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Preview: EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science

EurekAlert! - Atmospheric Science



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 20:09:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Methane emissions from trees

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Delaware) A new study from the University of Delaware is one of the first in the world to show that tree trunks in upland forests actually emit methane rather than store it, representing a new, previously unaccounted source of this powerful greenhouse gas.



RIT researchers win USGS grant to improve Landsat 8 data

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Rochester Institute of Technology) Rochester Institute of Technology researchers have won funding from the US Geological Survey to ensure accurate temperature data from NASA's Landsat 8 satellite. The agency awarded Aaron Gerace and Matthew Montanaro, senior scientists in RIT's Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, a five-year, $500,000 grant to continue monitoring improvements they made to Landsat 8's Thermal Infrared Sensor, or TIRS.



How do plants make oxygen? Ask cyanobacteria

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(California Institute of Technology) A new study adds 41 new types of cyanobacteria, and helps pin down when in history they 'invented' oxygen-producing photosynthesis.



NASA examines the rainfall left behind from ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Tropical Cyclone Debbie generated a lot of rainfall before and after it made landfall in Queensland, Australia, and NASA analyzed how much rain fell from a vantage point of space. NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the remnants early on March 30 is it lingered near Australia's Gold Coast.



Even short-duration heat waves could lead to failure of coffee crops

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Oregon State University) 'Hot coffee' is not a good thing for java enthusiasts when it refers to plants beset by the high-temperature stress that this century is likely to bring.



The carbon footprint of crime has fallen, study finds

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Surrey) A study led by an engineering doctorate student at the University of Surrey has found that the carbon footprint of crime over the last 20 years has fallen.



Melting sea ice may lead to more life in the sea

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Southern Denmark) Every year an increasing amount of sea ice is melting in the Arctic. This can start a chain reaction, which leads to increased production of algae and hence more food for creatures in the sea.



Emissions from the edge of the forest

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Half of the carbon stored in all of the Earth's vegetation is contained in tropical forests. Deforestation has a correspondingly fatal effect. Scientists estimate that this releases 1,000 million tonnes of carbon every year, which, in the form of greenhouse gasses, drives up global temperatures. A team of scientists from the UFZ and the University of Maryland has discovered that fragmentation of formerly contiguous areas of forest leads to carbon emissions rising by another third.



Is it a boy or is it a girl? New method to ID baby sea turtles' sex

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Florida Atlantic University) Is it a boy or is it a girl? For baby sea turtles it's not that cut and dry. Because they don't have an X or Y chromosome, baby sea turtles' sex is defined during development by the incubation environment. Warmer sand temperatures produce more females and cooler sand temperatures produce more males. A crucial step in the conservation of these animals is estimating hatchling sex ratios, which remains imprecise because of their anatomical makeup.



Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Rochester Institute of Technology) Enhanced single-walled carbon nanotubes offer a more effective and sustainable approach to water treatment and remediation than the standard industry materials -- silicon gels and activated carbon -- according to a paper by RIT researchers John-David Rocha and Reginald Rogers.



Journal: Researchers can track hazardous chemicals from fast-food wrappers in the body

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Just one month after major research findings showed dangerous PFAS present in more than one-third of fast food packaging tested, UAB and Notre Dame created a new technique to track PFASs in the body.



Tackling resilience: Finding order in chaos to help buffer against climate change

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Washington) A new paper by the University of Washington and NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center aims to provide clarity among scientists, resource managers and planners on what ecological resilience means and how it can be achieved.



Manufacturing, global trade impair health of people with no stake in either

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Irvine) The latest products may bring joy to people around the globe, but academic researchers this week are highlighting the heightened health risks experienced by people in regions far downwind of the factories that produce these goods and on the other side of the world from where they're consumed. In a study to be published Thursday, March 30, in the journal Nature, scientists quantify and map the shift of environmental and health burdens brought on by globalization and international trade.



Legends of the lost reservoirs

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Cincinnati) University of Cincinnati interdisciplinary researchers and global collaborators dig into the past to inspire modern water management strategies that can save time and money and may avoid negative effects on our climate.



Making cows more environmentally friendly

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Royal Botanic Gardens Kew) Scientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC) and the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Frankfurt have published a paper revealing an important discovery surrounding plants used to feed livestock.



'Weather whiplash' triggered by changing climate will degrade Midwest's drinking water

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Kansas) University of Kansas have published findings in the journal Biogeochemistry showing weather whiplash in the American Midwest's agricultural regions will drive the deterioration of water quality, forcing municipalities to seek costly remedies to provide safe drinking water to residents.



NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie over Queensland

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie after it made landfall in eastern Queensland and weakened.



Carnegie Mellon Power Sector Index tracks 24 percent decline in carbon emissions

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) The initial results of the new Carnegie Mellon University Power Sector Carbon Index, which measures CO2 emissions from the US electrical power generation sector, found that US power producers had cut CO2 emissions intensity by 24 percent since 2005.



Poor outlook for biodiversity in Antarctica: Study finds

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Monash University) An international study led by Monash scientists has debunked the popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world.



Study finds 1 in 8 Calgary homes exceed Health Canada's acceptable radon level

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Calgary) Radon gas is a colorless, odorless radioactive gas that has been linked to lung cancer. University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, researchers have proven it's prevalent throughout southern Alberta homes. Undertaking one of the largest Canadian municipal studies to date, Aaron Goodarzi, Ph.D., and his team tested radon levels in more than 2,300 Calgary and area homes. The results show that there is no unaffected neighborhood. The study is published in today's CMAJ Open.



Solving the mystery of the Arctic's green ice

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) In 2011, researchers observed something that should be impossible -- a massive bloom of phytoplankton growing under Arctic sea ice in conditions that should have been far too dark for anything requiring photosynthesis to survive. So, how was this bloom possible? Using mathematical modeling, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences found that thinning Arctic sea ice may be responsible for these blooms and more blooms in the future, potentially causing significant disruption in the Arctic food chain.



Study reveals amount of premature deaths linked to international trade

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of East Anglia) A new study involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) has revealed for the first time the global scale of premature deaths related to air pollution from international trade.



Building trust, not hate

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)) When anonymity between people is lifted, they more likely cooperate with each other. Playing nice can thereby become a winning strategy, an international team of scientists shows in a study to be published in Science Advances. The findings are based on experiments with a limited number of participants but might have far-reaching implications, if confirmed. Reducing anonymity could help social networks such as Facebook or Twitter that suffer from hate and fake news. It might also help in conflicts about environmental resources.



Manufacturing, global trade impair health of people with no stake in either

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Irvine) In a study to be published Thursday, March 30, in the journal Nature, scientists quantify and map the shift of environmental and health burdens brought on by globalization and international trade.



Financialization's negative effect on the American solar industry

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) The increasing role of the United States' financial sector in the 1980s and 1990s, when it shifted from focusing on technology investment to speculating on future markets, impaired the country's emerging solar industry, a new study reports.