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Preview: EurekAlert! - Agriculture

EurekAlert! - Agriculture



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 22:03:02 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Biodiversity loss shifts flowering phenology at same magnitude as global warming

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Columbia University) Researchers have revealed that declining plant diversity -- from habitat loss, human use, and other environmental pressures -- causes plants to flower earlier, and that the effects of diversity loss on the timing of flowering are similar in magnitude to the effects of global warming. The finding could have a powerful influence on the way scientists study ecosystem changes and measure the effects of global warming.



Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Lancaster University) Researchers at Lancaster University in the UK have found a way to detect subtle early warning signs that reveal a frog population is at risk from pollution.



UTA quantifying coral species' disease susceptibility by examining immune traits

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Texas at Arlington) A biologist from the University of Texas at Arlington is leading a new study aimed at quantifying how susceptible coral species are to disease by examining their immunity through a series of novel experiments and approaches.



Spread of ages is key to impact of disease, animal study finds

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Edinburgh) How a disease outbreak affects a group of animals depends on the breakdown of ages in the population, research has shown.



Predatory lizard enters Brazil clandestinely

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Anolis porcatus, a species native to Cuba, has been identified in several areas near the Port of Santos on the São Paulo coast, in Brazil. Its introduction into this area may threaten the survival of local lizard populations. A DNA study suggests these lizards could have come from Florida, where they're also exotic, rather than directly from Cuba.



A stem's 'sense of self' contributes to shape

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals like light and gravity. But if plants all have similar stimuli, why are there so many different plant shapes? Using simple mathematical ideas, researchers from the Harvard SEAS constructed a framework that explains and quantifies the different shapes of plant stems.



Dairy farmers should rethink a cow's curfew, says UBC researchers

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of British Columbia) Dairy cows housed indoors want to break curfew and roam free, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia, published today in Scientific Reports.



SPICY: Discovery of new ginger species spices up African wildlife surveys

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Wildlife Conservation Society) Scientists from WCS have discovered a new species of wild ginger, spicing up a wave of recent wildlife discoveries in the Kabobo Massif -- a rugged, mountainous region in Democratic Republic of Congo.



Climate change and an 'overlooked' nutrient: Silica

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Boston University) Sugar maples may have far greater silica pumping power than expected, and also may be more profoundly affected by climate change as warmer winters damage their vulnerable roots.



Strong interaction between herbivores and plants

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Cologne) A research project conducted at the University of Cologne's Zoological Institute reveals important findings on the interaction between nutrient availability and the diversity of consumer species in freshwater environments. A better understanding of this interaction will contribute to developing possibilities to maintain biodiversity in all kinds of ecosystems.



MSU lands NIH grant to study connection between fish genes and human medicine

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Michigan State University) Michigan State University has landed a $727,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to improve the use of fish as disease models for human medicine.



Wastewater cleaned thanks to a new adsorbent material made from fruit peels

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Granada) Researchers from the University of Granada, and from the Center for Electrochemical Research and Technological Development and the Center of Engineering and Industrial Development, both in Mexico, have developed a process that allows to clean waters containing heavy metals and organic compounds considered pollutants, using a new adsorbent material made from the peels of fruits such as oranges and grapefruits.



Corals die as global warming collides with local weather in the South China Sea

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) In the South China Sea, a 2°C rise in the sea surface temperature in June 2015 was amplified to produce a 6°C rise on Dongsha Atoll, a shallow coral reef ecosystem, killing approximately 40 percent of the resident coral community within weeks, according to a study published in Scientific Reports this week.



Immune study in chickens reveals key hurdle for Campylobacter vaccine effort

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Liverpool) New University of Liverpool research reveals that the immune response of farmed chickens does not develop fast enough to fight off Campylobacter during their short lifespan. The findings have important implications in the challenge towards developing a poultry vaccine for the bug, which is the UK's leading cause of food poisoning.



Novel virus breaks barriers between incompatible fungi

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(PLOS) Scientists have identified a virus that can weaken the ability of a fungus to avoid pairing with other incompatible fungi, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens. By promoting fungal pairing, the virus could aid transmission of additional unrelated viruses between fungi.



Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(US Geological Survey) Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications.



USDA awards $5 million for fellowships for research and extension experiences

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Institute of Food and Agriculture ) The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) NationalInstitute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced more than $5 million in grants for fellowship opportunities for undergraduate students at colleges and universities. These awards are made through NIFA's Research and Extension Experiences for Undergraduate (REEU)Fellowships program, part of the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative's (AFRI) Education and Literacy Initiative.



UTIA student fellows to tackle sustainable agriculture in the Rainforest

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) Producing sustainable yields in harmony with conserving the rainforest: a win-win for the people of Belize and the world. As part of the highly competitive Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, faculty with the University of Tennessee Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources and the UTIA Office of International Programs will recruit 14 undergraduate Research and Extension Fellows over three years to explore agro-ecological farming.



WPI team grows heart tissue on spinach leaves

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Researchers face a fundamental challenge as they seek to scale up human tissue regeneration from small lab samples to full-size tissues and organs: how to establish a vascular system that delivers blood deep into the developing tissue. Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Arkansas State University-Jonesboro have successfully turned to plants, culturing beating human heart cells on spinach leaves that were stripped of plant cells.



Under the Dead Sea, warnings of dire drought

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(The Earth Institute at Columbia University) Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans -- a possible warning for current times. Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as a fifth of modern levels some 120,000 years ago, and again about 10,000 years ago.



It's a fish eat tree world

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies) An international team of scientists analyzed 147 northern lakes and found that many rely on nutrients from tree leaves, pine needles, and other land-grown plants to feed aquatic life. The study, published today in Science Advances, offers the most comprehensive analysis to-date on terrestrial subsidies to lake food webs.



'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips (video)

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds -- organophosphate nerve agents -- can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable 'lab-on-a-glove.' The report on the glove appears in the journal ACS Sensors.



Salmon with side effects

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? German and Chilean scientists warning that dissolved organic compounds are placing huge strain on ecosystems and are changing entire biological communities.



A new species of hard coral from the World Heritage-listed Lord Howe Island, Australia

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Pensoft Publishers) The discovery of a new species of hard coral, found on Lord Howe Island, suggests that the fauna of this isolated location in the Tasman Sea off south eastern Australia is even more distinct than previously recognised. Even though the World Heritage-listed site has been long known for its biodiversity, the new species, recently described in the open access journal ZooKeys, is the first coral known to live exclusively in the region.



Making 'mulch' ado of ant hills

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(American Society of Agronomy) Research undertaken by scientists in China reveals that ants are hardworking and beneficial insects. In the activities of their daily lives, ants help increase air, water flow, and organic matter in soil. The work done by ants even forms a type of mulch that helps hold water in the soil.