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EurekAlert! - Cancer Research News



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Mon, 25 Sep 2017 03:54:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



UTSA receives $350,000 grant for prostate cancer research

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas at San Antonio) Jing Yong Ye, professor of biomedical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has received a two-year, $354,617 grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute to support the development of his noninvasive method of detecting prostate cancer.



Study finds up to one-quarter of cancer patients use marijuana

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Wiley) A new study conducted in a cancer center in a state with legalized medicinal and recreational marijuana found that approximately one-quarter of surveyed patients used marijuana in the past year, mostly for physical and psychological symptoms.



Discovery of a new genetic syndrome which predisposes the body to cancer

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) A new syndrome caused by biallelic mutations -- those produced in both gene copies inherited from the mother and father -- in the FANCM gene predisposes the body to the appearance of tumors and causes rejection to chemotherapy treatments. Contrary to what scientists believed, the gene does not cause Fanconi anaemia. Researchers recommend modifying the clinical monitoring of patients with these mutations.



Novel assay shows promise for non-invasive detection of PD-L1 on circulating tumor cells

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Future Science Group) Researchers have presented the first report of a new microfluidics-based approach for detecting circulating cancer biomarkers in blood samples.



Russian scientists have studied the genes that allow cancer cells to resist drugs

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(RUDN University) Researchers from the People's Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University) have studied the mechanism of drug resistance for ovarian and breast cancer cells. They discovered that these cancer cells have redox-dependent mechanism which is tasked with sustaining their drug resistance. The results have been published in two articles in the journal of Free Radical Biology and Medicine.



Positive, negative or neutral, it all matters: NASA explains space radiation

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Johnson Space Center) Charged particles may be small, but they matter to astronauts. NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is investigating these particles to solve one of its biggest challenges for a human journey to Mars: space radiation and its effects on the human body.



Forgoing chemo linked to worse survival in older patients with advanced colon cancer who had dementia

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Association for Cancer Research) A pre-existing diagnosis of dementia was associated with increased risk of death for older patients with advanced colon cancer; however, some of the effects of dementia on survival could be mediated by receipt of chemotherapy.



Alternative splicing, an important mechanism for cancer

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Sanford-Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Scientists discover several alterations in this cellular process with implications in cancer by analyzing samples from more than 4,000 patients.



Smoking negatively impacts long-term survival after breast cancer

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum finds that smoking negatively impacts long-term survival after breast cancer. Quitting smoking after diagnosis may reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer.



When good immune cells turn bad

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Investigators at CHLA have identified the molecular pathway used to foster neuroblastoma and demonstrated use of a clinically available agent, ruxolitinib, to block the pathway.



'Labyrinth' chip could help monitor aggressive cancer stem cells

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Michigan) Inspired by the Labyrinth of Greek mythology, a new chip etched with fluid channels sends blood samples through a hydrodynamic maze to separate out rare circulating cancer cells into a relatively clean stream for analysis. It is already in use in a breast cancer clinical trial.



Study shows diet and exercise improve treatment outcomes for obese pediatric cancer patients

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Diet and exercise may improve treatment outcomes in pediatric cancer patients, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital.



International conference on molecular targets & cancer therapeutics to be Held Oct. 26-30

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Association for Cancer Research) The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the National Cancer Institute, and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) will host their annual International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics Oct. 26-30 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia.



Drug combination may improve impact of immunotherapy in head and neck cancer

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - San Diego) Checkpoint inhibitor-based immunotherapy has been shown to be very effective in recurrent and metastatic head and neck cancer but only in a minority of patients. University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers may have found a way to double down on immunotherapy's effectiveness.



Whole food diet may help prevent colon cancer, other chronic conditions

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Penn State) A diet that includes plenty of colorful vegetables and fruits may contain compounds that can stop colon cancer and inflammatory bowel diseases in pigs, according to an international team of researchers. Understanding how these compounds work on a molecular level could be an initial step toward finding treatments for people with cancer, they added.



Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Doctors at Penn Medicine have become the first in the world to treat a patient with a new treatment platform designed to streamline the way therapeutic radiation is delivered to cancer patients.



Mitochondria drive cell survival in times of need

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(McGill University) McGill University researchers have discovered a mechanism through which mitochondria, the energy factory of our body's cells, play a role in preventing cells from dying when the cells are deprived of nutrients - a finding that points to a potential target for next-generation cancer drugs.



Breathing dirty air may harm kidneys

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Washington University in St. Louis) Outdoor air pollution may increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and contribute to kidney failure, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs (VA) St. Louis Health Care System. Scientists used VA data to evaluate the effects of air pollution and kidney disease on nearly 2.5 million people and compared it to air-quality levels collected by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).



A rapid alternative to standard safety tests for lentiviral vectors

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Cell Press) A new, publicly available test to assess the safety of cell therapy products altered by lentivirus generates results within a few hours, potentially hastening the pace at which viral immunotherapies move into clinical trial. Current assays required by the US Food and Drug Administration take about six weeks to complete. The rapid test, which does not have a significant risk of false positives, is also a fraction of the cost of the standard approach.



Bio-inspired approach to RNA delivery

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A team of MIT chemical engineers, inspired by the way that cells translate their own mRNA into proteins, has designed a synthetic delivery system that is four times more effective than delivering mRNA on its own.



3-D printed brain allows surgeons to practice

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Connecticut) The first time a young surgeon threads a wire into a stroke victim's chest and neck and fishes a blood clot out of the brain may be one of the most harrowing moments in her career. Using brain scans and a 3-D printer, a UConn Health radiologist and a medical physicist made a life-size model of the arteries and will make the pattern freely available to any doctor who requests.



New clinical trial explores combining immunotherapy and radiation for sarcoma patients

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Maryland Medical Center) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers are investigating a new approach to treat high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas by combining two immunotherapy drugs with radiation therapy to stimulate the immune system to destroy the main tumor as well as leftover microscopic cancer cells that may seed other tumors.



Slowly proliferating melanoma cells with high metastatic properties

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Wistar Institute) A study conducted at The Wistar Institute has led to the identification of a slowly proliferating and highly invasive melanoma cell subpopulation, characterized by production of a protein associated with invasive behavior.



New study offers novel treatment strategy for patients with colon cancer

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Boston University School of Medicine) Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In a new study, researchers demonstrate for the first time that a previously uncharacterized protein is increased in colon cancer. The protein is immunoglobulin containing proline rich receptor-1 (IGPR-1) which was recently identified in the same laboratory as a cell adhesion molecule.



Penn researchers identify new target, develop new drug for cancer therapies

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Opening up a new pathway to fight cancer, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to target an enzyme that is crucial to tumor growth while also blocking the mechanism that has made past attempts to target that enzyme resistant to treatment. Researchers were able to use this finding to develop a drug that successfully inhibits tumor growth of melanoma as well as pancreatic and colorectal cancer in mice.