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Last Build Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 05:00:00 GMT

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Reverse Engineering

Mon, 23 Jan 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) Reverse engineering is the process of discovering the technological principles of a device through analysis of its structure, function, and operation. It often involves taking apart an electronic component, software program, or other device in order to redesign the system for better maintainability or produce a copy of a system without access to the original design. Militaries often use reverse engineering to copy other nations' technology. What are some well-known examples from WWII? Discuss



Microcredit

Sun, 22 Jan 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) Microcredit is the extension of small loans—which are not secured by collateral and often require repayment in weekly installments—to poor individuals for use in income-generating activities that will improve the borrowers' living standards. The concept of microcredit was developed in 1976 by Muhammad Yunus, a Bangladeshi economist, as a means of alleviating poverty and improving the lives of Bangladesh's poorest inhabitants. What group comprises the majority of microcredit borrowers?



Bouncing Betty

Sat, 21 Jan 2017 05:00:00 GMT

(image) The German S-mine, nicknamed the "bouncing betty" by US troops during World War II, is the best-known example of a bounding mine. These land mines are designed to attack unshielded infantry by launching into the air, exploding at waist-height, and propelling shrapnel outward at lethal speeds. One of the definitive weapons of the war, the S-mine often maimed rather than killed its victims and was one of the most feared devices encountered by Allied troops. What did French soldiers dub the S-mine?