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Preview: WNYC's Leonard Lopate Show

Midday on WNYC



WNYC hosts the conversation New Yorkers turn to each afternoon for insight into contemporary art, theater, and literature, plus expert tips about the ever-important lunchtime topic: food.



Last Build Date: Fri, 23 Feb 2018 14:30:13 -0500

Copyright: © WNYC
 



Mark Bittman on How to Cook Vegetarian

Mon, 26 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Chef, cookbook author and New York Times food columnist Mark Bittman discusses his latest cookbook How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food. The book includes more than 2,000 recipes and variations for straightforward, delicious vegetarian dishes for home cooks. The book covers the whole spectrum of meatless cooking-including salads, soups, eggs and dairy, vegetables and fruit, pasta, grains, legumes, tofu and other meat substitutes, breads, condiments, desserts, and beverages, complete with illustrations. Bittman offers advice on everything from selecting vegetables to preparing pad Thai.  Mark Bittman will be in attendance at the Glynwood March Farm Dinner, on March 3rd from 6:30 to 9:30 pm. The dinner, featuring guest chef Mimi Beaven of Little Ghent Farm/Made in Ghent, will feature a menu with regionally adapted varieties that have been cultivated from seed through the Kitchen Cultivars Project. This segment is guest hosted by Mary Harris. Check out some recipes from How to Cook Everything Vegetarian below! Pho MAKES: 4 servingsTIME: About 1 hour, depending on garnishesFish and meat often figure prominently in the Vietnamese meal-in-a-bowl soup known as pho, but there are traditional and fine vegetarian options, chief among them this broth made from soy sauce and a blend of spices like star anise and cinnamon. All that’s required is a willingness to invest in making the broth and a few additional toppings and you’ll be handsomely rewarded. 2 tablespoons good-quality vegetable oil1 large onion, halved and sliced1 head garlic, cloves separated but unpeeled1 2-inch piece fresh ginger, cut into coinsSaltPinch sugar3 or 4 star anise pods1 cinnamon stick2 bay leaves2 tablespoons black peppercorns6 cups vegetable stock (pages 97–100)¹/₄ cup soy sauce, plus more to taste1 tablespoon cider vinegar1 bunch fresh cilantro¹/₂ pound mushrooms (any kind), trimmed8 ounces thin rice vermicelli6 cups boiling water4 scallions, sliced, for garnish2 or 3 limes, cut into wedges, for garnishAdditional toppings as you like (see the list that follows) 1. Put the oil in a large pot over medium heat. When it’s hot, add the onion, garlic, and ginger. Sprinkle with some salt and the sugar and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables soften, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the star anise, cinnamon, bay leaves, and peppercorns and stir until warm and fragrant, no more than a minute. Add the stock, soy sauce, vinegar, half the cilantro (save the rest for garnish), mushrooms, and 1 cup water. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat so the stock bubbles gently. Cook, partially covered, until you are happy with the concentration of flavor, 30 to 60 minutes. 2. Put the rice vermicelli in a large bowl, sprinkle with salt, and cover with the boiling water. Soak until the noodles are barely tender; start checking after 3 minutes. Drain the noodles, then rinse them and the bowl with cold water to cool down. Return the noodles to the bowl, add enough cold water to cover, and let sit until you’re ready to serve. 3. Strain the broth through a fine-meshed strainer, return it to the pot, and keep at a gentle bubble. Taste and adjust the seasoning, adding more soy sauce if you’d like. (You can make the broth to this point, cool, and store it in the refrigerator for several days or the freezer for a few months. Return it to a boil and keep hot until time to serve.) 4. Prepare any additional toppings from the list that follows (or whatever else you’d like) and put them in bowls or platters. Drain the noodles and divide them among big bowls; ladle some broth over the noodles. Garnish with the scallions, limes, and sprigs of the reserved cilantro. Top the soup with other additions as you like. 12 Ways to Enhance PhoThe list here is far from comprehensive, but will give you some idea of different ways to turn a bowl of noodle soup into a meal:1. Sliced or grated raw daikon or other radishes, carrots, kohlrabi, or turnips2. Mung bean sprouts3. Sliced steamed vegetables, like bok choy, Napa cabbage, mustard greens, br[...]



A Memoir of Misadventures in Russia

Mon, 26 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Journalist and novelist Michael Idov talks about his new memoir Dressed Up for a Riot: Misadventures in Putin’s Moscow . He recounts the tempestuous years he spent living alongside the media and cultural elite of Putin's Russia. After accepting a surprise offer to become the editor in chief of GQ Russia, Idov and his family moved to Moscow. He became a tabloid celebrity, acted in a Russian movie with Snoop Dogg, befriended the members of Pussy Riot, punched an anti-Semitic magazine editor on the steps of the Bolshoi Theatre, sold an autobiographical sitcom pilot and even wrote Russia's top-grossing domestic movie of 2015.

This segment is guest hosted by Mary Harris.




Mark Bittman's Vegetarian Cookbook, Michael Idov's Misadventures in Moscow

Mon, 26 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Chef, cookbook author and New York Times food columnist Mark Bittman discusses his latest cookbook How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food. Journalist and novelist Michael Idov talks about his new memoir Dressed Up for a Riot: Misadventures in Putin’s Moscow.

This episode is guest hosted by Mary Harris.




Florence Gould, The Woman Who Bought Happiness

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 14:30:13 -0500

Susan Ronald talks about her biography A Dangerous Woman: American Beauty, Noted Philanthropist, Nazi Collaborator -- The Life of Florence Gould. She tells the story of Gould, a wealthy socialite and patron of the arts who became embroiled in a notorious money laundering operation for high-ranking Nazis in France during World War II. Ronald reveals how Gould managed to avoid prosecution for her crimes and became a significant contributor to the Metropolitan Museum and New York University.

Susan Ronald is in conversation with biographer Meryl Gordon on February 26th at 6:30 pm at Shakespeare & Co. (939 Lexington Ave. at 68th Street.)

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

 

Florence Gould, The Woman Who Bought Happiness


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022318bpod.mp3




How Environmental Laws Can Protect People, Not Polluters

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 12:10:25 -0500

Environmentalist and Delaware Riverkeeper Maya K. Van Rossum discusses her new book The Green Amendment: Securing Our Right to A Healthy Environment. Van Rossum argues that our environmental laws have been designed to accommodate pollution rather than prevent it. She lays out a new agenda for environmental advocacy that looks to empower citizens and protect our right to clean air and water.

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

How Environmental Laws Can Protect People, Not Polluters


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022318apod.mp3




How to Build Your Perfect Schedule

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Daniel Pink discusses his new book When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing. Pink draws on psychology, biology and economics to reveal how best to live, work and succeed by using the hidden patterns of the day to build the ideal schedule. He looks at how timing affects everything from student test scores to exercise, and even marriage.

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

How to Build Your Perfect Schedule


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022318cpod.mp3




Please Explain This Flu Season

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Dr. Mirella Salvatore, Assistant Professor of Healthcare Policy and Research and go-to flu expert at Weill Cornell Medical College, joins "Please Explain" to discuss the flu. This year’s flu strain is highly contagious and in some cases, deadly. Just last week, the CDC reported that 84 children have died from the flu since the season began in October. Salvatore answers whether this year’s flu season worse than ever, just how long will it last and if flu shots are even worth getting.

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

Please Explain This Flu Season


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022318dpod.mp3




An Amendment Against Polluters, The Science of Perfect Timing, Please Explain the Flu

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Environmentalist and Delaware Riverkeeper Maya K. Van Rossum discusses her new book The Green Amendment: Securing Our Right to A Healthy EnvironmentSusan Ronald talks about her biography A Dangerous Woman: American Beauty, Noted Philanthropist, Nazi Collaborator The Life of Florence GouldDaniel Pink discusses his new book When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect TimingDr. Mirella Salvatore, Assistant Professor of Healthcare Policy and Research and go-to flu expert at Weill Cornell Medical College, joins "Please Explain" to discuss the flu.

This episode is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.




New Book Challenges the Myths of Civil Rights History

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Dr. Jeanne Theoharis discusses her book A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History. Theoharis has written a powerful alternate history of the Civil Rights movement that challenges the well-worn narratives of this era. By looking at how the history of the Civil Rights movement has been used by politicians and others, the book challenges our understanding of the time and offers a more nuanced picture of Civil Rights leaders and goals.

