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Preview: Electronic Writing II

Electronic Writing II



The class blog for Brown University's Electronic Writing II course



Last Build Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 15:03:27 +0000

 



Student Projects

Mon, 15 May 2006 21:21:05 +0000

Adam White and Daniel Byers This is the House that Jack Built William Durette 30 Poems Sight Syllable Solitaire   Alice Liu Simple Scott Kolp The Keats Machine Untitled (“2 Grid”)   Raphael Lee What We Want Il Pleut Joshua Spechler QuBit Poetry A Picture Poem Elliott Breece A Sunrise We Were Bound to Miss […]



The Great Hatsby

Thu, 27 Apr 2006 14:00:49 +0000

TheGreatHatsby is the name of an AIM bot that instigates conversation between two totally unrelated people. Its name is a play on words from the book The Great Gatsby. It is a relay bot that retrieves the most recently updated Live Journal posts and obtains the AIM screenname of the posting user. It then sends […]



clikclak

Sun, 02 Apr 2006 06:41:33 +0000

Someone sent this to me in response to the “Word Disassociation” that Adam had sent on. Not quite the same thing, but you Maya-heads will get a kick out of it — electronic writing in Maya! There is a version in French and English. http://clik.clak.free.fr/ 



Judd Morrissey, The Jew’s Daughter

Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:46:57 +0000

You can leave comments here for The Jew’s Daughter. Here’s a bit to start you off: Morrissey..explored the subject of textual context and reconfiguration in The Jew’s Daughter, a work in which rolling over active words changes passages of text on the same screen, as opposed to prompting a change of screen. The screen stays […]



Individual Presentations

Thu, 09 Mar 2006 19:00:19 +0000

Following are the individual assignments for class presentations over the next month. Please do a “walk through” of your 2-3 pieces and have a few discussion questions ready. This should all take 10-15 minutes; it’s very informal, merely a way to expose ourselves to lots of different work. April 4 Lisa Oliver John Cayley et. […]



The Medium is the Massage

Fri, 03 Mar 2006 14:29:36 +0000

I couldn’t find anything too provocative on the web for this one, so this is from Wikipedia: While today it looks like a black and white copy of Wired magazine, and its prose reads more or less like boilerplate for any of the heady techno-utopian pronouncements of the 1990s, it should be noted that it […]



David Clark

Fri, 03 Mar 2006 14:20:24 +0000

Net’s flavor of the month… A IS FOR APPLE http://aisforapple.net “A is for Apple is an interactive work that investigates a cryptography of the apple. Using an ever expanding series of associative links, the work looks for hidden meanings, coincidences and insights that stem from the apple. This leads to a vast web of references […]



Handwritten Calendar

Mon, 27 Feb 2006 17:34:05 +0000

I thought this was pretty cool: http://yugop.com/ver3/stuff/03/fla.html



What We Will

Tue, 21 Feb 2006 17:28:23 +0000

Here’s a really successful electronic writing piece that takes great advantage of 360 degree photography, sound and interface. It’s a collaboration between John Cayley, Giles Perring, Douglas Cape, and others – they call it “broadband interactive drama.” Definitely worth checking out. What We Will



Jeffrey Jones, 70 Scenes of Halloween

Sun, 19 Feb 2006 18:50:28 +0000

  The following is from the Village Voice review of the original production of 70 Scenes of Halloween in 1980: Jones’s deadpan farce with intellectual aspirations ends long after it should, but on the other hand it could end anywhere. Time in the play is out of joint, non-continuous, as fragmented as a series of […]