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Preview: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health

EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2017 01:33:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Discovering potential therapeutic protein inhibitors for Chagas disease

Tue, 26 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Tokyo Institute of Technology) Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), Nagasaki University have identified four potential protein inhibitors and unlocked drug discovery strategies for the treatment of Chagas disease by using advanced three-dimensional computer simulation by supercomputer TSUBAME in combination with in vitro experiments and X-ray crystallography. Through this "smart drug discovery" in which IT drug discovery and biochemical experiments cooperate, they identified hit compounds for target protein with a hit rate of 20 times or more than conventional High Throughput Screening (HTS) methods.



Weight loss for adults at any age leads to cost savings, study suggests

Tue, 26 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Helping an adult lose weight leads to significant cost savings at any age, with those savings peaking at age 50, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.



Patients who get opioids in the ER are less likely to use them long-term

Tue, 26 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American College of Emergency Physicians) Compared to other medical settings, emergency patients who are prescribed opioids for the first time in the emergency department are less likely to become long-term users and more likely to be prescribed these powerful painkillers in accordance with The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. A paper analyzing 5.2 million prescriptions for opioids is being published online today in Annals of Emergency Medicine.



Larger-dose opioid prescriptions not coming from emergency departments, study shows

Tue, 26 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Mayo Clinic) Opioid prescriptions from the emergency department (ED) are written for a shorter duration and smaller dose than those written elsewhere, shows new research led by Mayo Clinic. The study, published today in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, also demonstrates that patients who receive an opioid prescription in the ED are less likely to progress to long-term use.



Internists reaffirm 'strongest possible opposition' to Graham-Cassidy proposal

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American College of Physicians) In a letter to Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Charles Schumer today, the American College of Physicians (ACP) reaffirmed its strongest possible opposition to the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson (GCHJ) proposal, especially considering changes released last night to the bill that would be even more harmful to patients.



Poll: More than two-thirds of Republicans want Congress to enact an ACA alternative

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) According to a new POLITICO/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health poll, more than two-thirds (71 percent) of Republicans want Congress to try again to enact an alternative to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In contrast, a majority of Democrats (57 percent) believe Congress should move on to other issues.



Penguin-mounted video captures gastronomic close encounters of the gelatinous kind

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Ecological Society of America) Footage from penguin-mounted mini video recorders shows four species of penguin eating jellyfish and other gelatinous animals of the open ocean, a food source penguins were not previously believed to partake of, scientists report this month in the Ecological Society of America's peer-reviewed journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.



Study finds being in a good mood for your flu jab boosts its effectiveness

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Nottingham) New research by a team of health experts at the University of Nottingham has found evidence that being in a positive mood on the day of your flu jab can increase its protective effect.



Do you really need that MRI?

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Do you really need that MRI? Your doctor may order an MRI based on factors other than your actual medical need for imaging, researchers in UT Southwestern's Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research found. Their study in JAMA Internal Medicine showed that a physician's prior image-ordering habits, as well as ownership of the equipment, were strong indicators of unnecessary imaging orders.



Psychological impacts of natural disasters on youth

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Miami) Professor of Psychology/Pediatrics, University of Miami, Annette M. La Greca, is fully aware of children's reaction to trauma. Her research focuses on the impact of disasters on youth since Hurricane Andrew in 1992. La Greca has been evaluating how best to define post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children. This line of research will help to quickly identify the children who need support services post-disaster and identify key aspects of the post-disaster environment that facilitate their recovery.



Researchers identify gene variants linked to a high-risk children's cancer

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Pediatric researchers investigating the childhood cancer neuroblastoma have identified common gene variants that raise the risk of an aggressive form of that disease. The discovery may assist doctors in better diagnosing subtypes of neuroblastoma.



Can stevia help treat metabolic syndrome?

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Increasingly popular as a calorie-free sweetener, steviol, as well as other extracts of the Stevia rebaudiana (SR) plant have pharmacological and therapeutic activity, including effects that make them natural alternatives for treating obesity, hypertension, and elevated levels of blood sugar and lipids, all disorders associated with metabolic syndrome.



