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EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2017 20:48:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computing

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A study by MIT researchers shows that collections of ultracold molecules can retain the information stored in them for hundreds of times longer than previously achieved in these materials. These clusters might thus serve as 'qubits,' the basic building blocks of quantum computers.



BTI receives DARPA 'Insect Allies' Award

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Boyce Thompson Institute) Researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), the University of Minnesota, the University of California, Davis, and Iowa State University have received a four-year $10.3 million award to engineer insect-vectored viruses to express genes in maize that can help in combatting disease, drought, and other yield-reducing stresses.



Researchers seek to improve solar cell technology using new materials and nanowires

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Rochester Institute of Technology) Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology are expanding solar cell technology using nanowires to capture more of the sun's energy and transform it into usable electricity. Parsian Mohseni, assistant professor of microsystems engineering, was recently awarded nearly $300,000 for an Early Concepts Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) from the National Science Foundation.



Heavy metals in water meet their match

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Swansea University) A newly developed filter, which removes more than 99 percent of heavy metal toxins from water, shows potential for water remediation in developing nations around the world.The project, developed in collaboration between Swansea University and Rice University, has won both national and international awards.



NASA-NOAA satellite spots Tropical Storm Nesat being sheared

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Nesat being affected by vertical wind shear as it parallels the east coast of the Philippines.



'Dark ecology project' will use past weather radar data to trace bird migrations

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Every spring and fall, billions of birds migrate across the United States, largely unseen under the cover of darkness. Now a team of researchers led by computer scientist Daniel Sheldon at the University of Massachusetts Amherst plan to develop new analytic methods with data collected over the past 20 years -- more than 200 million archived radar scans from the national weather radar network -- to provide powerful new tools for tracking migration.



NASA's Aqua satellite catches Typhoon Noru's 10 mile-wide eye

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the eye of Typhoon Noru as it continued to track west in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The eye appeared to be about 10 nautical miles wide in satellite imagery.



Satellite shows some shear in Hurricane Hilary

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NOAA's GOES-West satellite revealed that vertical wind shear is affecting Hurricane Hilary.



NASA casts an infrared eye on Tropical Storm Irwin

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Infrared imagery from NASA looked at cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Irwin and found the strongest storms in the system were west of its low-level center.



When forest creatures have a problem, they call an engineer

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(New Jersey Institute of Technology) New Jersey Institute of Technology students create a children's book with a focus on STEM.



Simulations signal early success for fractal-based retinal implants

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Oregon) Computer simulations of electrical charges sent to retinal implants based on fractal geometry have University of Oregon researchers moving forward with their eyes focused on biological testing.



UTA professor receives grant to develop device to fight osteoporosis

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas at Arlington) A faculty member at the University of Texas Arlington's College of Nursing and Health Innovation has received a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to design a revolutionary device that could stimulate bone growth and ultimately be used as a weapon against osteoporosis.



Researchers report regenerative effects of low-dose growth factors for bone defect healing

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers compared the effects of three bone growth factors to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)--the most commonly used agent for repair of large bone defects, which is not without risks at the doses required -- and showed significant bone-healing effects including the formation of new blood vessels at low doses relative to BMP2.



Crops that kill pests by shutting off their genes

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Cell Press) Plants are among many eukaryotes that can 'turn off' one or more of their genes by using a process called RNA interference to block protein translation. Researchers are now weaponizing this by engineering crops to produce specific RNA fragments that, upon ingestion by insects, initiate RNA interference to shut down a target gene essential for life or reproduction, killing or sterilizing the insects. The potential of this method is reviewed in Trends in Biotechnology.



New imaging technique overturns longstanding textbook model of DNA folding

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering) Researchers funded by NIH have developed an imaging method that reveals a much more diverse and flexible DNA-protein chromatin chain than previously thought. The result suggests a nimbler structure to regulate gene expression, and provide a mechanism for chemical modifications of DNA to be maintained as cells divide.



Moth larvae testing firm wins grant

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Exeter) A company which provides moth larvae for use in scientific testing -- reducing the need for tests on mice and rats -- has won a £100,000 grant.



Reality check for 'wonder material'

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Groningen) Topological insulators, a class of materials which has been investigated for just over a decade, have been heralded as a new 'wonder material', as has graphene. But so far, topological insulators have not quite lived up to the expectations fueled by theoretical studies. University of Groningen physicists now have an idea about why. Their analysis was published on 27 July in the journal Physical Review B.



The Danish reference genome

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) After close to 5 years of work, the GenomeDenmark consortium has now finalized the efforts to establish a Danish Reference genome. The result is a reference of unrivalled quality and information depth, as compared to other similar international references and studies. Due to the unique and high quality approach, the consortium consisting of three Danish universities and the genomics company BGI Europe has been able to analyze otherwise intractable genomics regions for the first time.



First molecules discovered by next-generation artificial intelligence to be developed into drugs

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine signed a multi-year drug development agreement with the biotechnology company Juvenescence AI Limited. Juvenescence AI will develop the first compounds generated by Insilico's deep-learned drug discovery engines, which trained over structural, functional, and phenotypic data in order to predict the biological activity of compounds. Insilico's platforms incorporate new AI techniques such as Generative Adversarial Networks in order to generate novel compounds with desired pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties.  



Using tweets to decrypt the personality of Donald Trump and other powerful people

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Queensland University of Technology) A detailed, QUT-led study examining the tweets of US President Donald Trump reveal an 'emotionally unstable innovator' using social media as a political tool.



Seeing more with PET scans: New chemistry for medical imaging

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Researchers have found a surprisingly versatile workaround to create chemical compounds that could prove useful for medical imaging and drug development.



High-speed FM-AFM and simulation reveal atomistic dissolution processes of calcite in water

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Kanazawa University) We have developed high-speed frequency modulation AFM (FM-AFM) and enabled atomic-resolution imaging in liquid at ~1 s/frame. With this AFM, we have obtained images revealing the transition region is formed along the step edges. Our simulations suggest the transition region be a Ca(OH)2 monolayer formed as an intermediate state. Thus, our understanding of the calcite dissolution in water is much improved. This FM-AFM will be applicable to various studies on solid-liquid interface dynamic processes.



American Society of Human Genetics 2017 Annual Meeting

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Society of Human Genetics) The American Society of Human Genetics 2017 Annual Meeting will take place Oct. 17-21, 2017, in Orlando, Fla.



New method promises easier nanoscale manufacturing

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Chicago) Scientists at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new way to precisely pattern nanomaterials that could open a new path to the next generation of everyday electronic devices.



Novel perspectives on anti-amyloid treatment for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)) For decades researches have been investigating the underlying foundations of Alzheimer's disease to provide clues for the design of a successful therapy. This week, VIB/KU Leuven scientists have published breakthrough insights in the prestigious journal Cell. A collaboration between Professor Lucía Chávez-Gutiérrez and Professor Bart De Strooper (both VIB-KU Leuven) revealed the molecular basis of the hereditary form of Alzheimer's disease that strikes early in life.