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Preview: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health

EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 06:33:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Immunotherapy drug becomes first therapy approved by FDA for rare skin cancer

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) The US Food and Drug Administration yesterday granted accelerated approval to the checkpoint inhibitor Bavencio (avelumab) for the treatment of patients with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), including those who have not received prior chemotherapy. Avelumab is the first FDA-approved treatment for metastatic MCC and the first disease that the drug has ever been approved to treat.



UNC to create and test injectable long-acting implant to prevent HIV/AIDS

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of North Carolina Health Care) Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have received a three-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a new implantable drug delivery system for long-lasting HIV-prevention.



Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont) New research has uncovered that capillaries have the capacity to both sense brain activity and generate an electrical vasodilatory signal to evoke blood flow and direct nutrients to neurons.



An intriguing new gene candidate in the search for Alzheimer disease therapies

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Tau pathology is one of the defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD), which is the most common form of dementia in older age. While symptomatic treatments exist, there are currently no preventive therapies for AD. Investigators at BWH and Rush University Medical Center reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with Tau accumulation. Published in Molecular Psychiatry, the paper describes the identification and validation of a genetic variant within the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type delta (PTPRD) gene.



A little vigorous exercise may help boost kids' cardiometabolic health

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) As little as 10 minutes a day of high-intensity physical activity could help some children reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, according to an international study led by a researcher at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.



New gene discovered associated with Tau, a common form of brain pathology

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Rush University Medical Center) Investigators at Rush University Medical Center and the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that accumulates in several different conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that occurs with repeated head injuries.



'Bench to bedside to bench'

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Jackson Laboratory) It's time to update the old 'bench-to-bedside' shorthand, researchers at The Jackson Laboratory, NHGRI and institutions across the US declare.



Clock stars: Astrocytes keep time for brain, behavior

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Washington University in St. Louis) Star-shaped cells called astrocytes, long considered boring, 'support cells,' are finally coming into their own. To everyone's surprise they even play an important role in the body's master clock, which schedules everything from the release of hormones to the onset of sleepiness.



BRCA testing on the rise for those without breast or ovarian cancers

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) More women are requesting BRCA gene testing associated with certain types of cancer thanks to increased interest in the procedure. Traditionally women tested for mutations in the cancer-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been those diagnosed with early onset breast or ovarian cancer in order to guide treatment options.



Schizophrenia-associated gene research funded by $3.1 million NIH grant

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Emory Health Sciences) A research team at Emory University is embarking on a multipronged study of 3q29 deletion syndrome, a genetic mutation associated with a 40-fold increased risk for schizophrenia and a range of other neuropsychiatric conditions including mild to moderate intellectual disability, autism and anxiety.



Study confirms prescription weight-loss medication helps with opiate addiction recovery

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have confirmed that a prescription weight-loss pill decreases the urge to use opiates such as oxycodone. In a study published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, the researchers led by UTMB scientist Kathryn Cunningham found that the drug, lorcaserin, reduced the use and craving for the opioid oxycodone in preclinical studies.



Neurosurgical practices must evolve and transform to adapt to rapidly changing healthcare industry

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Oxford University Press USA) Neurosurgeons hoping to successfully navigate the rapidly changing healthcare industry must advance their strategies and adapt new ways of thinking in order to continue to thrive in an evolving environment.



The need to reinvent primary care

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Springer) Primary care is 'first-contact, continuous, comprehensive, and coordinated care provided to populations undifferentiated by gender, disease, or organ system.' High-quality primary care has been associated with improved population health, lower costs, and greater equity. Despite this evidence, primary care has been consistently under-resourced, accounting for just six to eight percent of US health care expenditures. A special issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine, just published, takes a look at primary care today.



Microwave-induced bismuth salts-mediated synthesis of molecules of medicinal interests

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Bentham Science Publishers) The products obtained via bismuth salts-mediated reactions are medicinally active or starting materials for the synthesis of biologically active molecules including sex hormones, anticancer agents, antibacterial agents and agents for chagas diseases.



'Jumonji' protein key to Ewing's sarcoma rampage

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Oncogene pinpoints a protein that may be essential to Ewing's sarcoma metastasis -- when researchers knocked down the protein KDM3A in Ewing's sarcoma tumor cells, one of a family known as Jumonji proteins, they also inhibited the cancer's metastatic ability.



Survivors of childhood brain tumors have increased body fat

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(McMaster University) These findings suggest that one of the most important risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, which is excess total and central fat in the body, is present relatively early in survivors of childhood brain tumors. This may program their future risk of these diseases and impact their outcomes.



UTA quantifying coral species' disease susceptibility by examining immune traits

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas at Arlington) A biologist from the University of Texas at Arlington is leading a new study aimed at quantifying how susceptible coral species are to disease by examining their immunity through a series of novel experiments and approaches.



On the trail of Parkinson's disease

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Konstanz) The molecular causes of diseases such as Parkinson's need to be understood as a first step towards combating them. University of Konstanz chemists working alongside Professor Malte Drescher recently succeeded in analysing what happens when selective mutations of the alpha-synuclein protein occur -- a protein that is closely linked to Parkinson's disease.



New study identifies successful method to reduce dental implant failure

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Plymouth) A research team comprising scientists from the School of Biological Sciences, Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry and the School of Engineering at the University of Plymouth, have joined forces to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a new nanocoating for dental implants to reduce the risk of peri-implantitis.



Hydrophobic proteins on virus surfaces can help purify vaccines

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Michigan Technological University) Through experimental and computational tests, new research expands on the theory of virus surface hydrophobicity. By being slightly water-repellent, the outer layers of proteins in virus capsids affect how it interacts with cells and the environment. Understanding this more can improve vaccine production and virus detection.



Scientists discover shared genetic origin for ALS/MND and schizophrenia

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Trinity College Dublin) The study, conducted by scientists at Trinity College Dublin, indicates that the causes of ALS/MND and schizophrenia are biologically linked. The scientists say that the new findings have major implications for how we classify diseases and that they challenge the existing divide between neurology and psychiatry.



Severe psoriasis predominantly affects men

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Umea University) The fact that men are overrepresented in psoriasis registers and consume more psoriasis care have long led researchers to believe that the common skin disease disproportionately affects men. A unique study with 5,438 Swedish psoriasis patients now reveals that women have a statistically significant lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men. The study, conducted by researchers at Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet, is published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.



Spread of ages is key to impact of disease, animal study finds

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Edinburgh) How a disease outbreak affects a group of animals depends on the breakdown of ages in the population, research has shown.



Study shows potential of stem cell therapy to repair lung damage

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(European Lung Foundation) A new study has found that stem cell therapy can reduce lung inflammation in an animal model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis.



New lab-on-a-chip platform seeks to improve pathogen detection

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Future Science Group) Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute have developed a new prototype lab-on-a-chip platform for the easy and versatile detection of molecular pathogens.