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Preview: UC Berkeley Events Calendar

UC Berkeley Events Calendar



Campus-wide event listings from the University of California, Berkeley



 



Veronica De Jesus/ MATRIX 268, thru Feb 25, 2018
De Jesus's memorial portraits honor artists, writers, and diverse cultural figures, testifying to the fact that each life is valuable and worthy of recognition.



Buddhist Realms, thru Apr 22, 2018
This presentation showcases exquisite examples of Buddhist art from the Himalayan region.



Art Wall: Karabo Poppy Moletsane, thru Jul 15, 2018
Moletsane’s vibrant, large-scale portraits for the Art Wall draw on both traditional African visual culture and Afrofuturism.



Fiat Yuks: Cal Student Humor, Then and Now, thru Jun 3, 2018
Let there be laughter! This exhibition features Cal students’
cartoons, jokes, and satire throughout the years selected
from their humor magazines and other publications.



The Science of Mindfulness and Self-Compassion, Feb 23-24
Since publication of Kristin Neff's goundbreaking book, Self-Compassion, there has been a surge of interest in the science and practice of self-compassion, particularly in clinical settings. But what is self-compassion, how does it relate to the practice of mindfulness, and how can it benefit yourself and your clients, patients, colleagues, and loved ones?

Self-compassion is made up of three elements: mindfulness, common humanity, and self-kindness. You will better understand the relationship between these elements at this two-day immersive workshop with Kristin Neff, Ph.D., and Shauna Shapiro, Ph.D., internationally recognized experts on self-compassion and mindfulness.

Neff and Shapiro will spend two days exploring the unique and overlapping dimensions of mindfulness and self-compassion, with the goal of revealing how to integrate both into our personal and professional lives.

Starting with the heart aspects of mindfulness--including cultivating a kind awareness of the present moment--the instructors will then move on to self-compassion, exploring why we find it so hard to give compassion to ourselves and how we can learn to treat ourselves as kindly as we would a loved one. Together, mindfulness and self-compassion can create a state of connected presence during difficult moments in our lives.

Neff and Shapiro will also present theory and research on mindfulness, compassion, and self-compassion—all shown to be powerfully associated with psychological and physical well-being--examining their roles in caregiving setting.

10 CEs available for health profssionals.



Environmental Design Archives Exhibition: Hollywood and Vine, thru May 15
Image: The Altadena, California home of graphic designer and filmmaker Saul Bass, garden designed by Garrett Eckbo, house designed by Buff, Straub, and Hensman.

See the homes of the STARS!! Or more precisely, designs for the homes and gardens of film stars, directors, screen writers, and designers including Glenn Ford, Clint Eastwood, Marion Davies, Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder, and Saul Bass.

This exhibit, curated by Environmental Design Archives curator Waverly Lowell, also pays tribute to the California wine industry’s influence on the designed environment. The exhibit will be displayed in the Environmental Design Library from January 22 through May 15, 2018.



Way Bay, thru May 6
Way Bay is a sweeping exploration of the creative energies that have emerged from the San Francisco Bay Area over the past two hundred years. The exhibition features nearly two hundred works of art, film, performance, poetry, and archival materials by Bay Area artists and others whose work engages with the region’s geographic, social, and cultural landscape.

The exhibition takes a nonlinear form and is organized around diverse poetic themes that cut across time periods, media, styles, and artistic cultures, bringing together voices from a wide range of practices and representing diverse communities and sensibilities. Works by artists and filmmakers such as Bruce Baillie, Lutz Bacher, Joan Brown, Bruce Conner, Jay DeFeo, Enrique Chagoya, Richard Diebenkorn, Ernie Gehr, Sabura Hawagawa, Sargent Johnson, Joanne Leonard, Chiura Obata, Helen Clark Oldfield, Joe Overstreet, Alice Anne Parker Stevenson, Rosie Lee Tompkins, Carlos Villa, and many others are juxtaposed throughout the exhibition.

In contrast to a conventional historical survey, Way Bay is organized to suggest poetic currents and connections among works from disparate cultures and communities, highlighting transhistorical affinities among artists, filmmakers, authors, and other creative practitioners who have contributed to—and drawn inspiration from—the region’s distinctive character.

Continuous film screenings in the galleries showcase the Bay Area’s rich history as an incubator for avant-garde and experimental cinema, beginning with a silent film that captures life on the streets of San Francisco just days before the 1906 earthquake destroyed much of the city. The exhibition also includes highlights from BAMPFA’s extensive archive of video and audio recordings by artists working in the Bay Area, as well as an interactive post card project devoted to poetry by Bay Area writers. A series of lectures, performances, readings, and participatory workshops in the Fisher Family Art Lab extends Way Bay across diverse media and disciplines.