Dr. Jeanne Theoharis will give a talk on "The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks" at 7 pm on Wednesday, February 28th at Brooklyn's Central Library (10 Grand Army Plaza). There will be a wine and cheese reception prior to the talk at 6:30 pm. 

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd. 

New Book Challenges the Myths of Civil Rights History


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022218apod.mp3




'The Play That Goes Wrong' Comes to Broadway

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Ashley Bryant, Mark Evans and Clifton Duncan talk about starring in the Broadway revival of The Play That Goes Wrong. This Olivier Award-winning comedy is a hilarious hybrid of Monty Python and Sherlock Holmes. It’s set on the opening night of The Murder at Haversham Manor where things quickly go from bad to utterly disastrous. The Play That Goes Wrong is playing at the Lyceum Theater (149 W. 45th Street).

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

'The Play That Goes Wrong' Comes to Broadway


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022218bpod.mp3




An Iranian-American's Grand Tour of Exile

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Author Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi discusses her new novel Call Me Zebra. It follows the journey of 22 year-old Zebra, who fled Iran with her family during the Iraq War and settled in New York. Following the death of both her parents, Zebra decides to make a "Grand Tour of Exile" and returns to Barcelona (her family's last stop before arriving in the United States) in an effort to reclaim her past. 

Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi will be in conversation with Weike Wang at the Asian American Writers’ Workshop on February 21st at 7 pm and will be in conversation with Lynne Tillman at Books Are Magic on February 23rd at 7:30 pm.

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

An Iranian-American's Grand Tour of Exile


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022218cpod.mp3




DuPont's Toxic Legacy in New Jersey

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

James O’Neill and Scott Fallon, reporters for The Record/NorthJersey.com join us to discuss their recent investigation into DuPont’s toxic legacy in northern New Jersey: “Toxic Secrets: Pollution, Evasion and Fear in North Jersey.” They found that owners of the former DuPont facility which operated out of Pompton Lakes, New Jersey for 100 years knew that the cancer-causing solvents they leaked could vaporize into homes in the surrounding communities. They examine DuPont’s fight against regulators, and the cancer clusters that exist as a result of toxic plumes.

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

 

DuPont's Toxic Legacy in New Jersey


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022218dpod.mp3




Rewriting Civil Rights History, 'The Play That Goes Wrong,' Dupont's Toxic Legacy

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Dr. Jeanne Theoharis discusses her book A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights HistoryAshley BryantMark Evans and Clifton Duncan talk about starring in the Broadway revival of The Play That Goes Wrong. Author Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi discusses her new novel Call Me ZebraJames O’Neill and Scott Fallon discuss their recent investigation for The Record/NorthJersey.com into DuPont’s toxic legacy: “Toxic Secrets: Pollution, evasion and fear in North Jersey.” 

This episode is hosted by Jami Floyd.




Actress Laura Benanti On Her Diverse Career

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 10:27:05 -0500

Tony Award-winning actor Laura Benanti discusses her diverse career and her recent turn from Broadway where she recently co-starred with Amy Schumer in Meteor Shower.  Laura is also a series regular on Season 3 of Samantha Bee’s and Jason Jones’ TBS series The Detour, which premiered on January 23rd.

Laura will be performing The Story Goes On with her mother Linda Benanti, at Feinstein’s/54 Below, from February 20th to February 23rd.  

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolu.

Actress Laura Benanti On Her Diverse Career


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022118cpod.mp3




Two Years of Tumult at Facebook

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Nick Thompson, Editor in Chief of WIRED, discusses his cover story for the March issue, “Inside the Two Years that Shook Facebook--and the World,” which he reported with Fred Vogelstein. The article details the recent tumult at Facebook that started with leaks, and explores how the company moderates content.

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

Two Years of Tumult at Facebook


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022118dpod.mp3




Amy Chua on the Question of American Identity

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Amy Chua discusses her new book Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations. Chua argues that America tends to view people as being defined by their nationhood rather than other group identities, which is to our detriment. She writes that we can only overcome our divisiveness by acknowledging difference, honoring our unique identities and combating inequity. 

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

Amy Chua on the Question of American Identity


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022118apod.mp3




Raoul Peck's Film on Young Karl Marx

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Raoul Peck talks about his latest film, The Young Karl Marx, a dramatized biopic about Karl Marx’s early adulthood. Alternating fluidly between French, German and English, this film shows how Marx introduced Communist ideals across Europe and how he and Engels began collaborating and drew on workers’ movements in both England and France.

The Young Karl Marx opens on Friday, February 23rd at The Metrograph Theater with a national release to follow. There will be a Q&A at Metrograph after evening screenings on Friday, February 23th and Saturday, February 24th.

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

Raoul Peck's Film on Young Karl Marx


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022118bpod.mp3




Amy Chua on American Identity, Raoul Peck on Karl Marx, Tumult at Facebook

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Amy Chua discusses her new book Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of NationsRaoul Peck talks about his latest film, The Young Karl Marx, a dramatized biopic about Karl Marx’s early adulthood. Tony Award-winning actor Laura Benanti discusses her diverse career on the stage and screen. Nick Thompson, Editor in Chief of WIRED, talks about his cover story, “Inside the Two Years that Shook Facebook--and the World.

This episode is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.




A Book on Optimism in the Age of Fear

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 13:20:29 -0500

Gregg Easterbrook discusses his latest book It’s Better Than It Looks: Reasons for Optimism in an Age of Fear. He details why, despite problems like fascism, terrorism, environmental collapse, racial and economic inequality, the modern world is better than it has ever been. He argues that crime and most forms of pollution are in long-term decline, while longevity and education keep rising and economic indicators are better than in any past generation, and offers policy changes to address problems that we’re currently facing.

Gregg Easterbrook will be speaking on Tuesday, February 20th at 6:00 p.m. at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs.

 This segment was guest hosted by Hari Kondabolu.

A Book on Optimism in the Age of Fear


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022018cpod.mp3




Lindy West on Leaving Twitter, and Loving It

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 12:09:03 -0500

Lindy West, author and contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, talks about her latest column, “I Quit Twitter and It Feels Great.” She discusses the vicious and aggressive harassment of women journalists online (something she has experienced personally), Twitter’s inability to stop the abuse and what this means for women looking to publicize their work and have a voice online.

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

 

Lindy West on Leaving Twitter, and Loving It


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022018dpod.mp3




The Deadly Rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:49:11 -0500

Frontline correspondent Martin Smith discusses his new documentary, Bitter Rivals: Iran and Saudi Arabia, a two-part series that examines how a rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia has plunged the Middle East into sectarian war. The first episode traces the history of how religion and power politics have driven perpetual conflict, from revolution in Iran, to reaction by Saudi Arabia, and wars in Afghanistan, Lebanon and Iraq. The second episode looks at the current political state of Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Bitter Rivals: Iran and Saudi Arabia premieres Tuesday, February 20th and Tuesday, February 27th on PBS and online.

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

The Deadly Rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022018apod.mp3




How Journalists Can Fight Gender Imbalance in Their Stories

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:48:48 -0500

Journalists Ed Yong and Adrienne LaFrance discuss Yong’s new piece in The Atlantic titled, “I Spent Two Years Trying to Fix the Gender Imbalance in My Stories” and LaFrance’s 2016 piece, “I Analyzed a Year of My Reporting for Gender Bias (Again).” Both journalists analyzed what percentage of quotes in their articles came from women. The articles break down the metrics by which they measured representation and the steps Yong and LaFrance have taken to equally represent all genders in their articles. Their work sheds light on pervasive bias and how important it is for individuals to actively combat it in their creative output.

This segment was guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

How Journalists Can Fight Gender Imbalance in Their Stories


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday022018bpod.mp3




Saudi Arabia's Fight with Iran, Gender Bias in Reporting, Lindy West's Twitter

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Frontline correspondent Martin Smith discusses his Frontline documentary, Bitter Rivals: Iran and Saudi Arabia. Journalists Ed Yong and Adrienne LaFrance talk about Yong’s new piece in The Atlantic titled, “I Spent Two Years Trying to Fix the Gender Imbalance in My Stories” and LaFrance’s 2016 piece, “I Analyzed a Year of My Reporting for Gender Bias (Again).” Gregg Easterbrook discusses his latest book It’s Better Than It Looks: Reasons for Optimism in an Age of FearLindy West, author and contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, talks about her latest New York Times column, “I Quit Twitter and It Feels Great.” 

This episode is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.




