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Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Fri, 28 Mar 2008 13:57:09 GMT

Yesterday I filled in an on-line questionnaire from my local newspaper asking my opinion on where I would be receiving my news 5 years from now. My reply was that I would still depend on my newspaper subscription because that is the only format that allows our family to share the paper around the table on weekend mornings. I don't want to pass the laptop around the table or change my seat to keep the sunshine off my LCD. I want to selectively read the stories that interest me, not depend on the TV or radio editors' estimate of the public interest. It's not the redundancy of the new coverage, but the common format of e-news that keeps me coming back to the newspaper.



Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 27 Mar 2008 17:59:19 GMT

Actually, it's probably a shortage of people who can read.  (For those of you wondering, I taught my cat to type, read and speak years ago.)

(image)

 




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 27 Mar 2008 04:41:15 GMT

1. Newspapers suck.  I don't like waiting until Sunday to get it, having to fold and refold, and navigating to page C6 for the last half of the article.

2. 99% of executives suck.  Business management is harder than astrophysics.

3. Competition sucks.  It puts companies (and ultimately industries) out of business; it unemploys workers.  The main winner is the consumer, but he gets what he wants, not necessarily what he needs.




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 27 Mar 2008 02:40:15 GMT


Actually, I think it's the economics stupi ... er, I mean, Swell Guy.



Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Tue, 25 Mar 2008 14:23:00 GMT

I’ve enjoyed John Dvorak’s columns and respect his expertise in technology. But he was out of his element in his critique of the newspaper industry.   He does raise a valid challenge to the staff cuts that have eliminated the bylines of many of newspapers’ best writers and reporters (along with the quality control provided by their copy and line editors): “How does making a product worse fix a problem?” Publishers will insist they haven’t made their products worse, of course. But their readers know better.   The publishers’ strategy makes perfect sense if you don’t believe you can reverse the declines in advertising revenue and paid circulation. By cutting costs, you protect your – still-healthy – profit margins, maximizing cash flow in the short term.   But Mr. Dvorak’s prescriptions are facile. He states without elaboration: “there are ways of saving money and cutting costs other than cutting staff and hanging on for dear life.” Well, Mr. Dvorak, I’m sure we’d all like to know what you have in mind.   Similarly, his reference to the “multimillion dollar incomes of the corporate management do-nothings” is the sort of ad hominem attack I would expect from an amateur blogger, not a columnist on a respected magazine.   Finally, I must respond to his pessimistic advice that would-be journalists choose public relations or writing advertising copy if they want to make a reasonable living. As a former newspaper journalist -- and as the parent of a teenage daughter who is considering journalism as a career -- I have to believe there is an alternative.   It is for that reason that I am joining with colleagues to launch the TreeHouse Media Project, a cooperative program to give veteran journalists the technical tools and business skills they need to become web-based publishers. If you still believe journalism is a noble calling, but don’t want to live in poverty to practice it, join us at  http://www.treehouse-media.net/.   Rich Heidorn Jr.      [...]



Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Fri, 21 Mar 2008 06:25:21 GMT

For a guy who thinks newspapers are dying, Dvorak sure does rattle on about them. Clearly they are still important to him at some point. If Dvorak knew anything about hyperlocal news, he might have a clue. The reality is that all news, like all politics, is local. What's dying is the newspaper behometh. Something that gets so large it can't even deliver to all its customers. Yeah, those guys are going down hard. And are newspaper executives geniuses. Nope. They are frustrated writers or editors or photographers. If they were otherwise employable, they would be otherwise employed. And they will be the means by which the newspaper in its basic form will survive. Because they will kill the corporate creature that strangles the newspaper industry now. And once they do, the newspaper both in print and on the Web will  rise out of the ashes as a leaner, far more flexible creature. Owned by individuals, the newspaper will then once again step forward and fulfill the function that earned them a place in the Bill of Rights. Or something.



Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Fri, 21 Mar 2008 01:50:44 GMT

When "Point After Sales" became a big thing, something happened I wouldn't have believed possible:  I became even more skeptical.  Come on...design print cartridges to wear out sooner and be at least nearly impossible to replace with non-manufacturer stock or to refill?  Wasn't it HP that was seeking a patent violation on any cartridge that didn't come from them?

