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EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2017 02:33:02 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Adults with autism make more consistent choices

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Association for Psychological Science) People with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) often show a reduced sensitivity to contextual information in perceptual tasks, but new research suggests that this reduced sensitivity may actually lead to more consistent choices in high-level decision-making tasks.



Comprehensive program improves measures of childhood obesity at community health center

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts General Hospital) A comprehensive program to reduce or prevent childhood obesity in low-income communities led to significant improvements in obesity-related measures among children cared for at a Massachusetts community health center.



Community-wide effort to fight childhood obesity shows promise

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) A large-scale effort to reduce childhood obesity in two low-income Massachusetts communities resulted in some modest improvements among schoolchildren over a relatively short period of time, suggesting that such a comprehensive approach holds promise for the future, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.



Study: Intracranial pathology not necessary for gadolinium deposition in brain tissues

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Radiological Society of North America) New research suggests gadolinium retention may be more widespread and may be present in many more, or possibly all, patients exposed to gadolinium-based contrast agents, according to new research.



Skin cell model advances study of genetic mutation linked to heart disease, stroke risk

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Using a new skin cell model, researchers have overcome a barrier that previously prevented the study of living tissue from people at risk for early heart disease and stroke. This research could lead to a new understanding of disease progression in aortic aneurysm -- ballooning of the large artery in the chest that carries blood from the heart to the body.



Gene mutation linked to retinitis pigmentosa in Southwestern US Hispanic families

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Thirty-six percent of Hispanic families in the U.S. with a common form of retinitis pigmentosa got the disease because they carry a mutation of the arrestin-1 gene, according to a new study from researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.



Quest to prevent Macular degeneration continues with UA researcher's $1.7m NIH grant

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Arizona Health Sciences) After showing that individuals who take levodopa, or l-dopa, for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease are protected from developing macular degeneration, University of Arizona researcher Brian S. McKay, PhD, is taking the next step in his quest to prevent the blinding eye disease, thanks to a $1.7 million R01 grant from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health.



Septic systems are a major source of emerging contaminants in drinking water

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Silent Spring Institute) A new analysis shows that septic systems in the United States routinely discharge pharmaceuticals, consumer product chemicals, and other potentially hazardous chemicals into the environment. The study is the most comprehensive assessment to date of septic systems as important sources of emerging contaminants, raising health concerns since many of these chemicals, once discharged, end up in groundwater and drinking water supplies.



New tool offers snapshots of neuron activity

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A team of MIT and Stanford University researchers has developed a way to label neurons when they become active, essentially providing a snapshot of their activity at a moment in time.



New study links hot flashes with depression

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) With age comes a greater risk of depression, especially in women. With 15% of the female population in the US being 65 or older, and the number expected to double in the next 50 years, there is a major focus on age-related disorders, including depression. A new study published in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), documents an association between hot flashes and a greater risk of depression.



Alzheimer's disease risk linked to a network of genes associated with myeloid cells

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai researchers find this network central to Alzheimer's disease susceptibility.



Chimpanzee 'super strength' and what it might mean in human muscle evolution

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) For years, anecdotes and some studies have suggested that chimpanzees are 'super strong' compared to humans, implying that their muscle fibers are superior to humans'. Now a research team including a UMass Amherst kinesiologist reports that contrary to this belief, chimp muscles' maximum dynamic force and power output is just about 1.35 times higher than human muscle of similar size, a difference they call 'modest' compared with historical, popular accounts of chimp 'super strength,' being many times stronger than humans.



UA researchers: Brains evolved to need exercise

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Arizona) Mounting scientific evidence shows that exercise is good not only for our bodies, but for our brains. Yet, exactly why physical activity benefits the brain is not well understood. In a new article published in the journal Trends in Neurosciences, University of Arizona researchers suggest that the link between exercise and the brain is a product of our evolutionary history and our past as hunter-gatherers.



Why social isolation can bring a greater risk of illness

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Social isolation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, leads to sleep loss, which in turn leads to cellular stress and the activation of a defense mechanism called the unfolded protein response.



Glycans as biomarkers for cancer?

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Wiley) Glycosylated proteins are often overexpressed in tumor cells and thus could serve as tumor markers, especially those with the interesting molecule sialic acid as their sugar moiety. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists now report on a bioorthogonal labeling test for sialylated glycoproteins based on a glycoproteomics approach. This assay not only assesses the level of sialylated glycans in the tumor cell membranes, but also identifies up- or downregulated proteins directly in the prostate cancer tissue.



Novel platform uses nanoparticles to detect peanut allergies

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Notre Dame) A team of chemical and biomolecular engineers at the University of Notre Dame have developed a novel platform to more accurately detect and identify the presence and severity of peanut allergies, without directly exposing patients to the allergen.



Where are the new therapies for heart disease?

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Bentley University) Despite dramatic reductions in the death rate from cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease and stroke, it remains the leading causes of death, and experts have expressed concern that the number of new therapies coming to market has lagged.



Study: Lack of sleep + spat with spouse = potential health problems

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(MediaSource) A lack of sleep can certainly lead to crankiness and a spat with your spouse, but new research shows that if it happens consistently, it could take a serious toll on your health. Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center took blood samples from couples before and after an argument, and found that spouses who fought after not getting enough sleep had higher levels of inflammation than normal.



World's largest sleep study launches from Western University, Canada

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Western Ontario) Renowned Western University neuroscientist Adrian Owen has launched the world's largest sleep-and-cognition study to help researchers learn the effects on our brains of sleep and sleep deprivation.



Endocrine Society issues Scientific Statement on obesity's causes

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Endocrine Society) A new Scientific Statement issued by the Endocrine Society calls for more research aimed specifically at understanding the underlying mechanisms that make it difficult to maintain long-term weight loss.



A little place for my stuff

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Washington University in St. Louis) Just as people endlessly calculate how to upsize or downsize, bacteria continually adjust their volume (their stuff) to fit inside their membrane (their space). But what limits their expansion? The answer will suprise you.



Mount Sinai researcher identifies best practices for cochlear implant hearing preservation

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Findings could transform treatment worldwide and enhance patient care.



Review: Insomnia medication may wake up some patients from vegetative state

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A systematic review of zolpidem for noninsomnia neurological disorders, including movement disorders and disorders of consciousness, finds reason for additional research.



Study: Exposure to light causes emotional and physical responses in migraine sufferers

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) This research found that light makes migraine headaches more painful and induces negative emotions and unpleasant physical sensations. Laboratory studies identify previously unknown connections between nerve cells in the eye and neurons in the brain that regulate physiological, autonomic, endocrine and emotional responses. These findings offer promising path forward for researchers in treatment of migraines.



'Own-point-of-view' video method leverages power of perception to improve emergency care

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Society for Academic Emergency Medicine) The 'own-point-of-view' perspective video technique, coupled with a subjective re situ interview, provides a better understanding of how physicians make clinical decisions in an authentic treatment setting, compared with the conventional external perspective.