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Preview: EurekAlert! - Agriculture

EurekAlert! - Agriculture



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2016 03:03:00 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Voracious Asian jumping worms strip forest floor and flood soil with nutrients

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Wisconsin-Madison) New research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that Asian jumping worms, an invasive species first found in Wisconsin in 2013, may do their work too well, speeding up the exit of nutrients from the soil before plants can process them.



How do shark teeth bite? Reciprocating saw, glue provide answers

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Washington) A recent University of Washington study sought to understand why shark teeth are shaped differently and what biological advantages various shapes have by testing their performance under realistic conditions. The results appeared in August in the journal Royal Society Open Science.



Flying beauties photoshoot: School kids in the Philippines learn what insects do for rice

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Pensoft Publishers) Science advances society and fosters sustainability, so why not involve everyone in building a better future? Culminating in the first citizen science workshop for arthropods to take place in the Philippines, one of the main objectives of the five-year, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research coordinated research project, LEGATO, was also to find ways to engage society in collecting research data and applying research findings in practice.



European Research Council awards €1.5 million to arm cereals against pathogens and diseases

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Earlham Institute) Announced today by the European Research Council, Dr. Ksenia Krasileva, Group Leader at the Earlham Institute and the Sainsbury Laboratory has been awarded a €1.5 million Starting Grant (over five years) to investigate the immune system of our most important crops. Her research into plants' immune system could create new genetic solutions for protecting plant health and future sustainable crop production.



First-of-kind study suggests cover crop mixtures increase agroecosystem services

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Penn State) Planting a multi-species mixture of cover crops -- rather than a cover crop monoculture -- between cash crops, provides increased agroecosystem services, or multifunctionality, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.



Researchers name a new species of reptile from 212 million years ago

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Virginia Tech) An extinct reptile related to crocodiles that lived 212 million years ago in present day New Mexico has been named as a new species, Vivaron haydeni, in a paper published this week by Virginia Tech's Department of Geosciences researchers.



Living together in mud: New bivalve species dwelling on a sea cucumber discovered in Japan

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Pensoft Publishers) Most bivalves live in sand or mud or attached to rock surface. However, a new bivalve species described from Japan lives on a sea cucumber that burrows in mudflats. This species is attached to the host by thin threads and uses host burrows as shelter from predators. This species, published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, is one of the smallest species in the genus, which is probably an adaptation to a narrow host burrow.



JIC scientist awarded prestigious 5 year European Research Council starting grant

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(John Innes Centre) Dr Diane Saunders an early career scientist at the John Innes Centre (JIC) in partnership with the Earlham Institute has been awarded a prestigious European Research Council (ERC) starting grant to pursue her chosen area of research.



Forecasting climate change's effects on biodiversity hindered by lack of data

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Purdue University) An international group of biologists is calling for data collection on a global scale to improve forecasts of how climate change affects animals and plants.



10 new projects to be supported under Joint DOE user facility initiative

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(DOE/Joint Genome Institute) The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory have accepted 10 projects submitted during the 2017 call for proposals for their joint 'Facilities Integrating Collaborations for User Science' (FICUS) initiative. The accepted proposals will begin on Oct. 1, 2016 and fall under the following focused topic areas: Plant-Microbe Interactions, Biofuels and Bioproducts, and Biogeochemistry of Select Inorganics.



Study: A tenth of the world's wilderness lost since the 1990s

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Wildlife Conservation Society) Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology show catastrophic declines in wilderness areas around the world over the last 20 years.



Critical information needed in fight to save wildlife

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Connecticut) An international group of 22 scientists is calling for a coordinated global effort to gather important species information that is urgently needed to improve predictions for the impact of climate change on future biodiversity.



The history of beer yeast

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Cell Press) Today's industrial yeast strains are used to make beer, wine, bread, biofuels, and more, but their evolutionary history is not well studied. In a Cell paper publishing Sept. 8, researchers describe a family tree of these microbes with an emphasis on beer yeast. The resulting genetic relationships reveal clues as to when yeast was first domesticated, who the earliest beer brewers were, and how humans have shaped this organism's development.



One-tenth of the world's wilderness lost in 2 decades

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(James Cook University) A research team including Professor William Laurance from James Cook University has discovered there has been a catastrophic decline in global wilderness areas during the past 20 years.



Calculating the role of lakes in global warming

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) Lakes bury more carbon than all the world's oceans combined. How will they respond to global warming?



JIC scientists create new training resource to break down barriers to wheat research

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(John Innes Centre) Scientists from Dr Cristobal Uauy's laboratory at the John Innes Centre have developed a new open access online wheat training hub to support researchers currently working on wheat or hoping to make the transition to work on this important crop.



Crab from the Chinese pet market turns out to be a new species of a new genus

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Pensoft Publishers) Shimmering carapaces make crabs attractive to pet owners. To answer the growing demand, fishermen collect and trade crustaceans, often not knowing what exactly they have handed over to their clients. Luckily for science and nature alike, however, the authors of a paper now published in the open-access journal ZooKeys have spotted such a crab and recognized its peculiarities to prove it as a new species and even a new genus from southern China.



How does your garden grow?

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Santa Barbara) According to a new study, turning lawn into a vegetable garden can reduce greenhouse gas emissions.



Study finds increased ocean acidification due to human activities

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Oceanographers from MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution report that the northeast Pacific Ocean has absorbed an increasing amount of anthropogenic carbon dioxide over the last decade, at a rate that mirrors the increase of carbon dioxide emissions pumped into the atmosphere.



Mango and the microbiota: Potential role of this superfruit in maintaining gut health

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Wild Hive) Research published in the Journal of Nutrition has for the first time, documented the potential effects of mango consumption on gut microbiota of mice. When samples were compared from the beginning to the end of the study period, mango supplementation was found to prevent the loss of beneficial gut bacteria often induced by a high-fat diet. This is an important finding as specific bacteria in the intestinal tract may play a role in obesity and obesity-related complications, such as type 2 diabetes.



Future fisheries can expect $10 billion revenue loss due to climate change

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of British Columbia) Global fisheries stand to lose approximately $10 billion of their annual revenue by 2050 if climate change continues unchecked, and countries that are most dependent on fisheries for food will be the hardest hit, finds new University of British Columbia research.



Novogene announces joint venture with AITbiotech to establish next-gen sequencing center in Singapore

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(Novogene Corporation) Novogene Corporation Ltd, a leading global next-generation sequencing (NGS) services and genetics diagnostic company, announced today a joint venture with AITbiotech Pte Ltd, a Singapore-based NGS products and services company, to establish a high-throughput next-generation sequencing and R&D Centre in Singapore. The Singapore center, NovogeneAIT Genomics Singapore, will deliver NGS services using Illumina's latest HiSeq X Ten sequencing system.



Thrive or fail: Examining forest resilience in the face of fires

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Wisconsin-Madison) US and Canadian scientists outline a framework this month in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment to help scientists better test, understand and predict when forests are resilient enough to recover from fire or when a combination of conditions could tip the scales, drastically altering forest landscapes.



Pushing a parasite from land to sea

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Davis) Higher levels of rainfall and coastal development increase the risk of disease-causing organisms flowing to the ocean, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. The study advances earlier work by tracking the parasite T. gondii to see how human-driven land-use change and rainfall might be impacting pathogen movement from land to sea.



Genetically modified humans? CRISPR/Cas 9 explained (video)

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT

(American Chemical Society) Thanks to a new, cheap and accurate DNA-editing technique called CRISPR-Cas9, targeted genetic modification in humans is no longer just the realm of science fiction. Both the British and U.S. governments recently gave scientists the thumbs-up to edit DNA in human embryos and adults using CRISPR. In the latest Reactions episode, we explain how CRISPR works, how it is being used today and what the future might bring for this landmark technology: https://youtu.be/5gQGWJraptU.