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Risk and Win!

2018/04/24April 20, 2018

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If you think risk management is a bit of meaningless management-speak, this is the book for you. The world is full of risks and they all need managing. In fact, we all manage risks all the time whether well or badly. Every decision we make involves making some assessment of the risks involved. Risk management is simply an attempt at doing it more explicitly, scientifically and, hopefully, effectively. In this book, readers will learn more about the whys and hows of risk management, and examples of how not to do it. I have tried to explain it in everyday language and show how it can be applied in a small business to your advantage.




Learn Wi-Fi Password Penetration Testing (WEP/WPA/WPA2)

2018/04/24April 19, 2018

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46+ Videos to teach you how to hack and secure Wi-Fi (WEP, WPA, WPA2, WPA/WPA2 Enterprise) About This Video You will learn about how networks work, how devices communicate with each other and how the information is transferred in a wireless networks, as well as a number of attacks that you can launch without the need to know the password such as controlling all the connections around you. In Detail You will learn about how networks work, how devices communicate with each other and how the information is transferred in a wireless networks, as well as a number of attacks that you can launch without the need to know the password such as controlling all the connections around you.




Learn Network Hacking From Scratch (WiFi and Wired)

2018/04/24April 19, 2018

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Learn how to hack and protect both WiFi and wired networks like a pro. About This Video This course is divided into three main sections:pre-connection, gaining access and post connection. Learn how to launch powerful attacks detect them to protect yourself and your network against them. In Detail Welcome to this comprehensive course on network hacking! This course is focused on the practical side of penetration testing without neglecting the theory behind each attack. Before jumping into penetration testing, you will first learn how to set up a lab and install needed software to practice penetration testing on your own machine. All the attacks explained in this course are launched against real devices in the author's lab. The course is structured in a way that will take you through the basics of Linux, computer systems, networks and how devices communicate with each other, then you will learn how to exploit this method of communication to carry out a number of powerful attacks. This course will take you from total beginner to a more advanced level. All the attacks in this course are practical attacks that work against any wireless enabled device, so it does not matter if the device is a phone, tablet, laptop, or another device. These attacks also work against all operating systems (Windows, OSX, Linux IOS, Android, and so on.). Each attack is explained in a simple way first so that you understand how it actually works; first, you will learn the theory behind each attack and then you will learn how to carry out the attack using Kali Linux.




Practical Web Scraping for Data Science: Best Practices and Examples with Python

2018/04/24April 18, 2018

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This book provides a complete and modern guide to web scraping, using Python as the programming language, without glossing over important details or best practices. Written with a data science audience in mind, the book explores both scraping and the larger context of web technologies in which it operates, to ensure full understanding. The authors recommend web scraping as a powerful tool for any data scientist’s arsenal, as many data science projects start by obtaining an appropriate data set. Starting with a brief overview on scraping and real-life use cases, the authors explore the core concepts of HTTP, HTML, and CSS to provide a solid foundation. Along with a quick Python primer, they cover Selenium for JavaScript-heavy sites, and web crawling in detail. The book finishes with a recap of best practices and a collection of examples that bring together everything you've learned and illustrate various data science use cases. What You'll Learn Leverage well-established best practices and commonly-used Python packages Handle today's web, including JavaScript, cookies, and common web scraping mitigation techniques Understand the managerial and legal concerns regarding web scraping Who This Book is For A data science oriented audience that is probably already familiar with Python or another programming language or analytical toolkit (R, SAS, SPSS, etc). Students or instructors in university courses may also benefit. Readers unfamiliar with Python will appreciate a quick Python primer in chapter 1 to catch up with the basics and provide pointers to other guides as well.




