Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/infectious_emerging_diseases.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
bacteria  disease  health  human  infection  institute  medicine  new  published  research  researchers  study  university  vaccine 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases

EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2016 02:57:00 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Experts urge a defensive stance in efforts against antimicrobial resistance

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Burness) In a Comment in Nature, CDDEP Director Ramanan Laxminarayan and other experts in antimicrobial resistance suggest that the United Nations should reframe global efforts against antimicrobial resistance by adopting a defensive stance. The suggested focus should be in building the resilience of society and maintaining diversity in the 'global microbiome'-- only a fraction of which causes human or animal disease.



New vaccination strategies coach immune system to make HIV-neutralizing antibodies

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) New approaches that could spur the human body to produce HIV-blocking antibodies have been successful in mice mimicking the human immune system, according to five studies published today in the research journals Cell, Immunity and Science.



How effective is a smartphone app in teaching sexual health to teen girls?

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Care New England ) New research has been published that suggests that a smartphone application vs. traditional methods can potentially connect teenage girls to more information about sexual health.



Newly discovered infectious prion structure shines light on mad cow disease

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry) Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta has identified the structure of the infectious prion protein, the cause of 'mad cow disease' or BSE, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, which has long remained a mystery.



European region most skeptical in the world on vaccine safety

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Public confidence in vaccines varies widely between countries and regions around the world, and the European region is the most skeptical about vaccine safety, according to the largest ever global survey of confidence in vaccines led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. With recent disease outbreaks triggered by people refusing vaccination, the authors believe the findings provide valuable insights, which could help policymakers identify and address issues.



Prisons could unlock hep C-free future

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(International Network for Hepatitis C in Substance Users) Prisons provide one of the most significant opportunities to drive down the prevalence of hepatitis C, and help reach global WHO elimination goals, says new research presented at the 5th International Symposium on Hepatitis Care in Substance Users today.



Kymouse success in steps to developing HIV vaccine

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Don Powell Associates Ltd) Kymab, the Scripps Research Institute, and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative show that a novel approach using Kymouse, a modified mouse that mimics human antibody responses, and an immunogen of HIV-protein nanoparticles is an effective platform for discovering and testing possible HIV vaccines. Immunized mice produced human antibodies against the virus protein, the first proof of principle that this strategy can work, triggering the response required to test components of a future vaccine.



New 'Trojan horse' antibody strategy shows promise against all Ebola viruses

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) In research published in Science, a team of scientists describe a new therapeutic strategy to target a hidden Achilles' heel shared by all known types of Ebola virus. Two antibodies developed with this strategy blocked the invasion of human cells by all five ebolaviruses. The team included scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Integrated Biotherapeutics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and The Scripps Research Institute.



A cinematic approach to drug resistance

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard Medical School) In a creative stroke inspired by Hollywood wizardry, scientists from Harvard Medical School and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have designed a simple way to observe how bacteria move as they become impervious to drugs.



Feed a virus, starve a bacterial infection?

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Cell Press) A new study puts some old folk wisdom to 'feed a cold and starve a fever' to the test. In mouse models of disease, Yale researchers looked at the effects of providing nutrients during infection and found opposing effects depending on whether the infections were bacterial or viral. Mice with bacterial infections that were fed died, while those with viral infections who were fed lived. The paper appears Sept. 8 in Cell.



Human hookworm infection exerts high health and economic burden

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(PLOS) A study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases suggests that the health and economic burden of hookworm infection is estimated to exceed those of a number of diseases receiving greater attention and investment. Sarah Bartsch from John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Peter Hotez from Baylor College of Medicine, and colleagues found that human hookworm infection confers a substantial global health and economic burden through loss of productivity, and years of life living with disability due to infection outcomes.



UAlberta mechanical engineering in hot pursuit of creeping bacteria

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Alberta) The growth of bacterial biofilm is problematic when you think of all the liquid flowing through all those miles of tubing at your local hospital or Medi-Centre. The movement of bacteria with flow can lead to the spread of infection. Mechanical engineering professor Aloke Kumar's lab set out to study the formation of the filaments, as well as the conditions under which they begin to break down and finally break off.



