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Preview: EurekAlert! - Business and Economics

EurekAlert! - Business and Economics



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2016 10:15:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



MIT Portugal Ph.D. student wins the Road Safety Innovation Award by ACP

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(MIT Portugal Program) Francisco Duarte, a Ph.D. Student in Transportation Systems of the MIT Portugal Program at University of Coimbra, was honored today with the first prize at the initiative promoted by Automóvel Clube Portugal in a partnership with BP Portugal, National Council of Rectors and National Innovation Agency. The 10 000€ prize will later be invested in the venture's prototype and is currently under construction.



Wiley becomes first major publisher to require ORCID IDs for submitting authors

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Wiley) John Wiley & Sons Inc. (NYSE: JWa and JWb), announced plans to require ORCID iDs as part of the manuscript submission process for a large number of journals. Beginning in winter 2016, more than 500 Wiley journals using ScholarOne Manuscripts will require the submitting author (only) to provide an ORCID identifier (iD) when submitting a manuscript.



Tasting garlic... with your feet!? Weird food chemistry tricks (video)

Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(American Chemical Society) Did you know you can 'taste' garlic with your feet? Or that chocolate can instantly dissolve that wad of gum in your mouth? Or that nose grease can get rid of the foam on a badly poured beer in seconds? This week, Reactions explains these three offbeat food-chemistry tricks. In the name of science, we encourage you to play with your food with these do-it-yourself experiments. Check out the videos here: http://bit.ly/WeirdFoodTricks.



NTU launches new research lab to develop greener maritime energy solutions

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Nanyang Technological University) Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) today launched a new marine research laboratory to develop innovative eco-friendly technologies for Singapore's maritime and offshore industry. It is equipped with the region's first dual-fuel marine engine. Partners are SembCorp Marine and the Singapore Economic Development Board.



Treating cancer, mental health neglect in rural America

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Oregon Health & Science University) OHSU Knight Cancer Institute oncologist publishes New England Journal of Medicine 'Perspective' on her experience treating a patient in rural Oregon with breast cancer, mental illness.



Investigating link btwn bedside nursing & avoidable readmissions for older black patients

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) As many as a quarter of all older adults discharged from an acute hospitalization will return within thirty days. Readmissions like these result in increased healthcare costs, functional decline and greater need for skilled nursing when transitioning back to community settings. Older black patients bear a disproportionate risk of readmissions according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and no single approach has been repeatedly effective in reducing readmissions for older black patients.



Study: Mobile money lifts Kenyan households out of poverty

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT Prof. Tavneet Suri is co-author of a new paper showing that mobile-money services have had notable long-term effects on poverty reduction in Kenya -- especially among female-headed households -- and have inspired a surprising occupation shift among women.Published in today's issue of Science, the study estimates that, since 2008, access to mobile-money services increased daily per capita consumption levels of 194,000 -- or 2 percent -- of Kenyan households, lifting them out of extreme poverty.



Prostate cancer patients more likely to die of other diseases, say 15-year PLCO results

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) 15-year PLCO results published this month in Cancer: 'Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will not die from their disease... now we need to focus on discovering the men that will,' says E. David Crawford, M.D., investigator at the University of Colorado Cancer Center.



Research explains why some presents are great to give but not to receive

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Indiana University) New research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business highlights common mistakes that people will make this holiday season, including thinking more about the moment they expect when giving a present than the many moments after when their recipients keep and use the gift.



Rice scientists' study of human migration could help understand cancer metastasis

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Rice University) A new Rice University study finds that migration for the first humans in America was easier moving east-west as opposed to north-south, largely because the knowledge needed to live in the same climate zones was easily transferable. Researchers said the findings could also shed light on the behavior of metastatic cancers.



New free Scopus metrics to assess academic journal quality

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Elsevier) Information products and services provider Elsevier has launched CiteScoreTM metrics in Scopus, the world's largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature, providing the scholarly community free access to comprehensive metrics for journals from over 5,000 publishers.



