Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Breaking News
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
cancer  health  journal  new study  new  patients  published  research  researchers  risk  scientists  study  team  university 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Breaking News

EurekAlert! - Breaking News



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 06:42:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Watching birds near your home is good for your mental health -- official

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

People living in neighborhoods with more birds, shrubs and trees are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and stress, according to research by academics at the University of Exeter, the British Trust for Ornithology and the University of Queensland.



Dietary prebiotics improve sleep, buffer impacts of stress, says study

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

New research suggests that lesser-known gut-health promoters called prebiotics -- which serve as food for good bacteria inside the gut -- can also have an impact, improving sleep and buffering the physiological impacts of stress.



Alzheimer's drug prescribed off-label could pose risk for some

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer's disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test. UCLA School of Nursing researchers discovered that for people who carry a specific genetic variation -- the K-variant of butyrylcholinesterase, or BChE-K -- donezpezil could accelerate cognitive decline.



Many genetic changes can occur early in human development

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Multiple genetic changes can occur before or early after conception.



New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Origami-inspired materials use folds in materials to embed powerful functionality. However, all that folding can be pretty labor intensive. Now, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are drawing material inspiration from another ancient Japanese paper craft -- kirigami.



Molecular 'on switch' could point to treatments for pediatric brain tumor

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have identified a mechanism that controls the expression of genes regulating the growth of the most aggressive form of medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor.



Sandia use confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Sometimes, you have to go small to win big. That is the approach a multilab, interdisciplinary team took in using nanoparticles and a novel nanoconfinement system to develop a method to change hydrogen storage properties.



Decoding the genome's cryptic language

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new tool to identify RNA-DNA interactions. The tool can provide a full account of all the RNA molecules that interact with a segment of DNA, as well as the locations of all these interactions -- in just a single experiment. The research is a step toward identifying new functions and instructions encoded in the genome.



The making of music

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A new study suggests that music -- and specifically infant-directed song -- evolved as a way for parents to signal to children that their needs are being met, while still freeing up parents to perform other tasks, like foraging for food, or caring for other offspring.



Effects of a poor diet during pregnancy may be reversed in female adolescent offspring

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Here's some good news if you are female: Research published online in The FASEB Journal, shows that in mice, what is eaten during adolescence or childhood development may alter long-term behavior and learning, and can even 'rescue' females from the negative effects on behavior resulting from a poor maternal diet during pregnancy.



New structural studies reveal workings of a molecular pump that ejects cancer drugs

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Sometimes cells spit out things we don't want them to -- like medications. Researchers have determined the three-dimensional structure of a tiny pump that expels, among other things, chemotherapy agents. This new knowledge could lead to the design of more effective drugs.



Study shows adipose stem cells may be the cell of choice for therapeutic applications

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

An international team of researchers, funded by Morris Animal Foundation, has shown that adipose (fat) stem cells might be the preferred stem cell type for use in canine therapeutic applications, including orthopedic diseases and injury.



Pitt study provides clues to relationship between schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Bioinformatics study identifies genetic variants with differing effects on risk of rheumatoid arthritis and schizophrenia.



Men with higher cognitive ability better at taking heart medication

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

After a heart attack, it is important for patients to take medication that lowers cholesterol levels. In a new study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, researchers at Uppsala and Umeå Universities have found that general cognitive ability (intelligence) has a bearing, in the first year and two years after the heart attack, on how well men take statins prescribed for them.



Nano-sized hydrogen storage system increases efficiency

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Lawrence Livermore scientists have collaborated with an interdisciplinary team of researchers including colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories to develop an efficient hydrogen storage system that could be a boon for hydrogen powered vehicles.



New U-M study shows how bacteria get into the lungs; findings could help disease research

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

New research pinpoints just how bacteria get into human lungs, and opens the door to more research on what happens to them -- and our bodies -- as a result of the lung microbiome.



Antibiotic resistance: A burgeoning problem for kids too

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

In a new, first-of-its-kind study, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found a 700 percent surge in infections caused by bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family resistant to multiple kinds of antibiotics among children in the US. These antibiotic resistant infections are in turn linked to longer hospital stays and potentially greater risk of death.



Princeton-Intel collaboration breaks new ground in studies of the brain

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Princeton University and Intel researchers have collaborated to develop software that allows for 'decoding digital brain data' to reveal how neural activity gives rise to learning, memory and other cognitive functions. The software can be used in real time during an fMRI brain scan.



