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EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 15:48:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



UTA awarded $6 million in 2016 to find new ways to identify and treat cancer

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at Arlington) The University of Texas at Arlington is becoming a major cancer research institute, receiving more than $6 million dollars in new grants in 2016 to strengthen its integrated cancer research program and improve outcomes across the complete spectrum of the patient experience.



Medical, scientific image analysis vastly improved by new software

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Missouri-Columbia) Researchers at the University of Missouri have developed new software that will analyze any series of images much faster and more accurately than ever before.



New national Lyme Disease biobank to accelerate research by making samples available

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(TellMed Strategies) Bay Area Lyme Foundation, a national organization funding research to make Lyme disease easy to diagnose and simple to cure, announces the launch of the Lyme Disease Biobank, which is the first program to provide researchers with blood and urine samples from people with acute Lyme disease from multiple regions across the country, including the East Coast, West Coast and Upper Midwest.



Designing diagnostic labs that are safe, specific and sustainable

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(DOE/Sandia National Laboratories) To detect an outbreak early -- whether Ebola, Zika or influenza -- healthcare workers must have a local, trustworthy diagnostic lab.



New sensors can detect single protein molecules

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) For the first time, MIT engineers have designed sensors that can detect single protein molecules as they are secreted by cells. These sensors, which consist of modified carbon nanotubes, could help scientists with any application that requires detecting very small amounts of protein, such as tracking viral infection, monitoring cell manufacture of useful proteins, or revealing food contamination.



Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) The presence of water on ancient Mars is a paradox. There's plenty of geographical evidence that rivers periodically flowed across the planet's surface yet Mars should have been too cold to support liquid water at that time. Now, Harvard researchers suggest that early Mars may have been warmed intermittently by a powerful greenhouse effect. Researchers found interactions between methane, CO2 and hydrogen in the early Martian atmosphere may have created warm periods when the planet could support liquid water on the surface.



NAS honors five for major contributions in physical science and engineering

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The National Academy of Sciences will honor five individuals with awards in recognition of their extraordinary scientific achievements in physical science and engineering.



Scientists lay foundations for new type of solar cell

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY) An interdisciplinary team of researchers has laid the foundations for an entirely new type of photovoltaic cell. In this new method, infrared radiation is converted into electrical energy using a different mechanism from that found in conventional solar cells. The mechanism relies on so-called polaron excitations, which combine the excitation of electrons and vibrations of the crystal lattice. The scientists present their work in the journal Advanced Energy Materials.



What holds the heart together

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Our hearts beat a life long. With every beat our heart muscle contracts and expands. How this can work throughout an entire life remains largely a mystery. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now measured the forces acting between the building blocks titin and α-actinin which stabilize the muscle.



New discovery: Nanometric imprinting on fiber

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) Researchers at EPFL have come up with a way of imprinting nanometric patterns on the inside and outside of polymer fibers. These fibers could prove useful in guiding nerve regeneration and producing optical effects, for example, as well as in eventually creating artificial tissue and smart bandages.



Finnish biopharmaceutical company Desentum closes financial round totalling nearly EUR 2 Million

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland) Desentum, a company developing novel allergen immunotherapy -- aka allergy vaccine -- secured funding to advance their treatment targeting birch pollen allergy.



Your (social media) votes matter

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Notre Dame) Tim Weninger, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Notre Dame, conducted two large-scale experiments on Reddit and the results provide insight into how a single up/down vote can influence what content users see on the site.



New project to boost sat-nav positioning accuracy anywhere in world

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Nottingham) A project exploiting global navigation satellite systems to establish the blueprint for the world's most accurate real-time positioning service is to run at the University of Nottingham. The service, to be developed at prototype level, will benefit safety-critical industries like aviation and maritime navigation, as well as high accuracy dependent applications such as offshore drilling and production operations, dredging, construction, agriculture and driverless cars and drones, just to name a few.



Finding new cancer drugs in the neighborhood

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Earlham Institute) Computational biologists have looked at the complex networks of interacting proteins that drive cancer formation, and found that targeting the neighbors of cancer-causing proteins may be just as effective as focusing on the cancer proteins themselves.



Sci-fi holograms a step closer with ANU invention

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Australian National University) Physicists from The Australian National University have invented a tiny device that creates the highest quality holographic images ever achieved, opening the door to imaging technologies seen in science fiction movies such as 'Star Wars.'



New avenue for anti-depressant therapy discovered

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Turku) Finnish researchers have made a ground-breaking discovery revealing new molecular information on how the brain regulates depression and anxiety. They found that a protein called JNK when active, represses the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus. By inhibiting JNK solely in newly generated nerve cells in this region, they were able to alleviate anxiety and depressive behavior in mice.



Why some drivers slow down when using mobile phones: QUT research

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Queensland University of Technology) With mobile phone distracted driving a growing road safety issue, a QUT study reveals why some drivers slow down when using a mobile phone but others don't. Oscar Oviedo-Trespalacios, from QUT's Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety -- Queensland, believes education could help make the practice safer along with changing the design of mobile phones. His paper has just been published in the international journal Traffic Injury Prevention.



New insights into the forms of metal-organic frameworks

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), has introduced a new novel design strategy for synthesizing various forms of metal-organic materials (MOMs).



Don't smile too big to be effective in online marketing ads, study finds

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Kansas) A new study that includes a University of Kansas researcher has found that the level of smile intensity in marketing photos influences how consumers perceive the marketer's competence and warmth, which can lead to different results depending on the context.



Swarm of underwater robots mimics ocean life

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - San Diego) Underwater robots developed by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego offer scientists an extraordinary new tool to study ocean currents and the tiny creatures they transport. Swarms of these underwater robots helped answer some basic questions about the most abundant life forms in the ocean -- plankton.



Consumer-use baby monitors have little proven benefit for healthy infants

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) It sounds simple and harmless -- an electronic sensor attached to a baby's sock that monitors vital signs and alerts parents on their smart phones if, for instance, an infant's oxygen saturation level drops. But pediatric experts argue that such devices may cause undue alarm to parents, with no evidence of medical benefits, especially to healthy babies.



Nanocavity and atomically thin materials advance tech for chip-scale light sources

Mon, 23 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Washington) University of Washington engineers have discovered an important first step towards building electrically pumped nanolasers that are critical to the development of integrated photonic based short-distance optical interconnects and sensors.



Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions

Mon, 23 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Berkeley) UC Berkeley today launched the RISELab, whose mission is to improve how machines make intelligent decisions based on real-time input.



UTA electrical engineering professor earns society's highest honor

Mon, 23 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at Arlington) J.-C. Chiao, a University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineering professor, has been named a Fellow of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.



Monash awarded grant to lead global slum revitalization research

Mon, 23 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Monash University) A global charitable foundation has awarded an AUD $14 million grant to an international research consortium led by Monash University. In one of only four such successes selected from over 600 applications worldwide, the Wellcome Trust (UK) awarded the prestigious grant to the Monash-led team for a research project that will potentially improve the lives of the more than a billion people living in urban slums globally.