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EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Wed, 23 Aug 2017 16:48:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



USC researcher identifies a new way to treat HIV

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Southern California) Medical treatment that targets human proteins rather than ever-mutating viruses may one day help HIV-positive people whose bodies have built a resistance to 'cocktails' currently used to keep them healthy. I-Chueh Huang has spent 13 years researching how the human immune system controls viral infections. His lab recently pinpointed a protein variant that can be targeted to prevent the human immunodeficiency virus from harming HIV-positive individuals.



Anglers' delight as algal blooms breakthrough highlights innovative science

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(John Innes Centre) Millions of fish-deaths caused by toxic Prymnesium algal blooms could be prevented with the application of a household chemical best known for bleaching hair, breakthrough research has revealed.



NASA sees Tropical Depression Harvey's rebirth

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the cloud top temperatures of newly reborn Tropical Depression Harvey.



Putting it to the test

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Utah) University of Utah researchers led by chemical engineering and chemistry professor Marc Porter and U surgeon and professor Courtney Scaife have developed a rapid portable screening test for liver cancer that doesn't involve sending a specimen to a blood lab and cuts the wait time for results from two weeks to two minutes. This inexpensive test can be administered wherever the patient is, which will be valuable for developing nations with little access to hospitals.



Development of games prevents cognitive decline in elderly people

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Development of games prevents cognitive decline in elderly people. The study involved a control group and a third group of people who learned to play video games.



Use of brain-computer interface, virtual avatar could help people with gait disabilities

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Houston) Researchers from the University of Houston have shown for the first time that the use of a brain-computer interface augmented with a virtual walking avatar can control gait, suggesting the protocol may help patients recover the ability to walk after stroke, some spinal cord injuries and certain other gait disabilities.



NASA's Aqua Satellite spots Typhoon Hato's Landfall in China

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Hato just hours after it made landfall in southeastern China.



Tropical Storm Kenneth battered by wind shear on satellite imagery

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Satellite imagery revealed that wind shear and cooler sea surface temperatures have taken their toll on the once hurricane Kenneth. Kenneth has now weakened to a tropical storm and continues to be torn apart as seen in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite.



New prospects on the spread of tumors

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Technische Universität Dresden) Scientists of Technische Universität Dresden, the University of Applied Sciences HTW Dresden and the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research Heidelberg have gained new prospects on the invasion mechanism of malignant tumours using mathematical models and computer simulations.



The breaking point

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Weizmann Institute of Science) What, exactly, happens right around the edge of the crack, in the area in which those large stresses are concentrated? Professor Eran Bouchbinder of the Weizmann Institute of Science's Chemical Physics Department, explains that the processes that take place in this region are universal -- they occur in the same way in different materials and under different conditions.



Lego proteins revealed

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Weizmann Institute of Science) According to Dr. Emmanuel Levy and his group in the Weizmann Institute of Science's Structural Biology Department, Lego-like assemblies should have formed relatively frequently during evolution. Could this assembly method be common, or even easy to reproduce? Their answer, which was recently published in Nature, may have implications for both biological research and nanoscience.



DNA sensor system developed for specific and sensitive measurement of cancer-relevant enzyme activity

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Aarhus University) The development of DNA sensor systems is of great importance for advances in medical science. Now another piece of the puzzle for the development of personalized medicine has been found with the results of a highly sensitive monitoring of cancer-related topoisomerase II enzymes.



Wing shape helps swifts glide through storms, study suggests

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Edinburgh) They are among nature's best fliers, spending most of their time in flight ... now scientists have shed new light on how swifts can glide with ease, whatever the weather.



'Shapeshifter' that regulates blood clotting is visually captured for the first time

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Boston Children's Hospital) It has not been possible to witness exactly how von Willebrand factor senses and harnesses mechanical forces in our blood vessels -- until now. A team in the Boston Children's Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the HMS Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology has revealed exactly how VWF stops bleeding from cuts and bruises. Cutting-edge fluorescence imaging and microfluidic tools allowed them to capture images of individual VWF molecules elongating and relaxing in response to blood flow.



VTT and Fläkt Woods have developed an intelligent flow sensor for demand-controlled ventilation -- high-quality indoor air, energy efficiency

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland) VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Fläkt Woods Oy have developed a flow sensor which enables ventilation to adapt to actual demand, thereby improving indoor air quality and energy efficiency.



Development of screening tests for endocrine-disrupting chemicals

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Wiley) A new article published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry looks under the hood of how US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientists develop and validate testing methods that support regulatory decisions.



Treating arthritis with algae

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) Researchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and the Norwegian research institute SINTEF are pursuing a new approach to treating arthritis. This is based on a polysaccharide, a long-chain sugar molecule, originating from brown algae. When chemically modified, this 'alginate' reduces oxidative stress, has an anti-inflammatory effect in cell culture tests and suppresses the immune reaction against cartilage cells, thereby combating the causes of arthritis. The research is, however, still in its infancy.



A more complete picture of the nano world

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Lehigh University) Aerosol particles, says Xiaoji Xu, assistant professor of chemistry at Lehigh University, are among the many materials whose chemical and mechanical properties cannot be fully measured until scientists develop a better method of studying materials at the microscale as well as the much smaller nanoscale (1 nm is one-billionth of a meter). Xu has developed such a method and utilized it to perform noninvasive chemical imaging of a variety of materials, as well as mechanical mapping with a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers.



New use of blood cleaning device saves high-risk patients with liver failure

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Maryland Medical Center) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers report that a device that removes toxins from the blood can also effectively provide a bridge to liver transplantation or buy time for a traumatically injured liver to heal, suggesting broader uses for the device than previously thought.



Artificial intelligence helps with earlier detection of skin cancer

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Waterloo) New technology being developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo and the Sunnybrook Research Institute is using artificial intelligence (AI) to help detect melanoma skin cancer earlier.



More education linked to better cognitive functioning later in life

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Lumosity) New research from the University of California, Berkeley, analyzed the performance of around 196,000 Lumosity subscribers to quantify the cumulative effect of attending school on cognition, finding that more education is linked to better cognitive functioning later in life.



'Nano-hashtags' could provide definite proof of Majorana particles

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Eindhoven University of Technology) In Nature today an international team of researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, Delft University of Technology and the University of California - Santa Barbara presents an advanced quantum chip that will be able to provide definitive proof of the mysterious Majorana particles and a crucial step towards their use as a building block for future quantum computers.



Major leap towards data storage at the molecular level

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Manchester) Now scientists at the University of Manchester have proved that storing data with a class of molecules known as single-molecule magnets is more feasible than previously thought.



Confederate submarine crew killed by their own weapon

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Duke University) A powerful shockwave from the H.L. Hunley's own weapon killed the crew of the Confederate combat submarine as it sunk a Union ship. This finding comes from a four-year research project that involved repeatedly setting blasts near a scale model, shooting authentic weapons at historically accurate iron plate and many calculations on human respiration and the transmission of blast energy by Rachel Lance, a 2016 Ph.D. graduate of Duke Engineering.



Fatal attractions for disease-carrying mosquitoes

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(ISCA Technologies Inc.) ISCA Technologies, a California-based biotech firm, is working on several innovations to stop outbreaks of malaria-spreading mosquitos before they occur by using pheromones and other naturally occurring attractants.