A Nazi Doctor's Quest for Redemption

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Award-winning filmmaker and author John Heminway talks about his new book In Full Flight: A Story of Africa and Atonement. He tells the story of Dr. Anne Spoerry, a legendary French doctor who treated hundreds of thousands of people across rural Kenya over the span of 50 years after World War II. Heminway uncovers her past as a "doctor" in a Nazi concentration camp and explores the question of whether it is possible to rewrite one's troubled past simply by doing good in the present.

John Heminway will give a reading on Wednesday, February 21 at 7:30 pm at Diane’s Books of Greenwich Event at Perrot Memorial Library (90 Sound Beach Ave, Old Greenwich, Connecticut).

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou. 

A Nazi Doctor's Quest for Redemption


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021918bpod.mp3




Reporting the Dark Side of the Olympics

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

David Zirin, sports editor for The Nation and host of the podcast “Edge of Sports,” discusses his recent reporting on the Olympics including his articles, “The Farce of ‘Olympic Athletes from Russia" and “The Olympics Land on South Korea, Destroying Acres of Sacred Forests.” 

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

Reporting the Dark Side of the Olympics


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021918dpod.mp3




The Farce of Black History Month

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Doreen St. Felix, staff writer for The New Yorker, discusses her new piece, “The Farce, and the Grandeur, of Black History Month Under Trump.” St. Felix looks at the superficial nature and commercial appropriation of Black History Month. She also charts her own path of learning about Black History, from high school curricula that oversimplified figures like George Washington Carver and Harriet Tubman, to finding an intellectual home as an undergrad in Brown University’s Africana Studies Department.

Listeners, tweet at or call us about what you wish your school taught you about Black History!

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

 

The Farce of Black History Month


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021918cpod.mp3




Steve Coll on the United States' Secret Wars in South Asia

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Steve Coll, New Yorker staff writer and Dean of Columbia Journalism School, discusses his new book Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America's Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Coll examines how prior to 9/11, the United States had been carrying out small-scale covert operations in Afghanistan, ostensibly in cooperation with, although often in direct opposition to, the Pakistani intelligence agency “I.S.I.” He looks at how a highly secretive wing of I.S.I., known as "Directorate S," covertly trained, armed and sought to legitimize the Taliban. Coll reveals how America became ensnared in an elaborate, factional, and seemingly interminable conflict in South Asia.

Steve Coll will give a talk and book signing on Thursday, February 22nd at the Upper West Side Barnes & Noble  (2289 Broadway at 82nd St).

This segment is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.

Steve Coll on the United States' Secret Wars in South Asia


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021918apod.mp3




Steve Coll on Secret Wars, Real Black History, The Winter Olympics

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

New Yorker staff writer and Dean of Columbia Journalism School Steve Coll discusses his new book Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America's Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Award-winning filmmaker and author John Heminway talks about his book In Full Flight: A Story of Africa and Atonement. New Yorker staff writer Doreen St. Felix discusses her new piece, “The Farce, and the Grandeur, of Black History Month Under Trump.” David Zirin, sports editor for The Nation and host of the podcast “Edge of Sports,” discusses his recent reporting on the Olympics.

This episode is guest hosted by Hari Kondabolou.




The 'Leftover' Women Shaping China

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:57:43 -0500

American journalist & The Economist’s Cuba correspondent, Roseann Lake, talks about her new book, Leftover in China: The Women Shaping the World's Next Superpower. Lake chronicles the lives of four educated young women in China who have acquired wealth and independence, but who struggle to find romantic partners. Lake looks at how these women navigate a world where gender roles have not evolved as quickly as society itself, leading to a generation of single, ambitious women in Chinese cities.

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.

The 'Leftover' Women Shaping China


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021618bpod.mp3




Gillian Jacobs and the Cast of 'Kings'

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Actors Zach Grenier, Eisa Davis and Gillian Jacobs talk about the Public Theater’s new production, Kings, written by Sarah Burgess and directed by Thomas Kail. This new play looks at the lobbying culture in DC and offers humorous and bristling commentary on the current state of our democratic system. Kings is running through March 25th.

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal. 

 

Gillian Jacobs and the Cast of 'Kings'


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021618cpod.mp3




China's Jiu Ling Hou and the Future of the World

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Zak Dychtwald discusses his new book Young China: How the Restless Generation Will Change Their Country and the World. He examines the future of China through the lens of the Jiu Ling Hou -- the generation born after 1990. Dychtwald moved to China after college, became fluent in Mandarin and explored through personal encounters how young Chinese feel about everything from money, food, travel and sex, to their government, the West, and China’s shifting role in the world.

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal. 

China's Jiu Ling Hou and the Future of the World


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021618apod.mp3




Please Explain Awkwardness

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Melissa Dahl, editor of New York Magazine’s “Science of Us” column, and the author of Cringeworthy: A Theory of Awkwardness, joins "Please Explain" to talk about all things awkward.

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal. 

Please Explain Awkwardness


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021618dpod.mp3




China's Restless Generation, 'Kings' at The Public, Embracing Awkwardness

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Zak Dychtwald discusses his new book Young China: How the Restless Generation Will Change Their Country and the WorldRoseann Lake talks about her new book, Leftover in China: The Women Shaping the World's Next Superpower. Actors Zach Grenier, Eisa Davis and Gillian Jacobs discuss the Public Theater’s new production, Kings, written by Sarah Burgess and directed by Thomas Kail. Melissa Dahl, editor of New York Magazine’s “Science of Us” column, and the author of Cringeworthy: A Theory of Awkwardness, talks about all things awkward.

This episode is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.




Exhibit Features East Village Photographer Peter Hujar

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Joel Smith, the Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography at The Morgan Library & Museum, discusses the new exhibit Peter Hujar: Speed of Life at the Morgan. It runs through May 20th and features 140 photographs with a focus on portraiture. They chart Hujar’s career from the mid-1950's through the next three decades and reveal his profound influence on the East Village art scene during this time.

This segment is guest hosted by Kai Wright.

Exhibit Features East Village Photographer Peter Hujar


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021518cpod.mp3




Book Explores the Legacy of the Marshall Plan

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Council on Foreign Relations senior fellow Benn Steil discusses his new book The Marshall Plan: Dawn of the Cold War. He explains the legacy of America’s greatest foreign policy achievement in the context of today’s world order, why it can never be replicated and whether its influence is at stake today with isolationism on the rise. With U.S.-Russia relations again faltering, and NATO and the EU imperiled, he argues that it is now more critical than ever to consider the intent behind the Marshall Plan, which established these seventy years ago.

This segment is guest hosted by Kai Wright.

Book Explores the Legacy of the Marshall Plan


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021518apod.mp3




The Enduring Legacy of Stop and Frisk

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff, president of Policing Equity and the Franklin A. Thomas Professor in Policing Equity at John Jay, and Dr. Carla Shedd, Associate Professor of Urban Education and Sociology at CUNY Graduate Center, talk about the psychological and social costs of stop-and-frisk policing. In a recent opinion piece for The New York Times, "On Stop and Frisk, We Can't Celebrate Just Yet," Dr. Goff argues that even after the NYPD curtailed its widespread practice of stop-and-frisk, the negative effects of this practice still shapes communities, particularly for Black and Latino men.

This segment is guest hosted by Kai Wright.

The Enduring Legacy of Stop and Frisk


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021518dpod.mp3




How Infighting Splintered the NFL Protest Movement

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Howard Bryant, a senior writer for ESPN, joins us to discuss his latest story, “A Protest Divided.” He examines the legacy of the movement started by Colin Kaepernick, and the politics behind the ways various factions in the NFL have co-opted the message, and energy, of his movement, and how NFL players are trying to continue to raise awareness of social justice.

This segment is guest hosted by Kai Wright. 

 

How Infighting Splintered the NFL Protest Movement


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021518bpod.mp3




Inside NFL Protests, Peter Hujar's Photography, Stop-and-Frisk Isn't Over

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Council on Foreign Relations senior fellow Benn Steil discusses his new book The Marshall Plan: Dawn of the Cold War, which looks at the legacy of the Marshall Plan in the context of today’s world order. Howard Bryant, a senior writer for ESPN, discusses his story, “A Protest Divided,” about the movement started by NFL's Colin Kaepernick. Joel Smith, the Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography at The Morgan Library & Museum, discusses the new exhibit Peter Hujar: Speed of LifeDr. Phillip Atiba Goff, president of Policing Equity and professor in Policing Equity at John Jay College, and Dr. Carla Shedd, Associate Professor of Urban Education and Sociology at CUNY Graduate Center, talk about the enduring legacies of NYPD's practice of stop-and-frisk.  

