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Preview: EurekAlert! - Biology

EurekAlert! - Biology



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 08:12:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



Save the bees? There's an app for that

Sun, 19 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Vermont) A new mobile app can calculate the crop productivity and pollination benefits of supporting endangered bees.



Bee decline threatens US crop production

Sun, 19 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Vermont) The first-ever study to map US wild bees suggests they are disappearing in the country's most important farmlands.



Maize study finds genes that help crops adapt to change

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Cornell University) A new study analyzed close to 4,500 maize varieties to identify more than 1,000 genes driving large-scale adaptation to the environment.



Smart reforms key to global fish recovery, even with climate change

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(VVH Consulting) New research finds that climate change will cause dramatic impacts in the world's fisheries, but with effective management most fisheries could yield more fish and more prosperity, even with a changing climate. Relative to today, this preliminary research illustrates that effective management reforms can lead, globally, to a nearly 90 percent increase in profits, a third more fish in the water and a more than 10 percent increase in harvest by 2100 in the face of climate change.



GA4GH at AAAS 2017

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Global Alliance for Genomics and Health) The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH), an international coalition of academic, industry, and patient groups that aims to foster a culture of data-sharing between researchers and clinicians, will host a symposium in the Medical Sciences and Public Health track of the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) on Feb. 18, 2017, at 1 p.m. in room 309 of the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Mass.



How to build a bio-bot: Researchers share design and development of biological machines

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Creating tiny muscle-powered robots that can walk or swim by themselves -- or better yet, when prompted -- is more complicated than it looks. Rashid Bashir and Taher Saif of the University of Illinois will speak on the design and development of walking and swimming bio-bots at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Reboot Gitmo for science

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Vermont) How do you redeem a place like Gitmo, the notorious US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba? Reboot the naval base and detainee center as a cutting-edge marine research lab and peace park, says Joe Roman, a conservation biologist at the University of Vermont (UVM).



Invitation: Global warming to cause dramatic changes in fisheries

Sat, 18 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(VVH Consulting) New research from scientists and economists at the University of California Santa Barbara, Oregon State University and Environmental Defense Fund identifies the dramatic future impacts of climate change on the world's fisheries and how fishing reforms are vital to sustaining the global seafood supply. Even in the face of climate change, the research (to be released at the AAAS meeting on Feb. 18) finds that the total amount of fish in the oceans globally and fishing profits would increase significantly through effective management.



Researchers use big-brother tech to spy on bumblebees

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Arizona) RFID chips like the ones used to protect merchandise from shoplifting reveal surprising clues about life in a bumblebee colony.



It's more than just climate change

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Maryland) Accurately modeling climate change and interactive human factors -- including inequality, consumption, and population -- is essential for the effective science-based policies and measures needed to benefit and sustain current and future generations. A recent study presents extensive evidence of the need for a new paradigm of modeling that fully incorporates the feedbacks between Earth systems and human systems.



New life for 19th-century plants

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Botanical Society of America) Plant specimens stored in herbaria are being used to explore important ecological questions. In a recent study, researchers at Brown University show the effectiveness of herbarium specimens of herbaceous plants to track changes in heavy metal concentrations over time. The study compares concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc in specimens collected around Providence, RI, from 1846 to 1916, and compares these levels to plants collected from the same areas in 2015.



UConn to speed human limb growth

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Connecticut) The University of Connecticut has joined the Advanced Regenerative Manufacturing Institute as a partner for the purpose of sharing its revolutionary human tissue and limb regeneration technologies.



Egg-free surrogate chickens produced in bid to save rare breeds

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Edinburgh) Hens that do not produce their own chicks have been developed for use as surrogates to lay eggs from rare breeds. The advance -- using gene-editing techniques -- could help to boost breeding of endangered birds, as well as improving production of commercial hens, researchers say.



Congo river fish evolution shaped by intense rapids

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(American Museum of Natural History) New research provides compelling evidence that a group of strange-looking fish living near the mouth of the Congo River are evolving due to the intense hydraulics of the river's rapids and deep canyons. The study reveals that fishes in this part of the river live in 'neighborhoods' that are separated from one another by the waters' turbulent flow.



Developing a catalytic conveyor belt

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Pittsburgh) Capitalizing on previous studies in self-powered chemo-mechanical movement, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering and Penn State University's Department of Chemistry have developed a novel method of transporting particles that utilizes chemical reactions to drive fluid flow within microfluidic devices.



From mice, clues to microbiome's influence on metabolic disease

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The community of microorganisms that resides in the gut, known as the microbiome, has been shown to work in tandem with the genes of a host organism to regulate insulin secretion, a key variable in the onset of the metabolic disease diabetes. That is the primary finding of a study published this week (Feb. 14, 2017) in the journal Cell Reports by a team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers.



UTMB scientists uncover how Zika virus causes microcephaly

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered the mechanisms that the Zika virus uses to alter brain development. These findings are detailed in Stem Cell Reports.



Low level vitamin D during remission contributes to relapse in ulcerative colitis patients

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) A new study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that lower levels of vitamin D in the blood increase the risk of clinical relapse in patients with Ulcerative Colitis (UC), an inflammatory bowel disease that causes long-lasting inflammation and ulcers in the colon. The study was published in the February issue of the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.



Role of rogue protein PAK4 confirmed in pancreatic cancer cells

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund) A new study that confirms the role of a protein called PAK4 in the movement and growth of pancreatic cancer cells could help researchers find new ways to tackle the disease.



Researchers replicate nature's ability to reflect light to develop innovative ma

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Surrey) Researchers from the University of Surrey have developed an innovative new technique to mimic one of nature's greatest achievements -- natural structural color.



Molecular phenomenon discovered by advanced NMR facility

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(University of Warwick) Cutting edge technology has shown a molecule self-assembling into different forms when passing between solution state to solid state, and back again -- a curious phenomenon in science -- says research by the University of Warwick.



The reasons for our left or right-handedness

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Ruhr-University Bochum) It is not the brain that determines if people are right or left-handed, but the spinal cord. This has been inferred from the research results compiled by a team headed by private lecturer Dr Sebastian Ocklenburg, Judith Schmitz, and Prof Dr H. C. Onur Güntürkün. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and from South Africa, the biopsychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have demonstrated that gene activity in the spinal cord is asymmetrical already in the womb.



Atomic force imaging used to study nematodes

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Kazan Federal University) In a new study, researchers report for the first time the effective imaging of the nanoscale structure of C. elegans nematodes' cuticle using atomic force microscopy operating in PeakForce Tapping mode.



Future trends for top materials by Mario J F Calvete

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Bentham Science Publishers) In the last four decades materials science has evolved and developed into a very diverse range of highly specialized family of compounds -- from what were once essentially esoteric, often topical, basic research specialties -- into what one would clearly class today as one of the most significant and important industrial fields and specializations of our modern era.



Researchers are first to see DNA 'blink'

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 EST

(Northwestern University) Northwestern University biomedical engineers have developed imaging technology that is the first to see DNA 'blink,' or fluoresce. The tool enables researchers to study individual biomolecules (DNA, chromatin, proteins) as well as important global patterns of gene expression, which could yield insights into cancer. Vadim Backman will discuss the technology and its applications -- including the new concept of macrogenomics, a technology aiming to regulate the global patterns of gene expression without gene editing -- at the 2017 AAAS annual meeting.