Subscribe: EurekAlert! - Biology
http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/biology.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
cancer  clotting factor  developed  early  health  new  patients  research  researchers  scientists  study  university texas  university 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: EurekAlert! - Biology

EurekAlert! - Biology



The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.



Last Build Date: Sat, 03 Dec 2016 12:12:01 EST

Copyright: Copyright 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.
 



CD19-targeting CAR T-cell immunotherapy yields high responses in treatment-resistant CLL

Sat, 03 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) In a small, early phase trial, a high percentage of patients who had exhausted most traditional treatments for chronic lymphocytic leukemia saw their tumors shrink or even disappear after an infusion of a highly targeted, experimental CAR T-cell immunotherapy developed at Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.



After gene therapy, hemophilia B patients maintain near-normal levels of clotting factor

Sat, 03 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers are reporting the highest and most sustained levels to date of an essential blood-clotting factor in patients with the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia B. After receiving a single dose of an experimental gene therapy in a clinical trial, patients with hemophilia produced near-normal levels of clotting factor IX, allowing them to stop clotting factor infusions and to pursue normal activities of daily life without disabling bleeding episodes.



Overcoming the limitations of optical microscopy

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) A research group led by Professor Dr. Benjamin Judkewitz at Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin is planning to overcome the limitations of optical microscopy and produce images of deeper tissue layers. The laboratory's endeavors are being funded by the European Research Council, which has allocated a total of €1.49 million over a period of five years.



Open-source tools accelerate plant breeding in developing countries

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Boyce Thompson Institute) The GOBII Project has developed new software to help plant breeders in developing countries to pick the best parent varieties for adding new traits into existing high-yield crops.



Saturated fat could be good for you

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(The University of Bergen) A Norwegian study shows that saturated fat actually could be good for you. The quality of the food, whether it's highly processed or not, could have a larger impact on your health.



New test identifies high-risk liver patients

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Newcastle University) Newcastle scientists and medics have developed a promising new test to identify patients with a rare liver disease who will not respond to standard treatment, allowing earlier intervention with alternatives.



Researchers find link between antidepressant use and congenital anomalies or stillbirths

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Swansea University) Academics at Swansea University have carried out a dose-response analysis which suggests that pregnant women who take a specific type of antidepressant in early pregnancy have a small but significantly greater risk of having babies with major congenital anomalies (sometimes referred to as birth defects) or stillbirths compared with those who did not take these antidepressants.



Faster, noninvasive method to determine the severity of a heart failure

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Eindhoven University of Technology) Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and the Catharina Hospital in Eindhoven have developed a method that is very quick, noninvasive, cost-effective and can be performed at the hospital bedside. Moreover, this method appears to have a predictive value for whether or not a double pacemaker will be successful.



High-precision magnetic field sensing

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(ETH Zurich) Scientists have developed a highly sensitive sensor to detect tiny changes in strong magnetic fields. The sensor may find widespread use in medicine and other areas.



Environmental scientist's early warning indicators win the prize

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Umea University) Promising environmental researcher David Seekell has been awarded a prestigious prize: the Science and SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists. He was awarded the prize for his dissertation at Umeå University that developed early warning indicators for environmental tipping points practically usable to government officials and landowners.



Johns Hopkins researchers uncover more genetic links to brain cancer cell growth

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Two recently discovered genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissue cells -- an altered gene and a snippet of noncoding genetic material -- could offer clues to tumor behavior and potential new targets for therapy, Johns Hopkins scientists report.



Biologists unlock 51.7-million-year-old genetic secret to landmark Darwin theory

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of East Anglia) Scientists have identified the cluster of genes responsible for reproductive traits in the Primula flower, first noted as important by Charles Darwin more than 150 years ago.



Evaluation of scientific rigor in animal research

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(PLOS) The 'reproducibility crisis' in biomedical research has led to questions about the scientific rigor in animal research, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments. In research publishing in the open-access journals PLOS Biology and PLOS ONE on Dec. 2, 2016, researchers from the University of Bern have assessed scientific rigor in animal experimentation in Switzerland. The study, commissioned by the Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office, found widespread deficiencies in the reporting of experimental methodology.



Seafood consumption 15 times higher among Indigenous than non-Indigenous people

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of British Columbia) Coastal Indigenous people eat on average 15 times more seafood per person than non-Indigenous people in the same country, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. The findings highlight the need to consider food sovereignty and cultural identity as part of fisheries policy and Indigenous human rights.



A radiation-free approach to imaging molecules in the brain

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Scientists hoping to see molecules that control brain activity have devised a probe that lets them image such molecules without using chemical or radioactive labels. The sensors consist of proteins that detect a particular target, which causes them to dilate blood vessels, producing a change in blood flow that can be imaged with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or other techniques.



Mechanism of probiotic health promotion revealed

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(American Society for Microbiology) In several clinical trials, the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus paracasei DG has been shown to promote health, but until now, the mechanism has remained a black box. New research now suggests that the health benefits arise from communication between the probiotic bacteria and the human host. That communication involves bacterial secretion of a novel polysaccharide that tells the immune system to release certain immunity-stimulating chemicals.



Psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Chapman University) In a paper just published by researchers at Chapman University, findings showed associations between psychological well-being and physical activity in adults ages 50 and older.



UTA CAPPA student wins statewide bullet train station design competition

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at Arlington) A University of Texas at Arlington student has won a statewide design competition for her Dallas station design for the Texas Central Partners' bullet train that is planned to run between Houston and Dallas by the early 2020s.



Study: Enhancing cancer response to radiation

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Oregon Health & Science University) Study provides early evidence that a panel of microRNA may be used in the future as a biomarker for several types of cancer.



UChicago startup turns renewable energy into natural gas

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Chicago) One of the biggest challenges to wider adoption of wind and solar power is how to store the excess energy they often produce.A technology developed at the University of Chicago, and now being commercialized by a University startup, is addressing the intermittent nature of these renewable sources. It uses a selectively evolved, unicellular microorganism that helps convert electricity into methane gas. That gas can be stored, transported and used wherever natural gas is used, including for the generation of power on demand.



UTSA study describes new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Texas at San Antonio) A new study by Lyle Hood, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes a new device that could revolutionize the delivery of medicine to treat cancer as well as a host of other diseases and ailments. Hood developed the device in partnership with Alessandro Grattoni, chair of the Department of Nanomedicine at Houston Methodist Research Institute.



Monell Center receives grant to develop technologies to improve taste of lifesaving drugs

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Monell Chemical Senses Center) The Monell Center announced today that it has received a $345,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant supports an innovative global health research project titled, 'Developing Novel Pediatric Formulation Technologies for Global Health: Human Taste Assays.'



In cancer immunotherapy, one PD-L1 test to rule them all?

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Ambitious collaboration between industry, advocacy and academia results in study comparing leading four assays for anti-PD-L1 immunotherapies.



Scientists discover new method to restore function of white blood cells in septic patients

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) New research findings published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology (http://www.jleukbio.org), suggest that treating the white blood cells of sepsis patients with antibodies that block programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand (PD-L1) molecules may restore their function and ultimately their ability to eradicate deadly bacteria.



URI scientist: Rare childhood disease linked to major cancer gene

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 EST

(University of Rhode Island) A team of researchers led by a University of Rhode Island scientist has discovered an important molecular link between a rare childhood genetic disease, Fanconi anemia, and a major cancer gene called PTEN. The discovery improves the understanding of the molecular basis of Fanconi anemia and could lead to improved treatment outcomes for some cancer patients.