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Preview: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health

EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:33:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Transforming patient health care and well-being through lighting

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) The world of health care is changing rapidly and there is increased interest in the role that light and lighting can play in improving health outcomes for patients and providing healthy work environments for staff, according to many researchers. Recently, the Center for Lighting Enabled Systems & Applications (LESA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, together with the Illumination Engineering Society (IES), sponsored a workshop to explore pathways to define and promote the adoption of lighting systems specifically for health-care environments.



Public lecture on consciousness, press room, and more: CNS 2018 only 4 weeks away

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Cognitive Neuroscience Society) The Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) 2018 conference -- only 4 weeks away -- will bring together more than 1,500 scientists at the Sheraton in Boston from March 24-27. They will discuss the latest research on attention, creativity, decision-making, language, memory, and music -- in 50+ talks and 1,000+ posters.



Almost all adolescents in an economically disadvantaged urban population exposed to tobacco smoke

Fri, 23 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American Association for Cancer Research) Ninety-four percent of adolescents ages 13 to 19 in an economically disadvantaged, largely minority population in San Francisco had measurable levels of a biomarker specific for exposure to tobacco smoke (NNAL).



NIST introduces new CHO peptide library

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) LinkedIn: Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, known as CHO, play an important role in modern medicine. NIST's new CHO peptide library will enable better production of treatments for psoriasis, cancer, hemophilia and leukemia.



Mutation explains why some people are more vulnerable to viral brain infection

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Rockefeller University) Scientists identified mutations in a single gene that impair immunity to viruses in a region of the brain called the brain stem.



NYU researchers adapt HIV test in developing rapid diagnostic test for Zika virus

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(New York University) Researchers at New York University College of Dentistry, in collaboration with Rheonix, Inc., are developing a novel test for Zika virus that uses saliva to identify diagnostic markers of the virus in a fraction of the time of current commercial tests.



New crystal structures reveal mysterious mechanism of gene regulation by the 'magic spot'

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Penn State) Using an innovative crystallization technique for studying 3D structures of gene transcription machinery, researchers revealed new insights into the long debated action of the 'magic spot' -- a molecule that controls gene expression in E. coli and many other bacteria when the bacteria are stressed. The study contributes to fundamental understanding of how bacteria adapt and survive under adverse conditions and provides clues about key processes that could be targeted in the search for new antibiotics.



Beetroot juice supplements may help certain heart failure patients

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Indiana University) Beetroot juice supplements may help enhance exercise capacity in patients with heart failure, according to a new proof-of-concept study. Exercise capacity is a key factor linked to these patients' quality of life and even survival.



As pediatric use of iNO increased, mortality rates dropped

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Children's National Health System) Jonathan Chan, M.D., and colleagues analyzed data from pediatric patient visits over a 10-year period at 47 children's hospitals and found as inhaled nitric oxide use and costs increased mortality rates dropped modestly.



Researchers develop new technology platform for cancer immunotherapy

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Johns Hopkins scientists invent multifunctional antibody-ligand traps (Y-traps), a new class of cancer immunotherapeutics. They develop Y-traps comprising an antibody targeting an immune checkpoint (CTLA-4 or PD-L1) fused to a TGFβ trap. In humanized mouse models, these Y-traps reverse immune suppression and inhibit growth of tumors that do not respond to current immune checkpoint inhibitors.



Research to uncover factors behind bladder cancer progression receives ACS grant

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Penn State) To find new therapies for aggressive bladder cancer, researchers must first uncover what drives each subtype at the molecular level. That's why the American Cancer Society has awarded a grant to study bladder cancer development to David DeGraff, assistant professor of pathology, surgery and biochemistry and molecular biology, and a member of Penn State Cancer Institute.



UT Dallas scientists isolate cancer stem cells using novel method

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at Dallas) Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have devised a new technique to isolate aggressive cells thought to form the root of many hard-to-treat metastasized cancers -- a significant step toward developing new drugs that might target these cells.



Few Chicagoland wetlands left without non-native species, study finds

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) The wetlands in and around Chicago are overwhelmingly invaded by non-native plants, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers. The study, which pulls together species occurrence data from over 2,000 wetlands in the urban region, is the first to describe wetland invasion patterns on such a large scale in the Chicagoland area.