In addition to works from BAMPFA’s collection, including many recent acquisitions on display for the first time, Way Bay includes exceptional paintings, prints, photographs, and other works from UC Berkeley’s Bancroft Library and Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology.



Theresa Hak Kyung Cha: Avant Dictee, thru Apr 22
Theresa Hak Kyung Cha: Avant Dictee offers viewers an opportunity to experience the work of this prolific artist in a new way, through her best-known work, the artist’s book Dictee. Placing the book as a point of entry into her wider creative production, the exhibition explores resonances between Dictee’s ten thematic sections (nine of them named for the Greek muses) and artworks drawn from the Cha archive at BAMPFA.

Cha’s oeuvre was profoundly interconnected across works and media, and she returned again and again to certain key themes. Avant Dictee includes art and archival documents—artist’s books, photography, concrete poetry, video, performance documentation, mail art, sculpture, and works on paper—in conversation with the chapters in Dictee. Some works are clearly related, such as an image in the book that references the artist’s father’s original calligraphy, seen in the exhibition. Other relationships are less direct, such as a work’s connection to a statement or question posed in the book.

Theresa Hak Kyung Cha (1951–1982) was born in Pusan, South Korea, and emigrated to the United States, settling in San Francisco with her family in 1964. She attended the Convent of the Sacred Heart, a Catholic high school where she learned and fell in love with the French language. Much of the work in the exhibition was created during Cha’s time as a student at UC Berkeley, where she earned four degrees (in comparative literature and art) between 1973 and 1978. Greatly inspired by her professors Jim Melchert, who introduced her to Conceptual and performance art, and Bertrand Augst, who launched her interest in film theory, Cha made a body of work that explores language, memory, time, history, and the spaces in between.

The exhibition takes a nonlinear form and is organized around diverse poetic themes that cut across time periods, media, styles, and artistic cultures, bringing together voices from a wide range of practices and representing diverse communities and sensibilities. Works by artists and filmmakers such as Bruce Baillie, Lutz Bacher, Joan Brown, Bruce Conner, Jay DeFeo, Enrique Chagoya, Richard Diebenkorn, Ernie Gehr, Sabura Hawagawa, Sargent Johnson, Joanne Leonard, Chiura Obata, Helen Clark Oldfield, Joe Overstreet, Alice Anne Parker Stevenson, Rosie Lee Tompkins, Carlos Villa, and many others are juxtaposed throughout the exhibition.

In contrast to a conventional historical survey, Way Bay is organized to suggest poetic currents and connections among works from disparate cultures and communities, highlighting transhistorical affinities among artists, filmmakers, authors, and other creative practitioners who have contributed to—and drawn inspiration from—the region’s distinctive character.

Continuous film screenings in the galleries showcase the Bay Area’s rich history as an incubator for avant-garde and experimental cinema, beginning with a silent film that captures life on the streets of San Francisco just days before the 1906 earthquake destroyed much of the city. The exhibition also includes highlights from BAMPFA’s extensive archive of video and audio recordings by artists working in the Bay Area, as well as an interactive post card project devoted to poetry by Bay Area writers. A series of lectures, performances, readings, and participatory workshops in the Fisher Family Art Lab extends Way Bay across diverse media and disciplines.

In addition to works from BAMPFA’s collection, including many recent acquisitions on display for the first time, Way Bay includes exceptional paintings, prints, photographs, and other works from UC Berkeley’s Bancroft Library and Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology.



Weekend Workshop 2017-2018: Voice, Identity, Access an Equity, Feb 24
Moving beyond the single story requires the contribution of new stories. Classrooms provide safe spaces for bringing students in conversation with one another and the world. Teachers will experience strategies, protocols, and content that allow students to contribute their stories and share their truths.



UCMP Short Course: Microbes from Earth's deep biosphere., Feb 24
From the surface of the Earth to the deep ocean, bacteria and their extremophile relatives drive fundamental chemical reactions that transform the planet and sustain life. The biologists, geologist, chemists, and environmental scientists in the emerging field of geomicrobiology - the study of how microorganisms interact with earth materials and the environment — are revealing new information about the genetics and fascinating chemical processes of the microbes that inhabit Earth’s soil, rocks, water, and atmosphere. These investigations of modern life — for example at hydrothermal vents and shallow hotsprings - provide a window into Earth's history, helping us understand the remains of ancient bacteria in stromatolites and other rocks. In the process, they provide clues to how life originated, evolved, and transformed our own and perhaps other planets. These investigations also point to new ways that bacteria can be used to decontaminate polluted environments. Please join us to explore these connections revealed by the latest research at the intersection of microbiology and geology.



