Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Biology
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/biology.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
agriculture  cells  food agriculture  food  group  institute  national institute  national  new  research  researchers  science  university 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Biology

EurekAlert! - Biology



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sun, 24 Sep 2017 10:12:02 EDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Chronic migraine cases are amplified by jawbone disorder, according to research

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) A study conducted by researchers in Brazil shows patients with chronic migraine are three times as likely to suffer from severe temporomandibular disorder. Though not a primary cause, the disorder is thought to accentuate and perpetuate sensitivity to pain; therefore, researchers recommend in chronic migraine clinical practice the assessement of the disorder's symptoms.



USDA announces funding for nutrition incentive programs

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Institute of Food and Agriculture ) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced $21 million to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants increase their purchases of fruits and vegetables by providing incentives at the point of purchase. The funding comes from the Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive (FINI) program, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill.



USDA announces support to grow the bioeconomy

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Institute of Food and Agriculture ) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced six grants totaling nearly $21.1 million to support the development of new jet fuel, biobased products and biomaterials from renewable sources. Funding is made through NIFA's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI), authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill.



Lehigh's Srinivas Rangarajan awarded ACS investigator grant

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Lehigh University) Srinivas Rangarajan, assistant professor in the department of chemical and biomolecular engineering, received a research grant from The American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF) in September 2017.



Researchers describe mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Alabama at Birmingham) A major health problem in older people is age-associated osteoporosis -- the thinning of bone and the loss of bone density that increases the risk of fractures. Researchers have now detailed an underlying mechanism leading to that osteoporosis. When this mechanism malfunctions, progenitor cells stop creating bone-producing cells, and instead create fat cells. Knowledge of this mechanism can provide targets in the search for novel bone-loss.



Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Maryland) Group A Streptococcus bacteria cause illnesses ranging from mild nuisances like strep throat to life-threatening conditions such as flesh-eating disease, also known as necrotizing fasciitis. Life-threatening infections occur when the bacteria spread underneath the surface of the skin or throat and invade the underlying soft tissue. Researchers have found two group A Streptococcus genes involved in invasive infections, which may be potential targets for therapeutics.



Fires in Australia pop up in places already burned

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Fires that span across the Northern Territory and Western Australia appear to have broken out in areas that have already been burned in previous fires.



NYU dentistry study pinpoints role of proteins that produce pearls

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(New York University) While it is known that pearls are made of calcium carbonate with an organic matrix core, the role of the proteins modulating the organization of these crystals has, until recently, been unclear. Researchers at NYU Dentistry reported the role of two such proteins that regulate the processes leading up to the formation of pearl.



UCI scientists identify important aspect of the brain's navigational system

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of California - Irvine) The ability to successfully navigate in the environment is essential both for animals searching for food or escaping predators, as well as for human urban dwellers. It is something we take for granted, but under the hood, it is supported by still incompletely understood brain networks that continuously calculate our position in the environment. Moreover, the location where certain experience occurred is an indispensable building block of memory.



Usher syndrome: Gene therapy restores hearing and balance

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Institut Pasteur) Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, the CNRS, Collège de France, University Pierre et Marie Curie, and University Clermont Auvergne, have recently restored hearing and balance in a mouse model of Usher syndrome type 1G characterized by profound congenital deafness and vestibular disorders caused by severe dysmorphogenesis of the mechanoelectrical transduction apparatus of the inner ear's sensory cells. These findings open up new possibilities for the development of gene therapy treatments for hereditary forms of deafness.



Cornell's Center for Materials Research's NSF funding extended, increased

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Cornell University) The Cornell Center for Materials Research - which through research and education is enhancing national capabilities in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and materials research at all levels -- has been has been granted $23.2 million for the next six years from the National Science Foundation.



Novel assay shows promise for non-invasive detection of PD-L1 on circulating tumor cells

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Future Science Group) Researchers have presented the first report of a new microfluidics-based approach for detecting circulating cancer biomarkers in blood samples.