This episode is guest hosted by Kai Wright.




Why Are State Legislatures Attacking Their Own Courts?

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Alicia Bannon, Deputy Director for Program Management at the Brennan Center for Justice, discusses the concerted attack by state legislatures on the judicial branch in the Trump era – just as courts are beginning to seem the last line of defense against partisan overreach from the other branches.

This segment is guest hosted by Kai Wright.

 

Why Are State Legislatures Attacking Their Own Courts?


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021418apod.mp3




Children's Book 'Wonder' Becomes a Film

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

RJ Palacio, graphic designer by day and a writer by night, discusses the film Wonder starring Owen Wilson and Julia Roberts. This film is based on her bestselling novel of the same name, which tells the story of August Pullman, a boy with facial differences caused by Treacher Collins syndrome who enters fifth grade and confronts the challenges of attending a mainstream elementary school for the first time. Wonder is out on Blu-ray and DVD on February 13th.

This segment is guest hosted by Kai Wright.

 

Children's Book 'Wonder' Becomes a Film


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021418cpod.mp3




Ask Us Your Winter Home Repair Questions

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Al and Larry Ubell, our Gurus of How-To, return just in time for winter home repairs and projects!

This segment is guest hosted by Kai Wright.

Ask Us Your Winter Home Repair Questions


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021418dpod.mp3




A Magician Finds Wonder in Everyday Life

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Nate Staniforth, a magician, writer, and former host of the Discovery Channel’s show Breaking Magic, talks about his new book Here Is Real Magic: A Magician's Search for Wonder in the Modern World. For over a decade, Nate toured the US as one of the busiest working magicians in the country. But after years on the road, he became disillusioned and traveled to India in search of real magic. It was in India -- as he talked to snake charmers and yogis, performed for locals, and infiltrated a 3,000-year-old clan of street magicians -- that he realized the importance of wonder in everyday life. 

This segment is guest hosted by Kai Wright.

A Magician Finds Wonder in Everyday Life


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021418bpod.mp3




The Attack on State Courts, Everyday Magic, 'Wonder' Becomes a Film

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Alicia Bannon, Deputy Director for Program Management at the Brennan Center for Justice, discusses the concerted attack by state legislatures on the judicial branch in the Trump era. Nate Staniforth, a magician, writer, and former host of the Discovery Channel’s show "Breaking Magic," talks about his new book Here Is Real Magic: A Magician's Search for Wonder in the Modern WorldRJ Palacio, graphic designer by day and a writer by night, discusses the film Wonder, which is based on her children's book. Al and Larry Udell our Gurus of How-To, return just in time for winter home repairs and projects!

This episode is guest hosted by Kai Wright.




Morgan Jerkins on Being a Black Millennial Feminist

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 11:23:19 -0500

Morgan Jerkins discusses her new collection of essays This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America. She interweaves incisive commentary on pop culture, feminism, black history, misogyny and racism with her own experiences to confront the very real challenges of being a black woman today. She writes on a range of topics from Sailor Moon, to Rachel Dolezal, to being a black visitor in Russia.

This segment is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll.

Morgan Jerkins on Being a Black Millennial Feminist


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021318dpod.mp3




How to Get More Women into the Tech Industry

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 11:22:52 -0500

Dr. Cristal Glangchai, scientist and Founder/CEO of VentureLab, a non-profit that develops experiential learning programs in youth entrepreneurship, talks about her new book VentureGirls: Raising Girls to Be Tomorrow’s Leaders. Women currently fill just 10 to 20% of tech industry jobs. Glangchai offers a unique solution based on her own experience as an engineer and argues that a key part of raising strong, confident young women is giving them the tools of entrepreneurship to engage in STEM.

This segment is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll.

How to Get More Women into the Tech Industry


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021318bpod.mp3




Debut Novel Examines Mysteries of the Self

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Nigerian author Akwaeke Emezi discusses her debut novel Freshwater. The novel focuses on a young Nigerian woman, Ada, who develops separate selves within her as a result of being born "with one foot on the other side." Narrated from the perspective of the various selves within Ada, and based in the author's realities, Freshwater explores the metaphysics of identity and mental health, plunging the reader into the mystery of being and self.

Akwaeke Emezi will be in conversation with Chinelo Okparanta on February 20th at Greenlight Bookstore (Ft. Greene store) at 7:30 p.m.

This segment is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll.

Debut Novel Examines Mysteries of the Self


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021318cpod.mp3




The Faulty Science of Forensics

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Meehan Crist and Tim Requarth discuss The Nation’s recent special investigation titled, “Forensic Science Put Jimmy Genrich in Prison for 24 Years. What if It Wasn't Science?” The investigation looks into how forensics is an imprecise science and relies much more on subjective interpretation than most people think. The article also looks at how prosecutors often rely on forensics despite two separately-commissioned federal review panels’ conclusive findings that these methods are profoundly inaccurate.

This segment is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll.

The Faulty Science of Forensics


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021318apod.mp3




Faulty Forensics, Akwaeke Emezi's Debut Novel, Becoming a Black Feminist

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Meehan Crist and Tim Requarth discuss The Nation’s recent special investigation titled, “Forensic Science Put Jimmy Genrich in Prison for 24 Years. What if It Wasn't Science?” Dr. Cristal Glangchai, scientist and Founder/CEO of VentureLab, talks about her new book VentureGirls: Raising Girls to Be Tomorrow’s LeadersNigerian author Akwaeke Emezi discusses her debut novel FreshwaterMorgan Jerkins talks about her new collection of essays, This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America. 

This episode is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll. 




Amy Sedaris Judges our Valentine's Craft Competition

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 10:23:28 -0500

They say you can’t hurry love, but you might be able to nudge it along with the perfect, homemade Valentine. Actress, comedian and author Amy Sedaris speaks with the winners of our “I Think I Like You!” Valentine’s Day craft competition. Listeners have been submitting their homemade crafts over the past few weeks, and Amy picked her top five favorites. The winners join her on-air to discuss their projects! 

This segment is guest hosted by Mary Harris.

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Amy Sedaris Judges our Valentine's Craft Competition


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021218apod.mp3




A True Story of Life, Death and Coffee

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 10:21:11 -0500

Bestselling author Dave Eggers and Mokhtar Alkhanshali, a Yemeni coffee farmer and the subject of Eggers' new book, discuss The Monk of Mokha. Eggers tells the true story of Alkhanshali who was raised in San Francisco and dreamed of resurrecting the ancient art of Yemeni coffee. At age 24, he left San Francisco and traveled to Yemen to tour terraced farms in the mountains. But when war broke out in Yemen, he was forced to reconsider his dreams. 

This segment is guest hosted by Mary Harris.

A True Story of Life, Death and Coffee


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021218dpod.mp3




Book Follows Three Marriages in Mumbai

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Elizabeth Flock, author and a reporter for PBS NewsHour, talks about her book The Heart Is a Shifting Sea: Love and Marriage in Mumbai. She examines love, marriage and modern India through the stories of three very different middle-class couples living in Mumbai. 

Flock will be in conversation on Monday, February 12th with Katie Roiphe and Laura Smith at the NYU Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute (20 Cooper Square, 7th Fl. Commons) at 6:30 p.m. and will also be in conversation with Suketu Mehta on Thursday, March 22th at McNally Jackson (52 Prince Street) 7 p.m.

This segment is guest hosted by Mary Harris.

Book Follows Three Marriages in Mumbai


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021218cpod.mp3




Alain Locke, Father of the Harlem Renaissance

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Jeffrey Stewart discusses his new book The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke, a new biography of the father of the Harlem Renaissance. Based on Locke’s own writings and on interviews with those who knew him, Stewart details how Locke became the first African American Rhodes Scholar, earned a PhD in philosophy at Harvard University and became a professor at Howard University. He also looks at how Locke came to mentor a generation of young artists including Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Jacob Lawrence.

Jeffrey Stewart will be in conversation with the Director of the Schomburg Center, Kevin Young, at the Schomburg Center's Langston Hughes Auditorium on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at 6:30 p.m.

This segment is guest hosted by Marry Harris.

