that basal ganglia-dependent mechanisms of neural exploration and consolidation generalize even to visual cortex, an area of the brain primarily thought to represent visual stimulus. These results contribute to our understanding of how the brain solves the reinforcement learning problem of learning neuroprosthetic skill.



Haas Scholars Program Info Session, Dec 12
Learn about how to apply to this research program for your last year!

The Haas Scholars Program supports twenty undergraduates with financial need with their interest for conducting research during their final year at UC-Berkeley. Applicants are evaluated primarily on the merit and originality of their proposal for an independent research or creative project that will serve as the basis for a senior or honors thesis. Haas Scholars receive close mentoring from members of the UC-Berkeley faculty, seminars and workshops to assist them in the research and writing process, the opportunity to present their work at a professional conference, and up to $13,800 each in financial support.

(International students and undocumented students are welcome and encouraged to apply.)






Scholar Information Meetings (SIMs), Dec 13
Newly arrived J-1 postdocs, professors, researchers, short-term scholars, and visiting student researchers are required to attend this meeting to validate their arrival in the U.S. Information on immigration regulations, travel, employment, resources for families, health insurance and other practical information will be discussed. Your final immigration document review will be completed at the beginning of the meeting, so please plan to arrive a little early. Bring the following:

■Passport
■DS-2019
■Admission stamp in passport or paper I-94 card
■Above documents for accompanying family members
■Print out of completed Scholar Information Meeting Check-In Form



Food Systems Policy and Communications Workshop Series 2017–18, Dec 13
What are effective tools to disseminate your research outside academia? In this Berkeley Food Institute workshop series, we will explore ways to engage policymakers, NGO groups, and the media to broaden the audience for your work. Open to faculty, researchers, and graduate students. Join for one session or take the whole series! Lunch provided.

All four sessions will be held at 11:45 AM–1:00 PM in 112 Hilgard Hall. RSVP is required for each individual session.

Session 2: Working with Outside Organizations on Research, Policy, and Dissemination

Roundtable on best practices for transdisciplinary collaboration beyond the academy. Successful examples from Berkeley will be shared, such
as state-legislated nutrition standards in child care and securing state grant funds for school breakfast.

Tia Shimada, MPH, Director of Programs, California Food Policy Advocates: Tia provides overarching leadership for CFPA’s programmatic work to improve the health and well-being of low-income Californians by increasing access to nutritious, affordable food. She also oversees the development and execution of CFPA’s annual research agenda. Her areas of expertise include policy advocacy to optimize the federal nutrition programs, particularly school and summer meals, and harnessing research to drive public policy. Tia has a strong interest in advancing equity and inclusion through systems change. She received her Master of Public Health from UC Berkeley and joined the staff in 2009.

Lorrene Ritchie, PhD, RD, Director, UCANR Nutrition Policy Institute: Lorrene Ritchie is the inaugural Director of the Nutrition Policy Institute (NPI) and Cooperative Extension Specialist in the University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Dr. Ritchie has devoted her career to the development of interdisciplinary, science-based and culturally relevant solutions to child obesity and has conducted studies in numerous settings on the impact of nutrition policies and programs. Current research interests include evaluation of the relationship of school-level programs and policies on student dietary intakes, the impact of policy on nutrition practices in child care settings, the relationship of federal, state and community-level programs and policies with child nutrition and weight status, and the impact of WIC nutrition education on child feeding practices.



Certificate Program in Facilities Management Online Information Session, Dec 13
Learn how the Certificate Program in Facilities Management prepares you for this rapidly changing field and helps build skills in facilities project management, strategic planning, leadership, construction planning, operations and maintenance.



Looking and seeing in the primary visual cortex, Dec 13
I will present a review of the role of the primary visual cortex V1 in the functions of looking and seeing in vision. Looking is attentional selection, to select a fraction of visual inputs into the attentional bottleneck for deeper processing. Seeing is to infer or decode the properties of the selected visual inputs, e.g., to recognize a face. In particular, I show that V1 creates a bottom-up (exogeneous) saliency map of the scene to guide the shift of gaze or attentional spotlight. In addition, I will argue that peripheral vision is more for looking, to select a visual location which is then moved into the central visual field in natural behavior, and that central vision is more for seeing the properties of the selected visual location. I will show experimental data suggesting that central and peripheral vision differ from each other in the extent of top-down feedback to V1 for visual recognition. See: www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/staff/Zhaoping.Li/ for references.



