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EurekAlert! - Education



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2018 03:27:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Avangrid, UMass Lowell to collaborate on clean energy

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Massachusetts Lowell) A new research partnership between Avangrid, its subsidiary Central Maine Power and UMass Lowell will expand the use of clean-energy technology -- in hydropower, wind energy, power grids, energy storage, data science and more -- benefiting consumers, students and the environment.



More University of Toronto affiliated scientists to publish lab notes in real time

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Toronto) About 20 scientists affiliated with a University of Toronto research organization have agreed to publish their lab notes in real time, a groundbreaking move aimed at hastening the discovery of new medical treatments.



Researchers find first evidence of sub-Saharan Africa glassmaking

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Rice University) Scholars from Rice University, University College London and the Field Museum have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a 'new chapter in the history of glass technology.'



Crop failure in the Andes

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Miami) As co-author of a study published in Global Change Biology, Kenneth Feeley, along with fellow biologist, Richard Tito, a native Quechua Indian from the region and the study's first author, discovered that tough times lie ahead for rural farmers growing the Andes' staple crops -- corn and potatoes.



Using Hawkeye from the Avengers to communicate on the eye

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Delft University of Technology) Superheroes can be used to communicate learning objectives to students in an interesting, fun, and accessible manner. Hawkeye, a member of the Avengers, is one such superhero, as Barry Fitzgerald of Delft University of Technology (TU Delft, The Netherlands) argues in the article 'Using Hawkeye from the Avengers to communicate on the eye', published in the journal Advances in Physiology Education.



Public health researcher and advocate Atul Gawande to receive Research!America award

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Research!America) Dr. Atul Gawande, surgeon, writer, and public health researcher and advocate, will receive Research!America's Isadore Rosenfeld Award for Impact on Public Opinion on March 14 in Washington, D.C. for dramatically raising the profile of health systems research, and promoting evidence-based research to improve health care delivery.



Ohio Supercomputer Center to host free webinar on innovative web-based HPC portal

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Ohio Supercomputer Center) The Ohio Supercomputer Center will host a free webinar to discuss topics related to its Open OnDemand software project at 2 p.m. on Jan. 29. The Customizing and Extending Open OnDemand Webinar will feature live demonstrations on OnDemand installations from different sites, including the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center and Tufts University. OSC experts will provide examples of how to configure OnDemand and extend the installation with custom branding and applications.



Kessler Foundation receives major federal grant to train rehabilitation researchers

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Kessler Foundation) Guang Yue, Ph.D., director of Human Performance and Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation, has been awarded a $735,000 grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR). This five-year grant funds an Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) Project in Rehabilitation Neuroscience and Engineering. The project aims to improve overall health and function of individuals with neuromuscular and musculoskeletal (NM-MSK) diseases and injuries by training doctoral-level researchers committed to advancing the field of rehabilitation.



MDI Biological Laboratory develops Anecdata citizen science mobile app

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) The MDI Biological Laboratory is riding the growing wave of interest in citizen science with the development of a new, easily accessible mobile phone app to help community organizations track and analyze crowd-sourced data from citizen volunteers on critical environmental questions.The free app is an outgrowth of Anecdata.org, an online citizen science portal for collecting and sharing environmental data that is now home to about 60 projects.



Lessons in nature boost classroom engagement afterward, researchers report

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Third-graders who spend a class session in a natural outdoor setting are more engaged and less distracted in their regular classroom afterward than when they remain indoors, scientists found in a new study. The effect was large and occurred week after week, regardless of teacher expectations.



Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority faculty

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Despite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key points of loss: during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure-track faculty.



Dozens of projects announced as EPSRC welcomes Year of Engineering

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council) As the Year of Engineering gets underway, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) has announced support for 28 pioneering new research projects. EPSRC, alongside the UK's other Research Councils and Innovate UK, is supporting the Year of Engineering, a year-long government-wide campaign to celebrate UK engineering and inspire a new generation into engineering careers. Throughout 2018, hundreds of organizations across the UK will showcase the world of engineering and look to inspire the next generation of engineers.



The only video you'll ever need to watch about gluten (video)

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American Chemical Society) Bakers on TV are always talking about whether their goodies have enough gluten. But the masses on Twitter act like gluten is some kind of monster hiding in your bread. So what gives? Is gluten good, or is it bad? This video from Reactions explains what gluten is, how it leads to tasty bread, and the health risks it holds for certain groups of people: https://youtu.be/-JVO62Vzhqc.