Alain Locke, Father of the Harlem Renaissance


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday021218bpod.mp3




Amy Sedaris Judges Valentine's Crafts, Love in Mumbai, Dave Eggers' New Book

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Actress, comedian and author Amy Sedaris talks to the winners of our “I Think I Like You!” Valentine’s Day craft competition. Jeffrey Stewart talks about his book, The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke, a new biography of the father of the Harlem Renaissance. Elizabeth Flock, author and a reporter for PBS NewsHour, discusses her book The Heart Is a Shifting Sea: Love and Marriage in Mumbai. Bestselling author Dave Eggers and Mokhtar Alkhanshali, a Yemeni coffee farmer and the subject of Egger's new book, discuss The Monk of Mokha.

This episode is guest hosted by Mary Harris.




Please Explain British Cuisine

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 11:55:23 -0500

This week’s Please Explain is all about British cuisine – it’s much maligned history, and it’s bright delicious future. James Beard Award-winning author, cook and British person Diana Henry discusses traditional dishes including pudding, pies, pig’s trotters and more, along with new ingredients and influences that have transformed home and restaurant cooking in Britain over the past 20 years.  Her latest book is How to Eat a Peach: Menus, Stories and Places. This segment is guest hosted be Melissa Clark. Baked Sausages with Apples, Raisins and Hard Cider A great cold weather supper for very little effort. You don’t have to soak the raisins in brandy if you feel you don’t deserve it (though I’m sure you do); boiling water is fine. Yield: 6 Ingredients: ²⁄3 cup raisins3 tablespoons brandy (apple brandy or regular brandy, or you can use whiskey)2 large onions, peeled3 eating apples, quartered and cored3 tablespoons olive oilsalt and pepper8 sprigs of thyme1 tablespoon soft light brown sugar12 pork sausages1 cup hard dry cider Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. 2. Put the raisins into a saucepan and add the alcohol. Bring to just under a boil, then take the pan off the heat and let the raisins plump up for 30 minutes. 3. Halve the onions and cut each half into four wedges. Put the onions and apples into an ovenproof dish that will hold the sausages in a single layer (it makes life easier if it’s a dish you can also serve from). Add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, the seasoning, and thyme and toss the apples and onions with your hands. Sprinkle sugar on each wedge of apple. Scatter the raisins and their soaking liquid in among the apples. 4. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil in a skillet and fry the sausages until golden all over; you are just doing this for color. Put them on top of the apples and onions and pour in the cider. 5. Bake for 50 minutes to one hour. The sausages will become dark brown, the apples golden and completely tender, and the liquid should be absorbed by the onions. Serve immediately with mashed potatoes and a green vegetable, such as Savoy cabbage or a watercress salad.  This recipe has been reprinted with permission from "Simple: Effortless Food, Big Flavors," by Diana Henry (Mitchell Beazley, 2016).   [...]Please Explain British Cuisine


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020918dpod.mp3




How to Love the Farmers' Market in Winter

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 11:33:51 -0500

Allison Plumer, chef and owner of Lot 2 in Brooklyn, and Heather Rubi, a farm-to-restaurant consultant, discuss winter farmers markets: what to get, how to prepare winter vegetables, and which markets are best in New York City. She also shares some of her favorite winter recipes.

This segment is guest hosted by Melissa Clark.

Roasted Carrots and Parsnips Glazed with Honey Butter, Sage and Feta  

Recipe from Allison Plumer

All of these ingredients can be found at your winter Greenmarket, with the exception of the lemon. 

Yield: 4

Ingredients:

1.5 lb carrots

1.5 lb parsnips

1 knob butter

4 tablespoons of honey, preferably a dark variety, like buckwheat 

Half bunch of sage 

Juice of 1 lemon 

Goat milk or other feta, optional

Directions:

1. Pick the leaves off the sage and hold them aside

2. Peel and cut your root veggies into your favorite shape for roasting. Keep them around the same size so they will cool uniformly.

3. Toss prepared roots with some olive oil and salt to enhance their flavors while they roast.

4. Roast roots at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes. We want to cook them a bit, but not soft all the way through as we are going to cook them again with the glaze. (Veggies can be roasted ahead of time and kept in the fridge). 

5. Add butter to medium sauce pan on medium heat. Once the butter melts down, add sage leaves and brown the butter with the leaves and add a pinch of salt

6. Add roots to the pan and toss to coat with the butter and sage mix. Squeeze on a few tablespoons of honey into the mix and add lemon juice.

7. Toss.

Sneak a taste and add more salt or honey if your palate demands it. I like to top this dish with fresh goat milk feta from the market or your favorite soft farmers cheese! 

 

  

How to Love the Farmers' Market in Winter


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020918apod.mp3




The Art of Braising Meat

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 10:56:16 -0500

Sam Sifton, journalist and Food Editor at the New York Times, and Marco Canora, chef, restaurateur and cookbook author, discuss the delicate art of braising. They offer a few of their favorite recipes as well as tips on how to strike the perfect balance between frying and slow-cooking your braised meal. This segment is guest hosted by Melissa Clark.  Smoky Braised Kale With Tomato Recipe from Sam Sifton's article in The New York Times, "The 400 Degree Thanksgiving." Yield: 8 to 10 servingsTime: 1 hour  This is a hack of a preparation the chef Travis Lett used at his restaurant Gjelina in Venice, California, as a pairing for a half-roasted chicken. With its deeply caramelized base of tomato paste and smoked paprika, the kale melts into velvety excellence that can stand on its own with a pile of rice or a baked potato. But it really shines brightly as a supporting player in a feast of poultry, pork or beef. Do two onions seem too many for you? Use one. This is a recipe really to make your own. Ingredients:  ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil2 Spanish onions, peeled and diced8 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced¼ cup tomato paste1 teaspoon hot smoked paprika (pimentón) Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste3 cups turkey or chicken stock, ideally homemade or low-sodium1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, plus more to taste4 (3/4-pound) bunches washed kale (any kind), thick stems discarded or cut into thin strips, leaves cut into thick strips (about 16 packed cups total) Directions:  1. Place a large, heavy-bottomed, high-sided pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat and add olive oil. When it shimmers, add onions and garlic and cook until they soften and begin to turn translucent, about 5 to 7 minutes. 2. Add tomato paste and smoked paprika, reduce heat to medium, and cook, stirring frequently, until the paste begins to caramelize, about 5 to 7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then add stock and vinegar, and allow to come to a boil. 3. Add half the kale, cover, and cook for a minute or two, until it wilts. Repeat with remaining kale. Stir to incorporate the onion mixture into the soft kale and simmer until tender, 20 to 30 minutes, partly covered. Season to taste with salt and pepper, drizzle with a little more vinegar, and serve. Smothered Pork Chops Recipe from Sam Sifton's article in The New York Times, "Star Anise Brine." Yield: 8 servingsTime: 3 hours Get the best pork chops you can, and the thickest, and give yourself a good 12 hours or more of lead time to soak them in the brine. If you are omitting the anise in the brine[...]


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020918bpod.mp3




Warm Spirits for the Cold Months

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Ivy Mix, co-owner and head bartender at Leyenda, named "Best American Bartender" at "Tales of the Cocktails," discusses winter cocktails. She shares the best cocktails for staying warm on cold winter evenings, including darker spirits, amaros, and warm punches, as well as how bartenders adapt to changing tastes during the winter. 

This segment is guest hosted by Melissa Clark.

 

Warm Spirits for the Cold Months


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020918cpod.mp3




Wintertime Farmers' Markets, How to Braise, Britain's Foodie Side

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Allison Plumer, Brooklyn chef and owner of Lot 2 Restaurant, and Heather Rubi, farm-to-restaurant consultant, discuss winter farmers markets in New York City. Sam Sifton, journalist and Food Editor at the New York Times, and Marco Canora, chef, restaurateur and cookbook author, discuss the delicate art of braising. Ivy Mix, co-owner and head bartender at Leyenda, named "Best American Bartender" at "Tales of the Cocktails," talks about winter cocktails. Chef and author Diana Henry joins "Please Explain" to discuss British cuisine.

This episode is guest hosted by Melissa Clark.




Warrington Hudlin on the Evolution of Black American Cinema

Thu, 08 Feb 2018 11:22:55 -0500

Director, producer and actor Warrington Hudlin talks about the evolution of Black American cinema and whether we’re currently in a golden age. Hudlin’s hit 1990 comedy “House Party,” which helped launch his career, recently appeared on The New York Times’ “28 Days, 28 Films for Black History Month” list.  

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal. 

