Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Business and Economics
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/business.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
cancer  foundation  health  institute  kessler foundation  kessler  new study  new  people  research  researchers  study  university  work 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Business and Economics

EurekAlert! - Business and Economics



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Mon, 11 Dec 2017 18:15:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



How do you track a secretive hawk? Follow the isotopes

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Cincinnati) A study by the University of Cincinnati found that the rare Henst's goshawk of Madagascar hunts lemurs in low-lying areas that are most at risk to deforestation. Researchers could use this isotope analysis to study the habitat and prey needs of other threatened species that are difficult to track.



Researchers examine how errors affect credibility of online reviews

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Indiana University) Shoppers increasingly consult online reviews before making holiday purchases. But how do they decide which reviewers to trust?Recently published research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business at IUPUI shows that consumer trust in online reviews is influenced by spelling errors and typos. But how much those errors influence each consumer depends on the type of error and that consumer's general tendency to trust others.



Wiley announces Partnership with Arizona State University to strengthen higher education outcomes in

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Wiley) John Wiley and Sons Inc., (NYSE:JW-A) (NYSE:JW-B) today announced a partnership with Arizona State University (ASU) to provide higher education institutions funding, leadership training materials and publishing workshops in order to develop engineering and science capacity in Vietnam.



Certain books can increase infant learning during shared reading, study shows

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Florida) Parents and pediatricians know that reading to infants is a good thing, but new research shows reading books that clearly name and label people and objects is even better.



People say they want to live longer -- if in good health

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Kansas) Individually most people only want to live long lives if they will be healthy, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas gerontologist.



Poll: Younger women, college educated women more likely to say they have been harassed

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) This report is part of a series titled "Discrimination in America." The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experiences with discrimination.



Mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Bentham Science Publishers) The purpose of this article was to propose mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs, and to recommend policies for policy makers and research investors.



Butler Hospital launches landmark trial for Alzheimer's prevention

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Care New England ) The Memory and Aging Program (MAP) at Butler Hospital enrolled one of the initial participants in an international Alzheimer's disease (AD) prevention study.



Medicaid expansion popular among Americans connected to program

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Chicago) A concerted effort by Republicans in Congress to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act hit a surprising road block earlier this year: strong pushback against cuts to Medicaid. According to new findings from researchers at the University of Chicago, Medicaid is now seen as an important part of the middle-class social safety net, thanks to nearly 60 percent of Americans being connected to the program directly or through a family member or close friend.



Managing concerning behaviors when opioids are taken for chronic pain

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Patients receiving long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain sometimes demonstrate challenging and concerning behaviors, such as using more opioid medication than prescribed or concomitant alcohol or drug use. A new study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, establishes expert consensus about treatment approaches that should be implemented when these behaviors arise.



ACP calls for elimination of physician compensation disparities

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American College of Physicians) In a new position statement on Compensation Equity and Transparency in the Field of Medicine, the American College of Physicians (ACP) asserts that physicians should receive equitable compensation based on comparable work and compensation should not vary based on characteristics of personal identity.



TGen and Baylor poised to create early detection test for pancreatic cancer

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) A group of the nation's premier cancer researchers led by the Baylor Scott & White Research Institute (BSWRI) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) -- has secured a $5.13 million federal grant to develop an early detection system for pancreatic cancer, the nation's third-leading cause of cancer-related death.



Technology developed by LSUHealthNO to drive advances in obesity-related diseases

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) For the first time, researchers led by Frank Lau, M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans, have successfully kept white fat tissue alive outside of the body for up to eight weeks. This breakthrough will pave the way for research advances improving treatment or prevention of such diseases as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer and others associated with white adipose tissue.



Artificial intelligence and accessible theater for the deaf and blind

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) Researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have developed pioneering technology, called Stage-sync, so that people with visual and auditory impairment can enjoy musical stage shows.



Multiple health implications of women's early marriage go beyond early childbearing

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Frontiers) A new study of four South Asian countries argues that early marriage should be considered a major public health issue, due to its complex associations with women's education, health and nutrition -- which may also affect the next generation of children. The study also finds that increased education has had some, but not enough, success in delaying girls' marriage.



WFIRM wound healing technology licensed to XCell Biologix

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center) A potential new cell-free treatment for severe burns and chronic wounds that was developed by scientists at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) has been exclusively licensed to XCell Biologix™, a private company that aims to make the therapy available to patients worldwide.



Major life events shared on social media revive dormant connections, study shows

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Notre Dame) New research from the University of Notre Dame examines the impact of major life events, on social network evolution, which, the study shows, has important implications for business practices, such as in marketing.



A good decision is not made in one go

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) The best decisions are made on the basis of the average of various estimates: this has been confirmed by the research of Dennie van Dolder and Martijn van den Assem, scientists at VU Amsterdam. Using data from Holland Casino promotional campaigns, they have researched whether it is true that when people make estimates, the average of their estimates is relatively close to reality. The results of the research are being published today in Nature Human Behaviour.



Dr. Peii Chen of Kessler Foundation named Distinguished Switzer Research Fellow

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Kessler Foundation) Peii Chen, Ph.D., at Kessler Foundation, has been awarded a 2017 Switzer Research Fellowship by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR). The $80,000 Distinguished Award funds her research on interventions to improve rehabilitation outcomes for people with spatial neglect, a hidden disability that complicates recovery after stroke. She is the eighth Foundation scientist to be awarded a Switzer Fellowship, and the first to receive a Distinguished Research Fellowship.



Dr. Peii Chen awarded NIDILRR grant for stroke research at Kessler Foundation

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Kessler Foundation) Peii Chen, Ph.D., of Kessler Foundation has been awarded a 2017 Field-Initiated Project grant by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR). The three-year $600,000 federal grant funds her innovative project, 'Development of a Virtual Reality Spatial Retraining Therapy to Improve Neglect in Stroke Survivors.'



Study: Most enrolled in Michigan's Medicaid expansion already either work or can't work

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Nearly half of the people who enrolled in Medicaid after it expanded in Michigan have jobs, a new study finds. Another 11 percent can't work, likely due to serious physical or mental health conditions. And about 1 in 4 enrollees are out of work but also are much more likely to be in poor health. The new findings may inform discussions of potential work requirements for poor and near-poor Americans who qualify for expanded Medicaid.



A new weapon against bone metastasis?

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Princeton University) A new antibody developed by Princeton researchers fights bone metastasis by undermining cancer's defense strategy and allowing chemotherapy to work.



As building floor space increases, time running out to cut energy use and meet climate goals: UN

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Terry Collins Assoc) The UN-backed Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction predicts that the floor area of buildings worldwide (235 billion m2 in 2016) will roughly double by 2060, some 230 billion m2 of additional buildings -- the equivalent of all the buildings in Japan added every year; a Paris every week. While energy intensity of the buildings sector has improved, it isn't enough to offset rising energy demand. Ambitious action is needed to avoid locking in long-lived, inefficient buildings assets for decades.



Social media trends can predict tipping points in vaccine scares

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Waterloo) Analyzing trends on Twitter and Google can help predict vaccine scares that can lead to disease outbreaks, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.



Payment incentives to psychiatrists in Ontario do not increase access for new patients

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Incentive payments, introduced to encourage community-based psychiatrists to see new patients after discharge from a psychiatric hospital or following suicide attempts, do not increase access, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).