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Preview: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health

EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sun, 23 Jul 2017 21:33:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



First patient treated in trial of a novel liver dialysis device, DIALIVE

Sun, 23 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(European Association for the Study of the Liver) The first patient in an international trial of a new liver dialysis system has been recruited at the Royal Free Hospital in London. The device, called DIALIVE, was invented by scientists and doctors at University College London and Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust.



Link between income inequality and physical activity for women, but not for men

Sun, 23 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Oxford University Press USA) A recent paper published in the Journal of Public Health finds that women from areas with high income inequality are less likely to meet overall physical activity recommendations than men from the same geographical area.



High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause mental health problems in offspring

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Oregon Health & Science University) New research in an animal model suggests a high-fat diet during pregnancy alters the development of the brain and endocrine system of offspring. The new study links an unhealthy diet during pregnancy to mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression in children.



CRI scientists provide insight into genetic basis of neuropsychiatric disorders

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(UT Southwestern Medical Center) A study by scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) is providing insight into the genetic basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this research, the first mouse model of a mutation in the ARID1B gene was created and then used to show that growth hormone treatments reverse some manifestations of the mutation.



First issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Cardiovascular Research Foundation) The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the first issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available online.



Rush hour pollution may be more dangerous than you think

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Duke University) Everyone knows that exposure to pollution during rush hour traffic can be hazardous to your health, but it's even worse than previously thought. In-car measurements of pollutants that cause oxidative stress found exposure levels for drivers to be twice as high as previously believed.



Good fighters are bad runners

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Utah) For mice and men, a strength in one area of Darwinian fitness may mean a deficiency in another. A look at Olympic athletes shows that a wrestler is built much differently than a marathoner. It's long been supposed that strength in fighting, or protecting territory and resources, comes at the expense of running, or spatial mobility. Now an experiment with house mice provides evidence for this theory.



In saliva, clues to a 'ghost' species of ancient human

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University at Buffalo) In saliva, scientists have found hints that a 'ghost' species of archaic humans may have contributed genetic material to ancestors of people living in sub-Saharan Africa today. The research adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that sexual rendezvous between different archaic human species may not have been unusual.



University of Cincinnati creates new model to support workers with disabilities

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Cincinnati) The University of Cincinnati's Advancement and Transition Services trained Aramark dining services employees on evidence-based practices used by job coaches to support workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, or I/DD. The result: the independence levels and social capital of workers with I/DD drastically improved over the course of a semester. The new model of support could help workers with I/DD in other workplaces.



Offer of $100 boosts rates of colon cancer screenings

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Offering $100 to patients eligible for a preventive colonoscopy screening more than doubled the rate of screening when compared to a simple emailed request, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.



Pharmacology: Probing the pores in membrane vesicles

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) Ion channels in the membrane vesicles that mediate intracellular protein transport play a crucial role in cell physiology. A method developed by an Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team now allows them to be studied with greater specificity than ever before.



How physical exercise prevents dementia

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Goethe University Frankfurt) Numerous studies have shown that physical exercise seems beneficial in the prevention of cognitive impairment and dementia in old age. Now researchers at Goethe University Frankfurt have explored in one of the first studies worldwide how exercise affects brain metabolism.



Depression changes structure of the brain, study suggests

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Edinburgh) Changes in the brain's structure that could be the result of depression have been identified in a major scanning study.



Alzheimer's drug may help treat traumatic brain injury

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Wiley) Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of disability and death globally, but medications have generally failed to benefit patients.



LSTM awarded £6.4 million to strengthen capacity to control malaria and other diseases

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers at LSTM have been awarded £6.4 million from the Global Challenges Research Fund to strengthen the global capacity to control vector-borne diseases. Professor Hilary Ranson, Head of LSTM's Department of Vector Biology, will lead a team of experts working with leading research institutes and national disease control programs in three African countries with exceptionally high burdens of disease, to develop evidence based solutions for integrated vector control.



Spatial orientation: New model for the origin of grid cells

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich neurobiologists present a new theory for the origin of the grid cells required for spatial orientation in the mammalian brain, which assigns a vital role to the timing of trains of signals they receive from neurons called place cells.



$1.9 million NIH grant to Wayne State to research genetic disease that causes blindness

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A team of Wayne State University researchers recently received a $1.9 million grant from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health to better understand leukodystrophies (LD) and genetic Leukoencephalopathies (gLE), rare genetic disorders affecting the white matter -- myelin -- in the central nervous system. Patients diagnosed with a leukodystrophy experience a gradual decline in development, including a progressive loss in gait, body tone, vision, hearing, swallowing and/or ability to eat.



Socioeconomic factors and severity of coronary artery disease

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Bentham Science Publishers) Historically, from the 1930's to the 1950's, the rate of cardiovascular disease in high-income countries was high. Since the mid-1970's, the rate of cardiovascular disease has declined in high income countries, possibly due to socioeconomic inequalities and better management of risk factors for coronary heart disease among the wealthy.



New study reveals that causes of severe antisocial behavior may differ for boys and girls

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Bath) The causes of severe antisocial behavior may differ between boys and girls, which could pave the way for new sex-specific treatments, according to a major new study published today.



COX-2 inhibitors may reverse IDO1-mediated immunosuppression in some cancers

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Association for Cancer Research) In preclinical studies, tumors that consitutively expressed the protein indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) responded to the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib (Celebrex) and had improved infiltration of certain subsets of T cells, making them more likely to respond to anti-PD1 therapies.



Sleep disorders may increase cognitive problems particularly in those at risk for Alzheimer's

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Thoracic Society) People who carry a genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease appear to be at greater risk of diminished cognition from sleep-disordered breathing than those without the susceptibility, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.



Francis Crick Institute to train top African scientists

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Francis Crick Institute) The Francis Crick Institute and five partner institutes in Africa have today announced a fellowship program to train African researchers to tackle infectious diseases in their home countries. The program, called the Crick African Network, is supported by a £6 million grant from the Global Challenges Research Fund, a five-year initiative led by the UK Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy to address problems faced by developing countries.



New PET-CT scan improves detection in rare cardiac condition

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Illinois at Chicago) Using a new imaging technique that can diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis much more accurately than traditional tests, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that the disease affects other organs in 40 percent of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis.



SNMMI technologist section announces 2017 award winners

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Society of Nuclear Medicine) The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's Technologist Section (SNMMI-TS) -- an international scientific and medical organization --r ecognized contributions to and work in the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging during the SNMMI 2017 Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado, held June 10-14. Several awards ceremonies were held to recognize the valuable role that SNMMI-TS members play in advancing the discipline of nuclear medicine technology.



Shooting the Achilles heel of nervous system cancers

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center) A cooperative research team led by researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center devised a strategy to target cancer cells while sparing normal cells by capitalizing on vulnerabilities that are exposed only in tumor cells. These vulnerabilities are known as the 'Achilles heel' of cancer cells. Although much is known about the mutations that cause a cell to become malignant, little is known about these vulnerabilities. The team has published new findings on this topic.