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Survival - Earth Changes and the Pole Shift





Updated: 2018-04-21T12:23:49Z

 



What life in survivor/refugee camps might be like.

2015-01-09T08:01:43.136Z

Just trying to document what current refugee camps look like to help us anticipate the challenges future survivor camps might face. (In any case we'll probably get an idea of what this will be like before the poleshift).

#1) Here is a Syrian refugee camp showing the challenges they face attempting to work together. The need to equally share resources (water, shelter, electricity, etc), educating kids, etc.…

Just trying to document what current refugee camps look like to help us anticipate the challenges future survivor camps might face. (In any case we'll probably get an idea of what this will be like before the poleshift).

#1) Here is a Syrian refugee camp showing the challenges they face attempting to work together. The need to equally share resources (water, shelter, electricity, etc), educating kids, etc.

width="481" height="272" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/86mFVcc0dXw?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0">

#2) Here is a Jordanian refugee camp showing the disruption something like war (or the poleshift) brings about. People's dreams for the future & their present lives all brought to an abrupt end. Simple things such as playing sports bring back a sense of normalcy. (And bringing back a sense of normalcy is so important). For those that have lost all hope, seeing survivors work together gives them a new purpose & the resolve to keep on keeping on.

width="487" height="275" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/UyRwuM84Re4?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0">

#3) Here is a 14 year old kid who's volunteered to be a nurse. Giving up his childhood to cater to more important things at hand. (I believe its said somewhere in zetatalk, that kids will be resourceful in helping out)

width="487" height="275" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9PFCZ80BFyo?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0">

#4) And another refugee camp in Turkey. People have lost everything & control over their lives. So naturally everyone's on edge, not knowing where or to whom to channel this anger at. (They're not in control. Can't grow crops there. Not near any sources of fishing. They are completely dependent on food aid & dont have any idea on how to better their situation for themselves.)

width="490" height="277" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/sXYnhtDRFSI?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0">

Here is some zetatalk that might be helpful with this topic:

The correct adjustment when the infrastructure is devastated, or when supplies get tight, is to cut back on selfish expectations and share what is available with others. Since all homes cannot be heated, moving in together so that one heated house can supply several families should be mandated. This will bring screams from everyone who has been told they should expect their own home, their own apartment, that this is their right. In decades past extended families lived together, the oldsters helping young mothers with their babies, and since this type of living will be the norm in the Aftertime, get used to it early.

If despite Obama’s encouragement windmill and solar panel use within the US is still being neglected...this is a matter that can be remedied relatively quickly. Constructing and erecting windmill farms would be faster than attempting to transport refined gasoline or heating oil by boat to the East Coast. Follow the lead of countries like Sweden, which have utilized wind power for decades. The US of course will not recover from the New Madrid and what is to follow along the West Coast. - ZetaTalk

Please feel free to add to this discussion. (All the examples here are in the context of the Syrian rebellion, so it may be providing only a narrow perspective)




Mental Trauma

2014-12-02T21:41:03.041Z

This is an aspect of the aftertime that is easy to overlook. Or perhaps we don’t want to examine it, because of the angst it brings. Regardless, the more informed & mentally prepared we are, the better off all of us, including our loved ones, will be. (This is an attempt to summarize the traumatic effects the pole shift might bring. Im no expert, so please feel free to correct/chime in) =============================================================== Here is a good… This is an aspect of the aftertime that is easy to overlook. Or perhaps we don’t want to examine it, because of the angst it brings. Regardless, the more informed & mentally prepared we are, the better off all of us, including our loved ones, will be. (This is an attempt to summarize the traumatic effects the pole shift might bring. Im no expert, so please feel free to correct/chime in) =============================================================== Here is a good review of Mental health from the troubled times website. It includes an explanation of post-traumatic stress (PTSD) symptoms. Also, dont forget to check the Survivor's mindset blog, on the front page of this ning. Clearly, being able to face the future realistically is a great help in avoiding a breakdown. Mental illness is forced on one for a number of reasons. The genetic propensity for chemical disruption in the brain is one, which is why the propensity for mental illness runs in families. The inability to escape a situation deemed intolerable is another, the source of post traumatic stress in soldiers who are not allowed to leave the battlefield and are told to perform atrocious acts they would not normally perform. Great loss does not normally cause insanity but rather depression, and the antidote for depression is to take action. This is why we have advised that group leaders have an action plan for the hours after the pole shift, so that everyone is busy doing something, if only gathering the broken crockery and preparing a group meal. Exercise, and the mental mindset to take action to set things right, is a great cure for depression.  ---- Zetatalk from Nancy's newsletter on mental trauma/ PTSD And here is zetatalk on the post-traumatic stress disorder (ptsd) that may follow: The temporary insanity that 43% of survivors will endure will be more akin to the Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) suffered by soldiers in combat. Here, the mind splits during distress too great to bear, and the distress compartmentalized in an attempt to isolate the memories. Isolation may result, but any instance in the present that reminds the sufferer of the past trauma results in a sudden return to the scene. The PTSD sufferer may sudden find himself returned to a combat situation, with stories of returning soldiers hiding in the barn and shooting at the cows examples of the delusional state that can result. Survival communities will find many of their number irritable, suddenly lashing out without cause at others, or intractably fearful. Frank delusions may be present, where loved ones long dead are expected for dinner, or the dead baby is carried about and nursed. The mind heals over time, with pain fading from memory and replaced by more recent and pleasant memories. One does not have to acquire PTSD to feel the toll disasters can impose mentally. The general irritability, loss of sleep, temporary sense of fear, temporary depression--these are things we can all be susceptible to. You can Youtube what the after effects to ppl in disasters like earthquakes, hurricanes (Katrina?), etc were like. As disconcerting as it may be, you will be mentally preparing yourself. Also, according to recent studies, MEDITATION is "A Surprising Treatment For Depression That May Be Just As Effective As Talking to A Therapist" Will add videos on veterans with PTSD & cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).... (CBT is an approach that helps patients be objective about their depression &/or PTSD , instead of[...]



