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EurekAlert! - Cancer Research News



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2018 15:54:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Cells lacking nuclei struggle to move in 3-D environments

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) A study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and published in the Journal of Cell Biology examined the role of the physical structure of the nucleus in cell movement through different surfaces.



MIT Portugal is developing a compression sleeve for breast cancer patients

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(MIT Portugal Program) The project developed by the MIT Portugal Ph.D. Student at the University of Minho Carlos Gonçalves, was considered the most innovative of the nine projects incubated during 10 weeks by Startup Nano, a pioneer incubation and acceleration program for nanotechnology innovation promoted by Startup Braga in a partnership with the International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory and the Centre for Nanotechnology and Smart Materials (CeNTI) both located in Braga.



Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells alive

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway.' Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, Charité scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for patients. Results from this research have been published in the journal Cell Reports.



Mortality of surgery vs. targeted radiation in early lung cancer patients

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Among patients older than 80 years, 3.9 percent receiving surgery passed away within the 30-day post-treatment window, compared with 0.9 percent of patients receiving focused radiation.



Factor that doubles the risk of death from breast cancer identified

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Karolinska Institutet) Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the risk of death from breast cancer is twice as high for patients with high heterogeneity of the oestrogen receptor within the same tumour as compared to patients with low heterogeneity. The study, published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, shows that the higher risk of death is independent of other known tumour markers and also holds true for Luminal A breast cancer.



Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Springer) Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature.



UCLA study describes structure of herpes virus tumor linked to Kaposi's sarcoma

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) UCLA team shows in the laboratory that an inhibitor can be developed to break down the herpes virus. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, or KSHV, is one of two viruses known to cause cancer in humans.



Fanconi anemia: Insight from a green plant

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American Society of Plant Biologists) Fanconi anemia is a human genetic disorder with severe effects, including an increased risk of cancer and infertility. Research in plants helps us understand the disease in humans, showing how a key protein functions in the exchange of genetic material.



Beyond drugs for IBD: Improving the overall health of IBD patients

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American Gastroenterological Association) 1.6 million Americans suffer from IBD. Identifying the best medical treatment leads to improved disease management, but IBD patients also experience mental, emotional and other physical side effects that need to be understood and managed to improve the overall health of IBD patients. Research presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress™ helps health care providers understand how to better manage their patients' overall health and mental well-being to increase the quality of their lives.



Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry) UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to advance public health measures.



Harrington Discovery Institute announces 2018 grant funding to 10 physician-scientists

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) Ten physician-scientists are named 2018 Harrington Scholar-Innovator Award recipients to support their discoveries in diverse research areas, including cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis and addiction.



Cancer gene screening more cost effective in the general population than high-risk groups

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Oxford University Press USA) A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that screening the general population for mutations in specific genes is a more cost effective way to detect people at risk and prevents more breast and ovarian cancers compared to only screening patients with a personal or family history of these diseases.



More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer risk

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Tufts University School of Medicine and Cancer Center.



Single blood test screens for eight cancer types

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.



Researchers discover new enzymes central to cell function

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Case Western Reserve University) Doctors have long treated heart attacks, improved asthma symptoms, and cured impotence by increasing levels of a single molecule in the body: nitric oxide. The tiny molecule can change how proteins function. But new research featured in Molecular Cell suggests supplementing nitric oxide--NO--is only the first step. Researchers have discovered previously unknown enzymes in the body that convert NO into 'stopgap' molecules--SNOs--that then modulate proteins. The newly discovered enzymes help NO have diverse roles in cells.



Two new breast cancer genes emerge from Lynch syndrome gene study

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Columbia University Medical Center) Columbia University researchers have identified two new breast cancer genes that also cause Lynch syndrome.



Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Michigan State University) A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus.



How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center researchers.



DNA study casts light on century-old mystery of how cells divide

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Edinburgh) Scientists have solved a longstanding puzzle of how cells are able to tightly package lengthy strands of DNA when they divide -- an essential process for growth, repair and maintenance in living organisms.



Scientists identify potential target genes to halt progression of thyroid cancer

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Research shows that expression of 52 microRNAs falls as the disease becomes more aggressive. Restoring levels of these molecules in the tumor could be a novel therapeutic strategy.



Researchers identify a new chromatin regulatory mechanism linked to SirT6

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute) Researchers IDIBELL, led by Dr. Àlex Vaquero, have proposed a new double mechanism of inhibition of the NF-κB pathway linked to the action of SirT6 on chromatin.



New registry launched to track, improve the quality of cancer care delivered in the US

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American Society for Radiation Oncology) A registry that tracks the quality of medical care provided to patients receiving cancer treatment launched this month as part of a collaboration between the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). In addition to improving the quality of care for people living with cancer, the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI®) Reporting Registry also makes it easier for medical and radiation oncologists to report quality-related performance metrics.



Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will occur

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Surrey) Smokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, a new study in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology reports.



A centuries-old math equation used to solve a modern-day genetics challenge

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Utah) Researchers developed a new mathematical tool to validate and improve methods used by medical professionals to interpret results from clinical genetic tests. The work was published this month in Genetics in Medicine.



CancerSEEK: Generalized screening for multiple cancer types

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Researchers have developed a noninvasive blood test based on combined analysis of DNA and proteins that may allow earlier detection of eight common cancer types. In more than 1,000 patients, their method, dubbed CancerSEEK, detected cancer with a sensitivity of 69 to 98 percent (depending on cancer type).