Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Cancer
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/cancer.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
breast cancer  breast  cancer  cells  institute  medical  medicine  national  new  patients  research  researchers  study  university 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Cancer

EurekAlert! - Cancer Research News



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sat, 17 Feb 2018 08:54:02 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



DDW® 2018 offers reporters access to leading research in digestive health

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Digestive Disease Week) Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) will host its annual scientific meeting in Washington, DC, from June 2-5, 2018, bringing together physicians, researchers, and academics from across the world. Recognized as a top 50 medical meeting, this is your opportunity to learn cutting-edge medical advances and report on the latest research in gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery. This year's press program will offer reporters multiple opportunities to interact with leading researchers from the field.



'Liquid biopsy' can help predict outcomes in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) A clinically relevant 'liquid biopsy' test can be used to profile cancer genomes from blood and predict survival outcomes for patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), according to new research published by a multi-institutional team of researchers with The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James), the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.



Breast reconstruction patients often less satisfied than expected post surgery

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) Many breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy with or without immediate reconstruction mispredict future satisfaction with aspects of physical and sexual health post-surgery, according to a new study published by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC -- James).



New report: Labs differ widely in BRCA testing protocols

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(MediaSource) A new article published in npj Genomic Medicine showcases the wide differences in BRCA testing protocols at labs around the world. The article surveyed 86 laboratories around the world about their BRCA testing practices and found that all the labs differed widely in their approach.



Technology may be key to help patients quit smoking

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Medical University of South Carolina) Clinical researcher, Alana Rojewski, Ph.D., receives career development award to study smoking cessation programs in an oncology setting at MUSC Hollings Cancer Center and benefits of technology-based interventions for lung cancer screening patients.



Metabolomics, a promising tool for advancing in treatment personalization of oncological patients

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Bentham Science Publishers) This review provides specific examples of metabolomics applications in the field of clinical pharmacology and precision medicine with a focus on the therapeutic management of cancer and in the translation of these results to the clinics.



Affordable Care Act lowered uninsured rate for cancer survivors

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Wolters Kluwer Health) The percentage of cancer survivors without health insurance decreased substantially after implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), reports a study in the March issue of Medical Care, published by Wolters Kluwer.



New research highlights how cancer cells repair themselves following proton beam therapy

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Liverpool) Collaborative research conducted in Liverpool and Oxford, published in The Red Journal, identifies the specific cellular process that helps cancer cells damaged as a result of proton beam therapy, repair themselves.



Catching up to brain cancer

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Delaware) University of Delaware researchers have produced a new and freely available computer program that predicts cancer cell motion and spread with high accuracy. This new system gives researchers a faster way of examining rapidly spreading glioblastoma tumors -- an aggressive and devastating form of brain cancer -- and a new way of predicting the likely impact different treatments might have.



Self-sampling identifies twice as many women at risk of cervical cancer

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Uppsala University) Using self-sampling followed by HPV testing, more than twice as many women at risk of developing cervical cancer could be identified and offered preventive treatment. This is shown by researchers at Uppsala University in the first randomised study in the world comparing two ways of identifying cervical cancer, published today in the British Journal of Cancer.



Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Westmead Institute for Medical Research) New research, led by Professor Anna deFazio from the Westmead Institute and Westmead Hospital, has shown that the genes we inherit can have a significant impact on how the body processes chemotherapy drugs, which may lead to different clinical outcomes for ovarian cancer patients.



Szent-Györgyi Prize to honor NCI's Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(NIH/National Cancer Institute) The 2018 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research will be awarded to Douglas R. Lowy, M.D., and John T. Schiller, Ph.D., of the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). They are being recognized for their contributions toward the development of vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV).



CRISPR scissors, Cas12a, enables cutting-edge diagnostics

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Berkeley) Utilizing an unsuspected activity of the CRISPR-Cas12a protein, UC Berkeley researchers created a simple diagnostic system called DETECTR to analyze cells, blood, saliva, urine and stool to detect genetic mutations, cancer and antibiotic resistance and also diagnose bacterial and viral infections. The scientists discovered that when Cas12a binds its double-stranded DNA target, it indiscriminately chews up all single-stranded DNA. They then created reporter molecules attached to single-stranded DNA to signal when Cas12a finds its target.