Three or more cups of coffee daily halves mortality risk in patients with both HIV and HCV

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Elsevier) Patients infected by both HIV and hepatitis C virus are at specific risk of end-stage liver disease and greater risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In addition, HIV infection accelerates the progression of chronic hepatitis C to fibrosis and development of cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. In these HIV-HCV co-infected patients, drinking at least three cups of coffee each day halved the risk of all-cause mortality according to a new study published in the Journal of Hepatology.



80 percent of activity tracker users stick with the devices for at least 6 months

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Use of activity trackers, such as wearable devices and smartphone apps, is on the rise, and a new study shows that 80 percent of users stuck with the device for at least six months. In the first national study of a large, diverse population, researchers found that 1.2 percent of the study population engaged with devices, and that most of the individuals who started using an activity tracker were younger and had higher-incomes than people who opted not to use the devices.



Prostaglandin EI inhibits leukemia stem cells

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Iowa Health Care) Two drugs, already approved for safe use in people, may be able to improve therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a blood cancer that affects myeloid cells, according to results from a University of Iowa study in mice.



UNLV study reveals breakthrough in decoding brain function

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Nevada, Las Vegas) After four years of lab testing and complex neuro-decoding, a research team led by UNLV psychology professor James Hyman has struck a major breakthrough that could open the floodgates for research into the anterior cingulate cortex, or ACC, and how human brains learn.



Prenatal weight talks are easier with props

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Allina Health ) Weight is such a hot topic, some providers are uncomfortable talking about it with patients, even during pregnancy. An Allina Health study showed education and a weight tracking chart helped.



Canadian scientist takes HIV self-testing global with HIVSmart!™

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(McGill University Health Centre) HIV self-testing is getting a global push thanks to a major new partnership between the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), Sympact-X and The International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC), a key player in the fight against HIV/AIDS. This partnership with IAPAC will allow the implementation of HIVSmart!™ -- a software and cloud based application that facilitates HIV self-testing, linkages and retention in care -- in high HIV burden Fast-Track Cities worldwide.



Van Andel Research Institute hosts unique symposium on Parkinson's disease

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Van Andel Research Institute) Leading Parkinson's experts and advocates from around the world will gather at Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan, this month for Grand Challenges in Parkinson's Disease, a scientific event highlighting the latest breakthroughs in Parkinson's research and treatment. The 6th annual symposium will include talks from 19 scientific speakers, a poster session and extensive networking opportunities.



Better pancakes through chemistry (video)

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) Everyone seems to swear by a different pancake recipe. How can you griddle up the perfect pancakes for your Saturday morning breakfast? With chemistry, of course. Just in time for National Pancake Day, this video from Reactions will show you how to use chemistry to improve your flapjacks.



Streamlined process opens drug development to a new class of steroids

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Dartmouth College) Researchers at Dartmouth College have developed a technique to produce synthetic steroids that could pave the way for a cascade of new drug discoveries, significantly reducing the expense and time needed to develop therapeutics from an underexplored collection of molecules.



Violent crime increases during warmer weather, no matter the season, study finds

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Drexel University) A study analyzing crime data in Philadelphia for 10 years found that rates of violent crime and disorderly conduct are higher when the weather is warmer and more pleasant, even rising sharply during warmer-than-typical winter days.



Goodbye, login. Hello, heart scan

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University at Buffalo) Forget fingerprint computer identification or retinal scanning. A University at Buffalo-led team has developed a computer security system using the dimensions of your heart as your identifier.The system uses low-level Doppler radar to measure your heart, and then continually monitors your heart to make sure no one else has stepped in to run your computer. The technology will be presented next month at the 23rd MobiCom conference.



People are reluctant to use public defibrillators to treat cardiac arrests

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Warwick) A study led the University of Warwick suggests that people are reluctant to use public-access defibrillators to treat cardiac arrests.



Bone marrow concentrate improves joint transplants

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Missouri-Columbia) Biologic joint restoration using donor tissue instead of traditional metal and plastic may be an option for active patients with joint defects. Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine found in a group of patients that treating donor grafts with bone marrow aspirate concentrate before surgery improves bone integration and speeds recovery.