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Preview: EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science

EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Thu, 25 May 2017 01:09:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



How do blind cavefish find their way? The answer could be in their bones.

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Cincinnati) Blind cavefish typically have skulls that bend slightly to the left. A study by UC suggests this orientation might help them find food as they navigate in a perpetual counter-clockwise direction around a cave.



Population only part of tornado casualty story

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Florida State University) New research out of Florida State University shows that the strength of a tornado has a significantly larger effect than population on the number of casualties.



Fossil beetles suggest that LA climate has been relatively stable for 50,000 years

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Museum of Natural History) Research based on more than 180 fossil insects preserved in the La Brea Tar Pits of Los Angeles indicate that the climate in what is now southern California has been relatively stable over the past 50,000 years.



Disaster risk management: Science helps save lives

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(European Commission Joint Research Centre) Natural and man-made disasters threaten millions of people every year and cause billions of property damage. How much do we know about them? And how can we use that knowledge to save lives and money? A recent report, compiled by the European Commission's Science and Knowledge Service (JRC), seeks to answer these and other questions and to help prepare for the time when disaster strikes.



Atlas of the human planet 2017 -- how exposed are we to natural hazards?

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(European Commission Joint Research Centre) The 2017 edition of the JRC Atlas of the Human Planet looks at the exposure of people and built-up areas to the six major natural hazards, and its evolution over the last 40 years. The atlas will be presented during the 2017 Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction meeting in Cancun, Mexico.



Dartmouth-led study finds heavier precipitation in the northeast began in 1996

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Dartmouth College) Over the past century, the Northeast has experienced an increase in the number of storms with extreme precipitation. A Dartmouth-led study finds that the increase in extreme Northeast storms occurred as an abrupt shift in 1996, particularly in the spring and fall, rather than as a steady change over several decades. The findings were published in an early online release of the American Meteorological Society's 'Journal of Hydrometeorology.'



Water is surprisingly ordered on the nanoscale

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) Researchers from EPFL have shown that the surface of minuscule water drops with a 100 nm size is surprisingly ordered. At room temperature, the surface water molecules of these droplets have much stronger interactions than a normal water surface. The structural difference corresponds to a difference in temperature of -50°C, which may shed new light on a variety of atmospheric, biological and even geological processes.



Countries most affected by weather disasters do not spend more on weather services

Wed, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Countries hit hardest by weather-related disasters do not necessarily spend more on commercial weather and climate information services that assist in preparing for these events, a new study finds. Identifying countries for which this is true and improving the design and delivery of weather and climate services in these locations could lead to better decision-making regarding risks and challenges, ultimately helping to save lives, protect infrastructure, and move people out of poverty.



Going with the flow: The forces that affect species' movements in a changing climate

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Hokkaido University) Scientists have developed a simple metric to capture the directional agreement between ocean currents and warming, revealing how ocean currents affect the range shift of marine biota in a changing climate.



NASA sees powerful storms with advancing monsoon in Bay of Bengal

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Storms associated with the advancing monsoon in the Northern Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal were analyzed by NASA with the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite.



Pope's encyclical boosted his credibility on climate change, especially among liberals

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) The Pope's 2015 encyclical on climate change did not directly influence people's beliefs about the seriousness of climate change or its effect on the poor, a study in Cognition has found. The papal message did, however, indirectly influence people's beliefs about climate change by raising the Pope's credibility on that issue, most strongly among liberals.



Researchers untangle causes of differences in East Coast sea level rise

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Earth Institute at Columbia University) For years, scientists have been warning of a so-called 'hot spot' of accelerated sea-level rise along the northeastern US coast, but understanding the causes has proven challenging. Now an upcoming paper offers the first comprehensive model for sorting this out.



Depression risk following natural disaster can be predicted via pupil dilation

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Binghamton University) Pupil dilation could identify which individuals are at greatest risk for depression following disaster-related stress, and help lead to targeted interventions, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.



CAST project places new limitations on dark matter

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Freiburg) CERN research results deliver no evidence for the existence of solar axions.



Should you pee on a jellyfish sting? (video)

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) We all know the evils that come from a run-in with a jellyfish's tentacles. But thankfully, we can resort to peeing on a sting to make the pain go away -- or can we? Filmed at San Francisco's Aquarium of the Bay, the latest Reactions episode explains the fearsome chemistry of jellyfish stings, and debunks this age-old beach myth: https://youtu.be/KDj2t4-bn1g.



Weather patterns' influence on frost timing

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Utah) The frost-free season in North America is approximately 10 days longer now than it was a century ago. In a new study, published today in Nature Communications, researchers from the University of Utah and the US Geological Survey parse the factors contributing to the timing of frost in the United States. Atmospheric circulation patterns, they found, were the dominant influence on frost timing, although the trend of globally warming temperatures played a part as well.



Wolves need space to roam to control expanding coyote populations

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Washington) Wolves and other top predators need large ranges to be able to control smaller predators whose populations have expanded, according to a study appearing May 23 in Nature Communications. The results were similar across three continents, showing that as top predators' ranges were cut back and fragmented, they were no longer able to control smaller predators.



Whales only recently evolved into giants when changing ice, oceans concentrated prey

Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Smithsonian) A team of scientists have traced the evolution of whale size through more than 30 million years of history and found that very large whales appeared along several branches of the family tree about 2 to 3 million years ago. Increasing ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere during this period likely altered the way whales' food was distributed in the oceans and enhanced the benefits of a large body size, the scientists say.



Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Illinois College of Liberal Arts & Sciences) University of Illinois geologist Lijun Liu and his team have created a computer model of tectonic activity so effective that they believe it has potential to predict where earthquakes and volcanoes will occur. Liu, along with doctoral student Jiashun Hu, and Manuele Faccenda from the University of Padua in Italy, published a research paper in the journal of Earth and Planetary Science Letters focusing on the deep mantle and its relationship to plate tectonics.



Rethinking role of viruses in coral reef ecosystems

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(San Diego State University) Viruses are thought to frequently kill their host bacteria, especially at high microbial density. A state called lysogeny, in which viruses lie dormant but don't kill their hosts, has been thought to be relatively rare , mostly occurring at low bacterial concentrations. A new study suggests lysogeny might be much more common than previously believed. These findings could lead to a better understanding of degraded coral reef ecosystems and how to preserve them.



ESA announces the recipients of the 2016 Murray F. Buell and E. Lucy Braun Student Awards

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Ecological Society of America) The Ecological Society of America recognizes Michael J.M. McTavish and Julienne E. NeSmith for outstanding student research presentations at the 101st Annual Meeting of the Society in Fort Lauderdale, Florida in August 2016. ESA will present the awards during the 2017 Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon. The awards ceremony will take place on Monday, Aug. 7, at 8 AM in the Oregon Ballroom at the Oregon Convention Center.



Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperatures

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Washington) Evidence from the age of the dinosaurs to today shows that chemical weathering of rocks is less sensitive to global temperature, and may depend on the steepness of the surface. The results call into question the role of rocks in setting our planet's temperature over millions of years.



UNLV study: Warming news from Russia

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Nevada, Las Vegas) UNLV research in Russia challenges widely held understanding of past climate history; study appears in latest issue of top journal Nature Geoscience.



NASA adds up record Australia rainfall

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Over the week of May 15, extreme rainfall drenched northeastern Australia and NASA data provided a look at the record totals.



Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria cases

Mon, 22 May 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Lehigh University) A new study of 67 less-developed, malaria-endemic nations led by Lehigh University sociologist Dr. Kelly Austin, finds a link between deforestation and increasing malaria rates across developing nations.