Survey: Wait times for voters in 2016 election improved in several key states

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) While many voters reported long lines at polling locations around the country during the 2012 presidential election, this year the overall amount of time people had to wait to vote improved significantly, according to a new survey examining voter experience during the 2016 presidential election. MIT Professor Charles Stewart III presented the preliminary findings of the Survey on the Performance of American Elections, during a conference hosted by the Pew Charitable Trusts.



New tool to help predict dementia risk in older people

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(IOS Press) Preventing dementia is a major public health priority worldwide, and intense work is being conducted to formulate effective preventive strategies. Healthy lifestyle changes may help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but the challenge is to detect early on those who are most at risk and to choose the most relevant preventive measures.



Metaphoring the police: It's all about the right choice of word

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Springer) A well-chosen metaphor does wonders to explain concepts, to persuade and to ensure buy-in into any given matter. So says Paul Thibodeau of Oberlin College in the US, lead author of an article in Springer's journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review on the use of metaphors as a form of explanation.



Higher BMI in adolescence may affect cognitive function in midlife

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have found that higher Body Mass Index (BMI), if it begins in adolescence, can affect cognitive function in midlife. However, the effect appears to be restricted to adults who had a lower socioeconomic position as children.



Not free agents? Could human decisions actually be products of deterministic forces?

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(World Scientific) Is it not commonly accepted that human decision making is the result of free will and is therefore not deterministic? Yet there is an opposing view based on the theory of games that some aspects are deterministic. When this view is extended to include the system dynamics of space and time, an engineering approach to decision-based social structures becomes possible, with potentially profound consequences.



UNIST professor publishes book on contemporary issues in philosophy

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) UNIST professor Seungbae Park of Division of General Studies has published a book, entitled 'Great Debates in Philosophy.'



UNIST professor publishes book on contemporary art practice

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) 'Dynamic Growth in Contemporary Art and Creative Practitioners for the Future' is by Professor Kyong-Mi Paek of General Studies at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology.



WSU study finds people willing to pay more for new biofuels

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Washington State University) When it comes to second generation biofuels, Washington State University research shows that consumers are willing to pay a premium of approximately 11 percent over conventional fuel.



Mobile money access lifted 2 percent of Kenyan households out of poverty, finds new study

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Innovations for Poverty Action) A new study shows the expansion of mobile money helped bring hundreds of thousands of Kenyans out poverty, especially those in female-headed households. The study, published in Science, examined how M-PESA, Kenya's text message-based payments system, spread across the country over six years. The researchers estimate that the expansion of M-PESA lifted 194,000 households, or 2 percent of households in the country, above the poverty line, partly driven by women's access to the technology.



Antidepressant effects of ketamine

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) New preclinical evidence was put forward by investigators in a series of presentations at the recent meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology suggest that the a metabolite of ketamine can produce antidepressant-like effects in a mouse model of depression. The metabolite is produced when ketamine is broken down in the body. This finding may lead to further research to better understand ketamine's efficacy in depression and its potential side effects.



State of the art sensors made from graphene and children's toy silly putty

Thu, 08 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(AMBER Centre) Researchers in AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research centre, hosted in Trinity College Dublin, have used the wonder material graphene to make the novelty children's material silly putty® (polysilicone) conduct electricity, creating extremely sensitive sensors. The research potentially offers exciting possibilities for applications in new, inexpensive devices and diagnostics in medicine and other sectors.



UA Steele Children's Research Center receives $1.73m to study autoimmune disease triggers

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Arizona Health Sciences) The study seeks to find answers into the mechanisms that trigger autoimmune disease -- diseases that are on the rise in the Western world, afflicting approximately 24 million Americans.



Sandia Labs, Singapore join forces to develop energy storage

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(DOE/Sandia National Laboratories) Sandia National Laboratories has signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the government of Singapore's Energy Market Authority (EMA) that will tap into the labs' expertise in energy storage.



Shaping pharma: The industry's top stories from 2016

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(American Chemical Society) As the year comes to an end, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes stock of the top 10 stories that shaped the pharmaceutical landscape and set the stage for 2017.