Warrington Hudlin on the Evolution of Black American Cinema


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020818bpod.mp3




Social Media's Black Market of Stolen Identities

Thu, 08 Feb 2018 11:22:35 -0500

New York Times reporter Nicholas Confessore discusses his recent article, “Buying Online Influence From a Shadowy Market.” He investigates social media’s black market, where celebrities, athletes, pundits and politicians can buy millions of fake followers. Confessore also profiles the women and men who have had their identities stolen and used by fake Twitter accounts.

 This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal. 

Social Media's Black Market of Stolen Identities


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020818dpod.mp3




Did Comey Cost Hillary Clinton the Presidency?

Thu, 08 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Lanny Davis, an attorney who served as special counsel to President Bill Clinton and as a White House spokesperson, discusses his new book, The Unmaking of the President 2016: How FBI Director James Comey Cost Hillary Clinton the Presidency. Davis takes a close look at the allegations lodged against Clinton, especially the question of her using a private email server while Secretary of State. He argues that Comey played a key role in sowing distrust and spreading falsehoods about the former Secretary of State.

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal. 

 

Did Comey Cost Hillary Clinton the Presidency?


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020818apod.mp3




A Play on the Trans Experience, Through Voices of Family

Thu, 08 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Mashuq Mushtaq Deen, Resident Playwright at New Dramatists, discusses the New York premiere of Draw the Circle. Deen tells the hilarious and moving story of his transition entirely from the point of view of his family and friends. He brings to life the often-ignored struggle that a family goes through when their child transitions from one gender to another. Draw the Circle runs through February 18th at Rattlestick Playwrights Theater (224 Waverly Place). 

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal. 

A Play on the Trans Experience, Through Voices of Family


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020818cpod.mp3




Comey and the Presidency, Black Filmmaking in America, Social Media Fraud

Thu, 08 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Attorney and former White House Spokesman Lanny Davis discusses his new book The Unmaking of the President 2016: How FBI Director James Comey Cost Hillary Clinton the Presidency. Director, producer and actor Warrington Hudlin talks about the evolution of Black American cinema and whether we’re currently in a golden age. Mashuq Mushtaq Deen, Resident Playwright at New Dramatists, discusses the New York premiere of “Draw the Circle,” his play about how a family deals with a child's gender transition. New York Times reporter Nicholas Confessore talks about his recent article, "Buying Online Influence From a Shadowy Market" about the global marketplace of stolen identities and social media fraud.

This episode is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.




David Cay Johnston on Trump's New America

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 10:54:40 -0500

Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Cay Johnston discusses his latest book It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What the The Trump Administration is Doing to America. Cay Johnston, who has been reporting on Trump since 1988, examines how the Trump administration is remaking the government and goes inside the administration to show how the federal agencies that touch the lives of all Americans are being undermined.  

Cay Johnston will be in a conversation with Trump family biographer Gwenda Blair, moderated by David Nasaw, at CUNY (365 Fifth Avenue) on Wednesday, February 7th at 6:30 pm. 

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

David Cay Johnston on Trump's New America


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020718apod.mp3




A Novel from Alaska's Early Years

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 10:16:39 -0500

Bestselling author Kristin Hannah discusses her new novel The Great Alone. Set in Alaska in 1974, it tells the story of two families who move to the Alaskan wilderness in search of a better life. It focuses on the lives of Ernt Allbright, a former POW, who has recently returned from Vietnam and Leni, a 13-year-old girl caught in the middle of her parents’ dysfunctional relationship. 

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

 

A Novel from Alaska's Early Years


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020718cpod.mp3




How Lyndon B. Johnson Changed Everyday Life

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Historian Joshua Zeitz discusses his book Building the Great Society: Inside Lyndon Johnson's White House. He looks at how LBJ’s Great Society programs were put into practice by staff members who included Bill Moyers, Jack Valenti, Joe Califano and Harry McPherson. He tells the story of how one White House staff fundamentally changed everyday life for millions of citizens and forged a legacy of compassionate and interventionist government.

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

How Lyndon B. Johnson Changed Everyday Life


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020718dpod.mp3




One Public Defender's Journey to Mental Health

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Former attorney and writer Zack McDermott talks about his new book Gorilla and the Bird: A Memoir of Madness and a Mother's Love. McDermott, who is bipolar, tells the story of his descent into psychosis at age 26 and his desperate, poignant, often hilarious struggle to claw his way back to sanity. It's a journey that took him from New York City back to his Kansas roots and to his tough, big-hearted Midwestern mother, nicknamed the Bird.

This segment is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.

One Public Defender's Journey to Mental Health


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020718bpod.mp3




'It's Even Worse Than You Think,' An Alaskan Novel, LBJ's Great Society

Wed, 07 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Cay Johnston discusses his latest book "It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What the The Trump Administration is Doing to America." Former public defender and author Zack McDermott talks about his new book "Gorilla and the Bird: A Memoir of Madness and a Mother's Love." Bestselling author Kristin Hannah discusses her new novel "The Great Alone," which tells the story of two families who move to the Alaska in search for a better life. Historian Joshua Zeitz discusses his book "Building the Great Society: Inside Lyndon Johnson's White House."

This episode is guest hosted by Jami Floyd.




Novel Probes a Marriage and Wrongful Conviction

Tue, 06 Feb 2018 10:57:36 -0500

Award-winning author Tayari Jones discusses her new novel An American Marriage. It tells the story of newlyweds Celestial and Roy. Just as they are beginning their life together, Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn’t commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding. After five years, Roy’s conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together.

Tayari Jones will be in conversation with Isaac Fitzgerald of Buzzfeed at the New York Public Library (475 5th Ave, Manhattan) on February 7th at 6:30 pm. Jones will give a reading at Greenlight Bookstore (686 Fulton Street, Brooklyn) on February 8th at 7:30 pm.

This segment is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll.

Novel Probes a Marriage and Wrongful Conviction


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020618cpod.mp3




'Finding Sanctuary' from ICE in a Manhattan Church

Tue, 06 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Journalist Laura Gottesdiener and filmmaker/photographer Cinthya Santos Briones discuss their five-part series in The Nation, “Finding Sanctuary.” The series follows the family of Amanda Morales, an undocumented Guatemalan immigrant who is taking sanctuary in a Washington Heights church to avoid deportation. Morales took refuge with her three American-born children there in August and has been living there ever since. Hers was one of the first highly publicized church sanctuary efforts in New York City. “Finding Sanctuary” incorporates film, photography, and audio from both the journalists and the Morales daughters, who are documenting their life in sanctuary.

This segment is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll.

'Finding Sanctuary' from ICE in a Manhattan Church


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020618bpod.mp3




A Harrowing Escape from Boko Haram

Tue, 06 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Journalist Andrea Hoffman talks about her new book A Gift from Darkness: How I Escaped with my Daughter from Boko Haram. Hoffman interviewed and co-authored the book with Patience Ibrahim, a Nigerian woman whose first husband was murdered by Boko Haram when she was 19. After she left her village, remarried and became pregnant, Boko Haram soldiers abducted Patience, forced her to convert to Islam, and raped and tortured her for months. She tells the story of how she managed to escape with her child.  

This segment is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll.

A Harrowing Escape from Boko Haram


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020618dpod.mp3




Can a Non-Profit Drug Manufacturer Save our Healthcare System?

Tue, 06 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Dan Liljenquist, former lawyer and state senator in Utah, now Director of Special Projects at Intermountain Healthcare, and Dr. Erin Fox, professor and expert on drug shortages at University of Utah, discuss a new initiative spearheaded by Intermountain Healthcare to create a non-profit that produces its own generic drugs. Several major not-for-profit hospitals are part of this initiative to stymie drug shortages and the high prices that come with them. Intermountain Healthcare plans to either contract manufacturing to an existing pharmaceutical company or get the Food and Drug Administration approval to manufacture medication itself. By cutting out the middleman, these hospitals intend to wrest control of drug availability and pricing from the hands of the free-market, thereby offering patients more affordable and reliable care.

This segment is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll. 

Can a Non-Profit Drug Manufacturer Save our Healthcare System?


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020618apod.mp3




Making Meds Affordable, Sanctuary from ICE, 'An American Marriage'

Tue, 06 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Dan Liljenquist, former lawyer and state senator in Utah, now Director of Special Projects at Intermountain Healthcare, and Dr. Erin Fox, professor and expert on drug shortages at University of Utah, discuss a new initiative to create a non-profit that produces its own generic drugs. Journalists Laura Gottesdiener and Cinthya Santos Briones talk about their series for The Nation, “Finding Sanctuary," about a family living in a Manhattan church to avoid deportation. Award-winning author Tayari Jones discusses her new novel An American Marriage, about a couple in Atlanta torn apart by the criminal justice system. Journalist Andrea Hoffman about her book A Gift From Darkness: How I Escaped with My Daughter, the true story of a Nigerian woman who escaped Boko Haram with her daughter.