Study Abroad Office Hours at the Transfer Center, Oct 18-Dec 13
Interested in studying abroad as a transfer student? A Berkeley Study Abroad Peer Adviser will be holding drop-in office hours at the Transfer Student Center every Wednesdays 1-3pm this semester. Come learn about different programs offered, how to apply and additional services available.



Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop, Dec 13
Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, with suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of UC Berkeley's most popular undergraduate research opportunities, such as the Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP), Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF), and the Robert and Colleen Haas Scholars Program, a senior capstone experience for all majors.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students regardless of major, but it may be especially useful for freshmen, sophomores and transfer students.

Finding a Faculty Mentor

Many undergraduates find the process of securing a faculty sponsor for their research project somewhat daunting. This workshop will show you how to leverage the skills and knowledge you already possess to secure a faculty mentor. We will cover how to identify potential faculty sponsors on campus as well as how to prepare for the first meeting so that you make a great first impression.

The workshop will be especially useful for undergraduates, but is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline.



Members' Walk: Australasia, Dec 13
Enjoy late season blooms and striking evergreen foliage with Horticulturist Clare Al-Witri on a behind- the-scenes tour of the Australasian Area. Come and see plants in this collection that are native to New Zealand, subtropical regions of Australia, and the high elevations of the South Pacific islands.

Members' Walk: Australasia tour is exclusively available to current members. Admission is free and registration is required.



Applied Math Seminar, Dec 13
This presentation first reviews existing methods for adapting and optimizing computational meshes in an output-based setting. The target discretization is the high-order discontinuous Galerkin finite element method, on unstructured meshes with variable-order elements. While high-order discretizations have the potential for high accuracy, they may not show a clear benefit in efficiency over low-order methods when applied to problems with discon inuities in the solution or derivatives. In such cases, the performance of high-order methods can be improved through adaptive mesh optimization. We focus on adaptive methods in which the mesh size and order distribution are modified in an a posteriori manner based on the solution. To drive the optimization, we use an output-based technique that requires the solution of an adjoint problem for a chosen output and calculations of residuals on finer approximation spaces. The mesh size is encoded in a node-based metric, and the approximation order, when adapted, is stored as a scalar field. An optimal distribution of both quantities is found by deriving cost and error models for h and p refinement, and by iteratively equidistributing the marginal error to cost ratios of refinement. The result is an optimal anisotropic mesh and order field for a particular flow problem. We demonstrate this h-p optimization technique for several representative flow problems in aerospace engineering, and we compare the results to other refinement techniques, including h-only and p-only refinement.



Toastmasters on Campus Club, thru Jun 27, 2018
Toastmasters has been the world leader in teaching public speaking since 1924. Meetings are an enjoyable, safe, self-paced course designed to get you up and running as a speaker in only a few months.

Find out more at toastmasters.org or just drop by one of our meetings to get started.

Toastmasters on Campus has earned Toastmasters' highest honor, the President's Distinguished Club award, each of the last 8 years.



Faces Places, Dec 13
Forever young-at-heart filmmaker (and French New Wave legend) Agnès Varda teams up with hipster artist JR on a road trip across rural France. A first-rate achievement in Varda’s brilliant career.



BIO Express Travel Signature Day, Dec 14
Berkeley International Office has set aside this special day for "express" travel signatures just for you! Stop by any time during the hours below to get your documents signed on-the-spot (please read below "Do You Really Need a Travel Signature?").

Come to the I-House Great Hall during the following days and times for your Express Travel Signature.

- Wednesday, December 6 1pm-4pm
- Thursday, December 14 9am-3pm

International students and scholars planning to travel abroad need a valid signature (no more than one-year old) from an Adviser in Berkeley International Office on their I-20 or DS-2019 documents. This signature verifies that you are continuing your program and are eligible to re-enter the U.S.

Do You Really Need a Travel Signature?
Your documents may already have a valid travel signature. We recommend you get a "fresh" signature if your current one is more than 10 months old, just in case. Make sure yours is up-to-date before you leave town. Check your most recently issued document:
F-1 travel signatures are located at the bottom of page 2 of your most current I-20.

J-1 travel signatures are found on the front of the DS-2019 in the lower right corner of the document.

