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Preview: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health

EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2018 16:33:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically from one zip code to the next

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(The University of Texas System) Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically even across neighboring zip codes, according to a new analysis and mapping tool from researchers at The University of Texas System and UT Health Northeast. The analysis and searchable map, which are the first of their kind in Texas, use data from Texas Vital Statistics Linked Birth and Death Records from 2011-2014.



Cells lacking nuclei struggle to move in 3-D environments

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) A study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and published in the Journal of Cell Biology examined the role of the physical structure of the nucleus in cell movement through different surfaces.



Can stem cell exosome therapy reduce fatal heart disease in diabetes?

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Removal of dead or dying heart muscle cells after a heart attack is crucial. Researchers have preliminary data that diabetes impairs this removal, and this impairment may be the reason diabetes increases the risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. With aid of a new grant, investigators will study whether mesenchymal stem cells or their exosomes can boost dead cell removal and reduce damaging inflammation after heart attacks in animal models of diabetes.



Length of opioid prescription spell highest risk for misuse after surgery

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) With opioid overdoses now a leading cause of nonintentional death in the United States, data show most of these deaths can be traced back to an initial prescription opioid. A new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) sheds light on the possible link between physicians' opioid prescription patterns and subsequent abuse.



'Explosive evolution' of techniques to restore blood flow to the brain

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Loyola University Health System) Recent decades have seen an 'explosive evolution' of techniques to restore blood flow to areas of the brain endangered by stroke or clogged arteries, according to a report by Loyola Medicine neurologists and neurosurgeons.



Cystic fibrosis bacterial burden begins during first years of life

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of North Carolina Health Care) Cystic fibrosis shortens life by making the lungs prone to repeated bacterial infections and inflammation. UNC School of Medicine researchers have now shown for the first time that the lungs' bacterial population changes in the first few years of life as respiratory infections and inflammation set in. This research offers a way to predict the onset of lung disease in children with CF and suggests a larger role for preventive therapies, such as hypertonic saline.



Wiley Partners with Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) to provide member access to health science research

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Wiley) The Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) has enhanced its partnership with global research and learning company, John Wiley and Sons Inc., (NYSE:JW-A) (NYSE:JW-B) to provide members with access to the full collection of journals published on Wiley Online Library.



Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALS

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are part of an international team that has identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for limiting muscle, is activated.



Older hospitalized adults are infrequently tested for influenza

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Wiley) This year's flu season is shaping up to be an especially serious one, and it's important for clinicians to promptly recognize, diagnosis, and treat influenza in hospitalized patients, especially in vulnerable populations such as older individuals.



MIT Portugal is developing a compression sleeve for breast cancer patients

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(MIT Portugal Program) The project developed by the MIT Portugal Ph.D. Student at the University of Minho Carlos Gonçalves, was considered the most innovative of the nine projects incubated during 10 weeks by Startup Nano, a pioneer incubation and acceleration program for nanotechnology innovation promoted by Startup Braga in a partnership with the International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory and the Centre for Nanotechnology and Smart Materials (CeNTI) both located in Braga.



Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells alive

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway.' Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, Charité scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for patients. Results from this research have been published in the journal Cell Reports.



National school lunch program aces safety test

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Connecticut) The National School Lunch Program's (NSLP) strict safety standards work, according to a new University of Connecticut study that found food safety standards for ground beef supplied to the program are highly effective in keeping harmful bacteria out of school lunches nationwide. However, ground beef that fails NSLP inspection can be sold to other vendors, eventually making its way onto consumers' plates, meaning ground beef sold to schools may be the safest on the market.



A stopwatch for nanofluids: NIST files provisional patent for microflowmeter

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has filed a provisional patent application for a microflow measurement system, about the size of a nickel, that can track the movement of extremely tiny amounts of liquids -- as small as nanoliters per minute. The invention is designed to fill an urgent need in the rapidly expanding field of microfluidics, in which precisely measuring tiny flow rates is critical.