A global perspective: Can humans mitigate risks associated with natural disasters?

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(World Scientific) 'The Handbook of Disaster Risk Reduction & Management' explores climate change and its association with socio-economic development and cultures, particularly in vulnerable communities, and investigates how resilience to disasters can be built. As its title suggests, the focus is on mitigation strategies and policies to reduce and manage the consequences of natural disasters. The handbook covers pre- to post-disaster occurrences from a wide range of perspectives, such as gender and country.



Our weight tells how we assess food

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) A new study demonstrated that people of normal weight tend to associate natural foods such as apples with their sensory characteristics. On the other hand, processed foods such as pizzas are generally associated with their function or the context in which they are eaten. But that's not all. The research also highlighted the ways in which underweight people pay greater attention to natural foods and overweight people to processed foods.



Seven exciting studies on membrane technologies explained

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(World Scientific) 'Membranes for Gas Separations, Vol. 1' in the World Scientific Series in Membrane Science and Technology: Biological and Biomimetic Applications, Energy and the Environment, addresses the subject of gas separation using membranes. The book is a collection of seven gas-separating membrane technologies' studies. Each chapter of this book is dedicated to a distinctive example of different membrane compositions including inorganic, polymeric, metallic, metal organic framework and composite, which have demonstrated successes in separating several industrially relevant gas mixtures.



New gene delivery approach could allow long-term persistence in proliferating cells

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers added a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) to a conventional adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector used for gene transfer, and the modified vectors were able to establish colonies and maintain long-term transgene expression in HeLa cells.



700-year-old saint myth has been proven (almost) true

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Southern Denmark) Scientists confirm that the age and content of an old sack is in accordance with a medieval myth about Saint Francis of Assisi.



HSE scholars measure prestige of fashion models

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Beginning models should choose independent magazines in order to be successful in the fashion industry, but they should also keep in mind that the fashion business is becoming increasingly closed off every year. This is one of the conclusions drawn by Margarita Kuleva, Research Fellow at the Centre for Youth Studies, HSE St. Petersburg, and her student, Daria Maglevanaya.



Crowning the 'King of the Crops': Sequencing the white Guinea yam genome

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Earlham Institute) An international collaboration involving the Earlham Institute, Norwich, UK, and the Iwate Biotechnology Research Centre, Japan, has for the first time provided a genome sequence for the white Guinea yam, a staple crop with huge economic and cultural significance on the African continent and a lifeline for millions of people.



Rainbow colors reveal cell history

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Technische Universität Dresden) Dr. Nikolay Ninov, group leader at the DFG research center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden, and his group developed a system called 'Beta-bow,' which allows the history of β-cells to be traced by genetic bar-coding and multicolor imaging. The results of this study are now published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.



Assembly of nanoparticles proceeds like a zipper

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Aalto University) according to scientists from Aalto University Finland, viruses and nanoparticles can be assembled into processable superlattice wires. The demonstration shows that electrostatic self-assembly of nanoparticles can potentially be used to form processable materials for future applications.



Leopoldina Annual Assembly focuses on genome editing issues

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Leopoldina) The German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina today opened its 2017 Annual Assembly in Halle (Saale), with this year's theme being "Genome Editing - Challenges for the Future". The two-day event sees distinguished international scientists come together to address new molecular biological methods that enable targeted genetic interventions.



Tackling air pollution in Sub-Saharan Africa

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Portsmouth) The University of Portsmouth is helping to tackle air pollution and its harmful effects in Sub-Saharan Africa.



A sustainable future powered by sea

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) OIST researchers develop turbines to convert the power of ocean waves into clean, renewable energy.



Party discipline for jumping genes

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 EDT

(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Jumping genes, transposons, are part of the genome of most organisms, aggregated into families and can damage the genome by jumping. How hosts suppress the jumping is well investigated. Why they still can jump has hardly been understood so far. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna investigated for the first time in all transposons of the host organism, which properties and host environments facilitate jumping. They showed that family affiliation is more important than position.