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Last Build Date: Sun, 30 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

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Forget-Me-Nots

Sun, 30 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) Though they belong to a genus with roughly 50 species, most forget-me-nots are small, flat, five-petalled blue flowers with straggly stems. According to legend, the flowers received their name when a medieval knight, picking a posy for his lady by a riverside, fell into the water and drowned under the weight of his armor. As he was drowning, he threw the bouquet to his lover and shouted, "Forget me not!" Christian tradition, however, attributes the flower's name to what event? Discuss



Bog Bodies

Sat, 29 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) Because of their extreme acidity, bogs form a natural preservative and have been found to be a valuable repository of human remains. Over the past two centuries, hundreds of bodies—some of which date back 10,000 years—have been recovered from bogs throughout Europe. These unusually preserved corpses often remain so intact that even intricate details like tattoos and fingerprints can still be distinguished. How did many of the people whose remains have been recovered from the bogs die?



The Hammond Circus Train Wreck

Fri, 28 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) On June 22, 1918, a locomotive pulling 20 empty passenger cars rear-ended the Hagenbeck-Wallace circus train near Hammond, Indiana. The wreck and subsequent fire—likely ignited by the oil lamps in the circus train's wooden sleeping cars—resulted in 86 deaths and 127 injuries. Most of the dead were buried five days later in a nearby cemetery in a section called Showmen's Rest, which had been purchased by the Showmen's League of America just months earlier. What caused the collision?