TGen-NAU study generates Soviet anthrax pathogen genome from autopsy specimens

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University used deep DNA sequencing methods to generate the anthrax genome sequence from the victims of the 1979 anthrax outbreak in Sverdlovsk, Russia, when it was part of the USSR.



How to fight drug-resistant bacteria

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) This year, the US reported for the first time that a patient had been infected by bacteria resistant to colistin, an antibiotic of last resort. The announcement followed several years of warnings that current antibiotics aren't diverse enough to fight pathogens as drug resistance spreads. The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, sums up how researchers are trying to stay ahead of the bugs.



Superbugs under the microscope as international experts gather at Queen's University Belfast

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Queen's University Belfast) Queen's University Belfast is proud to be hosting the joint INBIONET/Infect-ERA Conference over Sept. 14-15, 2016.



Dr. Richard Rosenfeld recommends shared decision-making in treating adult sinusitis

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(SUNY Downstate Medical Center) In an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center's Distinguished Professor and Chair of Otolaryngology Richard M. Rosenfeld, M.D., M.P.H., recommends a process of shared decision-making between physicians and patients in the treatment of adult sinusitis.



Deadly scrub typhus bacteria confirmed in South America

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Oxford) Scrub typhus, a disease transmitted through 'chiggers' that kills at least 140,000 people a year in the Asia-Pacific region, may now be endemic in a part of South America, according to a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.



No consensus on how the microbiome affects tuberculosis, review finds

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso) Inconsistencies across studies and sampling errors remain major barriers to understanding how the lung microbiome changes with tuberculosis, according to a review published today in Clinical Microbiology Reviews.



New sensor could help fight deadly bacterial infections

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(The Optical Society) Scientists from the Photonics Research Center at the University of Quebec in Outaouais, Canada, and collaborators from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, have built a new sensor that can detect the potentially deadly E.coli bacteria in 15-20 minutes, much faster than traditional lab tests. The researchers describe the sensor in a paper in the journal Optics Letters, from The Optical Society.



Steroid use linked to worse outcomes in Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary) Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have found that patients who were prescribed corticosteroids as part of treatment for Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis had worse long-term outcomes of regaining facial function than those who were prescribed antibiotic therapy alone. Based on these findings, which were published online today in Laryngoscope, the researchers urge caution in prescribing corticosteroids to patients with acute Lyme disease-associated facial paralysis.



Mouse studies show experimental TB treatment may do more harm than good

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins researchers report evidence from mouse studies that a 'repurposed' drug that would be expected to improve the immune system response of tuberculosis patients may be increasing resistance to the antibiotic drugs these patients must also take.



JAMA editorial highlights challenges of implementing new TB screening guidelines

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Emory Health Sciences) An editorial in JAMA accompanies the publication of new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) screening recommendations for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection in primary care settings. The editorial, entitled 'The Challenge of Latent TB Infection,' points out the urgent need for TB-related research to identify new tools and diagnostics that will identify patients who are at high risk from progressing from latent TB infection to active TB disease.



Early study shows RTS,S malaria vaccine efficacy may improve by changing dosing schedule

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) Researchers at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and collaborators recently published results of a phase II study which demonstrated that by changing the dosing regimen, the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01, was improved to approximately 87 percent, compared with 63 percent using the current standard regimen.



NIH-funded researchers find signs TB can persist in lungs despite treatment

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) It has been known that the microbe that causes TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can persist in the lungs even after patient tissue samples test negative for the bacteria. In new research appearing in Nature Medicine, intramural researchers at the NIAID its grantees found through the use of positron emission tomography/computerized tomography scanning that TB lesions can remain in the lungs long after treatment with antibiotics has been completed.



Case Western Reserve researcher awarded Drexel Prize in Translational Medicine

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Case Western Reserve University) Jonathan Karn has been awarded the 2016 Drexel Prize in Translational Medicine by the Institute for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Disease at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia.