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EurekAlert! - Cancer Research News



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Wed, 24 May 2017 19:54:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Harvard Medical School expert calls for protection of critical gains made in cancer care under ACA

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard Medical School) As the White House moves forward with its efforts to repeal Obamacare, it should strive to preserve -- and further boost -- these important advances, according to an introduction penned by Harvard Medical School professor health care policy expert Nancy Keating, who served as guest editor for the issue.



BU researcher receives entrepreneur award from the American Thoracic Society

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Boston University Medical Center) Avrum Spira, MD, MSc, professor of medicine, pathology and bioinformatics at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is the inaugural recipient of the Research Innovation and Translation Achievement Award from the American Thoracic Society (ATS).



Feinstein Institute presents Cerami Award to Sir Paul Nurse for cancer research

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Northwell Health) Northwell Health's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine announced today that the seventh Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be awarded to Sir Paul Nurse, Ph.D., director of The Francis Crick Institute.



Moffitt researchers demonstrate mathematical modeling limits aggressive tumor cell growth

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute) Researchers in the Integrated Mathematical Oncology Department at the Moffitt found that mathematical models can be used to predict how different tumor cell populations interact with each other and respond to a changing environment.



A new method for creating safer induced pluripotent stem cells

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Future Science Group) Induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) hold great promise in regenerative medicine, personalized medicine and drug discovery. However, while avoiding the ethical controversies associated with embryonic stem cells, they carry neoplastic risk owing to the use of the oncogenes c-Myc and Lin28. This has limited their utility in the biomedical arena.



Revealed: How polyomavirus tricks our cells into helping it build its invasion route

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) If every cell in our body is a factory, viruses are industrial spies who try to break in and take over. New findings about how one of the most mysterious types of spy - polyomaviruses -- accomplishes this feat could aid the fight against Merkel cell carcinoma, and diseases in organ transplant and cancer patients.



Brain microenvironment makes HER2-positive breast cancer metastases resistant to treatment

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts General Hospital) A Massachusetts General Hospital-based research team has identified a novel mechanism behind the resistance of breast cancer brain metastases to HER2- or PI3K-targeted therapies and a treatment strategy that may overcome this resistance.



Blood test offers improved breast cancer detection tool to reduce use of breast biopsy

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Provista Diagnostics) A Clinical Breast Cancer study demonstrates Videssa Breast can inform better next steps after abnormal mammogram results and potentially reduce biopsies up to 67 percent.



Using a genetic signature to overcome chemotherapy-resistant lung cancer

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often respond to standard chemotherapy, only to develop drug resistance later, and with fatal consequences. But what if doctors could identify those at greatest risk of relapse and provide a therapy to overcome or avoid it?



Skin color no shield against skin cancer

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Rush University Medical Center) The misconception that people with more pigment -- called melanin -- in their skin cells are protected from cancer-causing ultra-violet rays can be deadly. Melanoma, the least common form of skin cancer but also the deadliest, are more likely to be caused by genetics than the sun. Thus too many people of color don't think to look for changing moles that can be fatal.



Study leads to breakthrough in better understanding acute myeloid leukemia

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Birmingham) A study led by the University of Birmingham has made a breakthrough in the understanding of how different genetic mutations cause acute myeloid leukemia.



Immunotherapy target suppresses pain to mask cancer

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Duke University) Duke University researchers found that a molecule called PD-L1, which is blocked by the immunotherapy drug nivolumab, acts not only on immune cells but also on the nerve cells that signal pain. That insight could lead to a simple test that measures subtle differences in pain sensitivity to gauge whether or not a cancer patient is responding to immunotherapy. This study also identifies PD-L1 as a previously unrecognized neuromodulator and pain inhibitor.



Study offers guidance for targeting residual ovarian tumors

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers who are working on an implantable device that could make intraperitoneal chemotherapy more bearable have published a new study that offers insight into how to improve chemotherapy strategies for ovarian cancer, and how to determine which patients would be most likely to benefit from their device.



Tracking cancer's signaling pathways

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) Malignant melanoma is one of the most common and dangerous types of cancer. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg investigated how and why brown pigmented moles turn into malignant melanoma using innovative robot technology. The insights gained can simplify methods of diagnosis in the future; furthermore, they suggest that certain cosmetic products and creams should be avoided.



A CLOUD of possibilities: Finding new therapies by combining drugs

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) The CeMM Library of Unique Drugs (CLOUD) is the first condensed set of FDA-approved drugs representing all clinical compounds. Its potential was shown in a combinatorial high throughput screen at the CeMM chemical screening platform, published in Nature Chemical Biology: by testing all CLOUD compounds in combination with each other, a pair of hitherto unrelated drugs proved to be highly effective against multiple prostate cancer cell lines known for their resistance to therapy.



Increased lysyl oxidase may be a significant contributor to heart disease and cancer

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) It's known that people with high blood pressure have increased levels of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX), but it has not been clear if LOX actually contributes to heart disease. Now, a new research report appearing online in The FASEB Journal helps answer this question by showing that LOX does negatively affect heart function in mice.



Where body fat is carried can predict cancer risk

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Cancer Research UK) Scientists have found that carrying fat around your middle could be as good an indicator of cancer risk as body mass index (BMI), according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer today.



A new T-cell population for cancer immunotherapy

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Basel) Scientists at the University of Basel in Switzerland have, for the first time, described a new T cell population that can recognize and kill tumor cells. The open access journal eLife has published the results.



AstraZeneca and the Francis Crick Institute sign research agreement

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Francis Crick Institute) The Francis Crick Institute has signed a new research agreement with global biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca. The five-year initiative will see researchers from AstraZeneca and the Crick collaborate on early-stage research that could translate into new treatments and health innovations in the future.



Just one alcoholic drink a day increases breast cancer risk, exercise lowers risk

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Institute for Cancer Research) A new report that analyzed the global scientific research on how diet, weight and exercise affect breast cancer risk finds there are steps women can take to lower their risk. The report finds that daily alcohol consumption and adult weight gain increase risk; physical activity and breastfeeding lower risk. The report also reveals, for the first time, that vigorous exercise decreases the risk of both pre- and post-menopausal breast cancers.



UTA's AbeXXa Biologics named one of 40 Best University Startups 2017 by NCET2

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas at Arlington) AbeXXa Biologics, a faculty startup at The University of Texas at Arlington, was named one of the 40 'Best University Startups 2017' by the National Council of Entrepreneurial Tech Transfer. AbeXXa is identifying a new series of biomarkers or targets for cancer from the many thousands of proteins found within a tumor cell, a new field of research that could potentially result in immunotherapies that prove effective for a broad range of patients.



Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune system

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Princeton University) Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have identified a small RNA molecule that helps maintain the activity of stem cells in both healthy and cancerous breast tissue. The study, which will be published in the June issue of Nature Cell Biology, suggests that this 'microRNA' promotes particularly deadly forms of breast cancer and that inhibiting the effects of this molecule could improve the efficacy of existing breast cancer therapies.



Taking a closer look at genetic switches in cancer

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(California Institute of Technology) Caltech biochemists have uncovered details of a protein that controls blood cell production in an aggressive form of leukemia.



The secret to combating pancreatic cancer may lie in suppression of a common protein

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Southern California - Health Sciences) Research indicates that in mice with a KRAS mutation, present in 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients, expressing only half the amount of the glucose-regulated protein GRP78 is enough to halt the earliest stage of pancreatic cancer development, resulting in delayed tumor development and prolonged survival.



New cancer drug can prevent reactions to common airborne allergens

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Northwestern University) A cancer drug for patients with certain types of leukemia and lymphoma can also prevent reactions to some of the most common airborne allergies, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine study. The promising data from this pilot study could have greater implications for adults with food allergies.