Subscribe: Comments on The Well-Rounded Mama: Breastfeeding Lowers the Risk for Diabetes And Oth...
http://wellroundedmama.blogspot.com/feeds/2419102312167917218/comments/default
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
benefits  bfing  breastfeed  breastfeeding  cassandra anoymous  issues  long term  long  makes  milk  pure innocent  supply  term  women 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Comments on The Well-Rounded Mama: Breastfeeding Lowers the Risk for Diabetes And Oth...

Comments on The Well-Rounded Mama: Breastfeeding Lowers the Risk for Diabetes And Other Maternal Disease Later In Life





Updated: 2018-04-22T15:34:38.868-07:00

 



I love the picture! so pure and innocent! I hope i...

2010-12-16T08:41:47.474-08:00

I love the picture! so pure and innocent! I hope i can be that confident when my little ones come out!



Cassandra and Anoymous, my heart goes out to you i...

2010-11-10T14:12:09.316-08:00

Cassandra and Anoymous, my heart goes out to you in your struggles with breastfeeding supply. My breastfeeding came very close to not succeeding with my first, so I remember all too well how frustrating and maddening all the "you have to breastfeed" stuff was to hear.

If you've read my blog for a while, hopefully you have seen that I have great empathy for women who have had trouble breastfeeding. PCOS is one reason that some women (esp women of size) have great difficulty breastfeeding, and I've written about that. I also have another post on PCOS and breastfeeding supply issues in the works; I'll try to move that up in the "to-do queue" in case this issue has any relevancy to either of you. Keep checking back.

However, please know that this post on maternal benefits of bfing was not written with "tsk, tsk" or fear tactics or judgment towards non-bfing moms in mind. I'm sorry if you inferred that from it, but it was simply meant to report that long-term breastfeeding has more maternal benefits than previously realized, not to judge women who don't bf long-term for whatever reason.

I can't NOT report on findings such as these; this is important news. And given the low U.S. rates of long-term breastfeeding, it's important that women hear that it has real health benefits for baby and mom, and that they be encouraged to continue if they want to. [There is a lot of pressure not to bf long-term; one doctor told me there were absolutely no benefits to continuing after 6 months, and many people treat you like an oddity if you bf more than a few months. So countering that message is really important.]

I certainly am not going to stop reporting on bfing's potential benefits, nor will I cease to encourage women to bf more/longer....but that doesn't mean that I am judging non-bfing moms. I know that there is that element of people out there who do, so I DO understand where your reaction is coming from, but please accept my assurances that I have no intent like that behind my post.

I know all too well from my PCOS research (and from friends who have struggled with supply issues) that not everyone can breastfeed, and I don't think I implied that everyone can breastfeed. Most can, yes, but sometimes there are management or completely biological issues that interfere with supply. And I know how heartbreaking that can be from seeing friends struggle with it.

If you have not already found the MOBI board, I hope you will go there asap. It's at mobimotherhood.org. It has EXCELLENT information on increasing milk supply. It also has truly non-judgmental support boards for women who are struggling (or have struggled) with breastfeeding issues, whether you continue to try or not. It's an AMAZING resource and you will find much support there, whatever your outcome.

There is also an excellent article there on grieving a lost breastfeeding relationship when breastfeeding doesn't go well. I highly recommend it.
http://mobimotherhood.org/MM/article-blaze.aspx.

I think a big part of the mission of this blog is to report research and advocate on public health topics, but it's always about things on a population level, and NEVER meant to judge women on their individual stories, whether they had a cesarean, whether they had to give up breastfeeding, whether they "took the epidural" or whatever.

It's always much more about public health implications, not about individual experiences.



To Anonymous: I'm there with you. I've be...

2010-11-09T18:27:25.338-08:00

To Anonymous:

I'm there with you. I've been pumping my heart out since my baby was born a month ago because she refused to latch even with all kinds of tools and visits to the lactation consultant (J cups with inverted nipples). It just wouldn't work. As of now I'm only getting 1-2 oz every 2 hours. We have to supplement with goat's milk formula. It's heartbreaking. I also wonder about these studies and if I'm getting any of those extra benefits from breastfeeding or if I'm doomed to the ailments because I can only pump. I loved reading blogs about breastfeeding while I was pregnant, but now reading them makes me want to cry.



Amazing! And a testimony to trusting your body and...

2010-11-09T14:30:37.376-08:00

Amazing! And a testimony to trusting your body and its complex biological processes.
PS. I am even more grateful for my breastfeeding years!



Wow! That's cool! Thank you for translating so...

2010-11-09T13:18:04.597-08:00

Wow! That's cool! Thank you for translating some of that awful jargon they use in research papers. I can do it, but it makes my brain hurt!



I certainly appreciate the intent of your post, to...

2010-11-09T13:11:17.834-08:00

I certainly appreciate the intent of your post, to promote breastfeeding and all of the good that comes from that. But, whenever I see one of these articles it always makes me feel upset because there is always an assumption made that all women can breastfeed, if given enough time, support etc.
For me, my mom, my sister, breastfeeding was not an option. I literally put my first born back into the hospital with severe jaundice because I could not produce enough breast milk. Even after numerous consultations, attempts to pump and even medications to increase milk production I still could not produce enough milk to keep a mouse alive, much less a human being.

I say this not to discourage breastfeeding but to encourage a little compassion and maybe a little less of the fear tactics for those of us who truly deeply wanted to breastfeed but were simply biologically incapable.