Postoperative wound monitoring app can reduce readmissions and improve patient care

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American College of Surgeons) A new smartphone app called WoundCare is successfully enabling patients to remotely send images of their surgical wounds for monitoring by nurses.



Increasing number of adolescents receive a psychiatric or neurodevelopmental diagnosis

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Turku) According to a national register study comparing Finnish birth cohorts from 1987 and 1997, an increasing number of adolescents receive a psychiatric or neurodevelopmental diagnosis. The number of diagnosed adolescents increased especially for girls in the younger cohort. The results of the study conducted by the University of Turku, Finland, and the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) were published in the Lancet Psychiatry journal.



Mortality of surgery vs. targeted radiation in early lung cancer patients

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Among patients older than 80 years, 3.9 percent receiving surgery passed away within the 30-day post-treatment window, compared with 0.9 percent of patients receiving focused radiation.



How metal scaffolds enhance the bone healing process

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) In cooperation with colleagues from the Wyss Institute at Harvard, researchers from the Julius Wolff Institute, the Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, and Charité's Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery have shown how mechanically optimized constructs known as titanium-mesh scaffolds help optimize bone regeneration. The researchers' findings have been reported in the current issue of Science Translational Medicine.



Adaptive immune response: New cofactor of roquin identified

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Roquin has a key role in the adaptive immune response. It controls the activation and differentiation of T cells and thus helps to make the decisions whether or not and which type of immune response will be mounted. Now, a team of scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München in cooperation have identified NUFIP2, a protein with a previously unknown function, as cofactor of Roquin and discovered that NUFIP2 enhances Roquin's regulatory function.



Scientists discover how treating eczema could also alleviate asthma

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)) Scientists from VIB-UGent have discovered insights for a possible new therapy for eczema that also reduces the severity of asthma. The findings are an important next step in understanding the relationship between the two inflammatory diseases and to developing effective therapies. The results of the study are published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.



A nanophenomenon that triggers the bone-repair process

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Researchers at the Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia have resolved one of the great unknowns in bone self-repair: how the cells responsible for forming new bone tissue are called into action. Their work reveals the role of an electromechanical phenomenon at the nanoscale, flexoelectricity, as a possible mechanism for stimulating the cell response and guiding it throughout the fracture repair process.



Factor that doubles the risk of death from breast cancer identified

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Karolinska Institutet) Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the risk of death from breast cancer is twice as high for patients with high heterogeneity of the oestrogen receptor within the same tumour as compared to patients with low heterogeneity. The study, published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, shows that the higher risk of death is independent of other known tumour markers and also holds true for Luminal A breast cancer.



Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Springer) Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature.



Hunting dogs as possible vectors for the infectious disease tularaemia

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) The zoonosis Tularaemia is life-threatening for rodents, rabbits and hares, but which can also infect humans and dogs. While contact with contaminated blood or meat makes hunters a high-risk group, the frequency of infections among hunting dogs has not been much studied. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now confirmed a relevant prevalence of infections in Austrian hunting dogs. This could intensify the debate whether the often asymptomatic animals represent an additional risk of infection for people.



Free online access to millions of documents on chemical toxicity made possible through ToxicDocs

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Springer) Millions of pages of internal corporate and trade association documents relating to the introduction of new products and chemicals into the workplace and commerce have been compiled into a free searchable online database called ToxicDocs. The history and future outlook for this database is now the subject of a free to view special section in the Journal of Public Health Policy which is a Palgrave Macmillan journal and is published by Springer Nature.



The Down syndrome 'super genome'

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Université de Genève) Only 20 percent of fetuses with trisomy 21 reach full term. But how do they manage to survive the first trimester of pregnancy despite this heavy handicap? Researchers from UNIGE and UNIL have found that children born with Down syndrome have an excellent genome -- better than the average genome of people without the genetic abnormality. It is possible that this genome offsets the disabilities caused by the extra chromosome, helping the fetus to survive.