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EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sun, 19 Nov 2017 02:09:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



UTSA researchers receive grant to help prevent contaminations in Edwards Aquifer

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at San Antonio) Vikram Kapoor, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Drew Johnson, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Texas at San Antonio, have been awarded a $692,452 funding agreement through the City of San Antonio's Proposition 1 Edwards Aquifer Protection Program to design and implement a way to track fecal bacteria in the Edwards Aquifer so that major contamination can be stopped before it starts.



When to fish: Timing matters for fish that migrate to reproduce

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Washington) A new University of Washington study points to yet another human factor that is hampering the ability of fish to reproduce: the timing of our fishing seasons. The study considers how the timing of fishing efforts might disproportionately target certain fish and change the life history patterns of entire populations.



Decrease in sunshine, increase in rickets

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Toronto) A University of Toronto student and professor have teamed up to discover that Britain's increasing cloudiness during the summer could be an important reason for the mysterious increase in rickets among British children over the past few decades.



Carbon emissions by plant respiration will have large impact on climate

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Minnesota) New findings by researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences, who partnered with scientists from across the world, suggest plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warn that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning.



Scientific advances can make it easier to recycle plastics

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Houston) Researchers report new approaches could dramatically increase the amount of plastic waste that can be successfully recycled.



Infrared NASA imagery shows development of Tropical Depression 31W

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of the latest tropical cyclone in the South China Sea.



Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Rice University) Researchers from Rice University, UCLA, Michigan State and the University of New Mexico have discovered a planetary-scale tug-of-war between life, deep Earth and the upper atmosphere that is expressed in atmospheric nitrogen. The research appears this week in Science Advances.



Warmer water signals change for Scotland's shags

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Centre for Ecology & Hydrology) An increasingly catholic diet among European shags at one of Scotland's best-studied breeding colonies has been linked to long-term climate change and may have important implications for Scotland's seabirds.



Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Centre for Ecology & Hydrology) New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning.



The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig) Leipzig. Forests fulfil numerous important functions, and do so particularly well if they are rich in different species of trees. In addition, forest managers do not have to decide on the provision of solely one function, such as wood production or nature conservation: several services provided by forest ecosystems can be improved at the same time. These are the results of two studies led by scientists from Leipzig University and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), and published in Ecology Letters.



Evaluation of novel hybrid membranes for carbon capture

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology) Hybrid materials known as mixed matrix membranes are considered a promising approach to capture carbon dioxide and mitigate against global warming. These materials are derived from a polymer combined with porous nanoparticles. We show that materials prepared using porous organic polymers are resilient to the acidic impurities present in industrial gas streams, whereas other hybrid materials fail. This means that they can be effective in carbon capture applications where these impurities are present.



Surrey develops new 'supercatalyst' to recycle carbon dioxide and methane

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Surrey) The University of Surrey has developed a new and cost-effective catalyst to recycle two of the main causes behind climate change -- carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4).



A popular tool to trace Earth's oxygen history can give false positives

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Georgia Institute of Technology) If someone cries 'Eureka!' because it looks like oxygen appeared in Earth's ancient atmosphere long before the body of evidence indicated, be careful. If it was a chromium isotope system reading that caused the enthusiasm, it might need to be curbed.



Hot and bothered

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Santa Barbara) Environmental economists predict climate change will bring big manufacturing losses to China by mid-21st century.



Groundwater depletion could be significant source of atmospheric carbon dioxide

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American Geophysical Union) Groundwater depletion could be significant source of atmospheric carbon dioxide.



Secrets of succulents' water-wise ways revealed

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Liverpool) Plant scientists at the University of Liverpool have revealed new insights into the mechanisms that allow certain plants to conserve water and tolerate drought.The research, which is published in The Plant Cell, could be used to help produce new crops that can thrive in previously inhospitable, hot and dry regions across the world.



Groundwater recharge in the American west under climate change

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Arizona) Groundwater recharge in the Western US will change as the climate warms -- the dry southern regions will have less and the northern regions will have more, according to new research. The new study covers the entire US West, from the High Plains states to the Pacific coast, and provides the first detailed look at how groundwater recharge may change as the climate changes. Groundwater is an important source of freshwater, particularly in the West.



Climate change impacts already locked in -- but the worst can still be avoided

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Exeter) Some impacts of global warming -- such as sea level rise and coastal flooding -- are already locked in and unavoidable, according to a major research project.



New research could predict La Niña drought years in advance

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at Austin) Two new studies from The University of Texas at Austin have significantly improved scientists' ability to predict the strength and duration of droughts caused by La Niña - a recurrent cooling pattern in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Their findings, which predict that the current La Niña is likely to stretch into a second year, could help scientists know years in advance how a particular La Niña event is expected to evolve.



Desert solar to fuel centuries of air travel

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(SolarPACES) Researchers at the Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, have concentrated 3,000 'suns' of solar thermal energy into a solar reactor at 1,500°C for thermochemical splitting of H2O and CO2 into hydrogen and carbon monoxide (syngas), the precursor to kerosene and other liquid fuels.



Study urges global-change researchers to embrace variability

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Virginia Institute of Marine Science) A new review article presents evidence that argues for a more nuanced approach to the design of global-change experiments -- one that acknowledges and purposefully incorporates the variability inherent in nature.



Pacific Island countries could lose 50-80 percent of fish in local waters under climate change

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program) Many Pacific Island nations will lose 50 to 80 percent of marine species in their waters by the end of the 21st century if climate change continues unchecked, finds a new Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program study published in Marine Policy. This area of the ocean is projected to be the most severely impacted by aspects of climate change.



NASA measures Haikui's remnant rainfall over southern Vietnam

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided data on rainfall over Vietnam from the remnants of former Tropical Storm Haikui.



Amazon's recovery from forest losses limited by climate change

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Edinburgh) Deforested areas of the Amazon Basin have a limited ability to grow new trees because of changes in climate, according to a study.



Pulling iron out of waste printer toner

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American Chemical Society) Someday, left-over toner in discarded printer cartridges could have a second life as bridge or building components instead of as trash, wasting away in landfills and potentially harming the environment. One group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they have devised a method to recycle the residual powder in 'empty' cartridges into iron using temperatures that are compatible with existing industrial processes.