First comparison of common breast cancer tests finds varied accuracy of predictions

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Queen Mary University of London) Commercially available prognostic breast cancer tests show significant variation in their abilities to predict disease recurrence, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London of nearly 800 postmenopausal women.



Researchers advance CRISPR-based diagnostic tool, develop miniature paper test

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) The team that first unveiled the rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic tool called SHERLOCK has greatly enhanced the tool's power to work with a miniature paper test, similar to a pregnancy test, allowing rapid and simple detection in any setting. Additional features greatly expand both the breadth and sensitivity of the diagnostic information, including the ability to detect multiple targets at once and quantify the amount of target in a sample.



New mutation linked to ovarian cancer can be passed down through dad

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(PLOS) A newly identified mutation, passed down through the X-chromosome, is linked to earlier onset of ovarian cancer in women and prostate cancer in father and sons. Kunle Odunsi, Kevin H. Eng and colleagues at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center in Buffalo, N.Y., report these findings Feb. 15, 2018, in PLOS Genetics.



Induced pluripotent stem cells could serve as cancer vaccine, Stanford researchers say

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Stanford Medicine) Induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, are a keystone of regenerative medicine. Outside the body, they can be coaxed to become many different types of cells and tissues that can help repair damage due to trauma or disease. Now, a study in mice from the Stanford University School of Medicine suggests another use for iPS cells: training the immune system to attack or even prevent tumors.



Stem cell vaccine immunizes lab mice against multiple cancers

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Cell Press) Stanford University researchers report that injecting mice with inactivated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) launched a strong immune response against breast, lung, and skin cancers. The vaccine also prevented relapses in animals that had tumors removed. The work appears in the journal Cell Stem Cell on Feb. 15.



A gut reaction...on a chip

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Instituto Superior Técnico (IST, Portugal), Boston Children's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have published a study using an organ-on-a-chip (Organ Chip) model of the human gut that reveals the intestinal blood vessel cells may play an important part in radiation-induced intestinal injury, and it confirms that a potential radioprotective drug, dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), suppresses the intestine's responses to radiation injury.



Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, OHSU join forces to advance precision

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and OHSU announced today a joint collaboration to improve patient care by focusing research on highly complex sets of biomedical data, and the tools to interpret them. The OHSU-PNNL Precision Medicine Innovation Co-Laboratory, called PMedIC, will provide a comprehensive ecosystem for scientists to utilize integrated 'omics, data science and imaging technologies in their research in order to advance precision medicine - an approach to disease treatment that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment and lifestyle for each person.



Cutting off cervical cancer's fuel supply stymies tumors

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that cervical tumors that don't respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer's fuel supply.



IRB Barcelona paves the way to the use of immunotherapy to treat aggressive colon tumors

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)) The researchers developed a mouse model that mimics advanced human colon cancer. This model has allowed them to study the immune system response for the first time.



Anne Dejean-Assémat receives the Sjöberg Prize 2018

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Institut Pasteur) Professor Anne Dejean-Assémat, from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm, has recently been awarded the Sjöberg Prize 2018, along with Professors Hugues de Thé from the Collège de France and Zhu Chen from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China. This prize, awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, was set up in 2016 and carries a grant of $1 million to fund the future research of these three eminent scientists.



PharmaMar licenses synthetic marine-derived payloads to Seattle Genetics

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Pharmamar) PharmaMar will receive an upfront payment of 5,000,000 US dollars, followed by development milestones if an antibody-drug conjugate enters clinical development.



A gene that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer controls inflammation in normal tissue

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas (CNIO)) A group of researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre has now discovered an unexpected link between the two processes: in the pancreas, one of the genes that increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer also controls inflammation. This finding offers 'a major conceptual change,' explains Paco Real, from the CNIO, which, as well as helping to understand the origin of tumors, suggests new strategies to improve the prevention of pancreatic cancer.