This episode is guest hosted by Rebecca Carroll.




A Guidebook for Talking About Race

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 12:22:43 -0500

Ijeoma Oluo, Editor at Large for The Establishment, discusses her book So You Want to Talk About Race. She leads constructive conversations about race and social issues, including police brutality trials, white supremacist rallies and Black Lives Matter protests. Each chapter focuses on a specific question: “What is cultural appropriation anyway?,” “Why do I keep being told to check my privilege?,” “If I don’t support affirmative action, does that make me racist?” and “What is intersectionality, and why do I need it?”

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.

 

A Guidebook for Talking About Race


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020518apod.mp3




'A State of Freedom' Explores Dislocation and Desire in India

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Neel Mukherjee talks about his new novel A State of Freedom. Set in contemporary India, he tells the stories of five characters in very different circumstances, including a domestic cook in Mumbai, a vagrant and his dancing bear and a girl who escapes terror in her home village for a new life in the city. Through these characters, he explores the many meanings of dislocation, intended or enforced, and the desire for more. 

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.

'A State of Freedom' Explores Dislocation and Desire in India


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020518cpod.mp3




Annie Duke on Making Decisions under Pressure

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Annie Duke, author and former professional poker player, discusses her new book, Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts. Duke offers tips on how to make well-thought out decisions in high pressure environments. And while she can’t guarantee you’ll always get it right, her book offers insight into how to be a more confident decision maker and how to forgive yourself when you get it wrong.

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.

Annie Duke on Making Decisions under Pressure


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020518bpod.mp3




Tell Us About The Last Time You Moved

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Moving is the force behind some of the most controversial changes in the United States: immigration and gentrification. And soon, moving will be the only way people can save themselves from the effects of climate change. But moving is also very personal. It can mean new opportunities, independence, escaping a crazy roommate, and expanding a family. Or it can mean breakups, divorce, losing a job, or settling for less.

New York, like many cities throughout the world, is a place of movers, locals and transients alike. One way to capture the story of this city to ask: how did we all get here?

We want to hear from you! When is the last time you moved? What did that change mean for your life? Leave us a comment below, or give us a call!

This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.

Tell Us About The Last Time You Moved


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020518dpod.mp3




How to Talk About Race, 'State of Freedom,' City of Movers

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Ijeoma Oluo, Editor at Large for The Establishment, discusses her book "So You Want to Talk About Race." Annie Duke, author and former professional poker player, talks about her new book, "Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts." Neel Mukherjee discusses his novel "A State of Freedom," which explores the intersecting lives of five characters in India. Listeners call in to share their stories of moving and making home in New York City.

This episode is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.




How the Human Body Surpasses Its Limits

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 12:03:48 -0500

For this week's Please Explain, journalist Alex Hutchinson discusses his book Endure: Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance. In Endure, Hutchison profiles extreme runners and super-athletes, who have challenged scientific consensus on what the human body is capable of. 

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

How the Human Body Surpasses Its Limits


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020218dpod.mp3




Updating the Bechdel Test for the 21st Century

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 10:32:41 -0500

Walt HickeyRachel Dottle and Ella Koeze talk about their recent piece for FiveThirtyEight, "The Next Bechdel Test," which suggests new ways to call attention to inequality in the film industry. The original Bechdel-Wallace Test asks: Does it have at least two named female characters? And do those characters have at least one conversation that is not about a man? The Next Bechdel Test argues that since a third of the top fifty movies of 2016 failed the Bechdel Test, there should be revised, higher standards applied when looking at gender and racial inequality in film. 

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart. 

Updating the Bechdel Test for the 21st Century


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020218cpod.mp3




A New Yorker's Path from Debutante to Bookstore Owner

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Jeannette Watson discusses her memoir, It's My Party. In it she tells the story of her life, born into a celebrity family and the years she spent as a debutante and later, a young wife and mother who struggled with depression and mental illness. She explains why she moved to New York City in the 1970's and opened the Upper East Side bookstore Books & Co., which became a center for the literati for twenty years.

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart. 

 

A New Yorker's Path from Debutante to Bookstore Owner


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020218bpod.mp3




How Toxic Oil Wastewater Gets into Your Food

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Food & Water Watch executive director Wenonah Hauter discusses the organization's recent investigation, Toxic Oilfield Wastewater Used to Grow California Food, Including OrganicsThe investigation reveals that toxic oil wastewater is used to grow crops in California, a practice that threatens food, farm workers, and the environment. Toxic oil wastewater is common even on organic farms, and nearly 40 percent of all organic produce grown in the United States comes from California. Food & Water Watch is announcing a campaign to ban the practice with a new documentary by Jon Bowermaster. 

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

How Toxic Oil Wastewater Gets into Your Food


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020218apod.mp3




Toxins on Your Lettuce, A Better Bechdel Test, Extreme Athletes

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Watch, discusses the organization's recent investigation, "Toxic Oilfield Wastewater Used to Grow California Food, Including Organics." Jeannette Watson talks about her memoir "It’s My Party," about finding independence and renewal in the Upper East Side. Walt Hickey, Rachel Dottle and Ella Koeze discuss “The Next Bechdel Test,” their piece for FiveThirtyEight on gender and racial inequality in the film industry. Journalist Alex Hutchinson discusses his book "Endure: Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance" for "Please Explain."

This episode is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.




Joanne Lipman on How to Cross the Gender Divide at Work

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 13:54:06 -0500

Journalist Joanne Lipman discusses her new book That's What She Said: What Men Need to Know (and Women Need to Tell Them) About Working Together. Filled with illuminating anecdotes, data from the most recent studies, and stories from Joanne Lipman’s own journey to the top of a male-dominated industry, it shows how we can win by reaching across the gender divide. That’s What She Said shows why empowering women as true equals is an essential goal for women and men—and offers a roadmap for getting there.

You can test your own implicit bias here.

Joanne Lipman will be in conversation with Cindi Leive, former editor-in-chief of Glamour, on February 1st at 7 pm at the Upper West Side Barnes & Noble (82nd & Broadway).

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

 

Joanne Lipman on How to Cross the Gender Divide at Work


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020118dpod.mp3




One Teenager's Adventure from Queens to Antarctica in 1928

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 10:35:26 -0500

Laurie Gwen Shapiro talks about her new book The Stowaway: A Young Man’s Extraordinary Adventure to AntarcticaShe tells the story of Billy Gawronski, a first generation New York City high schooler in 1928 desperate to escape a dreary future in the family upholstery business, who jumped into the Hudson River and stowed away on a ship bound for an expedition to Antarctica. 

Laurie Shapiro will give a reading on March 8th at 7pm at Essex Street Market.

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

One Teenager's Adventure from Queens to Antarctica in 1928


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020118bpod.mp3




How the Trump Administration Gave in to Goldman Sachs

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Gary Rivlin, a reporting fellow with The Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute, discusses his latest investigation at The Intercept: “Government by Goldman.” It looks at how Trump's chief economic adviser (and former Goldman Sachs employee) Gary Cohn is pursuing a radical deregulatory agenda and giving Goldman Sachs everything it ever wanted from the Trump administration.

 This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

How the Trump Administration Gave in to Goldman Sachs


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020118apod.mp3




Exhibition Explores the Fine Art of Neuroscience

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Grey Art Gallery Director Lynn Gumpert and neuroscientist Dr. Larry Swanson discuss the exhibit The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y CajalIt’s the first U.S. museum exhibition to present the extraordinary drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the father of modern neuroscience. Cajal’s depictions of the brain are still in wide use today because they offer much greater clarity than photographs. Featuring approximately eighty of Cajal’s drawings, the show situates them within the history of scientific illustration from the 16th to 19th centuries, and juxtaposes them with contemporary visualizations of the brain.

The Beautiful Brain is on view at New York University's Grey Art Gallery through March 31st.