Pro Entity Framework Core 2 for ASP.NET Core MVC

2018/04/24April 18, 2018

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Model, map, and access data effectively with Entity Framework Core 2, the latest evolution of Microsoft’s object-relational mapping framework that allows developers to access data using .NET objects, and the most common data access layer used in ASP.NET Core MVC 2 projects.  Best-selling author Adam Freeman explains how to get the most from Entity Framework Core 2 in MVC projects. He begins by describing the different ways that Entity Framework Core 2 can model data and the different types of databases that can be used. He then shows you how to use Entity Framework Core 2 in your own MVC projects, starting from the nuts-and-bolts and building up to the most advanced and sophisticated features, going in-depth to give you the knowledge you need.  What you’ll learn:  Gain a solid architectural understanding of Entity Framework Core 2 Learn how to create databases using your MVC data model  Learn how to create MVC models using an existing database  Learn how to use Entity Framework Core 2 to access data in an MVC application  Learn how to use Entity Framework in RESTful Web Services Each topic is covered clearly and concisely and is packed with the details you need to learn to be truly effective. The most important features are given a no-nonsense in-depth treatment and chapters include common problems and details of how to avoid them.  Who this book is for:  This book is for ASP.NET Core MVC 2 developers who want to use Entity Framework Core 2 as the data access layer in their projects.




The Hybrid Trap: Why Most Efforts to Bridge Old and New Technology Miss the Mark

2018/04/24April 1, 2018

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Technological transitions are challenging, particularly for companies in mature industries. Incumbents are frequently blindsided by new technologies, thereby missing opportunities to enter emerging markets early. While some established companies become early adopters of new technologies, the authors argue that they typically lack the vision and the commitment to become leaders. Too often, they cling to the familiar, developing "hybrid" products that combine elements of the old and the new. This puts even the best incumbent companies in a weak position when the market finally embraces the new technology, something the authors call the "hybrid trap." This article takes a close look at the auto industry's transition from internal combustion engines to electric vehicles (EVs) and compares it to precedents in other industries. Several incumbent automakers, such as General Motors Co. and Honda Motor Co. Ltd., entered the EV market early, but they backed away from these projects in favor of continued emphasis on established engine technology. Gradually, most of them focused on hybrid cars that combined old and new technologies. This opened the door to new competitors, notably Tesla Inc., which focused solely on the EV technology. By mid-2017, nearly every old-line engine producer was playing catch-up on EV technology, working to release new electric models in the next two to five years. Although it is too early to know if Tesla will be successful in the long run, the Tesla example, in the authors' view, points to a fundamental weakness in how incumbents respond to industry transformations. In the 1960s, U.S. electronics companies responded to the introduction of Japanese transistor radios by developing products that blended transistor technology with traditional vacuum tubes. In the early 1990s, Kodak Ltd. tried to sell a "film-based digital imaging" product, which merged film photography and digital technology. And a decade ago, BlackBerry Ltd. tried to respond to the challenge of the iPhone by releasing a phone that had both a touchscreen display (like the iPhone) and a traditional keyboard (like earlier BlackBerry phones). The answer for incumbents, the authors write, isn't to walk away from products based on the old technology and jump headlong into the new. But they need to take precautions so that the company's legacy operations don't hamper their ability to pursue new technology. New technologies can open opportunities that extend well beyond the scope of legacy products. But such opportunities can be accessed only by companies that are willing to view the world through the lens of the new technology.