New antiviral drug cuts cytomegalovirus infection and improves survival in patients

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

In a significant advance in improving the safety of donor stem cell transplants, a major clinical trial led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has shown that a novel agent can protect against the most common viral infection that patients face after transplantation.



Study shows ancient humans arrived in South America in multiple waves

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

The findings published Wednesday (Feb. 22, 2017) in the journal Science Advances suggest that Paleoamericans share a last common ancestor with modern native South Americans outside, rather than inside, the Americas and underscore the importance of looking at both genetic and morphological evidence, each revealing different aspects of the human story, to help unravel our species' history.



Penn vet team identifies new therapeutic targets for tropical disease leishmaniasis

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Each year, about 2 million people contract leishmaniasis, which results in disfiguring skin ulcers that may take months or years to heal and in rare cases can become metastatic, causing major tissue damage. Now a team led by University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine researchers have a promising target for treatment.



New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.



A novel DNA vaccine design improves chances of inducing anti-tumor immunity

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Scientists at The Wistar Institute and Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. have devised a novel DNA vaccine approach through molecular design to improve the immune responses elicited against one of the most important cancer antigen targets.



Study catalogs the complex flavors of American-made goat cheese

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Researchers generated a flavor lexicon that lists the 39 flavor attributes in cheeses made with goat milk. Flavor lexicons are important tools for cheesemakers because they help with development, product benchmarking and quality control.



The dawn of a new era for Supernova 1987a

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Three decades ago, astronomers spotted one of the brightest exploding stars in more than 400 years. Since that first sighting, SN 1987A has continued to fascinate astronomers with its spectacular light show. To commemorate the supernova's 30th anniversary, new observations and a 3-D model are being released.



NASA's Webb Telescope team prepares for earsplitting acoustic test

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Inside NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., the James Webb Space Telescope team completed the environmental portion of vibration testing and prepared for the acoustic test on the telescope.



Cosmic blast from the past

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Three decades ago, a massive stellar explosion sent shockwaves not only through space but also through the astronomical community. SN 1987A was the closest observed supernova to Earth since the invention of the telescope and has become by far the best studied of all time, revolutionising our understanding of the explosive death of massive stars.



How proteins reshape cell membranes

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Small 'bubbles' frequently form on membranes of cells and are taken up into their interior. The process involves EHD proteins -- a focus of research by Prof. Oliver Daumke of the MDC. He and his team have now shed light on how these proteins assemble on the surface of a cell and reshape its membrane.



Can staying active help to prevent chronic pain? Physical activity affects pain modulation in older adults

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Older adults with higher levels of physical activity have pain modulation patterns that might help lower their risk of developing chronic pain, reports a study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.



Interactive health apps may inspire healthy behaviors, but watch the tone

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Just like real doctors and nurses, online health tools with good -- but controlled -- communication skills can promote healthier lifestyles, according to researchers. However, if their tone is conversational, these tools may lull users into a false sense of comfort, they add. In a study, people who experienced a back-and-forth interaction with an online health risk assessment website were more likely to follow the health behaviors suggested by the tool.



Study examines ways to use demand information to adjust capacity

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A new UT Dallas study derived optimal policies and data-driven, problem-solving techniques for firms to learn about demand so that they can decide when and by how much they should adjust their capacity level.



Tissue-engineered model developed to study bone-invading tumor

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Researchers have used tissue engineering to create models for studying the bone-destroying activity of tumors such as the aggressive pediatric cancer Ewing's sarcoma.



What effect does prenatal and postpartum maternal depression have on children?

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

The results of a large study do not support the notion that prenatal and postpartum maternal depression is particularly detrimental to children's psychological development. Instead, the most robust effects were found for maternal depression occurring during children's preschool years.



Elevated stress levels among Norway's youngest in childcare

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Norwegian researchers measured the stress hormone cortisol in 112 toddlers from 85 different childcare centers in six municipalities, approximately five months after they started attending. Children with the longest childcare days (eight-nine hours) showed increases in cortisol during the day.



Hammerhead shark migration gives new hope for conservation

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Great Hammerhead sharks have been tagged and tracked across the USA and Bahamas in a bid to shed light on their migration habits. Researchers suggest that these sharks are more at risk than previously thought because of their predictable and seasonal migratory patterns. As an endangered species, the Great Hammerhead shark is in desperate need of effective conservation management. This new information will allow marine planners to improve the protection of this iconic animal.



In enemy garb

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Biologists expand on more than 150 years of textbook wisdom with a new explanation for wasp mimicry.



Teach yourself everyday happiness with imagery training

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

In a recently published paper in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, scientists at the Smartbrain Clinic in Oslo, Norway find that self-guided positive imagery training can successfully combat negative emotions in our daily lives. This tool is so powerful that it also changes the way our brain functions.



More virus infection, please

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Osaka University scientists generate a new plasmid-based reverse genetics system for rotaviruses.



New algorithm identifies gene transfers between different bacterial species

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

In a recent study combining machine learning and bioinformatics, a new computational method was developed for modelling gene transfers between different lineages of a bacterial population or even between entirely different bacterial species. The method was used to analyze a collection of 616 whole-genomes of a recombinogenic pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae.



High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A study from Stockholm University has now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes. The study has been published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.



Miniature device is 3 times more efficient in generating new colors of laser pulses

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A group of researchers from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw has just published the results of their works on miniature device -- a tripler -- for generating femtosecond laser pulses in the UV. Not only does the device has three times higher efficiency than previously used setups, but also fits on a finger tip, thanks to using a unique software package, developed in Warsaw, during the design stage.



New risk factors for anxiety disorders

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Several newly discovered variants of a gene increase the risk of developing anxiety disorders. A research team aims to derive new therapies from this finding which are better tailored to the individual patients.



Size matters... and structure too! New tool predicts the interaction of proteins and RNA

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation developed Global Score, a method that allows, for the first time, to predict protein interactions with long non-coding RNAs. This algorithm helps scientists prioritize binding partners for experimental validation, which will contribute to our understanding of the role of long non-coding RNAs in normal cell function and in disease.



Controversial test could be leading to unnecessary open heart operations

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A University of Leicester researcher leads an aortic stenosis study.



Study offers guidance on how to protect olive trees from being ravaged by deadly pathogen

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Expert ecologists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) have devised a scientific model which could help predict the spread of the deadly Xylella fastidiosa which is threatening to destroy Europe's olive trees.The CEH scientists have created a model which is able to qualitatively and quantitatively predict how the deadly bacterial pathogen may spread as well as offer guidance on how buffer zones should be arranged to protect uninfected olive trees.



Mild cognitive impairment (MCI)

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Greek researchers demonstrated the potential of a self-administered virtual supermarket cognitive training game for remotely detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI), without the need for an examiner, among a sample of older adults. MCI patients suffer from cognitive problems and often encounter difficulties in performing complex activities such as financial planning. They are at a high risk for progressing to dementia however early detection of MCI and suitable interventions can stabilize the patients' condition and prevent further decline.



Study reports multidrug resistant bacteria found in hospital sinks

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Many recent reports have found multidrug resistant bacteria living in hospital sink drainpipes, putting them in close proximity to vulnerable patients. But how the bacteria find their way out of the drains, and into patients has been unclear. Now a team from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, has charted their pathways. The research is published Feb. 24 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.



Evidence review supports pediatric use of PDE-5 inhibitors for pulmonary hypertension

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A systematic review of the comparative effectiveness and safety of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension published Feb. 24, 2017 in Pediatrics demonstrates that scientific evidence supports the use of this class of medications in infants, neonates and children with pulmonary hypertension.



More Earth-like than moon-like

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Mars' mantle may be more complicated than previously thought. In a new study published today in the Nature-affiliated journal Scientific Reports, researchers at LSU document geochemical changes over time in the lava flows of Elysium, a major martian volcanic province.



Never too late: Reaping the benefits of exercise in early postmenopause

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Women recently postmenopause have similar or improved benefits from physical activity, in terms of muscle and blood vessel function, as those premenopause. Therefore, early postmenopause might be a time when women can gain increased benefit from physical activity to oppose negative effects of oestrogen loss and aging.



The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Cancer leaders highlight main fears for patient care, treatment and research in a post-Brexit world.



Antibiotics used to treat cystic fibrosis increases risk of permanent hearing loss

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A powerful class of antibiotics provides life-saving relief for people with cystic fibrosis; however, a new study for the first time reveals the levels at which high cumulative dosages over time significantly increases the risk of permanent hearing loss in these patients. The study suggests physicians who treat patients with cystic fibrosis may be able to consider alternative strategies for treating the symptoms of respiratory infections associated with CF.



38,000-year-old engravings confirm ancient origins of technique used by Seurat, Van Gogh

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A newly discovered trove of 16 engraved and otherwise modified limestone blocks, created 38,000 years ago, confirms the ancient origins of the pointillist techniques later adopted by 19th and 20th century artists such as Georges Seurat, Vincent Van Gogh, Camille Pissarro, and Roy Lichtenstein.



