Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Nanotechnology
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/nanotechnology.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
based  brain  cells  developed  engineering  materials  method  new  researchers  science  solar  technology  university texas  university 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Nanotechnology

EurekAlert! - Nanotechnology



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 01:58:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Konstanz) The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops.



Future trends for top materials by Mario J F Calvete

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Bentham Science Publishers) In the last four decades materials science has evolved and developed into a very diverse range of highly specialized family of compounds -- from what were once essentially esoteric, often topical, basic research specialties -- into what one would clearly class today as one of the most significant and important industrial fields and specializations of our modern era.



Researchers are first to see DNA 'blink'

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Northwestern University) Northwestern University biomedical engineers have developed imaging technology that is the first to see DNA 'blink,' or fluoresce. The tool enables researchers to study individual biomolecules (DNA, chromatin, proteins) as well as important global patterns of gene expression, which could yield insights into cancer. Vadim Backman will discuss the technology and its applications -- including the new concept of macrogenomics, a technology aiming to regulate the global patterns of gene expression without gene editing -- at the 2017 AAAS annual meeting.



'Lossless' metamaterial could boost efficiency of lasers and other light-based devices

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - San Diego) Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a material that could reduce signal losses in photonic devices. The advance has the potential to boost the efficiency of various light-based technologies including fiber optic communication systems, lasers and photovoltaics.



Liquid metal nano printing set to revolutionize electronics

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(RMIT University) New technique uses liquid metals to create large wafers around 1.5 nanometres in depth to produce integrated circuits.



Printable solar cells just got a little closer

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering) A University of Toronto Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. This alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator.



Breakthrough in 'wonder' materials paves way for flexible tech

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Warwick) Gadgets are set to become flexible, highly efficient and much smaller, following a breakthrough in measuring two-dimensional 'wonder' materials by the University of Warwick.



Cells divide by 'bricklaying on moving scaffolding'

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Delft University of Technology) Researchers have succeeded in finding out how bacteria cut themselves into two daughter cells. The bacteria appear to build a new cell wall working from the outside in with the help of multiple molecular 'bricklayers'. The 'bricklayers' move along the inside of the wall under construction by 'treadmilling'; the building of the cell wall is performed from scaffolding that is continuously being moved at the front, while at the rear it is continuously being dismantled.



New, ultra-flexible probes form reliable, scar-free integration with the brain

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at Austin) Engineering researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have designed ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don't elicit scar formation when implanted. These smaller-than-a-capillary-sized probes could provide the reliable brain interface needed to control prosthetics, or follow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.



Engineers shrink microscope to dime-sized device

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at Dallas) Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have created an atomic force microscope on a chip, dramatically shrinking the size -- and, hopefully, the price tag -- of a high-tech device commonly used to characterize material properties.



A new spin on electronics

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Modern computer technology is based on the transport of electric charge in semiconductors. But this technology's potential will be reaching its limits in the near future, since the components deployed cannot be miniaturized further. But, there is another option: using an electron's spin, instead of its charge, to transmit information. A team of scientists from Munich and Kyoto is now demonstrating how this works.



Good vibrations help reveal molecular details

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Rice University) Rice University scientists develop a method to obtain structural details on molecules in lipid membranes near gold nanoparticles. Their method, called SABERS, could help researchers who study drug delivery and amyloid interactions implicated in neurodegenerative disease.



Nanotechnology based gene editing to eradicate HIV brain reservoir in drug abusers

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Florida International University) The study will use nanotechnology with magneto electric nanoparticles (MENPs) to deliver drugs across the blood brain barrier in conjunction with the Cas9/gRNA gene editing strategy that has shown great promise in finding and destroying copies of HIV that have burrowed into the host's genome.



Metal-organic frameworks used as looms

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ) Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have made major progress in the production of two-dimensional polymer-based materials. To produce cloths from monomolecular threads, the scientists used SURMOFs, i.e. surface-mounted metal-organic frameworks, developed by KIT. They inserted four-armed monomers, i.e. smaller molecular building blocks, into some SURMOF layers. Cross-linking of the monomers then resulted in textiles consisting of interwoven polymer threads. This work is now presented in Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14442)



Is a stretchable smart tablet in our future?

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Michigan State University) Engineering researchers at Michigan State University have developed the first stretchable integrated circuit that is made entirely using an inkjet printer, raising the possibility of inexpensive mass production of smart fabric.



CSIC develops a biosensor able to detect HIV only one week after infection

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)) A team from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has developed a biosensor that can detect type 1 HIV during the first week after infection. The experiments, performed on human serum, detect the p24 antigen, a protein present in the HIV-1 virus. This new technology, which has been patented by CSIC, detects the protein at concentrations 100,000 times lower than in current techniques.



How to roll a nanotube: Demystifying carbon nanotubes' structure control

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Institute for Basic Science) A key advancement in the design of high performance carbon-based electronics.



A new contrast agent for MRI

Tue, 14 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A specially coated iron oxide nanoparticle could provide an alternative to conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In rare cases, the currently used gadolinium agents have been found to produce adverse effects in patients with impaired kidney function.



Turning up the heat for perfect (nano)diamonds

Tue, 14 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American Institute of Physics) For use in quantum sensing, the bulk nanodiamond crystal surrounding the point defect must be highly perfect. Any deviation from perfection will adversely affect the quantum behavior of the material. Highly perfect nanodiamonds are also quite expensive and difficult to make. A cheaper alternative, say researchers, is to take defect-ridden, low-quality, commercially manufactured diamonds, and then 'heal' them. In APL Materials, they describe a method to heal diamond nanocrystals under high-temperature conditions.



NASA and MIT Collaborate to develop space-based quantum-dot spectrometer

Tue, 14 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) A NASA technologist has teamed with the inventor of a new nanotechnology that could transform the way space scientists build spectrometers, the all-important device used by virtually all scientific disciplines to measure the properties of light emanating from astronomical objects, including Earth itself.



Learning how to fine-tune nanofabrication

Tue, 14 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Kyoto University) Researchers developed a new computational method that may be used to produce tiny wires with diameters 1/100,000th that of a piece of hair, or tiny electrical circuits that can fit on the tip of a needle.



A nanofiber matrix for healing

Tue, 14 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Kyoto University) A new nanofiber-on-microfiber matrix could help produce more and better quality stem cells for disease treatment and regenerative therapies.



Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method

Tue, 14 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of British Columbia) University of British Columbia researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant -- the first of its kind in Canada -- that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections.



New method to detect ultrasound with light

Mon, 13 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Northwestern University) A tiny, transparent device that fits into a contact lens can determine the speed of blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate at the back of the eye, helping to diagnose diseases such as macular degeneration.



Now you can 'build your own' bio-bot

Mon, 13 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Illinois College of Engineering) For the past several years, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been developing a class of walking 'bio-bots' powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical and optical pulses. Now, Rashid Bashir's research group is sharing the recipe for the current generation of bio-bots. Their how-to paper is the cover article in Nature Protocols.