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Preview: EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science

EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 26 May 2017 04:48:02 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Government transparency limited when it comes to America's conserved private lands

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new study led by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison examined why private-land conservation data is sometimes inaccessible and found that limited capacity within some federal agencies as well as laws prohibiting others from disclosing certain information are to blame.



Research could bring 'drastically' higher resolution to your TV and smartphone

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Central Florida) By developing a way to tune the color of individual pixels, researchers have eliminated the need for subpixels -- allowing a greater density of pixels and much higher resolution for video displays.



Preliminary: BRCA variations may work alongside COMT variation to reduce breast cancer

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(George Washington University) George Washington University researchers, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, find through looking at genetic data sets of presumed cancer-free women who carry BRCA 1/2 variants, the co-occurrence of a rare COMT genetic variant in some women. This research outlines a strategy for looking at large genetic data sets for clues as to why a genetic carrier may never develop the associated diseases.



The best teams of the engineering competition 'Capture the Flag' were awarded

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University) On May 24, at the plenary session of the International Polytechnic Week, the winners of the students' competition 'Capture the Flag' organized by Siemens LLC with the support of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, were awarded. More than 60 students from various universities of St. Petersburg participated in the competition. Altogether, 11 teams competed in the framework of the event, eight of them successfully reached the finals.



Expressing genetic interactions through music

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Babraham Institute) An artistic collaboration between musician Max Cooper, visual artist Andy Lomas and researchers from the Babraham Institute in Cambridge has produced a new way to experience the elegance of DNA organization. Chromos captures the microscopic elegance of gene organization using evocative soundscapes.The music is inspired by the research of Dr Csilla Varnai at the Babraham Institute. Her work in computer modelling recreates how genetic information, recorded on DNA, is organised within living cells.



Solving the riddle of the snow globe

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) A new Tel Aviv University study finds the sedimentation of asymmetric objects in liquid is very different from that of symmetrical objects like spheres. The research may have practical applications in improving water treatment and industrial processes.



MIT researchers engineer shape-shifting food

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers from MIT's Tangible Media Group have concocted something akin to edible origami, in the form of flat sheets of gelatin and starch that, when submerged in water, instantly sprout into three-dimensional structures, including common pasta shapes such as macaroni and rotini.



eLearning Stakeholders and Researchers Summit 2017 is held in Moscow for the first time

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Research University Higher School of Economics) National Research University Higher School of Economics, in cooperation with the global online learning platform Coursera, is holding eLearning Stakeholders and Researchers Summit 2017 (eSTARS) -- the international conference focused on scientific and practical aspects of online education on Oct. 10-11, 2017, in Moscow.



Researchers find new way to control light with electric fields

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(North Carolina State University) Researchers from North Carolina State University have discovered a technique for controlling light with electric fields.



New metamaterial-enhanced MRI technique tested on humans

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(ITMO University) Scientists from the Netherlands and Russia designed and tested a new metasurface-based technology for enhancing the local sensitivity of MRI scanners on humans for the first time. The metasurface consists of thin resonant strips arranged periodically. Placed under a patient's head, it provided much higher signals from the local brain region. The results published in Scientific Reports, show that the use of metasurfaces can potentially reduce image acquisition time, thus improving comfort for patients, or acquire higher resolution images for better disease diagnosis.



Ag/ZnO-Nanorods Schottky diodes based UV-PDs are fabricated and tested

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(World Scientific) The current-voltage characteristics of the Ag/ZnO-Nanorod Schottky contacts were studied at forward applied bias over the range 0 V to 1 V, under dark and UV light. The dark and photocurrents were 1.29E-5A and 2.16E-5, respectively, and the contrast ratio (ratio of photocurrent to dark current) was 1.67 at +1.0 V for these devices. The results show that these devices could be useful for cost-effective and low-voltage UV detection applications.



Elsevier adds ClinicalKey to Research4Life access program for developing countries

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Elsevier) Elsevier, the information analytics company specializing in science and health, will add ClinicalKey to its global research and health resources available through Research4Life starting in June 2017. The expansion of the Research4Life access program with ClinicalKey benefits healthcare professionals in under-resourced, low- and middle-income communities around the globe.



Development of compound that captures specific alkane gas molecule with its color change

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Kanazawa University) A ring-shaped molecule based on pillar[5]arene conjugated with benzoquinone has been developed, the powder of which selectively captures n-alkane gas molecule by host-guest complexation but not branched or cyclic alkane molecule. Upon forming such host-guest complex, its color changed from dark-brown to light-red, a chromophore-like behavior. The complex is highly-stable at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure. Thus, the new compound may serve as a sensor and/or a storage material for specific alkane molecules.



New drug therapy could improve brain function and life expectancy of ALS patients

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) The Ben-Gurion U. researcher successfully redesigned a portion of MabThera, an FDA-approved drug used to treat certain autoimmune diseases and types of cancer, into a new molecule to treat ALS. 'Our experimental results on ALS transgenic mice showed a significant increase in life expectancy,' says Dr. Lichtenstein. 'Since the drug is already approved, we believe that we will only need limited preclinical testing to reach the clinical phase earlier than other initiatives.'



Researchers develop magnetic switch to turn on and off a strange quantum property

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) A NIST-led research team has developed the first switch that turns on and off a quantum behavior called the Berry phase. The discovery promises to provide new insight into the fundamentals of quantum theory and may lead to new quantum electronic devices.



US nuclear regulators greatly underestimate potential for nuclear disaster

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission relied on faulty analysis to justify its refusal to adopt a critical measure for protecting Americans from nuclear-waste fires at dozens of reactor sites around the country, according to an article in the May 26 issue of Science magazine. Radioactivity from such a fire could force approximately 8 million people to relocate and result in $2 trillion in damages.



High pressure key to lighter, stronger metal alloys, Stanford scientists find

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences ) Subjecting complex metal mixtures called high-entropy alloys to extremely high pressures could lead to finer control over the arrangement of their atoms, which in turn can result in more desirable properties.



UW engineers borrow from electronics to build largest circuits in eukaryotic cells

Thu, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Washington) UW synthetic biology researchers have demonstrated a new method for digital information processing in living cells, analogous to the logic gates used in electric circuits. The circuits are the largest ever published to date in eurkaryotic cells and a key step in harnessing the potential of cells as living computers that can respond to disease, efficiently produce biofuels or develop plant-based chemicals.



Regenerative medicine researcher's startup companies give hope to patients

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Virginia Tech) Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientist takes commercial route to develop new treatments for wound healing and cancer.



Novel technology applied to replace aging bridge

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Delaware) The University of Delaware has collaborated with state transportation officials on the design and construction of a new bridge, which continues to be monitored via a custom-designed instrumentation system. The old bridge was replaced with new technology known as a geosynthetic reinforced soil integrated bridge system (GRS-IBS).



New brain mapping tool produces higher resolution data during brain surgery

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - San Diego) Researchers have developed a new device to map the brain during surgery and distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues. The device provides higher resolution neural readings than existing tools used in the clinic and could enable doctors to perform safer, more precise brain surgeries.



Printed, flexible and rechargeable battery can power wearable sensors

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - San Diego) Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first printed battery that is flexible, stretchable and rechargeable. The zinc batteries could be used to power everything from wearable sensors to solar cells and other kinds of electronics. The work appears in the April 19, 2017 issue of Advanced Energy Materials.



New modified toy car designs offer children with disabilities more options

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Oregon State University) Researchers at Oregon State University have developed two new modified toy car designs for children with disabilities in an effort to encourage them to further explore, play, and engage in physical and social activities.



TSRI scientists find simple copper complex shuts down botulinum neurotoxin poisoning

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Scripps Research Institute) Clostridium botulinum is the bacterium that causes the neurointoxication, which produces one of the most potent toxins on earth and is classified as a potential bioterrorism threat. While no cure exists -- and botulism treatment options are limited -- a serendipitous discovery by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) may provide a new therapy that can stop the neurotoxin even in its more severe, advanced stages of action.



Learning about nutrition from 'food porn' and online quizzes

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard and Columbia researchers designed an online experiment to test how people learn about nutrition in the context of a social, online quiz.