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Preview: EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science

EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 18 Aug 2017 23:09:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



NJIT researchers will follow in the moon's slipstream to capture high-res sunspot images

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(New Jersey Institute of Technology) While much of the research around the eclipse on Monday will focus on the effects of the Sun's brief, daytime disappearance on Earth and its atmosphere, a group of solar physicists will be leveraging the rare event to capture a better glimpse of the star itself.



Satellite sees the formation of eastern Pacific's Tropical Depression 13E

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The thirteenth tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season formed on Aug. 18. NOAA's GOES-Wet satellite captured an image of the new storm.



NASA looks at rainfall in Tropical Storm Harvey

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Storm Harvey is now moving into the eastern Caribbean Sea. NASA's GPM core satellite examined the soaking rainfall the new tropical storm was generating along its path.



NASA gets a final look at Hurricane Gert's rainfall

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Before Hurricane Gert became a post-tropical cyclone, NASA got a look at the rainfall occurring within the storm. After Gert became post-tropical NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured an image as Gert was merging with another system.



Spoiler alert: Computer simulations provide preview of next week's eclipse

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Researchers from Predictive Science Inc. used NASA and National Science Foundation-supported supercomputers to run highly-detailed forecasts of the Sun's corona -- the aura of plasma that surrounds the sun -- at the moment of the eclipse. The team combined data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, magnetic field maps, solar rotation rates and cutting-edge mathematical models to predict the state of the Sun's surface. The simulations are the largest produced by the group and include new physics.



Identifying individual atmospheric equatorial waves from a total flow field

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) A new study presents a method for identifying individual equatorial waves in wind and geopotential height fields using horizontal wave structures derived from classical equatorial wave theory.



Right kind of collaboration is key to solving environmental problems

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Stockholm University) Society's ability to solve environmental problems is tied to how different actors collaborate and the shape and form of the networks they create, says a new study from researchers at Stockholm Resilience Centre which is published in the journal Science.



Climate change and habitat conversion combine to homogenize nature

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Davis) Climate change and habitat conversion to agriculture are working together to homogenize nature, indicates a study in the journal Global Change Biology led by the University of California, Davis. In other words, the more things change, the more they are the same.



Agroindustrial waste can be used as material for housing and infrastructure

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Converting waste into resources, substituting toxic raw materials for healthy inputs, migrating from harmful to sustainable production processes. These are some of the guidelines for a research project about agroindustrial wastes and their potential use as appropriate materials for housing and infrastructure.



Study validates East Antarctic ice sheet to remain stable even if western ice sheet melts

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Indiana University) A new study from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis validates that the central core of the East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if the West Antarctic ice sheet melts.



New weather forecasting model could help advance NOAA's 3-4 week outlooks

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science) Predicting the weather three to four weeks in advance is extremely challenging, yet many critical decisions affecting communities and economies must be made using this lead time. However, model forecasts available for the first time this week could help NOAA's operational Climate Prediction Center (CPC) significantly improve its week 3-4 temperature and precipitation outlooks for the US.



Scientist emphasizes importance of multi-level thinking

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) An unusual paper by Prof. Michael E. McIntyre from University of Cambridge touches on a range of deep questions, including insights into the nature of science itself, and of scientific understanding -- what it means to understand a scientific problem in depth -- and into the communication skills necessary to convey that understanding and to mediate collaboration across specialist disciplines.



Poisonings went hand in hand with the drinking water in Pompeii

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Southern Denmark) The ancient Romans were famous for their advanced water supply. But the drinking water in the pipelines was probably poisoned on a scale that may have led to daily problems with vomiting, diarrhoea, and liver and kidney damage. This is the finding of analyses of water pipe from Pompeii.



Florida flood risk study identifies priorities for property buyouts

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Santa Cruz) A study of flood damage in Florida by scientists at UC Santa Cruz and the Nature Conservancy proposes prioritizing property buyouts based on flood risk, ecological value, and socioeconomic conditions. Forecasters say an above-normal hurricane season is likely in the Atlantic Ocean this year, while a rising sea level is making Florida increasingly vulnerable to dangerous flooding.



Discovery could lead to new catalyst design to reduce nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Purdue University) Researchers have discovered a new reaction mechanism that could be used to improve catalyst designs for pollution control systems to further reduce emissions of smog-causing nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust.



Outdoor light at night linked with increased breast cancer risk in women

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Women who live in areas with higher levels of outdoor light at night may be at higher risk for breast cancer than those living in areas with lower levels, according to a large long-term study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The link was stronger among women who worked night shifts.



In search of Edwards' pheasant

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Newcastle University) Scientists from Newcastle University, UK, say we need to improve our information about little-known species to reduce the risk of one going extinct just because no-one is interested in looking for it.



Injecting manure instead of spreading on surface reduces estrogen loads

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Penn State) With water quality in the Chesapeake Bay suffering from excess nutrients and fish populations in rivers such as the Susquehanna experiencing gender skewing and other reproductive abnormalities, understanding how to minimize runoff of both nutrients and endocrine-disrupting compounds from farm fields after manure applications is a critical objective for agriculture.



Larvaceans provide a pathway for transporting microplastics into deep-sea food webs

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) A new paper by MBARI researchers shows that filter-feeding animals called giant larvaceans can collect and consume microplastic particles, potentially carrying microplastics to the deep seafloor.



Boron nitride foam soaks up carbon dioxide

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Rice University) Rice University researchers create a reusable hexagonal-boron nitride foam that soaks up more than three times its weight in carbon dioxide.



Harnessing rich satellite data to estimate crop yield

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Without advanced sensing technology, humans see only a small portion of the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Satellites see the full range -- from high-energy gamma rays, to visible, infrared, and low-energy microwaves. The images and data they collect can be used to solve complex problems. For example, satellite data is being harnessed by researchers at the University of Illinois for a more complete picture of cropland and to estimate crop yield in the US Corn Belt.



How future volcanic eruptions will impact Earth's ozone layer

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) The next major volcanic eruption could kick-start chemical reactions that would seriously damage the planet's already besieged ozone layer. The extent of damage to the ozone layer that results from a large, explosive eruption depends on complex atmospheric chemistry, including the levels of human-made emissions in the atmosphere. Using sophisticated chemical modeling, researchers explored what would happen to the ozone layer in response to large-scale volcanic eruptions over the remainder of this century and in several different greenhouse gas emission scenarios.



This week from AGU: New study details ocean's role in fourth-largest extinction

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Geophysical Union) Extremely low oxygen levels in Earth's oceans could be responsible for extending the effects of a mass extinction that wiped out millions of species on Earth around 200 million years ago, according to a new study published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems.



A decade of monitoring shows the dynamics of a conserved Atlantic tropical forest

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Pensoft Publishers) Characterized with high levels of biodiversity and endemism, the Atlantic Tropical Forest has been facing serious anthropogenic threats over the last several decades. Having put important ecosystem services at risk, such activities need to be closely studied as part of the forest dynamics. Thus, a Brazilian team of researchers spent a decade monitoring a semi-deciduous forest located in an ecological park in Southeast Brazil. Their observations are published in the open-access Biodiversity Data Journal.



Greenland ice flow likely to speed up: New data assert glaciers move over sediment, which gets more slippery as it gets wetter

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Swansea University) Flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet is likely to speed up in the future, despite a recent slowdown, because its outlet glaciers slide over wet sediment, not hard rock, new research based on seismic surveys has confirmed. This sediment will become weaker and more slippery as global temperatures rise and meltwater supply becomes more variable. The findings challenge the view that the recent slowdowns in ice flow would continue in the long term.