 One thing was refreshing, though.  The phrase 'transparent' came out in business executive circles as a synonym somehow for invisible.  A lot of the transparent (obvious rather than invisible to the customer) idiocies came out at the same time.  Maybe "28 Days" should have been about contagious stupidity...

8]




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 23:27:58 GMT

Nail on head
"It would ruin the budget and eat into the multimillion dollar incomes of the corporate management do-nothings.

 Sometime in the late 70's - early 80's, we shifted the social mantra from
         
'What can I do for you ?  - to- What can yo do for me... ?
          Customer Value -to- Shareholder Value

- and so-on.

It is of our own making - and our children have to live with it




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 23:25:49 GMT

"If I spelled something wrong, who cares - it's my post.  Get over it.  Do something better than reading this - go do something useful, something that will challenge your mind, your muscle, and will increase your knowledge.  Hey - maybe even increase your worth.  That's where I'm going now..."

...exercise my what? as an ex-sailor, I resent that.  And I hope you don't value worth in dollars.

(image)




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 22:20:36 GMT

I have stopped reading big city newspapers and most magazines because I can read whatever news I want for FREE on the Internet.  Of course, I pay for the Internet service but I would anyway to get email and read about other things besides the latest murders, the latest dishonest deed, and the latest trash in the entertainment world. 

Our local, small town newspapers, who are not associated with the closest big city newspaper companies, have far more interesting news about our community.  And less or no reporting on the latest trash someone has done somewhere in the world.

One thing that disgusts me, among others, is our local CBS-affiliated news website gets it's entertainment news from a foreign country.  I can tell because there are words in the articles which are written in the British spelling instead of the American English spelling.  I emailed the website to tell them to check their spelling and they replied back that this entertainment section is outsourced from a non-USA place (can't remember exactly where).  Now our news reporting is being OUTSOURCED?? 

When will the US Government stop this OUTSOURCING nonsense and bring better-paying jobs back into the USA?  Without jobs - whose wages increase as sales prices increase - we can't pay taxes for better roads, schools, bridges, welfare for the illegals; we can't pay for our housing, we can't pay for the FREEDOMS we have fought for over the past 232 years.  Without taxes, we can't pay for the $100 hammers and other important needs of our government?

The points are:  Don't put news online for free and whine because your newspapers aren't selling.  Don't report on just the trash you can dig up - DO give us something to WANT to read about (coupons aren't worth buying a newspaper for - trees died for that newspaper).  Don't take the news from a non-US source - Americans need jobs too.  Hey - how about reporting the facts for a change!!  Report on TRUE stories, not the ones you made up while taking your morning shower, only to have to recant the story because your "source on condition of anoniminity" wasn't quite correct with the facts.  Do report on something worth while that occurs in our communities.  DO report on the HONEST people in our communities.  Stop outsourcing the news & the reporting jobs.  DO report on the unnecessary spending our politicians do - like the $100 hammers, but do I really care about to hear every movement of one particular young woman in the Music industry who is throwing her life away to drugs, partying, & compulsive spending?  NO!! 

I am not a reporter nor am I a walking spell-checker.  If I spelled something wrong, who cares - it's my post.  Get over it.  Do something better than reading this - go do something useful, something that will challenge your mind, your muscle, and will increase your knowledge.  Hey - maybe even increase your worth.  That's where I'm going now...




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 21:43:43 GMT

(image) oregonnerd:

"The reader is not unbiased and often resents and dismisses whatever contradicts his preconceptions. A newspaper knows it's on the right track when cries of bias come from both liberals and conservatives, which is usually the case."

 

Oh, bullshot.

(image)

 

 

Like that.




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 21:03:10 GMT

"The reader is not unbiased and often resents and dismisses whatever contradicts his preconceptions. A newspaper knows it's on the right track when cries of bias come from both liberals and conservatives, which is usually the case."

 

Oh, bullshot.

(image)

 




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 21:01:53 GMT

Old media is dying because they no longer carry the light of truth.  Corporate media sold out the USA and lied about Iraq, NAFTA, and so many other things that aren't good for America.  We don't trust papers or television anymore.  And why should we as they continue to collaborate against the people.

Blogs however are doing just fine and increasing their page views. 




Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 19:35:48 GMT

TtfnJohn: Yeah, it's become the print version of the old insult in radio and television known as rip and read from the wire services.  Local reporting, what there is of it often gets buried unless it's the latest overnight murder, death, riot or whatever.  Often augmented by the wire services local reporters so the media owner doesn't have to pay. Nah, the buzzword in the newspaper world now is "hyperlocal." Over the past 10 years the amount of wire coverage has decreased in most U.S. newspapers and so has the prominence it gets. I don't agree with this philosophy because just because someone lives in a boring town doesn't mean they want to read about that boring town to the exclusion of all else, but that's the current fad, even in some fairly large cities. The coverage of foreign news has decreased most drastically. American Journalism Review did a study on this some years back. TtfnJohn: TV and radio news suffer the same lack of reach these days not because they don't have local reports anymore, in fact they're very good at it.   Even in the largest markets, most radio and TV news departments get most of their local news out of the newspaper because their own staffs are so small. In smaller markets, it's even worse in radio because of a thing called "voice tracking" popularized by Clear Channel. The voices you hear on your local radio station may in fact be coming from hundreds of miles away from an announcer who records sound bites for a half-dozen stations that are interspersed by computer between other programming, such as music. He may in fact be serving a town he has never actually seen and sprinkles in local references he has swiped off a newspaper's Web site. TtfnJohn: What's gone here is a lack of trust.  Pretense, for example, to independence from a political viewpoint when you crack open a paper and see it all around you or watch TV news and in seconds can tell where they're coming from politically.   Independence and so called reporting objectivity become fantasies that turn the reader or viewer off completely. The reader is not unbiased and often resents and dismisses whatever contradicts his preconceptions. A newspaper knows it's on the right track when cries of bias come from both liberals and conservatives, which is usually the case. If both sides think their side got jobbed in favor of the other side, you've done your job. Having worked on newspapers with conservative, liberal and even libertarian opinion pages, I can say that most newsrooms operate the same way and will go after any politician, regardless of party affiliation, with equal zeal because catching one is what editors and reporters live for and being beaten to it by another news organization is humiliating and can damage a career. I've known hundreds of journalists, and they are largely cynical and misanthropic and deeply distrust anyone who seeks power (even in their own newsrooms). The only real bias is a distaste for anyone who has authority or aspires to have it. The notion that there is any allegiance to a political party is uninformed. I'll vote for someone, but I think every last one of them is full of it and probably were since birth like everyone else. Damn humans.[...]



Re: It's the Redundancy, Stupid

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 17:31:49 GMT

Print media in general is in a bad way.  Major market print media even deeper trouble.

Yeah, it's become the print version of the old insult in radio and television known as rip and read from the wire services.  Local reporting, what there is of it often gets buried unless it's the latest overnight murder, death, riot or whatever.  Often augmented by the wire services local reporters so the media owner doesn't have to pay.

So what?

 TV and radio news suffer the same lack of reach these days not because they don't have local reports anymore, in fact they're very good at it.

What's gone here is a lack of trust.  Pretense, for example, to independence from a political viewpoint when you crack open a paper and see it all around you or watch TV news and in seconds can tell where they're coming from politically.   Independence and so called reporting objectivity become fantasies that turn the reader or viewer off completely.

At least bloggers make no attempt to be either which may be why people start to turn there.

In the print world The Economist, of all magazines, thrives because it does provide good, in depth coverage of events and the reader knows going in that there is no pretense to objectivity.

Then again, there's PC Mag.  Once the masthead shouted out it's independence, presumably from IBM, now gone and good riddance to it.  Mostly it seems to have become yet another publication filled with breathless announcements of all things Microsoft, filled with reviews of the latest and greatest gadgets no one in their right minds wants and things like cameras which have, at best, a distant relationship to computing.

Once a vibrant and valuable source of information, opinionated and outspoken on all things its now boring, corporate and unfocused.  Kinda like CNET in print.

Let's face it, publishing of newspapers and most periodicals has become a vehicle for filling space with ads not editorial content.  Worse, that's replayed on their web sites.  TV news is no better, by the way.

Oh well, at least "journalists", as you point out, can go to work in PR or as assistants to politicians and make more money.  Just the thing to increase trust in media, right?

ttfn

John