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Preview: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science

EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 16:39:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



From the classroom to the NICU: Real-world neuroscience opening new avenues

Sun, 26 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Cognitive Neuroscience Society) When going to the movies with friends, one small action can make a big difference to be on the same page after the movie: eye contact. A simple conversation before the movie sets you up to be more in sync with your friends after the movie. These findings, being presented at the CNS conference in San Francisco, come from an unlikely place -- not the lab, or even a movie theater, but a classroom.



Identifying genes key to human memory: Insights from genetics and cognitive neuroscience

Sun, 26 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Cognitive Neuroscience Society) Researchers have identified more than 100 genes important for memory in people. The study, being presented at the CNS annual conference in San Francisco, is the first to identify correlations between gene data and brain activity during memory processing, providing a new window into human memory. It is part of the nascent but growing field of 'imaging genetics,' which aims to relate genetic variation to variation in brain anatomy and function.



New gene discovered associated with Tau, a common form of brain pathology

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Rush University Medical Center) Investigators at Rush University Medical Center and the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that accumulates in several different conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that occurs with repeated head injuries.



The Role of Context in Ethnic/Racial Identity Among Minority Youth

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Society for Research in Child Development) This special section of Child Development, edited by Drs. Eleanor Seaton, Stephen Quintana, Maykel Verkuyten and Gilbert Gee, adds important information to the research in this area. It includes articles from national and international scholars on how policies, relationships, and locations can influence the development and content of ethnic/racial identity among youth.



Schizophrenia-associated gene research funded by $3.1 million NIH grant

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Emory Health Sciences) A research team at Emory University is embarking on a multipronged study of 3q29 deletion syndrome, a genetic mutation associated with a 40-fold increased risk for schizophrenia and a range of other neuropsychiatric conditions including mild to moderate intellectual disability, autism and anxiety.



Study confirms prescription weight-loss medication helps with opiate addiction recovery

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have confirmed that a prescription weight-loss pill decreases the urge to use opiates such as oxycodone. In a study published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, the researchers led by UTMB scientist Kathryn Cunningham found that the drug, lorcaserin, reduced the use and craving for the opioid oxycodone in preclinical studies.



Most Lithuanians still emigrate for economic reasons

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Kaunas University of Technology) Independent research, initiated and carried out by Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) interdisciplinary migration research cluster shows that introduction of Euro in Lithuania coincides with the fourth wave of emigration. In 2015, more than 40 thousand people left Lithuania, and in 2016 -- around 50 thousand.



Spread of ages is key to impact of disease, animal study finds

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Edinburgh) How a disease outbreak affects a group of animals depends on the breakdown of ages in the population, research has shown.



Academics call for Parliament to tackle the privatization of NHS

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Newcastle University) A bill to prevent the privatisation of NHS services and to reinstate the NHS in England, supported and written by Newcastle University academics, is scheduled to be debated today.



The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP): A new model that addresses limitations of traditional taxonomies

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Psychological Association) An inaugural publication from an international consortium of psychologists and psychiatrists offers a new approach to diagnosing mental disorders. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) -- introduced by Dr. Roman Kotov and colleagues (Online First) in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology -- is a new, dimensional classification system of a wide range of psychiatric problems that was developed to reflect the state-of-the art scientific evidence.



Brain scans may help clinicians choose talk therapy or medication treatment for depression

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Emory Health Sciences) Researchers have found that specific patterns of activity on brain scans may help clinicians identify whether psychotherapy or antidepressant medication is more likely to help individual patients recover from depression.



OFC concludes featuring the evolution of silicon photonics, 5G networking and the Internet of Things

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Optical Society) OFC, the world's leading conference and exhibition for optical communications and networking professionals, concludes with 663 exhibiting companies, over 1,100 peer-reviewed papers and 14,500 attendees.



Most remaining smokers in US have low socioeconomic status

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) After decades of declining US smoking rates overall, most remaining smokers have low income, no college education, no health insurance or a disability. About 15 percent of US adults -- more than 36 million -- continue to smoke cigarettes. Half to three-fourths of them have one or more low-socioeconomic disadvantages, and the lowest socioeconomic categories have the highest smoking rates. The study concludes that continuing tobacco use is now concentrated among the least advantaged portion of society.



Predatory lizard enters Brazil clandestinely

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Anolis porcatus, a species native to Cuba, has been identified in several areas near the Port of Santos on the São Paulo coast, in Brazil. Its introduction into this area may threaten the survival of local lizard populations. A DNA study suggests these lizards could have come from Florida, where they're also exotic, rather than directly from Cuba.



Inactive teens develop lazy bones, study finds

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of British Columbia) Inactive teens have weaker bones than those who are physically active, according to a new study.



Overcoming workplace barriers to breastfeeding -- review and recommendations in The Nurse Practitioner

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Wolters Kluwer Health) For mothers of new infants, going back to work may pose a number of obstacles to continued breastfeeding. Workplace policies affecting the ability to breastfeed -- and the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in helping to overcome those obstacles -- are the topic of a special article in The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer.



Freestanding emergency departments in Texas deliver costly care, 'sticker shock'

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Rice University) The rapid growth of freestanding emergency departments in Texas has been accompanied by an equal increase in use at relatively high prices that lead to sizable out-of-pocket costs to patients, according to new research by experts at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas.



Research consortium develops evidence-based diagnostic model for mental illness

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University at Buffalo) Researchers haves has developed a new, evidence-based alternative to the mental health field's long-established diagnostic tools for the classification, treatment, and research of mental disorders. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) addresses what the authors say are limitations to the reliability and validity of traditional models.



Keck School of Medicine of USC receives grant for esophageal cancer research

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Southern California - Health Sciences) The Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) has been awarded a grant from the DeGregorio Family Foundation and Price Family Foundation to support research aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of how gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) increases the risk of developing esophageal cancer.



Poor oral health and food scarcity major contributors to malnutrition in older adults

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of North Carolina Health Care) A new study by UNC School of Medicine researchers suggests that food scarcity and poor oral health are major risk factors for malnutrition that leads an older adult -- already at high risk of functional decline, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality -- to land in the emergency department.



Plenaries at American Chemical Society meeting focus on energy, materials, partnerships

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) Scientists, in four plenary talks, will explore a variety of subjects related to the 'Advanced Materials, Technologies, Systems & Processes' theme of the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place April 2 to 6 in San Francisco.



SLU scientists take aim at diabetes and obesity with exercise in a pill

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Saint Louis University) With a series of new grants, Saint Louis University researchers will develop the potential of two nuclear receptors that control muscle metabolism.



Sleep deprivation impairs ability to interpret facial expressions

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Arizona) When you're tired, your ability to interpret subtle expressions of happiness and sadness can begin to deteriorate, researchers found. However, the ability to read more primitive survival-based emotions, like anger and fear, remains intact.



Limiting protein reduces post-heart attack injury in mice

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Missouri-Columbia) According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 735,000 Americans experience a heart attack each year. Opening a blocked coronary artery to restore blood flow to the heart prevents sudden cardiac death. However, doing so also triggers cardiac damage through oxidative stress and inflammation, which eventually can lead to heart failure. Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified a protein that can be targeted to decrease post-heart attack injury and prevent heart failure in a mouse model.



Study: Pharmacies should proactively offer naloxone to all patients who meet evidence-based criteria

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Boston University Medical Center) Pharmacies should proactively offer naloxone, a drug that blocks or reverses the effects of overdose, to patients taking opioid medications through universal opt-out strategies in an effort to get the life-saving drug into the hands of more people who need it, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center (BMC).