Soft Succulents Author Talk with Jeff Moore, Feb 24
Join author and nursery owner, Jeff Moore to hear from his latest book: Soft Succulents, a 300-page, 1000+ image look at all of the soft succulents that are so popular now – aeoniums, echeverias, dudleyas, crassulas, sedums, kalanchoes and more. His book and the talk will focus on plants in cultivation rather than habitat, with cultural tips and insights from a nursery owner with over 25 years of experience. Jeff is the owner of Solana Succulents located in Solana Beach, California. Following the book talk, Jeff will lead visitors through the succulent collection at UCBG.



Caminos de la Ciencia, Feb 24
This Presentation will be in Spanish / Esta presentación será en español

En esta presentación, el Dr. Javier A. Ceja-Navarro, investigador del Laboratorio Nacional de Berkeley, nos hablará sobre su trayectoria en la ciencia y las oportunidades que lo han llevado a estudiar microbios, bichos y el medio ambiente.

Javier nació en Tuxpan, Nayarit, México, y realizó toda su preparación profesional en su país natal. Javier llegó a Berkeley por primera vez hace nueve años como visitante escolar mientras terminaba sus estudios de doctorado. Esa primera visita a Berkeley influenció su vida y el deseo por explorar las ciencias biológicas y químicas en Berkeley y de convertirse en un científico enfocado en el estudio de las interacciones complejas que ocurren en distintos ambientes. Sin embargo, esta no es toda la historia; el Dr. Navarro nos llevará a través de un viaje, desde su curiosidad por la naturaleza durante su infancia, hasta los distintos eventos que lo llevaron a elegir su carrera y pasión por la ilustración, la naturaleza y la ciencia.

From Chemical Engineering to Microbiology and Back

In this presentation, Dr. Javier A. Ceja-Navarro, a researcher at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, will tell us about his career path through science and the opportunities that led him to work with microbes, critters, and the environment.

Javier was born in Tuxpan, Nayarit, Mexico and finished all his undergraduate and graduate coursework in Mexico. He came to UC Berkeley nine years ago as a visiting scholar while finishing his PhD studies. This first visit influenced his life and desire to explore the chemical and biological sciences at Berkeley and to become a scientist studying the complex interactions that occur in different environments. However, this is not the whole story, and Dr. Navarro will take us through his journey, from his childhood curiosity about the natural world and first experiments to the different events that brought him to choose what is now his career and passion for illustration, nature, and science.



Docent-led tour, thru Jan 4, 2019
Join us for a free, docent-led tour of the Garden as we explore interesting plant species, learn about the vast collection, and see what is currently in bloom. Meet at the Entry Plaza.

Free with Garden admission
Advanced registration not required

Tours may be cancelled without notice.
For day-of inquiries, please call 510-643-2755
For tour questions, please email gardentours@berkeley.edu or call 510-643-7265



Men's Basketball vs. Washington, Feb 24
Cal Men's Basketball hosts Washington in conference action at Haas Pavilion.



SOLD OUT - Natural Perfume Workshop with Jessica Hannah, Feb 24
Join us for this two hour beginners natural perfume workshop. You'll learn about the history and art of natural perfumes. You will create a formula with oils from around the world, including Italian bergamot, Haitian vetiver, Bulgarian rose, and more.

Beginner Natural Perfume Workshop Includes:
15 natural essential oils and absolutes to sample
Your formula blended into a .25 oz spray-bottle
A Mini bag for your perfume
A take home guide
A lively and educational discussion about botanical essences, distillation, and history
A mixing session guided by a trained natural perfumer
Your formula saved for future refills


Jessica Hannah is an artist, educator, and award-winning perfumer. She earned an MFA in Interdisciplinary Art and Media from Columbia College Chicago. Jessica lives and works from her studio in San Francisco, CA. Learn more about her work and company J.Hannah Co. at www.jhannahco.com



Baseball vs. Cal State Bakersfield - Double Header, Feb 24
Cal Baseball hosts Cal State Bakersfield - Double Header at Evans Diamond.



