Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Agriculture
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/agriculture.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
california  data  fishing  global  new study  new  ocean  researchers  scientists  study  university california  university  warming  world 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Agriculture

EurekAlert! - Agriculture



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 23 Feb 2018 02:03:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



The global footprint of fisheries

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Santa Barbara) UCSB researchers collaborate to track commercial fishing worldwide in real time.



Purdue researchers show microscopic wood nanocrystals make concrete stronger

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Purdue University) Purdue University researchers studying whether concrete is made stronger by infusing it with microscopic-sized nanocrystals from wood are moving from the laboratory to the real world with a bridge that will be built in California this spring. The researchers have been working with cellulose nanocrystals, byproducts generated by the paper, bioenergy, agriculture and pulp industries, to find the best mixture to strengthen concrete, the most common man-made material in the world.



Few Chicagoland wetlands left without non-native species, study finds

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) The wetlands in and around Chicago are overwhelmingly invaded by non-native plants, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers. The study, which pulls together species occurrence data from over 2,000 wetlands in the urban region, is the first to describe wetland invasion patterns on such a large scale in the Chicagoland area.



New partnership aids sustainable growth with Earth observations

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA and the nonprofit Conservation International are partnering to map land and water ecosystems around the world to provide decision makers with new tools for assessing natural resources for planning and management.



Sweet, bitter, fat: Genetics play a role in kids' snacking patterns, study finds

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Guelph) The types of snacks a child chooses could be linked to genetics, a University of Guelph study found.The study investigated whether genetic variants in taste receptors related to sweet, fat and bitter tastes influence the snacks preschoolers choose and found nearly 80 per cent carried at least one of these genotypes that could predispose them to poor snacking habits.These findings could help parents tailor their kids' diets based on their genetics of taste.



Tracking fishing from space: The global footprint of industrial fishing revealed

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Global Fishing Watch) Humans have been fishing the seas for over 42,000 years. However, the global footprint of fishing was poorly understood -- until now. A new study published today in Science illuminates the extent of global fishing -- down to individual vessel movements and hourly activity -- and finds that fishing occurs in over 55 percent of the world's oceans. By revealing where and when fishing occurs, the findings open an unprecedented gateway for improved ocean management.



When every fish counts

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Davis) Genetic analysis by UC Davis showed about one-third of endangered delta smelt were misidentified in surveys of the Yolo Bypass. Their study found that genetic tools can be a powerful complement to visual identification of endangered fish.



New insight into plants' self-defense

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Delaware) Researchers at the University of Delaware and the University of California-Davis have uncovered new details of how chloroplasts move about in times of trouble. It's the fundamental kind of research information that helps scientists understand plant biology and could help farmers prevent crop loss.



The Australian government's plan for the biocontrol of the common carp presents several risks

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Liege) Belgian, English and Australian scientists are calling on the Australian authorities to review their decision to introduce the carp herpes virus as a way to combat the common carp having colonised the country's rivers. In a letter published in the journal Science, they not only believe that this measure will be ineffective but that it also represents a risk to ecosystems.



Moths in mud can uncover prehistoric secrets

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Frontiers) A groundbreaking new technique for examining moth scales in forest lake sediments allows prehistoric outbreaks of these insects to be identified. The technique -- which could prove as revolutionary as fossil pollen and charcoal markers -- can provide information on the frequency and intensity of past and future insect epidemics, their impact on the forest environment and how they are linked to climate change.



Drier conditions could doom Rocky Mountain spruce and fir trees

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Colorado at Boulder) Drier summers and a decline in average snowpack over the past 40 years have severely hampered the establishment of two foundational tree species in subalpine regions of Colorado's Front Range, suggesting that climate warming is already taking a toll on forest health in some areas of the southern Rocky Mountains.



Damage encourages maple species to become female, Rutgers study finds

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Rutgers University) Jennifer Blake-Mahmud reports that striped maples not only change their sex periodically, but that they can wait until the last minute - three weeks before flowering - to do it. The switch appears to be triggered by physical damage, which can prompt a branch to flower female if it's cut off a male tree.



The battle for spinach

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Washington State University) Washington State University Professor Lindsey du Toit is leading research to help growers reduce the impact of a crippling fungal disease called Fusarium wilt.



Seasonal patterns in the Amazon explained

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) Environmental scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have led an international collaboration to improve satellite observations of tropical forests. With the help of professional tree climbers, the scientists collected field data on three factors that affect canopy 'greenness.'



Study suggests evolutionary change in protein function respects biophysical principles

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) For work reported in Science, Elizabeth Vierling at UMass Amherst and Justin Benesch at Oxford University looked at two types of small HSPs to address what they call a "basic evolutionary puzzle." That is, how two different types of small HSPs, Class I and Class II, evolved from a single type over 400 million years ago to form two distinct types with different functions.



Digestive ability of ancient insects could boost biofuel development

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of York) A study of the unusual digestive system of an ancient group of insects has provided new insights into future biofuel production.



Newly designed molecule binds nitrogen

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Würzburg) Chemists from the University of Würzburg have developed a boron-based molecule capable of binding nitrogen without assistance from a transition metal. This might be the first step towards the energy-saving production of fertilizers.



Tropical trees use unique method to resist drought

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Riverside) Tropical trees in the Amazon Rainforest may be more drought resistant than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside.That's good news, since the Amazon stores about 20 percent of all carbon in the Earth's biomass, which helps reduce global warming by lowering the planet's greenhouse gas levels.The study was published Monday in the journal New Phytologist.



Scientists create 'Evolutionwatch' for plants

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(PLOS) Using a hitchhiking weed, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology reveal for the first time the mutation rate of a plant growing in the wild.



First evidence of surprising ocean warming around Galápagos corals

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Arizona) A new analysis of the natural temperature archives stored in coral reefs shows the ocean around the Galápagos Islands has been warming since the 1970s. The finding surprised the research team, because the sparse instrumental records for sea surface temperature for that part of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean did not show warming. Scientists thought strong upwelling of colder deep waters spared the region from the warming seen in other parts of the Pacific.



From compost to composites: An eco-friendly way to improve rubber (video)

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(American Chemical Society) The concept of "from trash to treasure" holds true for the world of composting, where food waste is recycled into fertilizer for gardens. But what if compost could go beyond fertilizer? Now, one group reports in ACS Omega that by collecting the gases produced during the compost process, they can combine it with rubber to make optimized electronic sealants and sensors.



'Chameleon' ocean bacteria can shift their colors

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Warwick) Cyanobacteria -- which propel the ocean engine and help sustain marine life -- can shift their color like chameleons to match different colored light across the world's seas, according to research by an international collaboration including the University of Warwick.



Listening to data could be the best way to track salmon migration

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Elsevier) Sound could be the key to understanding ecological data: in a new study in Heliyon, researchers have turned chemical data that shows salmon migration patterns into sound, helping people hear when they move towards the ocean from one river to another. The approach - called sonification - enables even untrained listeners to interpret large amounts of complex data, providing an easier way to interpret "big data."



'Division of labor' between hemispheres of multicellular spheroidal alga controls light-sensitive movement

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(Tokyo Institute of Technology) Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) developed a motility-reactivation method to help determine how light-responsive changes in flagellar waveform in Volvox rousseletii, a multicellular spheroidal alga, are regulated. These results advance current understanding of how flagellar motility increased in complexity as single-celled organisms evolved into multicellular forms.



Tomatoes of the same quality as normal, but using only half the water

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 EST

(University of Seville) When reducing the water used to water cherry tomato crops by more than 50%, the product not only maintains its quality, both commercially and nutritionally, but it also even increases the level of carotenoids, compounds of great interest in the food-processing industry. In addition to being natural colourings, some are Vitamin-A precursors, which are beneficial for the health and have cosmetic uses.