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EurekAlert! - Agriculture



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Last Build Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2017 13:03:01 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Two UTA students earn prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program funding

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas at Arlington) Two University of Texas at Arlington College of Science students have been named recipients of National Science Foundation funds to further their graduate education through the NSF's prestigious Graduate Research Fellowship Program for 2017. Priscilla Glenn, a senior biology major, and Mayowa Olawoyin, a second-year Ph.D. student in mathematics, are among the awardees.



Survey: Another good year for Chesapeake Bay's underwater grasses

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Virginia Institute of Marine Science) An annual survey led by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science shows the abundance of underwater grasses in Chesapeake Bay increased 8 percent between 2015 and 2016, continuing an upward trend initiated in 2012.



Scientists examine impact of high-severity fires on conifer forests

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard University) The ability of some Western conifer forests to recover after severe fire may become increasingly limited as the climate continues to warm, scientists from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) and Harvard Forest found in a new study published today in Global Change Biology.



Cold-water corals: Acidification harms, warming promotes growth

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa is able to counteract negative effects of ocean acidification under controlled laboratory conditions when water temperature rises by a few degrees at the same time. Whether this will also be possible in the natural habitat depends on the degree of change in environmental conditions, researchers from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel argue in a publication in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science.



A close look into the barley genome

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) An international consortium, with the participation of the Helmholtz Zentrum München, Plant Genome and Systems Biology Department (PGSB), has published methodologically significant data on the barley genome. Their findings are contributing to the development of resistant varieties. The publication appeared in Nature.



Discovery in northern lakes may be key to understanding early life on Earth

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Waterloo) A team of researchers has discovered that many Canadian lakes can provide new insights into ancient oceans, and their findings could advance research about greenhouse gas emissions, harmful algal blooms, and early life forms.



Ocean warming to cancel increased CO2-driven productivity

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Adelaide) University of Adelaide researchers have constructed a marine food web to show how climate change could affect our future fish supplies and marine biodiversity.



Wasps and wine: Paper wasps contribute to sour rot disease, a scourge of wine industry

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Tufts University) New research led by Tufts University shows that the invasive European paper wasp, Polistes dominulus, plays a role in facilitating sour rot disease in the absence of other insects.



Want to better comply with dietary guidelines, and save money? Cook dinner at home

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Oregon State University) The best culinary paths to better health are not always paved with cash, new research shows, and cooking at home can provide the best bang-for-the-buck nutritionally as well as financially.



Researchers identify genes that help trout find their way home

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Duke University) In the spring when water temperatures start to rise, rainbow trout that have spent several years at sea traveling hundreds of miles from home manage, without maps or GPS, to find their way back to the rivers and streams where they were born for spawning. Researchers have identified genes that enable the fish to perform this extraordinary homing feat with help from Earth's magnetic field.



Barley genome sequenced

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Riverside) Looking for a better beer or single malt Scotch whiskey? A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside may have you covered. They are among a group of 77 scientists worldwide who have sequenced the complete genome of barley, a key ingredient in beer and single malt Scotch. The research, 10 years in the making, was just published in the journal Nature.



USDA announces $800,000 to support distance education in the agricultural sciences

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Institute of Food and Agriculture ) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced $800,000 in available funding to support distance education for students in remote geographic regions. Funding is made through a NIFA program that brings food and agricultural science education to United States insular areas.



USDA announces $1 million to support agricultural science education for insular areas

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Institute of Food and Agriculture ) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced $1 million in available funding for projects to strengthen food and agricultural science education in insular areas of the United States. Funding is made through two NIFA programs, the Resident Instruction Grants Program for Institutions of Higher Education in Insular Areas (RIIA) and the Agriculture and Food Sciences Facilities and Equipment (AGFEI) program.



Corn with a cover of grass

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Society of Agronomy) Corn raised for biofuel can result in eroded soils, as all materials are removed from the field. However, using a perennial grass groundcover could preserve soil in addition to reducing costs.



New study deems dairy 'excellent' source of protein for children

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Researchers at the University of Illinois are using pigs as a model to study the best way of evaluating protein quality in foods eaten by children, a method that was proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations in 2011.



Larger schooling fish found to have stronger attraction forces

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Uppsala University) In schooling fish, collective movement emerges as a result of multiple social interactions between individuals. In a new study led by researchers at Uppsala University, larger individuals have been found to display stronger attraction forces to one another than smaller individuals. Short range repulsion forces, on the other hand, are the same regardless of fish size.



Paleontologists identify new 508-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincers

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Toronto) Paleontologists have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. Named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, the creature documents for the first time the anatomy of early mandibulates, a sub-group of arthropods with specialized appendages known as mandibles, used to grasp, crush and cut their food.



'Unicorn' shipworm could reveal clues about human medicine and bacterial infections

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Northeastern University) Northeastern professor Daniel Distel and his colleagues have discovered a dark slithering creature four feet long that dwells in the foul mud of a remote lagoon in the Philippines. They say studying the animal, a giant shipworm with pinkish siphons at one end and an eyeless head at the other, could add to our understanding of how bacteria cause infections and, in turn, how we might adapt to tolerate -- and even benefit from -- them.



USDA announces $4.8 million available to support food safety outreach program

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Institute of Food and Agriculture ) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced $4.8 million in available funding to develop and implement food safety training, education, extension, outreach, and technical assistance projects. This funding, offered through the Food Safety Outreach Program and administered by NIFA, will address the needs of owners and operators of small to mid-sized farms, beginning farmers, socially-disadvantaged farmers, small processors, or small fresh fruit and vegetable merchant wholesalers.



UTA student receives NSF grant for research into ecological drivers of eye, brain size

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas at Arlington) Shannon Beston, a third-year Ph.D. student in biology at the University of Texas at Arlington, was selected to receive funds from the National Science Foundation's Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants program to further her research into how brains and eyes evolved in response to predation.



'Diet' products can make you fat, study shows

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Georgia) High-fat foods are often the primary target when fighting obesity, but sugar-laden 'diet' foods could be contributing to unwanted weight gain as well.



Ammonium nitrogen input increases the synthesis of anticarcinogenic compounds in broccoli

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of the Basque Country ) In the quest for less contaminating fertilizing strategies, a study by the UPV/EHU has explored the use of ammonium-based fertilizers, less widely used than the nitrate for fertilizing owing to the reduced growth displayed by the plants. The comparison between these two sources of nitrogen has revealed a higher amount of glucosinolates in the case of ammonium nutrition. This gives the plants greater insecticidal capacity and this is of great interest nutritionally as these are anticarcinogenic substances.



What do electrolytes actually do? (video)

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) Sports drink commercials love talking about them, but what are electrolytes and what happens if we don't have enough? Electrolytes are salts that we need in our body. They help control the movement of water in our cells along with vital nerve pulses. Sweating is one way you lose electrolytes. This video reveals the ins and outs of electrolytes and whether you should reach for a sports drink after running around the block. Find out in the latest Reactions video.



Predicting the movement and impacts of microplastic pollution

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry) Microplastics, which are particles measuring less than 5 mm, are of increasing concern. They not only become more relevant as other plastic marine litter breaks down into tiny particles, they also interact with species in a range of marine habitats. A study in Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management takes a look at how global climate change and the impact of changing ocean circulation affects the distribution of marine microplastic litter.



'Whispering' keeps humpbacks safe from killer whales, study finds

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Aarhus University) Newborn humpback whales 'whisper' to their mothers to avoid being overheard by killer whales, researchers have discovered. The recordings -- the first obtained from tags directly attached to the whales -- are published today in Functional Ecology.