Novel 'barcode' tracking of T cells in immunotherapy patients identifies likely cancer-

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A new discovery by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle makes an important step in identifying which specific T cells within the diverse army of a person's immune system are best suited to fight cancer.The findings will be published Feb. 24 in Science Immunology.



In first, scientists forecast West Nile Virus outbreaks

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health are the first to report a method to accurately predict the timing and intensity of West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreaks. The study is published in the journal Nature Communications.



Regular aerobic exercise beginning in middle age may lessen severity of stroke in old age

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Regular aerobic exercise may protect the collateral circulation and lessen the severity of strokes later in life.



Preventive measure during procedures using contrast material unnecessary

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Contrary to what international guidelines have prescribed for many years, preventive hydration to protect renal function during procedures using contrast material appears to have no added value. In fact, in some cases there are negative consequences. Research by Maastricht UMC+ shows that omitting the standard intravenous hydration given to people with compromised renal function could prevent complications and save millions of euros in care costs. The results were published this week in the prominent scientific journal The Lancet.



New 'tougher-than-metal' fiber-reinforced hydrogels

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Scientists have succeeded in creating 'fiber-reinforced soft composites,' or tough hydrogels combined with woven fiber fabric. These fabrics are highly flexible, tougher than metals, and have a wide range of potential applications.



Saturn's rings viewed in the mid-infrared show bright Cassini Division

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Researchers has succeeded in measuring the brightnesses and temperatures of Saturn's rings using the mid-infrared images taken by the Subaru Telescope in 2008. They reveal that, at that time, the Cassini Division and the C ring were brighter than the other rings in the mid-infrared light and that the brightness contrast appeared to be the inverse of that seen in the visible light. The data give important insights into the nature of Saturn's rings.



Electrons use DNA like a wire for signaling DNA replication

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A Caltech-led study has shown that the electrical wire-like behavior of DNA is involved in the molecule's replication.



New polymer additive could revolutionize plastics recycling

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Only 2 percent of the 78 million tons of manufactured plastics are currently recycled into similar products because polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP), which account for two-thirds of the world's plastics, have different chemical structures and cannot be efficiently repurposed together. That could all change with a discovery by a Cornell University research team.



First systematic study of deadly, antibiotic-resistant fungus reported

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

The deadly fungus, Candida auris, which has been found in hospitals, is resistant to entire classes of antimicrobial drugs, limiting treatment options for those infected. Now, in a first-of-its-kind study published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, microbiologists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have provided previously uninvestigated details pertaining to C. auris drug resistance and growth patterns.



Kidney damage diagnosis may be inaccurate for many, suggests study

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

An analysis of patient records reveals that, for many, an initial diagnosis of 'acute kidney injury' using current clinical diagnostic methods may have been inaccurate.



Bored by physical therapy? Focus on citizen science instead

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Researchers have devised a method by which patients improved their repetitive rehabilitative exercises by contributing to scientific projects in which massive data collection and analysis is needed. The citizen science activity entailed the environmental mapping of a polluted body of water with a miniature instrumented boat, which was remotely controlled through physical gestures tracked by the Microsoft Kinect, a low-cost motion capture system.



New gene for atrazine resistance identified in waterhemp

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Waterhemp, a common agricultural weed, has become increasingly resistant to atrazine and other herbicides. Waterhemp uses a class of enzymes known as GSTs to detoxify herbicides, but the exact GST responsible for atrazine resistance was not known until recently. University of Illinois researchers used molecular methods to identify a gene for GST-based atrazine resistance. Knowledge of the gene will allow for easier diagnosis and could lead to the development of more targeted control options.



Researchers find new clues for nuclear waste cleanup

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A Washington State University study of the chemistry of technetium-99 has improved understanding of the challenging nuclear waste and could lead to better cleanup methods.



Melting polar ice, rising sea levels not only climate change dangers

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

'Discussions of climate change usually are focused on changes occurring in polar and temperate zones, but tropical regions also are expected to experience changes in regional precipitation,' said Dr. Kirk Winemiller, AgriLife Research fisheries scientist and Regents Professor in the department of wildlife and fisheries sciences at College Station.



Nicotinamide riboside (vitamin B3) prevents nerve pain caused by cancer drugs

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A new study in rats suggests that nicotinamide riboside (NR), a form of vitamin B3, may be useful for treating or preventing nerve pain (neuropathy) caused by chemotherapy drugs. The findings by researchers at the University of Iowa were published recently in the Journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (PAIN) and lay the groundwork for testing whether this nutritional supplement can reduce nerve pain in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.