Miles Davis is not Mozart: The brains of jazz and classical pianists work differently

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences) A musician's brain is different to that of a non-musician. Making music requires an interplay of abilities which are also reflected in more developed brain structures. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have discovered that these capabilities are embedded in a much more finely tuned way than assumed: The brain activity of jazz pianists differs from those of classical pianists, even when playing the same piece of music.



Lithuanian scientists have solution for shaky hands condition

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Kaunas University of Technology) ViLim Ball technology created at a Lithuanian startup company Fidens helps to reduce uncontrollable shaking hands, which is one of the symptoms of essential tremor. The technology is effective in 7 out of 10 cases, and it can also be used to alleviate morning stiffness of joints for rheumatoid arthritis sufferers.



Imperial College London and CNRS create joint laboratory in mathematics

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(CNRS) Imperial College London and the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) are creating a joint laboratory to bring together some of the world's best mathematicians. The pioneering venture will integrate leading researchers and students from both institutions to significantly advance collaboration in mathematics between France and Britain. The International Joint Research Unit -- Unité mixte internationale -- will be named UMI Abraham de Moivre, after the great French mathematician, and will be based at Imperial's South Kensington campus in London.



Pediatric physician-scientists struggle for funding

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Washington University in St. Louis) A new, multicenter study that included Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that most NIH grants awarded to researchers in pediatrics during the past five years have been limited to physicians in senior positions at a small number of institutions. The findings indicate an overall downward trend in funding for pediatric research, particularly among early-career physician-scientists.



Print a 200-million-year-old dinosaur fossil in your own home

Fri, 12 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of the Witwatersrand) The digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.



2018 AAAS/Subaru Children's Science Book Prize winners announced

Fri, 12 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) The winners of the 2018 AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize for Excellence in Science Books exemplify outstanding and engaging science writing and illustration for young readers. AAAS and Subaru of America, Inc. co-sponsor the prizes to recognize recently published works that are drawn from and inspired by sound science.



Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology to be covered by Clarivate Analytics

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) The Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology (JNMT) has been selected by Clarivate Analytics for inclusion in its Emerging Sources Citation Index. This coverage begins with 2017.



Heidi M. Sosik selected as a Fellow of The Oceanography Society

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(The Oceanography Society) The Oceanography Society (TOS) congratulates Dr. Heidi M. Sosik (Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) on her selection as as a Fellow of The Oceanography Society. The citation on Dr. Sosik's certificate recognizes her for outstanding contributions to phytoplankton ecology, sensor development and graduate and undergraduate ocean science education. Dr. Sosik will be formally recognized on Feb. 13, 2018, during a ceremony at the Ocean Sciences Meeting in Portland, Ore.



Population-specific deep biomarkers of aging

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine and its' collaborators just present a novel deep-learning based hematological human aging clock using a large dataset of fully anonymized Canadian, South Korean and Eastern European blood test records to train an aging clock. The developed model predicts the age better than models tailored to the specific populations highlighting the differences of subregion-specific patterns of aging. In addition, the developed clocks were shown to be a better predictor of all-cause mortality than chronological age.



Students more engaged and attentive following outdoor lesson in nature

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Frontiers) A study recently published in Frontiers in Psychology has found that children are significantly more attentive and engaged with their schoolwork following an outdoor lesson in nature. Teachers could teach uninterrupted for almost twice as long during a subsequent indoor lesson. Outdoor lessons may be an inexpensive and convenient way to improve student engagement.



Education and income determine whether women participate in cervical screening

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Gothenburg) The impression that foreign-born women in Sweden more often are excluded from gynecological cancer screening needs to be reconsidered. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy, published in the journal PLOS One, makes it clear that foreign-born women participate to the same extent as women born in Sweden with a corresponding educational level and income.



Teenagers gamble away their education

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Springer) The odds are stacked against teenagers who regularly gamble. A new study in Springer's Journal of Gambling Studies shows that a 14-year-old who gambles is more likely to struggle at school. The study was led by Frank Vitaro of the University of Montreal, Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center and the Research Unit on Children's Psychosocial Maladjustment in Canada.