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Comments on U.S. Food Policy: Will global food prices keep us healthy?





Updated: 2017-12-17T15:40:25.401-05:00

 




2008-04-15T07:35:00.000-04:00

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I just signed up for your feed, so I'm a little la...

2008-04-11T15:40:00.000-04:00

I just signed up for your feed, so I'm a little late chiming in on this one...

This is for sure the big debate nowadays. Will the change in food prices affect consumers' choices, and how so? I, like many others, want to believe that higher-priced processed products will eventually stimulate sales of local, unprocessed foods, like fruits and vegetables. And the timing's good for folks in the Northeast like me, where we're just a few weeks away from the start of CSA season.

You argue, though, that one limiting factor may be the extent to which a given food can substitute for another food, to the consumer's satisfaction--with which I agree. (I think the example you use, however, is slightly flawed. Eating is, for one, an experience, and I hardly think that swallowing a spoonful of corn syrup is similar to taking a bite of a banana.) I think another limiting factor, to build on the observation you make in the penultimate sentence, is that many people will keep eating what they know and what they enjoy. If they're not at all in the habit of including fruits and vegetables in their diet, I'm not sure they'll suddenly take up eating them now. And many will keep eating what they enjoy, including processed foods, though they may have to eat less of it. At this point, we're all just waiting to see what'll happen...



Just wanted to say that I really like your work. ...

2008-04-09T14:34:00.000-04:00

Just wanted to say that I really like your work. Your perspective is fair, given your economic influence. I come from "commodity county," i.e. the Midwest. The current food price climate hits me from both sides. The high commodity prices mean high incomes for my family and my community; yet it means a painful trip to the grocery store. I, too, have a degree in economics and have really enjoyed the debate over the current economic climate. I am certainly not convinced that high corn prices are going to drive consumers to substitute salads for cheeseburgers. ~Sarah




2008-04-04T14:45:00.000-04:00

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