New assay may lead to a cure for debilitating inflammatory joint disease

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Current treatments for rheumatoid arthritis relieve the inflammation that leads to joint destruction, but the immunologic defect that triggers the inflammation persists to cause relapses. Known as autoantibodies and produced by the immune system's B cells, these defective molecules mistakenly attack the body's own proteins in an example of autoimmune disease.



Study: Two-thirds of clinicians lack knowledge of diabetes-related foot complication

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A new study investigated how much non-foot-specialist clinicians know about Charcot neuroarthropathy in an effort to understand how to better focus future educational forums on the topic.



NASA eyes Pineapple Express soaking California

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

NASA has estimated rainfall from the Pineapple Express over the coastal regions southwestern Oregon and northern California from the series of storms in February, 2017.



The truth about catnip (video)

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Catnip is notorious for its euphoric effects on our feline companions. What is it about catnip that makes cats go nuts, and what benefit does this have for the plants? The secret may be a chemical that has more to do with six-legged creatures than our four-legged friends. Watch the latest Speaking of Chemistry video here: https://youtu.be/G-XUpY82S18.



Just how early is spring arriving in your neighborhood? Find out ...

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

These maps from the USGS-led USA National Phenology Network provide a quick national overview of just how early spring is arriving: spring is now making an appearance in coastal California, southern Nevada, southeastern Colorado, central Kansas, Missouri, southern Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. It's rolling up across West Virginia and Virginia, soon to hit Philly and Indianapolis. It's already sprung - days ago -- across the southern Great Plains and SE Atlantic Coast, and it was 22 days early in DC!



Global vaccine injury system needed to improve public health

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

In an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Sam Halabi, University of Missouri associate professor of law, argues that a global vaccine injury compensation system administered through the World Health Organization would address the global public health issue of vaccine injuries.



Values gap in workplace can lead millennials to look elsewhere

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Much has been made in popular culture about millennials as they join the working world, including their tendency to job hop. Although this behavior often is explained as a loyalty issue, new research from the University of Missouri reveals one reason young workers choose to leave a firm is because they find a disconnect between their beliefs and the culture they observe in the workplace.



Melting sea ice may be speeding nature's clock in the Arctic

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Spring is coming sooner to some plant species in the low Arctic of Greenland, while other species are delaying their emergence amid warming winters. The changes are associated with diminishing sea ice cover, according to a study published in the journal Biology Letters and led by the University of California, Davis.



NASA sees another quick Tropical Cyclone demise in South Pacific

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the end of Tropical Cyclone 8P as it was being sheared apart by strong vertical wind shear.



New research explains why a common bacterium can produce severe illness

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

How can the same infection result in dramatically different levels of illness in two different people? A new study identifies two conditions -- a genetic immunodeficiency and delayed acquired immunity -- that explain why a patient developed a life-threatening disease in response to a common strain of bacterium.



Executive indiscretions can hurt the bottom line

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Adam Yore, an assistant professor of finance in the University of Missouri Trulaske College of Business at the University of Missouri, shows that personal indiscretions by executives can have multimillion dollar consequences for the companies that employ them.Yore and his co-authors examined 325 instances of executive indiscretions. The analysis found an immediate loss in shareholder value of 4.1 percent or $226 million when CEOs were involved in the misstep.



Back after a century, for-profit medical schools could make impact

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Long discouraged, for-profit medical education has established a renewed foothold in the US, leading a trio of Brown University scholars to examine in JAMA what that rise could mean.



More day cares near by, more germs? Maybe not, according to Drexel whooping cough study

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A team of Drexel University researchers looking into how a higher density of day care facilities may affect the prevalence of illness in a neighborhood and found that it doesn't really have much of an effect.



AOSpine North America provides a glimpse into the future of spine care

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

AOSpine North America has brought together experts to provide a glimpse into the next generation of spine care leading to a supplement in Neurosurgery on the 'Future Advances in Spine Surgery.'



Vast luminous nebula poses a cosmic mystery

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Astronomers have found an enormous, glowing blob of gas in the distant universe, with no obvious source of power for the light it is emitting. Called an 'enormous Lyman-alpha nebula' (ELAN), it is the brightest and among the largest of these rare objects, only a handful of which have been observed.



Air pollution may have masked mid-20th Century sea ice loss

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Humans may have been altering Arctic sea ice longer than previously thought, according to researchers studying the effects of air pollution on sea ice growth in the mid-20th Century.



