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EurekAlert! - Cancer Research News



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2016 11:54:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Diet, the gut microbiome, and colorectal cancer: are they linked?

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Recent evidence from animal models suggests a role for specific types of intestinal bacteria in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). If a microbial imbalance in the gut could actively contribute to CRC in humans, dietary-based therapeutic interventions may be able to modify the composition of the gut microbiome to reduce CRC risk, as discussed in a review article published in BioResearch Open Access.



Breast cancer patients could benefit from controversial hormone

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Adelaide) An international team of researchers involving the University of Adelaide is tackling the controversy over what some scientists consider to be a 'harmful' hormone, arguing that it could be a game changer in the fight against recurring breast cancers that are resistant to standard treatments.



EndoPredict outperforms Oncotype Dx in predicting the risk breast cancer recurrence

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Myriad Genetics, Inc.) Data being presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium show Myriad's EndoPredict, a second-generation test, significantly outperformed Oncotype Dx, a first-generation test, in predicting the long-term recurrence of breast cancer, particularly in years five to 10 following surgery. Clinicians can consider using EndoPredict to identify patients who can forgo chemotherapy with confidence, knowing they have a low risk of recurrence over 10 years.



Aggressive form of leukemia linked to defective 'protein factory'

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(KU Leuven) 20 to 40 percent of the patients with multiple myeloma -- a type of leukemia -- have a defect in the ribosome, the protein factory of the cell. These patients have a poorer prognosis than patients with intact ribosomes. At the same time, they respond better to a drug that already exists. These are the findings of a study by the Laboratory for Disease Mechanisms in Cancer at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium.



Naturally occurring symptoms may be mistaken for tamoxifen side-effects

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Cancer Research UK) Women taking tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer were less likely to continue taking the drug if they suffered nausea and vomiting, according to new data presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.



Depression drug reduces joint pain for women with early stage breast cancer

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(SWOG) A drug typically used to treat depression and anxiety can significantly reduce joint pain in postmenopausal women being treated for early stage breast cancer, according to new SWOG research to be presented Friday at a special plenary presentation at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.



Oral bacterium related esophageal cancer prognosis in Japanese patients

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Kumamoto University) A type of bacterium usually found in the human mouth, Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), has been found to be related to the prognosis of esophageal cancer in Japanese patients by researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan. The bacteria are a causative agent of periodontal disease and though it can be found among the intestinal flora, it hasn't been the focus of much research until now.



Researchers identify potentially druggable mutant p53 proteins that promote cancer growth

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) Scientists have focused on certain p53 mutations that generate mutant proteins that promote cancer growth and metastasis. The variants studied are truncated -- they lack half of the domains, or units, of the full-length p53 protein, which enable full-length p53 to enter the cell nucleus and bind DNA, essential in its normal tumor-suppressor function. The truncated mutants act by perturbing mitochondrial function, the team proposes.



UH Seidman cancer center expert presents triple-negative breast cancer immunotherapy trial

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) A researcher from UH Seidman Cancer Center will discuss his upcoming immunotherapy clinical trial for triple-negative breast cancer at 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Joseph Baar, MD, PhD, Director of Breast Cancer Research at UH Seidman Cancer Center, will share details about a phase II clinical trial testing the effectiveness of combining carboplatin and nab-paclitaxel with an immunotherapeutic agent called pembrolizumab in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.



Treating cancer, mental health neglect in rural America

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Oregon Health & Science University) OHSU Knight Cancer Institute oncologist publishes New England Journal of Medicine 'Perspective' on her experience treating a patient in rural Oregon with breast cancer, mental illness.



Researchers identify biomarkers of response to treatment in invasive breast cancer

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) Researchers report at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium that they have identified biomarkers they believe can be used as part of a larger model to predict how patients with HER2-positive operative breast cancer will respond to the targeted treatment trastuzumab, commercially known as Herceptin, and chemotherapy.



Prostate cancer patients more likely to die of other diseases, say 15-year PLCO results

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) 15-year PLCO results published this month in Cancer: 'Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will not die from their disease... now we need to focus on discovering the men that will,' says E. David Crawford, M.D., investigator at the University of Colorado Cancer Center.



