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Preview: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science

EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2016 03:39:00 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Application of the mathematics of harmony -- Golden non-Euclidean geometry in modern math

Fri, 09 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(World Scientific) A masterful exploration of history and the essence of mathematical reasoning to the future development of modern science and mathematics.



Researchers outline barriers to treating fear and anxiety

Fri, 09 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(New York University) A misunderstanding of how the certain parts of the brain function has hampered the creation of pharmaceuticals to effectively address fear and anxiety disorders, a pair of researchers has concluded.



Healthy ageing. Three days reality check.

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Biogerontology Research Foundation) The Eurosymposium on Healthy Ageing (EHA) www.eha-heales.org is an international event that provides a unique opportunity for researchers, government officials, biotech executives, entrepreneurs, and non-governmental institutions from around the world to meet, network, and forge new scientific collaborations.



Patient advocacy groups, industry and individuals join groundbreaking public-private partnership to continue advancing critical Alzheimer's disease research

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Rubenstein Associates, Inc.) The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) announces that patient advocacy groups, private foundations, companies and individual donors have again united in the fight against Alzheimer's disease by donating more than $14 million to launch the third phase of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI3).



Global DS Foundation funds research showing impact of trisomy 21 on interferon signaling

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Global Down Syndrome Foundation) Renowned Crnic Institute scientist, Dr. Espinosa, has found the interferon response is constantly activated in people with Down syndrome causing the body to fight a viral infection when such infection doesn't exist. Constant immune system activation would likely cause damaging side-effects and may explain cognitive deficit, increased prevalence of autoimmune disorders, higher risk of Alzheimer's disease, and protection against solid tumors. Testing FDA-approved drugs that block the interferon response could be an important next step.



Mouse model points to potential drug target for increasing social interaction in autism

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A study of a new mouse model identifies a drug target that has the potential to increase social interaction in individuals with some forms of autism spectrum disorder.



Experts urge a defensive stance in efforts against antimicrobial resistance

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Burness) In a Comment in Nature, CDDEP Director Ramanan Laxminarayan and other experts in antimicrobial resistance suggest that the United Nations should reframe global efforts against antimicrobial resistance by adopting a defensive stance. The suggested focus should be in building the resilience of society and maintaining diversity in the 'global microbiome'-- only a fraction of which causes human or animal disease.



IU and Regenstrief's OPTIMISTIC named one of 20 top geriatric studies of 21st century

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Indiana University) The OPTIMISTIC study, an innovative program developed and implemented by clinician-researchers from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute to prevent unnecessary hospitalizations of long stay nursing home residents, has been recognized by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society as one of 20 articles published from 2000 to 2015 that have shaped the field of geriatrics.



Paying do-gooders makes them less persuasive

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Association for Psychological Science) People who receive a financial incentive to raise money for a charity they care about are actually less effective in soliciting donations, even when potential donors have no idea that incentives were involved, according to new findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research suggests that incentives may have this effect because they result in the fundraisers coming off as less sincere to the people they're trying to persuade.



Life after Fitbit: Appealing to those who feel guilty vs. free

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Washington) Is life better or worse after sticking your Fitbit in a drawer? UW researchers surveyed hundreds of people who had abandoned self-tracking tools and found emotions ranged from guilt to indifference to relief that the tracking experience was over.



Linking perception to action

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Santa Barbara) A neuroscientist maps brain cell activity that occurs during the delay between sensation and action.



Can an integrative medicine approach help prevent medical errors?

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the US according to a published estimate, but many could be prevented with a shift in the medical industry from a production-driven to an integrative model of healthcare. The emphasis should be on value-based decision-making that takes into account the whole patient, says Editor-in-Chief John Weeks in an editorial in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.



How effective is a smartphone app in teaching sexual health to teen girls?

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Care New England ) New research has been published that suggests that a smartphone application vs. traditional methods can potentially connect teenage girls to more information about sexual health.



Sharing stories synchronizes group memories

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) People synchronize what they remember and what they forget after sharing memories with one another, according to Princeton University-led research. The findings, published in PNAS, have an applied scope: policymakers could use them to bust myths about certain topics, like how Zika virus is spread.



Study reveals how new experiences boost memory formation

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Edinburgh) Most people remember where they were when the twin towers collapsed in New York. New research reveals why that may be the case. A study led by the University of Edinburgh has shed new light on the biological mechanisms that drive the process, known as flashbulb memory.



Borderline personality disorder -- as scientific understanding increases, improved clinical management needed

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Wolters Kluwer Health) Even as researchers gain new insights into the neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD), there's a pressing need to improve diagnosis and management of this devastating psychiatric condition. A scientific and clinical research update on BPD is presented in the September/October special issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer.



New Kuwaiti law on the collection of human DNA threatens scientific collaboration

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(European Society of Human Genetics) The law requiring compulsory DNA testing of all Kuwaiti residents, as well as of all those visiting the country for whatever purpose, is a serious assault on the right to privacy of individuals, and is also likely to lead to the isolation of Kuwaiti scientific research and researchers, according to the European Society of Human Genetics.



New suicide prevention strategies for homosexual and transgender youth

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Homosexual, bisexual, and transgender youth tend to have a higher risk for suicide-related thoughts and behaviors, but research on interventions to prevent suicide among sexual and gender minority (SGM) youth has been limited. New research should focus on interventions specifically targeted to SGM youth and their unique and diverse challenges, including health needs, according to a study published in LGBT Health.



Researchers uncover new potential genetic links to common brain disorder

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Maryland School of Medicine) An international group of researchers has for the first time identified a set of 30 inherited recessive genes that play a role in intellectual disability, a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects as many as 213 million people around the world.



Curious travelers: Your pictures can help preserve world heritage

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Bradford) Archaeologists from the UK are calling on members of the public to help them preserve the legacy of some of the world's most important monuments and historic sites, including those most at risk in Syria and Libya.



Kill them with cuteness: The adorable thing bats do to catch prey

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(PLOS) A Johns Hopkins University researcher noticed the bats he works with cocked their heads to the side, just like his pet pug. As the article publishing in open-access journal PLOS Biology details, using high-tech recording devices, Wohlgemuth determined that a bat's fetching head waggles and ear wiggles sync with the animal's sonar vocalizations to help it hunt. The finding demonstrates how movement in bats can enhance signals used by senses like sight and hearing.



'Deeply unsettling' weight discrimination in the workplace highlighted

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Strathclyde) Women face weight-based prejudice in the workplace -- even when their body mass index is within the healthy range, research led by a University of Strathclyde academic has found.



The impact of extreme exercise on breathing in GB Olympic boxers and swimmers

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Kent) Researchers from the School of Sport and Exercise Science (SSES) investigated elite British athletes from both swimming and boxing and their research suggests asthma related breathing problems should not be a barrier to sporting success, as long as they are well managed and controlled.



Hip fractures: Most elderly unlikely to fully recover

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Springer) One in every two older persons who have suffered a hip fracture will never be as physically active and independent as they were before. The odds are even lower for the very old and those with dementia or other ailments, says Victoria Tang of the University of California in the US. She led an observational study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer.



Sensory cells of the balance organ can regenerate after injury

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Umea University) Research at Umeå University in Sweden shows that in the utricle -- which is one of the internal ear's balance organs in mammals -- epithelial cells can be regenerated, resulting in healthy sensory hair cells and surrounding supporting cells.