Finding Applications for Technologies Beyond the Core Business

2018/04/24April 1, 2018

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The technologies underlying a company's core businesses can have lucrative applications beyond the ones they provide to current customers. However, many companies don't pursue these opportunities, or do it half-heartedly. Typically, authors Erwin Danneels and Federico Frattini observe, companies are more comfortable developing new products for the customers they already serve than they are with applying their technologies in new markets (a process they call "technology leveraging"). Only a small number of companies make a deliberate effort to tap the potential for business outside their core markets. Using examples from companies the authors have studied or advised, the article describes a four-step process for leveraging technology that involves: (1) characterizing the technology, (2) identifying potential applications, (3) choosing from among the identified applications, and (4) selecting the best entry mode. The first step involves "de-linking" the technology from the specific products in which it is currently used. To do this, the authors explain, companies need to identify the functions the technology can perform. A good characterization can broaden the scope of the potential opportunities and allow people to focus clearly on the technology's abilities and limits. In many settings, this step requires extensive testing and R&D investment. As they explain, "You can't look for new applications until you know what your technology can do vis-à-vis what competing solutions do." Once companies have specified what the technology is, they can begin exploring new settings where it might be applied. Although the authors recommend starting with desk research, the biggest benefits often come from getting out of the office and interacting with people. Trade shows, they say, provide an excellent way to see firsthand where the technology and its alternatives might be applied, and to hear about the pain points of the existing technologies. Another approach is to tap into communities of problem-solvers who might be able to provide suggestions. Although identifying opportunities with the most promise may appear to be straightforward, in practice, the authors note, it can be more involved. Companies often underestimate the challenges of applying the technology, which may be revealed only by building early prototypes. In bringing technology to new markets, the goal should be to find new application areas where your technology performs better on existing performance dimensions, introduces a new performance dimension, or delivers the desired outcome at a lower cost. The fourth and final step in leveraging technology involves determining the best way to develop and commercialize the products that use the technology. In bringing technology to market, companies need to decide whether to develop products themselves or work with a third party. This decision can have significant implications in terms of capital requirements, time to market, level of control, and required commitment. However, there are no universal guidelines that apply in every situation.




Why Best Practices Often Fall Short

2018/04/24April 1, 2018

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Many executives take the value of best practices as a given. We have an abiding faith in the idea that the most direct route to improved performance is to study what successful firms do and copy them. In reality, that is quite rarely the case.




The Secret to Successful Knowledge Seeding

2018/04/24April 1, 2018

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Launching a peer-to-peer knowledge-sharing platform is not easy. Online support forums have two distinct segments: those who seek product support, and those who provide it. Knowledge seekers are hesitant to ask questions if knowledge contributors are few and far between, and knowledge contributors will not sign up if there are not enough problems to solve. It is a classic chicken or egg challenge that can be effectively addressed by seeding the platform with expert knowledge.




The End of Scale

2018/04/24April 1, 2018

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For more than a century, economies of scale made the corporation an ideal engine of business. However, the emergence of platforms and technologies that can be rented as needed have eroded the relationship between fixed costs and output that defined economies of scale. Together, these new factors have enabled small companies to pursue niche markets and successfully challenge large established companies that are weighed down by investments in mass production, distribution, and marketing. "Investments in scale used to make a lot of sense," argues author Hemant Taneja. They supported the development of cars, airplanes, radio, and television, and built out the electric grid and telephone system. But with the emergence of mobile, social, cloud computing, and artificial intelligence in recent years, Taneja argues that business logic has shifted toward what he describes as "the economics of unscale," which allows for mass customization for increasingly narrow markets. Because companies can stay nimble and focused by easily and instantly renting scale, they can adjust quickly to changing demand and conditions with little cost and relatively little effort. According to Taneja, large corporations are taking note. Traditionally, Procter & Gamble Co. invented most of its new products in-house. But in recent years it has started to tap into ideas from outside inventors who submit ideas via the internet. Other large companies, including General Electric Co. and Walmart Stores Inc., are tapping into new, unscaled businesses as well. Taneja presents three recommendations to large companies seeking to remain relevant. His first recommendation is to become a platform. Operating a platform can be enormously profitable because the companies that operate on the platforms come to depend on them for their success. The author’s second recommendation is to instill a product focus. Big companies, he argues, get sidetracked on issues that have little to do with making great products. But in an unscaled era, this can create openings for focused small competitors. His third recommendation is to find growth opportunities through what he calls "dynamic rebundling." The winners in the unscaled economy, he writes, "make every customer feel like a market of one." Products and services that are tailored to individuals will often have an advantage over mass-market products and services, Taneja says. Corporations, therefore, can try to maintain their advantage with collections of products from their portfolios that they bundle for particular customers.