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

 

Exhibition Explores the Fine Art of Neuroscience


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday020118cpod.mp3




'Government by Goldman,' A South Pole Adventure, Crossing the Gender Divide

Thu, 01 Feb 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Gary Rivlin discusses "Government by Goldman," his investigation into Trump's chief economic adviser Gary Cohn and the deregulatory agenda that benefits Goldman Sachs. Laurie Gwen Shapiro talks about her book "The Stowaway: A Young Man’s Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica," about a teenager who escaped New York City on a ship bound for Antarctica. Grey Art Gallery Director Lynn Gumpert and neuroscientist Dr. Larry Swanson discuss "The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal," an exhibit of illustrations from the grandfather of neuroscience. Journalist Joanne Lipman discusses her new book "That's What She Said: What Men Need to Know (and Women Need to Tell Them) About Working Together."

This episode is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.




What Immigration Policy Looks Like on the Arizona Border

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 11:57:59 -0500

Jeff Reinhardt and Alicia Dinsmore, volunteers with immigrant aid organization No More Deaths, and Geoff Boyce, postdoctoral research fellow at the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona, talk about the struggles No More Deaths has encountered in Arizona, including the recent arrests of their volunteers at the border. The group documented years of disappearances, border patrol abuses, and other findings in a recent online report. They will also discuss this report, as well as the history of immigration policies and how these have played out on the ground. 

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

What Immigration Policy Looks Like on the Arizona Border


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday013118dpod.mp3




I Think I Like You: A Valentine Craft Competition

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 11:31:26 -0500

They say you can’t hurry love, but you might be able to nudge it along with the perfect, homemade Valentine! Lucky for us, this Valentine’s Day, we have guidance from the queen of crafting herself, Amy Sedaris!

Some people celebrate Valentine’s Day with a heart-shaped box of chocolates, a dozen roses, and a nice dinner at a restaurant. But Amy Sedaris, the extraordinary comedian, actor, writer, and craft enthusiast, knows that a homemade gift can be one of the most meaningful ways to show someone in your life that they are truly special.

For this Valentine’s Day, we want to see your most creative, homemade, Valentine’s Day gifts. From desserts and baked goods, to love notes, drawings, or even a cleverly Photoshopped portrait. All kinds of crafts are welcome, and so are all levels of skill, whether you are a seasoned Etsy shop owner or a casual couch crocheter.

The deadline to submit is February 7th, at 10 pm ET. Amy will pick her favorites and talk to the winners live on the air on February 12th.

Submit your craft




Why America's Fight To End Hunger is Failing

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Andrew Fisher, who has worked in the anti-hunger field for twenty years as an executive director, researcher, policy advocate, and coalition builder, discusses his new book Big Hunger: The Unholy Alliance between Corporate America and Anti-Hunger Groups. He argues that anti-hunger efforts don’t succeed if they’re focused on charity and not on the root causes of food insecurity, improving public health and reducing income inequality. He details a vision that encompasses a broader definition of hunger characterized by a focus on public health, economic justice, and economic democracy.

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart. 

Why America's Fight To End Hunger is Failing


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday013118apod.mp3




A Radical Political Essay in Film

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Filmmaker Joao Moreira Salles discusses his new documentary, In the Intense Now. Inspired by Chris Marker’s meditative essays on political radicalism, Salles uses archival footage, newsreel clips and home movies from the 1960's to showcase uprisings in Paris, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and the Cultural Revolution in China.

In the Intense Now opens at Film Forum on January 31. Salles will appear for a Q&A at the 7 pm screenings on Wednesday, January 31 and Friday, February 2.

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

A Radical Political Essay in Film


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday013118bpod.mp3




A Documentary on New Jersey's Predecessor to Hollywood

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Filmmakers Tom Meyers and Dennis Doros discuss The Champion: America’s First Film Town. It tells the story of The Champion Film Company in Fort Lee, New Jersey, the first of eleven studios that would become the epicenter of the film industry for a decade before Hollywood. With a mixture of amazingly interchangeable scenery close to New York City’s Broadway talent, it was the perfect location to shoot pictures. The Champion is available via Milestone Films on their website.

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

A Documentary on New Jersey's Predecessor to Hollywood


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday013118cpod.mp3




The Failure to Feed America, Our First Film Town, A Border Update

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Andrew Fisher, who has worked in the anti-hunger field for twenty years as an executive director, researcher, policy advocate, and coalition builder, discusses his new book Big Hunger: The Unholy Alliance between Corporate America and Anti-Hunger Groups. Filmmaker Joao Moreira Salles discusses his new documentary, In the Intense Now, that uses archival footage and home movies to showcase uprisings in Paris, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and the Cultural Revolution in China. Filmmakers Tom Meyers  and Dennis Doros talk about The Champion: America’s First Film Town, a documentary about The Champion Film Company in Fort Lee, New Jersey, which served as the epicenter of the film industry before Hollywood. Jeff Reinhardt, Geoff Boyce and Alicia Dinsmore discuss the arrests of volunteers from the immigrant aid group "No More Deaths" and how immigration policies are playing out on the Arizona/Mexico border.

This episode is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.




Ed Asner Stars in a Play About Conflicting Accounts of the Holocaust

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 12:56:27 -0500

Ed Asner and Johanna Day discuss their starring roles in the play, The Soap Myth, along with the Emmy award-winning playwright Jeff Cohen. Set more than 50 years after the end of WWII, it tells the story of a young journalist who sets out to write an article about a cantankerous Holocaust survivor. 

The Soap Myth is playing on Tuesday, January 30th at the Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust (36 Battery Place).

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

Ed Asner Stars in a Play About Conflicting Accounts of the Holocaust


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday013018bpod.mp3




How Israeli Forces Became Experts in Assassination

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 11:36:40 -0500

Journalist Ronen Bergman discusses his new book, Rise and Kill First: The Secret History of Israel's Targeted Assassinations. In May, Bergman broke the news that President Trump disclosed classified information supplied by Israeli espionage agencies to the Russian Foreign Minister Sergey V. Lavrov. In his new book, he offers an inside account of Israel’s targeted killing programs—their successes, their failures, and the moral and political price exacted on the men and women who approved and carried out the missions.

Ronen Bergman will be in conversation with David Sanger at the 92nd Street Y on 1/30 at 8pm.

 This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart. 

How Israeli Forces Became Experts in Assassination


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday013018apod.mp3




Elif Shafak's Novel on Turkey at a Crossroads

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Internationally bestselling author Elif Shafak discusses her latest novel Three Daughters of Eve. Set over the course of an evening in Istanbul, it tells the story of Peri, a married, wealthy, beautiful Turkish woman, who comes across an old polaroid of herself with two university friends and their professor. She reflects on their arguments about Islam and feminism, and recalls the scandal that tore them all apart. 

Elif Shafak will be in the House of SpeakEasy's literary cabaret, "Darkness Falls," on January 30 at 7 pm at Joe's Pub at The Public Theater.

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

Elif Shafak's Novel on Turkey at a Crossroads


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday013018cpod.mp3




The Times Between Consciousness

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Kate Cole-Adams discusses her recently published book, Anesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness, which takes a deep dive into the history of anesthetics. She highlights how little we know about the nature of consciousness and how the body and mind actually process sensory information while under anesthesia. The book takes a unique form, blending memoir, investigative research, and poetic language to probe one of the least-understood aspects of medical science. 

This segment is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.

 

The Times Between Consciousness


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday013018dpod.mp3




Israel's Assassins, Ed Asner Stars in a Play About the Holocaust, The Mysteries of Anesthesia

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 00:00:00 -0500

Journalist Ronen Bergman discusses his new book, Rise and Kill First: The Secret History of Israel's Targeted AssassinationsEd Asner and Johanna Day talk about their starring roles in The Soap Myth about contested histories of the Holocaust along with the Emmy award-winning playwright Jeff Cohen. Internationally bestselling author Elif Shafak discusses her latest novel about Islam and feminism in Turkey, Three Daughters of Eve. Kate Cole-Adams talks about her book, Anesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness, which takes a deep dive into the history of anesthetics.

This episode is guest hosted by Jonathan Capehart.




Immigration and the American Dream Under Trump

Mon, 29 Jan 2018 12:28:09 -0500

Stephanie Butnick, deputy editor of Tablet Magazine and host of the podcast “Unorthodox,” comedian/columnist/radio host Dean Obeidallah and comedian Jordan Carlos discuss the idea of the American dream under the Trump administration and why immigration is an essential part of our democracy, history and future. Obeidallah touches on many of these issues in his opinion piece for The Daily Beast, "'Chain Migration' Has Helped Millions of Striving Families—Including Mine.”

This segment is guest hosted by Negin Farsad.

 

Immigration and the American Dream Under Trump


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/midday/midday012918apod.mp3