Can't Make It to Travel Signature Day?
If you are not able to make it to this Express Travel Signature Day, you can drop off your I-20 or DS-2019 any day during our regular business hours for overnight processing. It will be ready to pick up the following business day after 1pm.

For more information, see Travel and Visas (http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/travel)



Politically Engaged Science, thru Dec 21
This series challenges the notion that science and politics should not mix. Building on the March for Science and the People's Climate March, we'll discuss how research in the public interest can make an impact in a political environment dominated by corporate interests, from the major parties to the media.

Weekly discussions will focus on case studies of activist scientists, political debates featuring research, and contemporary examples of researchers' use of data analysis and scientific expertise to speak out on prominent issues. We will also collectively address broader questions:

• How can researchers maintain credibility and legitimacy in the face of political opposition? What happens when political intellectuals disagree? What about "objectivity" and "post-truth"?
• How should scientists and researchers interface with grassroots activism?
• How do accusations of politicization of science relate to the political interests of dominant forces in government, military, and industry?
• How should scientific research account for the differential impacts of environmental, economic or other crises on people based on their race, ethnicity, gender and class?
• What approaches to social and political change are available to scientists and researchers beyond electoral politics?

We welcome any interested members of our campus community to participate, whether students, staff, faculty. Our goal is to provide a forum to think through the challenges to and opportunities for politically engaged science, and hopefully build a foundation upon which future projects, groups, and initiatives can grow.

*Contact ucb.engaged.science@gmail.com to stay in the loop if you can’t attend.



Advanced Program in Sustainable Management Online Information Session, Dec 14
The Advanced Program in Sustainable Management covers the foundational topics in sustainability, carbon management, environmental business strategy, project implementation, environmental law and policy, compliance management systems and climate change risk-mitigation strategies. Learn how to comply with environmental regulations, as well as design and implement sustainability practices in cost-effective ways in the public and private sectors. Complete the courses that will enhance your knowledge and skills in the areas that reflect your career objectives.



Festival Favorite Animated Films, Dec 14
Award-winning films by Polish animation artists who explore human relationships in varied and innovative ways, from uninhibited humor to surrealism.



Neural circuits of dexterity, Dec 15
Dexterous movements serve the major functions of the brain, perception and manipulation of the world. Considering the range of possible actions and the complexity of musculoskeletal arrangements, control of the hand is an amazing achievement of the nervous system. Dexterous behavior involves understanding objects in the world, developing appropriate plans, converting those plans into appropriate motor commands, and adaptively reacting to feedback. The myriad of these underlying operations is likely performed by a diverse set of neural circuits. By combining anatomy, physiology, and specific (genetic and temporal) manipulations, my lab hopes to identify and understand the neural elements responsible for dexterous motor control. Currently, we focus on the role of the cortico-cerebellar loop in a skilled reach-grab-eat task in the rodent.



Core Essentials for Better Posture (BEUHS402), Dec 15
Improve your posture through awareness and exercise. Learn about common muscular imbalances and postural patterns. Practice strengthening, stretching, and stability exercises to promote healthy postures and better balance. Wear comfortable clothing. Enroll online through the UC Learning Center.



Dam Street, Dec 15
An unexpected pregnancy transforms the life of a teenage girl in a small riverside town, who still struggles to live down her past ten years later, in Li Yu’s elegantly composed Chinese drama.



Mildred Pierce, Dec 15
Joan Crawford won an Oscar for her driven performance in this noir melodrama that exposed the nightmare side of upward mobility and domestic virtue.



Global Lives Project, thru Dec 29
This collaborative video project captures twenty-four hours in the lives of diverse individuals across the globe.



Grounds for Science: Single cells to single atoms, Dec 15
This event is free, no tickets are required!

No tickets Required!
Come learn about cutting-edge research from the graduate student community at UC Berkeley in a relaxed, sci-fi-themed cafe setting. This month features short talks by graduate students Jesse Zhang and Justin Ondry.

Microfluidics and the Study of Single Cells - with Jesse Zhang
Our bodies are composed of tens of trillions of cells. Amazingly, recent advances in single cell studies show that no two of them are completely alike. Come learn about the field of microfluidics and how it is leading to new ways of studying single cells.

Seeing Atoms Using an Electron Microscope - with Justin Ondry
We know all matter is made up of atoms, but atoms are so tiny and close together, we can’t see their precise arrangement using conventional microscopes. In this talk, we will first explore just how small and closely spaced atoms are compared to our macroscopic world. We will then learn how, after 80 years of development, we can use electrons to image atoms with unprecedented precision.



