Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Earth Science
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/earth_science.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
change  climate change  climate  fish  fisheries  nasa  new  research  science  state university  study  system  university  west coast  west 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Earth Science

EurekAlert! - Earth Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 06:24:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Maize study finds genes that help crops adapt to change

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Cornell University) A new study analyzed close to 4,500 maize varieties to identify more than 1,000 genes driving large-scale adaptation to the environment.



Smart reforms key to global fish recovery, even with climate change

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(VVH Consulting) New research finds that climate change will cause dramatic impacts in the world's fisheries, but with effective management most fisheries could yield more fish and more prosperity, even with a changing climate. Relative to today, this preliminary research illustrates that effective management reforms can lead, globally, to a nearly 90 percent increase in profits, a third more fish in the water and a more than 10 percent increase in harvest by 2100 in the face of climate change.



Invitation: Global warming to cause dramatic changes in fisheries

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(VVH Consulting) New research from scientists and economists at the University of California Santa Barbara, Oregon State University and Environmental Defense Fund identifies the dramatic future impacts of climate change on the world's fisheries and how fishing reforms are vital to sustaining the global seafood supply. Even in the face of climate change, the research (to be released at the AAAS meeting on Feb. 18) finds that the total amount of fish in the oceans globally and fishing profits would increase significantly through effective management.



Communications expert explains how science should respond to fake news

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The rise of fake news has dominated the world of politics since the last US election cycle. But fake news is not at all new in the world of science, notes University of Wisconsin-Madison Life Sciences Communication Professor Dominique Brossard. Addressing the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Brossard discussed the fake news phenomenon in the context of science and online social networks like Facebook and Twitter.



NASA examines Ex-Tropical Cyclone Dineo's rainfall

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA examined the heavy rainfall generated by Tropical Cyclone Dineo as it made landfall in Mozambique and NASA's Terra satellite spotted the storm's remnants over four countries.



Looking for the next leap in rechargeable batteries

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Southern California) USC researchers may have just found a solution for one of the biggest stumbling blocks to the next wave of rechargeable batteries -- small enough for cellphones and powerful enough for cars.



Satellite views storm system affecting Southern California

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Satellite imagery captured the beginning of a chain of Eastern Pacific Ocean storms forecast to affect the US West Coast. A close-up satellite view show from Feb. 17 shows a large storm system affecting southern California, while a wider satellite view revealed a second storm system in the Central Pacific Ocean headed toward the east.



It's more than just climate change

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Maryland) Accurately modeling climate change and interactive human factors -- including inequality, consumption, and population -- is essential for the effective science-based policies and measures needed to benefit and sustain current and future generations. A recent study presents extensive evidence of the need for a new paradigm of modeling that fully incorporates the feedbacks between Earth systems and human systems.



System automatically detects cracks in nuclear power plants

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Purdue University) A new automated system detects cracks in the steel components of nuclear power plants and has been shown to be more accurate than other automated systems.



Congo river fish evolution shaped by intense rapids

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American Museum of Natural History) New research provides compelling evidence that a group of strange-looking fish living near the mouth of the Congo River are evolving due to the intense hydraulics of the river's rapids and deep canyons. The study reveals that fishes in this part of the river live in 'neighborhoods' that are separated from one another by the waters' turbulent flow.



Climate-driven permafrost thaw

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Geological Society of America) In bitter cold regions like northwestern Canada, permafrost has preserved relict ground-ice and vast glacial sedimentary stores in a quasi-stable state. These landscapes therefore retain a high potential for climate-driven transformation.



Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Konstanz) The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops.



Researchers replicate nature's ability to reflect light to develop innovative ma

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Surrey) Researchers from the University of Surrey have developed an innovative new technique to mimic one of nature's greatest achievements -- natural structural color.



Panel to discuss deep-sea mining at AAAS Meeting

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) A panel of scholars including Stace Beaulieu, a deep-sea biologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), will discuss the pros and cons of deep-sea mining during the symposium, "Should We Mine the Seafloor?" scheduled on Saturday, February 18, at the AAAS meeting in Boston, MA. A news briefing for science journalists will be held at 4 p.m. on Friday, February 17, in room 103 of the Hynes Convention Center.



One-of-a-kind? Or not. USU geneticist studies formation of new species

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Utah State University) Using stick insects of the Timema genus, a multi-institution research team combined field experiments with genomics, including sequencing of more than 1,000 genomes, to study speciation.



Six-legged robots faster than nature-inspired gait

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) Researchers at EPFL and UNIL have discovered a faster and more efficient gait, never observed in nature, for six-legged robots walking on flat ground. Bio-inspired gaits -- less efficient for robots -- are used by real insects since they have adhesive pads to walk in three dimensions. The results provide novel approaches for roboticists and new information to biologists.



Local weather impacts melting of one of Antarctica's fastest-retreating glaciers

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of East Anglia) Local weather plays an important part in the retreat of the ice shelves in West Antarctica, according to new research published in the journal Nature Communications.The study led by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) of the Pine Island Glacier (PIG) used a unique five-year record to study how the interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, as well as changing currents, control how heat is transported to, and beneath, the Pine Island Ice Shelf.



Where are the whales off the West Coast?

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) A free webinar for the shipping industry, fishing community and others interested in a new system that reveals where ships are most likely to encounter high densities of blue whales off the West Coast. The project funded by NASA and NOAA produces monthly maps of anticipated blue whale densities based on ocean conditions, which are regularly posted on NOAA Fisheries' West Coast Region website. The information is designed to help vessel crews and fishermen reduce the risk of ship strikes and entanglements.



Invite: Protecting the Crown Jewel of the Caribbean - Cuba's Marine Ecosystems

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(VVH Consulting) Cuba has some of the healthiest coastal ecosystems in the Caribbean, with largely intact coastal mangroves and many of the best coral reefs in the region. The normalization of relations between the United States and Cuba is expected to increase pressures on these systems while also providing new opportunities for collaborative science between the two countries.



Study examines life history of imperiled rattlesnake

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Northern Illinois University) Researchers examine the life history of the Eastern Massasauga rattlesnake, revealing important local climate impacts on the snake that should be carefully weighed when developing conservation strategies. The Eastern Massasauga is a small North American rattler with a distribution centered around the Great Lakes. In 2016, the snake was listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act.



Honey bee genetics sheds light on bee origins

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Davis) Where do honey bees come from? A new study from researchers at UC Davis and UC Berkeley clears some of the fog around honey bee origins. The work could be useful in breeding bees resistant to disease or pesticides.



Roads are driving rapid evolutionary change in our environment

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Dartmouth College) Roads are causing rapid evolutionary change in wild populations of plants and animals according to a Concepts and Questions paper published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. The Dartmouth-led study looks at the evolutionary changes that are being caused by the way roads slice and dice our planet.



Research at MDI Biological Laboratory sheds light on mechanisms underlying aging

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) Scientists have known for decades that drastically restricting certain nutrients without causing malnutrition prolongs health and lifespan in a wide range of species, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect have remained a mystery.In a paper recently published in the journal Aging Cell, MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Aric Rogers, Ph.D., sheds light on an important genetic pathway underlying this effect, raising the possibility that therapies can be developed to prolong healthy human lifespan.



Can facial recognition systems help save lemurs?

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Michigan State University) Michigan State University's biometrics team, led by Anil Jain, modified their human facial recognition system to create LemurFaceID, the first computer facial recognition system for lemurs. Once optimized, LemurFaceID can assist with long-term research of the endangered species.



Printable solar cells just got a little closer

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering) A University of Toronto Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. This alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator.