Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Agriculture
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/agriculture.xml
Preview: EurekAlert! - Agriculture

EurekAlert! - Agriculture



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2017 01:03:02 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



MSU-licensed technology wins top industry awards for combatting plant diseases

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Montana State University) MSU Professor Emeritus Barry Jacobsen discovered a strain of bacteria that is the active ingredient in LifeGard, a biopesticide that industry leaders are recognizing as one of the best on the market.



Loose skin and 'slack volume' protect hagfish from shark bites

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Chapman University) Chapman University has published new research showing how hagfishes survive an initial attack from predators before they release large volumes of slime to defend themselves. Because the slime is released after they are attacked, this defense strategy is only effective if they survive the initial bite. Results show that hagfish skin is not puncture resistant; it is both unattached and flaccid, which helps avoid internal damage from penetrating teeth.



Northeast farmers weigh warming climate, drenched fields

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Cornell University) Farmers in the Northeast are adapting to longer growing seasons and warming climate conditions -- but they may face spring-planting whiplash as they confront fields increasingly saturated with rain, according to a research paper published in the journal Climatic Change.



Landmark paper on global oceans garners international award

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Minnesota) The results made audiences gasp: Five percent of all the nitrogen in the Gulf of Mexico comes from Minnesota and 11 percent comes from Iowa. Few people thought it was possible for such small patches of land to have major effects on enormous bodies of water. These and other eye-popping findings were possible only after the publication of a 1996 paper in Biogeochemistry that is the recipient of ASLO's 2018 John H. Martin Award.



Bioluminescent worm found to have iron superpowers

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego have made a discovery with potential human health impacts in a parchment tubeworm, found to have ferritin with the fastest catalytic performance ever described.



All politics -- and cannabis marketing -- are local

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Davis) California's legal cannabis market, opening for business on Jan. 1, is expected to quickly grow to be the largest in the nation and worth more than $5 billion a year. County voting on Proposition 64 that led the state here -- to legalizing sales for recreational use -- can offer insight into how medical marijuana dispensaries will now market themselves.



Conserving the forests

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of California - Santa Barbara) UCSB economist Robert Heilmayr and colleagues evaluate certification programs as options for sustaining tropical forests.



Kent State researcher exposes MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beaches

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Kent State University) Tara C. Smith, Ph.D., a professor of epidemiology in Kent State's College of Public Health, published the findings of a study her lab conducted in 2015 that shows a higher-than-expected prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at beaches around Lake Erie.



UNH researchers find effects of climate change could accelerate by mid-century

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of New Hampshire) Environmental models are showing that the effects of climate change could be much stronger by the middle of the 21st century, and a number of ecosystem and weather conditions could consistently decline even more in the future.



Study: Forest resilience declines in face of wildfires, climate change

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(The University of Montana) The research team said that with a warming climate, forests are losing their resilience to wildfires.



OSU scientist to study living versions of origins-of-life fossils

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Oregon State University) An Oregon State University researcher will lead a study of chemical signaling and metabolite production among microbial communities whose origins trace back billions of years.



Tracing a plant's steps: Following seed dispersal using chloroplast DNA

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Botanical Society of America) Researchers have developed a new tool to sequence chloroplast DNA from hundreds of plants at once, to learn more about how plant populations move. This tool, CallHap, makes it cheaper and easier to sequence the chloroplast genomes of large numbers of plants and accurately track seed dispersal across landscapes.



UMass Amherst, Peking University scientists advance knowledge of plant reproduction

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Two groups of plant molecular biologists, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Peking University, have long studied how pollen tubes and pistils, the male and female parts of flowers, communicate to achieve fertilization in plants. Today they report in a Science early release paper that they have identified a pair of receptors essential to these communications as well as molecules that modulate the receptors' activity.



How Canada can help protect Canadians from obesity and chronic disease

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Toronto) University of Toronto nutritional scientists are leading a study with national experts calling on the Canadian government to outlaw junk food marketing to children, impose stricter limits on unhealthy nutrients added to foods, and impose a 'sugary drink tax.'



Lizards of Oz take toll on turtle eggs

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Queensland) Goannas have overtaken foxes as the number one predator of the endangered loggerhead turtle at its second largest Queensland nesting beach.A University of Queensland study has found that since feral red foxes were controlled in the 1980s, there has been an increase in the number goanna raids on loggerhead turtle nests at Wreck Rock beach, south of Agnes Waters.



Scientists call for improved technologies to save imperiled California salmon

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) Scientists working to protect California's most endangered salmon say in a new report that key improvements in tracking Sacramento River winter-run Chinook through California's complex water delivery system would help recover the species while the water continues to flow.



The toxic sugar tree: Mapping the evolutionary history of a cancerous sugar gene

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Nevada, Reno) The gene CMAH, that allows for the synthesis of a sugar called Neu5Gc, is missing from humans. This sugar is present in red meats, some fish and dairy products. When humans consume an animal with that gene, the body has an immune reaction to the foreign sugar, which can cause inflammation, arthritis, and cancer. University of Nevada, Reno researchers, have analyzed 322 animal genome sequences looking for animals with the presence of active CMAH genes.



Virginia Tech researchers trace the potato's origins, learn about its untapped potential

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Virginia Tech) Thanks to Veilleux and Laimbeer, it will soon be easier to breed the perfect potato chip or to access desirable traits such as enhanced disease resistance in wild or primitive species.



USDA's NIFA announces support for agricultural science education in insular areas

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(National Institute of Food and Agriculture ) The US Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture today announced support for projects that strengthen food and agricultural science education in insular areas of the United States. Funding is made through three NIFA programs.



Engineers create plants that glow

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) By embedding nanoparticles into the leaves of watercress, MIT engineers have induced the plant to give off dim light for nearly four hours. They believe engineered plants will one day be bright enough to act as desk lamps or street lights.



Bringing 'Avatar'-like glowing plants to the real world

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American Chemical Society) The 2009 film 'Avatar' created a lush imaginary world, illuminated by magical, glowing plants. Now researchers are starting to bring this spellbinding vision to life to help reduce our dependence on artificial lighting. They report in ACS' journal Nano Letters a way to infuse plants with the luminescence of fireflies. 



UVB radiation influences behavior of sticklebacks

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Bonn) Fish cannot see ultraviolet B rays but still change their behavior when they grow up under increased UVB intensity. According to studies by biologists at the University of Bonn on three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), increased UVB leads to a smaller body size and more risk-seeking behavior when faced with predators. Climate change is likely to increase UVB intensity, possibly with consequences for ecosystems and fish farming.



New model makes us wiser on cocktail effects

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Copenhagen) Danish researchers have addressed an international environmental problem by developing a model that can predict how certain chemicals amplify the effects of pesticides and other chemical compounds. Pesticide expert hopes that it will make environmental legislation easier.



Does eclipse equal night in plant life?

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American Society of Agronomy) As the Aug. 21 eclipse approached, researchers prepared to understand plants' response to light and temperature. The varied results have left the researchers with interesting questions.



Study finds links between deforestation and fisheries yields in the Amazon

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Virginia Tech) The conversion of tropical forests to crop and pastureland has long been a concern for scientists, a new study points to another unexpected consequence: changes in fish production.