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Preview: EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science

EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Wed, 28 Jun 2017 15:09:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Turning the climate tide by 2020

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)) The world needs high-speed climate action for an immediate bending-down of the global greenhouse-gas emissions curve, leading experts caution. Aggressive reduction of fossil-fuel usage is the key to averting devastating heat extremes and unmanageable sea level rise, the authors argue in a comment published in the renowned scientific journal Nature this week. In the run-up to the G20 summit of the planet's leading economies, the article sets six milestones for a clean industrial revolution.



NASA keeps a close eye on tiny stowaways

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Johnson Space Center) Wherever you find people, you also find bacteria and other microorganisms. The International Space Station is no exception.



This week from AGU: As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Geophysical Union) This week from AGU: As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along; New volcanic island unveils explosive past; Massive waves of melting Greenland ice warped Earth's crust; and more.



Improving Chinese air pollution leads to business opportunities

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) China's trouble with smog and air pollution is well known, but air quality is beginning to improve as Chinese authorities start to tackle the problem. According to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, their efforts have made China a major market for those in the business of abating and measuring air pollution.



Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from water (video)

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) The lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria. Scientists report a new development toward this goal in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.



NASA looks at rainfall from Tropical Storm Dora

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Now a tropical storm, Hurricane Dora has been skirting southwestern Mexico's coast since it formed and has transported tropical moisture onshore that has produced some heavy rain showers. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite has analyzed those rainfall rates.



Concurrent hot and dry summers more common in future

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(ETH Zurich) In the past, climate scientists have tended to underestimate the risk of a co-occurrence of heatwave and drought. This is the conclusion of one of the first studies to examine compound climate extremes.



Climate change impacts Antarctic biodiversity habitat

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Queensland) Ice-free areas of Antarctica -- home to more than 99 percent of the continent's terrestrial plants and animals -- could expand by more than 17,000 km2 by the end of this century, a study published today in Nature reveals.Led by University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences Ph.D. student Jasmine Lee, the study is the first to investigate how ice-free areas in Antarctica may be affected by climate change.



Cheap, energy-efficient and clean reaction to make chemical feedstock

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Institute for Basic Science) Combining experimental and computer chemistry, scientists find the conditions to break carbon-hydrogen bonds at low temperature with cheap titanium in place of rare metals.



'Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Cambridge) A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions.



More summer sunshine leading to increased Greenland ice melt

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Bristol) A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has discovered that a marked decrease in summer cloud cover during the last 20 years has significantly accelerated melt from the Greenland ice sheet.



Indoor air in schools could add to children's exposure to PCBs

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) The US banned PCBs nearly four decades ago, but they persist in the environment and have been found in animals and humans since then. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that concentrations of airborne PCBs inside schools could result in some students inhaling the compounds at higher levels than they would consume through their diets. Exposure through both are lower than set limits, but cumulative amounts, researchers caution, could be concerning.



NASA captures Hurricane Dora at peak strength, before weakening began

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Dora at peak strength late on June 26 before it started moving over cooler waters that began sapping its power.



Woodrats can't stomach favorite foods at high temps

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Utah) But the woodrats' unique adaptation that allows them to break down creosote toxins may be in jeopardy if temperatures continue to rise, according to University of Utah researchers. Their new study in Molecular Ecology explains why: Livers of mammals (including us) may be less efficient at breaking down toxins at higher temperatures.



Friend or foe? Manganese concentration in drinking water needs attention, researchers say

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Kansas State University) Kansas State University researchers published a study in Frontiers in Environmental Science that showed Manganese relates differently than its cancer-causing cousin, arsenic, to dissolved organic matter in groundwater. Researchers say more studies are need to understand the relationship.



New photoacoustic technique detects gases at parts-per-quadrillion level

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Brown University) The technique enables the detection of gases, such as atmospheric pollutants, present in extremely small quantities that are otherwise difficult or impossible to detect.



As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Earth Institute at Columbia University) A warming climate is not just melting the Arctic's sea ice; it is stirring the remaining ice faster, increasing the odds that ice-rafted pollution will foul a neighboring country's waters, says a new study.



The dust storm microbiome

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Weizmann Institute of Science) The airborne dust carried in sand storms affects the health of people and ecosystems alike. New research at the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that part of the effect might not be in the particles of dust but rather in bacteria that cling to them, traveling many kilometers in the air with the storms.



Ozone recovery may be delayed by unregulated chemicals

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Lancaster University) Recent increases in an unregulated ozone-depleting substance, could delay recovery of Antarctic ozone levels by 5-30 years, depending on emissions scenarios.The findings, published in Nature Communications, suggest that a previously ignored chemical called dichloromethane may now be contributing to ozone depletion.



Remote sensing technologies key to the future of the oil palm industry

Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Taylor & Francis Group) Remote sensing technologies, using satellite and aerial data, could revolutionize the management of the oil palm industry, bringing both business and environmental benefits, say environmental experts writing in the journal Geo-spatial Information Science.



Regulating the indirect land use carbon emissions imposes high hidden costs on fuel

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Biofuel policies like the Low-Carbon Fuel Standard in California are trying to minimize the indirect land use change related emissions by accounting for the indirect land use change factor as part of the carbon emissions per gallon of biofuels. A University of Illinois study examines the costs and benefits of using this approach at a national level.



Collapse of the European ice sheet caused chaos

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and Environment) Scientists have reconstructed in detail the collapse of the Eurasian ice sheet at the end of the last ice age. The big melt wreaked havoc across the European continent, driving home the original Brexit 10,000 years ago.



Septic systems are a major source of emerging contaminants in drinking water

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Silent Spring Institute) A new analysis shows that septic systems in the United States routinely discharge pharmaceuticals, consumer product chemicals, and other potentially hazardous chemicals into the environment. The study is the most comprehensive assessment to date of septic systems as important sources of emerging contaminants, raising health concerns since many of these chemicals, once discharged, end up in groundwater and drinking water supplies.



Air pollution casts shadow over solar energy production

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Duke University) Global solar energy production is taking a major hit due to air pollution and dust. The first study of its kind shows airborne particles and their accumulation on solar cells is cutting energy output by more than 25 percent in certain parts of the world. The regions hardest hit are also those investing the most in solar energy installations -- China, India and the Arabian Peninsula.



The beach time capsule

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Santa Barbara) And to think it was all right there in her garage.A load of boxes pulled from biologist Dale Straughan's home yielded a veritable treasure trove for UC Santa Barbara researchers studying the impact of climate change on coastal biodiversity in California.