Mark Morris Dance Group Dance Residency, Dec 15
What holiday season would be complete without go-go boots, dancing G.I. Joes, gender-bending snowflakes, and a spirited, slightly out-of-control family Christmas party? Mark Morris' The Hard Nut, "as gleefully irreverent as it is visually poetic and musically sensitive" (Dance Magazine), returns to Zellerbach Hall for the first time in five years with all that and more. Set to Tchaikovsky's iconic Nutcracker score, this lavish production has been charming audiences for over 25 years, delivering a pitch-perfect dose of both naughty and nice!



Ivy League + Young Alumni Holiday Party, Dec 15
Come mingle with fellow Cal alumni as well as other recent grads from the Ivy League and other amazing schools. Make sure to RSVP and purchase your ticket on Eventbrite.

Early bird sales end Nov 15, after which prices go up. A portion of the proceeds go to charity (Larkin Street Youth Services), and the rest funds your holiday party OPEN BAR :)



CAA Day of Service, Dec 16
CAA Day of Service
Shorebird Park Nature Center, Berkeley Marina
Saturday December 16, 2017
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Join CAA on December 16 to help reduce the amount of plastic on our planet by attending our second CAA Day of Service, a community-service project for UC Berkeley alumni and community members by cleaning up waste at the Berkeley Marina.



Residence Hall Move-Out for Winter Break, Dec 16
Students must leave their residence hall by 10 am on Saturday, Dec. 16. Students should take what they will need for winter break and can leave their remaining belongings in their dorm which is locked for the break.



Making the Largest 3D Maps of our Universe, Dec 16
Dr. Dillion will talk about a new technique being developed here at Berkeley with collaborators around the world to use radio telescopes to make huge 3D maps of hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, to test our cosmological theories. He will explain the observational challenges we’re facing and the reason why we’re building a giant array of 350 dishes–each one almost 50 feet across–in the middle of the South African desert. Along the way, he will discuss how we know what we know about cosmology today and how we use radio telescopes to map out that ancient hydrogen and see the impact that the very first stars, galaxies, and black holes had on it.

The last century has seen a revolution in our understanding of the universe and our place in it. We now know that the universe is about 13.8 billion years old and only about 5% normal matter–the stuff we’re made up of like protons, neutrons, electrons. Uncovering the nature of the other 95%, the mysterious dark matter and even more mysterious dark energy, is one of the most important questions in fundamental physics today.



Men's Basketball vs. Cal State Fullerton, Dec 16
Cal Men's Basketball hosts Cal State Fullerton at Haas Pavilion.



Mark Morris Dance Group Dance Residency, Dec 16
What holiday season would be complete without go-go boots, dancing G.I. Joes, gender-bending snowflakes, and a spirited, slightly out-of-control family Christmas party? Mark Morris' The Hard Nut, "as gleefully irreverent as it is visually poetic and musically sensitive" (Dance Magazine), returns to Zellerbach Hall for the first time in five years with all that and more. Set to Tchaikovsky's iconic Nutcracker score, this lavish production has been charming audiences for over 25 years, delivering a pitch-perfect dose of both naughty and nice!



Women's Basketball vs. BYU, Dec 16
Cal Women's Basketball hosts BYU at Haas Pavilion.



The Passion of Joan of Arc, Dec 16
Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film focuses on the face as a landscape of the soul. Pauline Kael called it “one of the greatest of all movies.”



Mark Morris Dance Group Dance Residency, Dec 16
What holiday season would be complete without go-go boots, dancing G.I. Joes, gender-bending snowflakes, and a spirited, slightly out-of-control family Christmas party? Mark Morris' The Hard Nut, "as gleefully irreverent as it is visually poetic and musically sensitive" (Dance Magazine), returns to Zellerbach Hall for the first time in five years with all that and more. Set to Tchaikovsky's iconic Nutcracker score, this lavish production has been charming audiences for over 25 years, delivering a pitch-perfect dose of both naughty and nice!



Hero, Dec 16
Jet Li, Maggie Cheung, Zhang Ziyi, and Tony Leung Chiu-wai propel Zhang Yimou’s gorgeously colorful wuxia tribute, set in ancient China. “Not so much a historical epic as a kind of highly determined ballet” (New Yorker).