Sweet, bitter, fat: Genetics play a role in kids' snacking patterns, study finds

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Guelph) The types of snacks a child chooses could be linked to genetics, a University of Guelph study found.The study investigated whether genetic variants in taste receptors related to sweet, fat and bitter tastes influence the snacks preschoolers choose and found nearly 80 per cent carried at least one of these genotypes that could predispose them to poor snacking habits.These findings could help parents tailor their kids' diets based on their genetics of taste.



Opioid abuse leads to heroin use and a hepatitis C epidemic, USC researcher says

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Southern California) Heroin is worse than other drugs because people inject it much sooner, potentially resulting in increased risk of injection-related epidemics such as hepatitis C and HIV, a Keck School of Medicine of USC study shows. As more people use opioids, many switch to heroin because it's more potent and cheaper - a trend that complicates disease prevention as health officials crack down on opioids.



Protein active in life-threatening allergic reactions is a promising target for therapy

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Food Allergy Research & Education) In a recently published study supported by Food Allergy Research & Education, researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have described a signaling pathway that can contribute to the dangerous circulatory and respiratory symptoms of anaphylaxis. The pathway, which promotes fluid loss from blood vessels into surrounding tissues, includes the interleukin-4 receptor, a protein that is targeted by a drug already approved to treat moderate to severe eczema. These findings hold promise for a treatment to make anaphylaxis less deadly.



Age and gender matter behind the wheel -- but not how you might expect

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) A UCLA study explored the relationship between new drivers' skills and age, gender, organized sports and video gaming. The results suggest that mandatory training should be required for all novice drivers, not just teenagers.



UBC engineers advance the capability of wearable tech

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) Creating the perfect wearable device to monitor muscle movement, heart rate and other tiny bio-signals without breaking the bank has inspired scientists to look for a simpler and more affordable tool. Now, a team of researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have developed a practical way to monitor and interpret human motion, in what may be the missing piece of the puzzle when it comes to wearable technology.



Mind-reading algorithm uses EEG data to reconstruct images based on what we perceive

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Toronto) A new technique developed by neuroscientists at U of T Scarborough can reconstruct images of what people perceive based on their brain activity gathered by EEG.



C-sections and gut bacteria increase risk of childhood obesity

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry) New CHILD Study research has found that overweight and obese women are more like to have children who are overweight or obese by three years of age--and that bacteria in the gut may be partially to blame.



Toenail fungus gives up sex to infect human hosts

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Duke University) The fungus that causes athlete's foot and other skin and toenail infections may have lost its ability to sexually reproduce as it adapted to grow on human hosts. The discovery that this species may be asexual -- and therefore nearly identical at the genetic level -- uncovers potential vulnerabilities that researchers could exploit in designing better antifungal medications. The findings appear online in Genetics.



Kessler Foundation receives grant to study cortical changes in youth with brain injury

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Kessler Foundation) Drs. Kiran Karunakaran and Karen Nolan have won a $35,000 grant from New Jersey Health Foundation to study the cortical changes in children and young adults with lower extremity motor deficits caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). 'Our research shows that robotic exoskeleton training has the potential for tremendous impact on gait function, balance, and neuromuscular responses, as well as community participation and quality of life for individuals with TBI,' explained Dr. Nolan.



Dr. Kucukboyaci receives grant to study cognitive therapies for traumatic brain injury

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Kessler Foundation) 'Memory and learning problems are very common in people with moderate to severe TBI,' explained Dr. Kucukboyaci. 'Through this NJ Health Foundation grant, we will be able to advance our preliminary research and directly address the need for Class I research in software-assisted cognitive rehabilitation. 'Our goal is to improve patient care for this population,' he continued, 'by devising and teaching TBI-tailored memory strategies that can boost work or school functioning, and monitoring cognitive changes over time.'



Therapy for muscular dystrophy-caused heart failure also improves muscle function in mice

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) Injections of cardiac progenitor cells help reverse the fatal heart disease caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy and also lead to improved limb strength and movement ability, a new study shows. The study, published today in Stem Cell Reports, showed that when researchers injected cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) into the hearts of laboratory mice with muscular dystrophy, heart function improved along with a marked increase in exercise capacity.



Looking for the origins of schizophrenia

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(D'Or Institute for Research and Education) Schizophrenia may be related to neurodevelopment changes, including brain's inability to create the appropriate vascular system, according to new study resulted from a partnership between the D'Or Institute for Research and Education, the University of Chile and the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). The results broaden the understanding about the causes of this severe and disabling disorder, which affects about 1 percent of the world's population.