New research on rape kit processing sees improvements

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

BYU professor Julie Valentine is on the front lines of sexual assault kit processing reform. Her latest, groundbreaking research was just released, showing drastic improvement in submission rates.



Drugs similar to aspirin, ibuprofen could help treat sepsis, study suggests

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A potentially life-saving treatment for sepsis has been under our noses for decades in the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) most people have in their medicine cabinets, a new University of Colorado Boulder study suggests.



Contact tracing and targeted insecticide spraying can curb dengue outbreaks

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Contact tracing -- a process of identifying everyone who has come into contact with those infected by a particular disease -- combined with targeted, indoor spraying of insecticide can greatly reduce the spread of the mosquito-borne dengue virus, finds a study led by Emory University researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).The results were published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine and based on analyses from a 2009 outbreak of dengue in Cairns, Australia.



Gene mutations cause leukemia, but which ones?

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Watanabe-Smith's research, published today in the journal Oncotarget, sought to better understand one 'typo' in a standard leukemia assay, or test. While studying cancer biology and completing his doctorate in the lab of Brian Druker, M.D., at the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Watanabe-Smith encountered a new problem: an issue with the model system itself.



Nematode resistance in soybeans beneficial even at low rates of infestation

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Soybeans with resistance to soybean cyst nematodes seem to have a yield advantage compared to susceptible varieties when SCN is present. Until now, scientists did not know what level of SCN infestation is needed to achieve the yield advantage. A new University of Illinois study shows that SCN resistance from the soybean accession PI 88788 offers yield advantages even at very low infestation rates.



New gene sequencing software could aid in early detection, treatment of cancer

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions.



Almost 4 decades later, mini eyeless catfish gets a name

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Discovered in a 1978-79 expedition, a pale, eyeless catfish that doesn't even measure an inch long is now known as Micromyzon orinoco, for the South American river in which it was discovered.



New paper published in Phytobiomes may lead to novel methods of Rhizoctonia solani control

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

In a research paper just published in Phytobiomes, a fully open-access journal of The American Phytopathological Society, University of Florida researcher Ken Obasa and colleagues identified a novel and important biological aspect of R. Solani while investigating brown patch infected cool-season turfgrasses: R. solani isolated from diseased tissue were persistently associated with bacteria during growth on solid media, leading them to uncover the impact of a bacterium on brown patch disease.



English learners treated differently depending on where they go to school

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

As the number of English learners continues to grow across the nation, new research indicates these students are being treated differently depending on where they go to school.



Tiny cavefish may help humans evolve to require very little sleep

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

We all do it; we all need it -- humans and animals alike. Neuroscientists have been studying Mexican cavefish to provide insight into the evolutionary mechanisms regulating sleep loss and the relationship between sensory processing and sleep. They are investigating how sleep evolves and using this species as a model to understand how human brains could evolve to require very little sleep, just like the cavefish.



Three layers of graphene reveals a new kind of magnet

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Scientists at TIFR discover the magnetism of electrons in three layers of graphene. This study reveals a new kind of magnet and provides insight on how electronic devices using graphene could be made for fundamental studies as well as various applications.



UC researchers teach drones to land themselves on moving targets

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati's College of Engineering and Applied Science are using artificial intelligence called fuzzy logic to get drones to navigate and land themselves on moving platforms. This holds promise for commercial uses such as delivering packages from moving vehicles.



Last year's El Niño waves battered California shore to unprecedented degree

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Last winter's El Niño may have felt weak to residents of Southern California, but it was one of the most powerful weather events of the last 145 years, scientists say.



Trilobite eggs in New York

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Despite a plethora of exceptionally preserved trilobites, trilobite reproduction has remained a mystery. No previously described trilobite has had unambiguous eggs or genitalia preserved. This study by Thomas A. Hegna and colleagues reports the first occurrence of in situ preserved trilobite eggs from the Lorraine Group in upstate New York, USA.



Researchers uncover a role for HSP90 in gene-environment interactions in humans

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

Researchers at the Whitehead Institute have now uncovered a role for the protein-folding chaperone HSP90 in humans, not only as a modifier of the effects of mutations, but as a mediator of the impact of the environment on the function of mutant proteins. And these effects of HSP90 can alter the course of human diseases.



Direct-to-consumer genomics: Harmful or empowering?

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

In a recent paper, Joel Eissenberg, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Saint Louis University, explores questions that stem from new advances in direct-to-consumer DNA tests, which have the effect of separating the physician-patient relationship from access to new personal health data.