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Preview: EurekAlert! - Nanotechnology

EurekAlert! - Nanotechnology



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2018 04:58:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



European science on the map at Davos summit

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(European Research Council) The European Research Council (ERC) will bring cutting-edge science to the forefront at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) from 23 to 26 January in Davos, Switzerland. Using ideas arising from this year's meeting theme: 'Creating a shared future in a fractured world', the ERC's President, Professor Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, and eleven remarkable scientists and scholars will feed into the debate, via fourteen sessions.



New long-acting approach for malaria therapy developed

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Liverpool) A new study, published in Nature Communications, conducted by the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine highlights a new 'long acting' medicine for the prevention of malaria.



Optical nanoscope allows imaging of quantum dots

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Basel) Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. In particular, the new method allows the imaging of quantum dots in a semiconductor chip. Together with colleagues from the University of Bochum, scientists from the University of Basel's Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute reported the findings in the journal Nature Photonics.



Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communication

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Illinois researchers have demonstrated that sound waves can be used to produce ultraminiature optical diodes that are tiny enough to fit onto a computer chip. These devices, called optical isolators, may help solve major data capacity and system size challenges for photonic integrated circuits, the light-based equivalent of electronic circuits, which are used for computing and communications.



Making fuel cells for a fraction of the cost

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Riverside) In a paper published today in Small, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, describe the development of an inexpensive, efficient catalyst material for a type of fuel cell called a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), which turns the chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity and is among the most promising fuel cell types to power cars and electronics.



Pathway opens to minimize waste in solar energy capture

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science) Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science have made an important discovery with significant implications for the future of solar cell material design.



Developing the VTX-1 liquid biopsy system: Fast and label-free enrichment of circulating tumor cells

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)) A new article in the February 2018 issue of SLAS Technology describes a new platform that could change the way cancer is diagnosed and treated by automating the isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) directly from cancer patient blood. This article provides unique insight into the development of a commercial system that has the potential to change the standard of care in cancer diagnosis and treatment.



Virtual reality goes magnetic

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf) The success of Pokémon GO made many people familiar with the concept of 'augmented reality': computer-generated perception blends into the real and virtual worlds. So far, these apps largely used optical methods for motion detection. Physicists from HZDR, IFW Dresden and the University Linz have now developed an ultrathin electronic magnetic sensor that can be worn on skin. Just by interacting with magnetic fields, the device enables a touchless manipulation of virtual and physical objects.



Piecework at the nano assembly line

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots. It allows molecular machines to move a hundred thousand times faster than with the biochemical processes used to date. This makes nanobots fast enough to do assembly line work in molecular factories. The new research results will appear as the cover story on 19th January in the renowned scientific journal Science.



MIT Portugal is developing a compression sleeve for breast cancer patients

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(MIT Portugal Program) The project developed by the MIT Portugal Ph.D. Student at the University of Minho Carlos Gonçalves, was considered the most innovative of the nine projects incubated during 10 weeks by Startup Nano, a pioneer incubation and acceleration program for nanotechnology innovation promoted by Startup Braga in a partnership with the International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory and the Centre for Nanotechnology and Smart Materials (CeNTI) both located in Braga.



A stopwatch for nanofluids: NIST files provisional patent for microflowmeter

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has filed a provisional patent application for a microflow measurement system, about the size of a nickel, that can track the movement of extremely tiny amounts of liquids -- as small as nanoliters per minute. The invention is designed to fill an urgent need in the rapidly expanding field of microfluidics, in which precisely measuring tiny flow rates is critical.



A nanophenomenon that triggers the bone-repair process

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Researchers at the Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia have resolved one of the great unknowns in bone self-repair: how the cells responsible for forming new bone tissue are called into action. Their work reveals the role of an electromechanical phenomenon at the nanoscale, flexoelectricity, as a possible mechanism for stimulating the cell response and guiding it throughout the fracture repair process.



2-D tin (stanene) without buckling: A possible topological insulator

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Nagoya University) An international research team led by Nagoya University synthesized planar stanene: 2-D sheets of tin atoms, analogous to graphene. Tin atoms were deposited onto the Ag(111) surface of silver. The stanene layer remained extremely flat, unlike in previous studies wherein stanene was buckled. This leads to the formation of large area, high quality samples. Stanene is predicted to be a topological insulator, with applications in quantum computing and nanoelectronics.



Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structures

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Northwestern University) Northwestern University researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices -- news to make the ears of Star Trek's Spock perk up. Using DNA as a key tool, the scientists took gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes and arranged them in two and three dimensions to form optically active superlattices. The structures could be programmed to exhibit almost any color across the visible spectrum.



Crystal clear

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)) Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam-sensitive crystalline materials.



Scientists develop a new material for manipulating molecules

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Córdoba) A scientist at the University of Córdoba, working with an international research team, has created a new porous single-crystal material which could have numerous applications in nanotechnology and catalysis.



Ultra-thin memory storage device paves way for more powerful computing

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at Austin) A team of electrical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin, in collaboration with Peking University scientists, has developed the thinnest memory storage device with dense memory capacity, paving the way for faster, smaller and smarter computer chips for everything from consumer electronics to big data to brain-inspired computing.



Ultra-thin optical fibers offer new way to 3-D print microstructures

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(The Optical Society) For the first time, researchers have shown that an optical fiber as thin as a human hair can be used to create microscopic structures with laser-based 3-D printing. The innovative approach might one day be used with an endoscope to fabricate tiny biocompatible structures directly into tissue inside the body.



Physicists succeed in measuring mechanical properties of 2-D monolayer materials

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Saarland University) Working in collaboration with a team from the Leibniz Institute for New Materials, a group of physicists at Saarland University, led by Professor Uwe Hartmann, has for the first time succeeded in characterizing the mechanical properties of free-standing single-atom-thick membranes of graphene.



Small but fast: A miniaturized origami-inspired robot combines micrometer precision with high speed

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Reported in Science Robotics, a new design, the milliDelta robot, developed by Robert Wood's team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) integrates their microfabrication technique with high-performance composite materials that can incorporate flexural joints and bending actuators, the milliDelta can operate with high speed, force, and micrometer precision, which make it compatible with a range of micromanipulation tasks in manufacturing and medicine.



Ultrathin black phosphorus for solar-driven hydrogen economy

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Osaka University) Osaka University researchers combined two different types of 2-D materials -- black phosphorus and bismuth vanadate -- to form a biologically inspired water-splitting catalyst. Normal sunlight could drive the reactions and careful design of the catalyst enabled the expected ratio of hydrogen and oxygen production.



Nanowrinkles could save billions in shipping and aquaculture

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Sydney) Biofouling costs shipping billions in increased fuel costs and affects aquaculture. A nanostructured surface inspired by the carnivorous pitcher plant could slash those costs.



'An outstanding record of acheivement'

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Santa Barbara) UCSB professor and Nobel laureate Shuji Nakamura is awarded the 2018 Zayed Future Energy Prize.



Scientists synthesize nanoparticle-antioxidants to treat strokes and spinal cord injuries

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(National University of Science and Technology MISIS) An international science team has developed an innovative therapeutic complex based on multi-layer polymer nano-structures of superoxide dismutase (SOD). The new substance can be used to effectively rehabilitate patients after acute spinal injuries, strokes, and heart attacks.



UNIST provides new insights into underwater adhesives

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has succeeded in developing a new type of underwater adhesives that are tougher than the natural biological counterpart.