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Preview: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health

EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2017 14:33:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Digital assay of circulating tumor cells may improve diagnosis, monitoring of liver cancer

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Massachusetts General Hospital) Use of an advanced form of the commonly used polymerase chain reaction method to analyze circulating tumor cells may greatly increase the ability to diagnose early-stage cancer, increasing the likelihood of successful treatment.



Mayo researchers identify mechanism of oncogene action in lung cancer

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Mayo Clinic) Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper published this week in Cancer Cell, Mayo Clinic researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation.



'FishTaco' sorts out who is doing what in your microbiome

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) How much do different bacterial species contribute to disease-associated imbalances in the human microbiome? A new computational method, dubbed FishTaco, is helping find out. The method looks at which microbes are present and what they are doing. Understanding imbalances in say, the human gut microbiome, might eventually suggest new ways to manage obesity, type 2 diabetes, or autoimmune diseases.



Oregon faces obstacles expanding health insurance to all residents, study finds

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(RAND Corporation) Creating a Medicare-like public insurance option for residents of Oregon may be the easiest system to extend health coverage to more people in the state, but other proposals such as single-payer plan or a system to provide limited private insurance to all residents would eventually cover more people, according to a new study. Both proposals to create universal coverage would face substantial hurdles in obtaining needed federal waivers.



Brain stimulation used like a scalpel to improve memory

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Northwestern University) Scientists showed for the first time that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel to affect a specific improvement in precise memory. Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing the building you are looking for has a specific color, shape and location, rather than simply knowing the part of town it's in. Precise memory is crucial for normal functioning, and it is often lost in people with memory disorders.



As cells age, the fat content within them shifts

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University at Buffalo) As cells age and stop dividing, their fat content changes, along with the way they produce and break down fat and other molecules classified as lipids. By providing broad insights into the connection between lipids and cellular aging, the findings open the door for additional research that could support the development of lipid-based approaches to preventing cell death or hastening it in cancerous tumors.



Access to anesthesia care is not improved when states eliminate physician supervision

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American Society of Anesthesiologists) Patient access to anesthesia care for seven common surgical procedures is not increased when states 'opt-out' of the Medicare rule that requires anesthesia to be administered with physician supervision, reports a study published in the online first edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.



Press registration now open for 2017 Experimental Biology meeting

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Experimental Biology 2017) Press registration is open for the 2017 Experimental Biology meeting (EB 2017) to be held in Chicago April 22-26. With more than 14,000 attendees and thousands of scientific sessions, EB 2017 is a research bonanza you won't want to miss.



Why the lights don't dim when we blink

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Berkeley) Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. So why doesn't blinking plunge us into intermittent darkness and light? New research led by the University of California, Berkeley, shows that the brain works extra hard to stabilize our vision despite our fluttering eyes.



Insecticides mimic melatonin, creating higher risk for diabetes

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University at Buffalo) Synthetic chemicals commonly found in insecticides and garden products bind to the receptors that govern our biological clocks, University at Buffalo researchers have found.



What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs, according to a study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A study published this week in eLife reveals the mechanism for this sleepiness.



Advances in imaging detect blunt cerebrovascular injury more frequently in trauma patients

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American College of Surgeons) Advances in diagnostic imaging technology have meant that more trauma patients are being diagnosed with blunt cerebrovascular injuries, and as a result, stroke and related death rates in these patients have declined significantly over the past 30 years. These changes are due to the evolution of imaging technology, namely CT-scanning, and its wide availability in hospitals large and small, according to a new study from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis.



Wayne State University research team develops new diagnostic tool to identify tinnitus in animals

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A team of researchers from Wayne State University has developed a behavioral tool that may significantly aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tinnitus, ultimately leading to new drugs and treatment methods.



1 percent of Cambodian children live in orphanages yet have a living parent

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Nearly 80 percent of adolescents living in Cambodia's orphanages have one or more living parents, according to a study by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. This is the first research of its kind to assess the literacy and health of children living outside of family care in Cambodia.



A role for mutated blood cells in heart disease?

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Boston University Medical Center) A new study provides some of the first links between relatively common mutations in the blood cells of elderly humans and atherosclerosis.



Advanced cookstoves provide environmental benefits, but less than expected

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(North Carolina State University) Researchers have found that while advanced wood-burning cookstoves can provide benefits to the environment and climate, these benefits are less than expected due to higher emissions measured in the field compared to laboratory settings. The study, conducted in rural Malawi, found that pollutant emissions from these stoves were much higher than was reported in laboratory testing, due in part to how the stoves were being used.



Great differences in the view of withdrawing futile intensive care

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Umea University) The views among physicians and the general public when it comes to deciding whether to withhold or withdraw treatment of terminally ill patients differ greatly. However, in a hypothetical case study at Umeå University in Sweden of a clearly hopeless medical case, great unanimity among physicians' and the public's assessments could be seen with regards to cancelling treatment or offering relief at the final stages of life.



'Marine repairmen' -- new research shows limpets are construction workers of the seashore

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Trinity College Dublin) New research shows that limpets can repair their damaged shells with biological material so that they are as strong as the originals. However, they are still vulnerable to multiple impacts and 'spalling' -- a well-known cause of failure in engineering materials such as concrete.



Statins could halt vein blood clots, research suggests

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Leicester) Statins could hold the key to eradicating one of the most preventable causes of hospital deaths after researchers uncovered a new role for the cholesterol-lowering pill.



Atherosclerosis: Endogenous peptide lowers cholesterol

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) Cells of the innate immune system that play an important role in development of atherosclerosis contain a protein that reduces levels of cholesterol in mice -- and thus helps to inhibit or mitigate the disease.



Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Bonn) Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bonn have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. A clearing procedure which turns the brain into a 'glass-like state' and light sheet fluorescence microscopy are used to visualize host-graft connections in a whole-brain preparation.



One night stand regrets

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Women regret saying yes to casual sex much more often than men do. Men -- almost exclusively -- regret saying no. Why?



Plan A is to get patients to stick to their blood pressure pills

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Springer) There is value in starting off patients with high blood pressure on an all-in-one pill. This advice is given to clinicians by Julie Lauffenburger and colleagues of the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. In a paper in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer, the researchers found more value in fixed-dose combination pills that contain more than one type of medication, rather than separate pills for each drug.



CRISPR meets single-cell sequencing in new screening method

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) A new cell screening method combines two revolutionary tools of biomedical research: Scientists at CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences have integrated CRISPR genome editing with single-cell RNA sequencing. Their study establishes a method for studying gene regulation in unprecedented scale and detail.



More than half of atrial fibrillation patients become asymptomatic after catheter ablation

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society of Cardiology) More than half of patients with atrial fibrillation become asymptomatic after catheter ablation, reports the largest study of the procedure published today in European Heart Journal.