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Comments on Weighty Matters: The Food at the Ottawa Heart Institute





Updated: 2015-04-11T20:55:55.532-04:00

 



I live in Minneapolis, MN, USA and at the Abbott N...

2008-06-07T19:49:00.000-04:00

I live in Minneapolis, MN, USA and at the Abbott Northwestern Hospital which houses one of our premier cardiac care centers, the main place to eat is a McDonalds. It's appalling.



The child of friends of ours was in the hospital f...

2008-05-23T08:42:00.000-04:00

The child of friends of ours was in the hospital for two weeks. The parents were constantly at the hospital, leaving only when absolutely necessary.

I dropped by with salad, yogurt, fresh fruit, bottled water, and fresh bread. Afterwards, they told me that those were the first vegetables they had in a week!

How is that possible? They were very concerned for their own health because any illness would cancel their visiting rights.

Were healthy options available? Were healthy options priced out of their range, not appealing or cheap unhealthy food was more accessable? It concerns me that the parents could take care of themselves with healthy food.



The issue of dietary fare goes beyond Timmies and ...

2008-05-21T10:53:00.000-04:00

The issue of dietary fare goes beyond Timmies and the cafeterias.
I think every hospital should be forced to serve healthy fare to patients, food that is also made available in the cafeterias for visitors and staff to eat.

It might mean a slimmer profit margin but I really don't understand why this isn't the case. Hospitals are supposed to be about "healthy" - right?

Bad hospital food for patients is the norm. My MIL was recently a patient at a local hospital. The food she was served was awful. She couldn't eat it - which is terrible considering she needed nourishment to get better. While I was there I looked around at what else was available, what I saw was trays and trays of white bread.

p.s I caught part of this series on CBC radio. It's not about hospital cafeteria food per se - it's more about food for patients - worth a listen.



The sad fact is that they sell that type of food b...

2008-05-20T12:01:00.000-04:00

The sad fact is that they sell that type of food because that's what their customers want to buy. Although I agree with you that there should be healthy options easily available on the menu(s), the absence of the same does not mitigate the personal responsibility of the people who chose that bill of fare.

When I have to visit friends in hospitals, when I go someplace where the food is suspect, even when I fly, I pack a lunch for myself (and typically my friends) for the event. Not only is it cheaper and healthier, but the truth is that it tastes better than what is generally available for purchase.

And trust me, the people around me (us) who are watching us eat are painfully aware of the difference.



Unfortunately, this is Par For The Course, where c...

2008-05-20T11:09:00.000-04:00

Unfortunately, this is Par For The Course, where cafeterias are concerned. The same issues of customer desires, shelf life, and profit margins exist at hospitals and company cafeterias as they do in Real Life. Lobbying for healthier foods does not help if you're the only one requesting them, and boycotting (choosing to spend your food dollars elsewhere) only seems to force them to move in even more unhealthy foods (and chain restaurants) as they struggle to remain financially feasible.

In the online diabetes communities I frequent, I've heard from many fellow diabetics that the diets they have been served while hospitalized for reasons related to diabetes -- were completely INappropriate for diabetics (tons of white flour, hydrogenated oils, mashed potatoes with tons of salt, etc.) It is as if the hospital either had no nutritionist or dietician, or had no nutritionist or dietician overseeing patient meals in the kitchen.

What seems to make it even harder to find "appropriate meals" outside the home (in general) is that everyone sees a different "diet" as appropriate for his/her condition (either personally or stereotypically), making it logistically more difficult to provide anything more than the least common denominator and to condition everyone to accept that as "normal and acceptable".

If only there were some realistic way to educate the people and drive the market...