Film: Saraband, Feb 24
A blistering sequel to Scenes from a Marriage, Bergman’s final work proved that his grasp of human foibles had only sharpened, not mellowed, with age. Still seething after all these years, ex-spouses Marianne and Johan (longtime collaborators Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson) are reunited when Marianne visits the surly old contrarian on his isolated estate. Slipping into the half-fond, half-insulting dialogue typical of former lovers, the two are soon overshadowed by the ongoing emotional warfare between Johan’s sixty-one-year-old son, Henrik, and Henrik’s teenage daughter, Karin. Bergman tunes this troubled foursome like a fine quartet, with each scene or sonata gathering in emotional resonance. Purposefully avoiding actual locations or realism, he places all events on pointedly artificial sets, highlighting the theatricality of the piece and the actors’ declarations. No one talks like this anymore, at least in films; instead, Saraband aims for the heights of Strindberg, Ibsen, or Chekhov, and achieves them.

- Jason Sanders



Baseball vs. Cal State Bakersfield - Double Header, Feb 24
Cal Baseball hosts Cal State Bakersfield - Double Header at Evans Diamond.



Ritual Noise: LEXAGON, Titania Kumeh, Earthbound, Feb 24
Programmed by Chika Okoye and David Brazil

Join us for a three-part performance event of sound and ritual.

LEXAGON brings an Afrofuturist sonic mirage, weaving together loops of soulful vocals, clarinet, and theremin. Inspired by female jazz vocalists and melancholy love songs, her performances incorporate femme ballads with ritualized moments of improvisation and experimental noise.

Titania Kumeh’s performances are meditations on her family, ancestry, and experiences as a first-generation, Liberian-Bahamian American maneuvering through the world in the body of a black woman. Kumeh has performed with the Brontez Purnell Dance Company and in productions by Lisa Rybovich Cralle, Sophia Wang, Wura Natasha Ogunji, and Tropic Green/Adee Roberson. She was the lead singer in the punk rock band Ugly.

A collaboration between Jade Ariana Fair and Angel Castellon, Earthbound is a visceral landscape of sound and movement. As a duo they explore the realms of intimacy, anger, worship, and love by sculpting sounds of liberation from the material world they live in as queer femmes of color.



Berkeley Dance Project 2018, Feb 22-24
"Berkeley Dance Project 2018" features works by professional Bay Area choreographers Katie Faulkner and James Graham, as well as by TDPS student choreographers Madeline Aragon and Hillary Tang. Berkeley Dance Project opens Thursday, February 15, 2018 and continues through Saturday, February 24, 2018 at Zellerbach Playhouse. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm.

Katie Faulkner (the award-winning founder of little seismic dance company) has created a piece that uses movement and projection mapping to examine the physical changes that women undergo as they progress through puberty, childbearing, aging, and illness, with a specific focus on the power that women possess in their ability to reproduce. On the heels of a year of female action and activism (2017’s Women’s March on Washington, and the recent #MeToo and #TimesUp movements), Faulkner’s piece, performed by an all-female cast, gives voice to the physical experience of being a woman in the world.

James Graham (artistic director of the San Francisco-based James Graham Dance Theatre) has created a new work that questions our experiences with gender, sexuality, and identity – how we see ourselves, and how we are seen in the world. James questions, “In comparison to when I was a student, how do these diverse young people experience their comfort level in their own gender identity and sexuality? It’s inspiring to delve into their stories.”

Original student choreography is also featured in "Berkeley Dance Project 2018." Works by TDPS students Madeline Aragon and Hillary Tang will be restaged on a larger scale, after premiering in December as part of TDPS’s Fall Choreography Showcase. Aragon’s duet conveys the challenge of clear communication between two people, and the resulting impact on relationships between friends, lovers, or family members. Hillary Tang's solo exposes her personal process of acknowledging a toxic relationship, removing herself from the abuse, and ultimately finding internal peace and clarity.



Film: On Dangerous Ground, Feb 24
Nicholas Ray’s study of the vigilante mentality is here personified in one pent-up, brutalizing cop. Ray pegs the impulse toward vengeance, like that of forgiveness, as a personal moment, even when it belongs to the crowd. Robert Ryan’s Jim Wilson is a particular kind of big-city neurotic, tortured by his cheerless existence. On the streets, he is judge and jury: we are all guilty of being human. Wilson is banished temporarily to Twin Peaks country, where a mentally disturbed killer is being protected by his sister (Ida Lupino), and the townsfolk, led by a murdered girl’s father (Ward Bond), are out for blood. Lupino plays a blind woman; we hear her before we see her, and the deep resonance of her voice alters the tone of the film. She becomes seer to Ryan’s cop who can’t close his eyes. Set to a Bernard Herrmann score, the glistening urban noir gives way to a moody snowscape where understanding and redemption come, as always in these fatalistic films, a few heartbeats too late.

- Judy Bloch