Rice scientists' study of human migration could help understand cancer metastasis

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Rice University) A new Rice University study finds that migration for the first humans in America was easier moving east-west as opposed to north-south, largely because the knowledge needed to live in the same climate zones was easily transferable. Researchers said the findings could also shed light on the behavior of metastatic cancers.



Localized immunotherapy new possibility to treat bladder cancer

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Uppsala University) Antibody-based immunotherapy is a new promising method to treat cancer. Unfortunately, today's treatments can result in adverse side effects. New findings from Uppsala University show an alternative way to administer the therapy, which has the same effect on the tumor but less impact other parts of the body.



2017 Brupbacher Cancer Research Prize for Adrian Bird, Guido Kroemer & Laurence Zitvogel

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Zurich) The 2017 Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Prize for Cancer Research of CHF 100,000 is being awarded to three researchers for their outstanding contributions to basic oncological research. Recipient of the first prize is Adrian Bird, University of Edinburgh, while Guido Kroemer, Université Paris Descartes, and Laurence Zitvogel, Gustave Roussy Cancer Center in Paris, are joint recipients of the second prize. The ceremony will take place on Feb. 2, 2017 at the international Brupbacher Symposium in Zurich.



Scientists reveal 'safety catch' within all dividing cells

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Institute of Cancer Research) Researchers have made a major discovery about how cells control when to divide -- representing a step forward in scientists' understanding of one of the most fundamental processes of life.



DNA methylation biomarker for prostate cancer shows promise for accurately determining patient risk

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Elsevier Health Sciences) Report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a biomarker, PITX2 DNA methylation, which is capable of distinguishing cancerous tissue from non-cancerous tissue and predicting the risk of cancer recurrence using only small amounts of tissue obtained from core needle biopsies.



Tumor found in a 255-million-year-old mammalian ancestor

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(The JAMA Network Journals) A tumor in a 255-million-year-old mammalian ancestor called a gorgonopsian is detailed in a new research letter published online by JAMA Oncology.



Study shows new treatment strategy in head & neck cancer not better than current standard

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University Health Network) Results of the largest Canadian clinical trial to date comparing standard treatment for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer with an experimental treatment did not show the new treatment is superior.



Blood-borne HPV antibodies indicate head, neck cancer prognosis

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Brown University) A new study in JAMA Oncology finds that the presence of particular antibodies of human papillomavirus in blood serum are reliable indicators of five-year head and neck cancer survival.



Tracking breast cancer cell genetics reveals longer potential treatment window

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(The Francis Crick Institute) Breast cancer cells break away and spread to other parts of the body relatively late on in breast tumor development, an international team of scientists has shown. The research, jointly led by Dr. Peter Van Loo at the Francis Crick Institute, could help refine cancer therapy and is published in the journal Genome Biology.



More complications, less satisfaction in breast cancer patients who get radiation, implants

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Michigan Health System) A new study finds that breast cancer patients who have implant reconstruction following radiation therapy had more complications from the surgery and were less satisfied with the result than women who had implants but no radiation.



Radiation therapy may increase complications in breast cancer patients receiving implants

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(American Association for Cancer Research) Radiotherapy increased complications and impaired patient-reported satisfaction with reconstructed breasts in breast cancer patients who received implant reconstruction but not in those who received autologous reconstruction, according to data from a large, prospective, multicenter cohort study presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 6-10.



Scientists develop exciting new option for targeted cancer therapy

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Trinity College Dublin) Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have identified a new option for more targeted cancer therapy. Their method should allow greater doses of cancer drugs to be administered with fewer side-effects, because the drugs are inactive in the body until being sparked into life when coming into contact with cancer cells.



Researchers reveal 3-D structure of cell's inflammation sensor and its inhibitors

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego have now determined the 3-D structure of CCR2 simultaneously bound to two inhibitors. Understanding how these molecules fit together may better enable pharmaceutical companies to develop anti-inflammatory drugs that bind and inhibit CCR2 in a similar manner. The study is published Dec. 7 by Nature.