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EurekAlert! - Cancer Research News



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2017 13:54:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Use of Prostate Health Index test reduces unnecessary biopsies

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Springer) The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a cost-effective tool used by urologists to detect prostate cancer. It reduces the risk of over diagnosis, and cuts down on the need to send men for unnecessary and often uncomfortable biopsies. So says Jay White of Carolina Urology Partners in the US, lead author of a study in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, published by Springer Nature.



Special Focus Issue of Future Oncology highlights advances in image guided therapy

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Future Science Group) The Future Science Group (FSG) published journal, Future Oncology, has released a special focus issue that examines the field of image guided therapy in oncology, highlighting the latest advancements in image guided therapy and the application of several techniques in a number of cancer types.



Improved method of engineering T-cells to attack cancer

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Cardiff University) Researchers at Cardiff University have found a way to boost the cancer-destroying ability of the immune system's T-cells, offering new hope in the fight against a wide range of cancers.



Diabetes drug helps repair UV-damaged DNA in cells of 'Moon children'

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) The severe and debilitating genetic disease Xeroderma pigmentosum impedes cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Scientists from CeMM found a drug approved for diabetes treatment to alleviate the impact of the gene defect in cell culture, which led to the discovery of a previously unknown DNA repair mechanism. The study was published in Molecular Cell.



Osimertinib improves progression-free survival in Asian EGFR-mutated lung cancer patients

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) Osimertinib improves progression-free survival compared to standard first line therapy in Asian patients with EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the Asian subset analysis of the FLAURA trial presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress, sumultaneously published in The New England Journal of Medicine.



Study shows new second line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer is effective and safe

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) A randomised trial in 650 patients has confirmed the safety and efficacy of a new second line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer, researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress.



National cooperative group trial seeks to cut in half early mortality rates for rare leukemia

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) A national cooperative group trial is making a handful of the country's experts in a rare leukemia available around the clock, with the goal of cutting by more than half the high mortality rates that occur in the difficult first few weeks of treatment.Induction mortality for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, or APL, can be as high as 30 percent, but for patients who survive those first few weeks, survival rates can soar beyond 90 percent, making it the most curable leukemia.



Six researchers from MD Anderson elected as AAAS Fellows

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) In recognition of their contributions to basic, translational, and clinical research, six faculty members from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).



Some cancer therapies may provide a new way to treat high blood pressure

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Georgetown University Medical Center) Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say Georgetown University Medical Center investigators. The finding could offer a real advance in hypertension treatment because although a number of high blood pressure drugs are now available, they work by different mechanisms that are not suited for all patients.



Pairing cancer genomics with cognitive computing highlights potential therapeutic options

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center-led study has demonstrated the ability of cognitive computing to scour large volumes of data from scientific studies and databases to identify potentially relevant clinical trials or therapeutic options for cancer patients based on the genetics of their tumors. The findings suggest that cognitive computing applications could help physicians to stay abreast of scientific literature and highlight potential therapeutic options, specifically as it relates to cancer genetics.



Cell-weighing method could help doctors choose cancer drugs

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have shown that they can use a new type of measurement to predict how drugs will affect cancer cells taken from multiple myeloma patients. Their predictions correlated with how those patients actually fared when treated with those drugs.



Many cancer survivors are living with PTSD

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Wiley) A recent study showed approximately one-fifth of patients with cancer experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) several months after diagnosis, and many of these patients continued to live with PTSD years later.



Overweight women may need more frequent mammograms

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Radiological Society of North America) Women with higher body mass index (BMI) face an increased risk of not detecting their breast tumor until it has become large, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings suggest that women with higher BMI may need shorter intervals between mammography screening exams.



Mainstreaming genetic counselling for ovarian cancer

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) A study that looked at mainstreaming genetic counselling for ovarian cancer to support screening programmes in Malaysia was presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. The preliminary results of the MaGiC study show that most patients counselled by a well-trained but not necessarily an expert in genetics were satisfied or just as satisfied with their experience as compared to those being counselled by a genetic counsellor or clinical geneticist.



Study finds all Myanmar mouth cancer patients chew betel quid

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) A study in Myanmar has found that all mouth cancer patients use smokeless tobacco, researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. Betel quid chewing often starts in adolescence and is associated with smoking and drinking alcohol, which are also risk factors for oral cancer.



Only one in five Indonesian women are aware of cervical cancer screening

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) Just one in five Indonesian women are aware of cervical cancer screening, according to a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. The research in nearly 5,400 women also found that only 5% knew about mammography for early detection of breast cancer.



More care is needed for cancer supportive care

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) Cancer-related effects and the treatment itself can have a significant psychosocial impact on cancer survivors. A recent study (STEP study) that assessed over 1800 cancer survivors across ten countries in Asia Pacific was presented at the ESMO Asia Congress today.



ESMO Consortium study reveals inequality in access to treatment in Asia

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) opened its 3rd ESMO Asia Congress today, once again in Singapore, attracting close to 3000 regional and international cancer doctors with leading researchers and experts to promote advances in science, diagnosis, treatment, and best practices for cancer patients in Asia.



Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Oxford University Press USA) A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types of cancer, including those of the breast, kidney, bowel, and womb. However, after surveying 3,293 adults, taken as representative of the UK population, researchers found that only a quarter of respondents were aware of the link between obesity and cancer.



Anti-tumor and immune-potentiating Enterococcus faecalis-2001 β-glucans

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Bentham Science Publishers) Enterococcus faecalis 2001 is a probiotic lactic acid bacterium and has been used as a biological response modifier (BRM). From physiological limitation of bacterial preservation in storage and safety, the live E. faecalis 2001 has been heat-treated and the BRM components containing high level of β-glucan, named EF-2001, were prepared.



University of Guelph professor identifies protein key to cancer cells ability to spread

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Guelph) U of G scientists have made a discovery that could reduce the spread of cancer by hindering a protein that binds cancer cells together and allows them to invade tissues.The groundbreaking study identified a protein, known as cadherin-22, as a potential factor in cancer metastasis, or spread, and showed that hindering it decreased the adhesion and invasion rate of breast and brain cancer cells by up to 90 percent.



Study analyzes mutations in cerebrospinal fluid in lung cancer with brain metastases

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) Researchers have explored the analysis of mutations in cerebrospinal fluid of lung cancer patients with brain metastases in a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. Tumor tissue from brain metastasis is difficult to obtain and therefore less invasive methods are needed to identify and monitor the presence of known actionable mutations.



ALEX study shows alectinib 600 mg more effective than crizotinib in Asian cancer patients

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(European Society for Medical Oncology) A subanalysis of the phase III ALEX study has shown that alectinib 600 mg twice daily is more effective than standard of care crizotinib in Asian patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress.



How a poorly explored immune cell may impact cancer immunity and immunotherapy

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) The immune cells that are trained to fight off the body's invaders can become defective. It's what allows cancer to develop. So most research has targeted these co-called effector T-cells. But a new study takes a step back and considers: What if the problem isn't with the effector T-cells but starts higher up the cellular chain?



Novel therapeutic target discovered for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai researchers identify new protein in a common subtype of breast cancer which can potentially offer more effective therapies for the future.