Useful plants for the aftertime

2014-08-31T01:15:52.054Z

I came across a useful plant called Azolla, & figured maybe a thread documenting plants that would be useful for the aftertime would be a good idea. Azolla is a fern that grows in stagnant or slow-moving water. Like duckweed; except unlike duckweed, it will grow in the shade.This makes it a perfect plant for the aftertime. Optimal growing temperatures are from 18 to 28 C (64 to 82… I came across a useful plant called Azolla, & figured maybe a thread documenting plants that would be useful for the aftertime would be a good idea. Azolla is a fern that grows in stagnant or slow-moving water. Like duckweed; except unlike duckweed, it will grow in the shade.This makes it a perfect plant for the aftertime. Optimal growing temperatures are from 18 to 28 C (64 to 82 F). It can survive temperatures of upto 45 C (113 F) and -5 C (23 F). During winters in the aftertime, a makeshift greenhouse can provide year round production of this plant. The plant can be cultivated in compost tea. They will also live in water with fish or ducks, recycling their excrements. Why Azolla? - It is high in protein. Azolla’s nutritional value is similar to that of Soybean, Alfalfa sprouts and Spirulina -It doubles in size in 4 days. -It doesnt need soil. It fixes nitrogen like legumes. So excess growth can be mixed in the compost, or directly used as a top dressing in the garden. -It feeds fish, chicken & cattle, etc. Due to low fibre content, the nutrients are easily abosrbed. -Improves milk production and health of livestock. An Example of a grow area src="//www.youtube.com/embed/guFp5AgLK-g?wmode=opaque" height="183" width="323" frameborder="0"> An instance of growing Azolla in vertically stacked trays, to maximize space. A How-to grow video src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7MJQtaQ-0pE?wmode=opaque" height="252" width="334" frameborder="0"> (Cow manure can be replaced by worm compost or fish poop) Examples of Azolla grown with Tilapia. src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kMMngeqTIrE?wmode=opaque" height="238" width="316" frameborder="0"> src="//www.youtube.com/embed/B5T98h8g5Vg?wmode=opaque" height="193" width="343" frameborder="0"> In both instances, the fish feed on the azolla, & the azolla feed on the decomposing fish poop. The rain aerates the tank sufficiently. Duck-Azolla-Minnow farming in China Azolla are good accumulators of heavy metals. But since fish dont accumulate lead, this is a good setup to have in the aftertime. If grown for humans or animals  they should be grown out of the aftertime rain, under some netting or plastic coveralls. Ducks & Chickens eating azolla: (Video #1 & Video #2) Why not grow azolla instead of having our crops barely make it through? In some parts of the world, growing azolla and tilapia/trout can be a year round production. Some makeshift fish tanks is all you need. During winter, you can grow a few baby tilapia indoors, and grow them back in spring. Even without fish, you can grow azolla with worm compost. In a semi-indoor greenhouse, this can be year round high quality food for you and your livestock. A quick google search will show you places near you that sell them.  Any place that sells aquarium plants would be a good start If you know of other versatile plants for the aftertime, please feel free to add on to this. cheers Source *edited* [...]



100 pounds of potatoes on 4 square feet

2014-01-02T22:20:59.832Z

This is an interesting concept for concentrated production of a valuable vegetable. I cannot vouch for it personally, but it makes sense as a good way to utilize space. I intend to try it this spring and if we are still here come fall, will report back.  http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-grow-100-pounds-of-potatoes-in-4-square-feet-81760…

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This is an interesting concept for concentrated production of a valuable vegetable. I cannot vouch for it personally, but it makes sense as a good way to utilize space. I intend to try it this spring and if we are still here come fall, will report back.  http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-to-grow-100-pounds-of-potatoes-in-4-square-feet-81760

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Raising Worms, Grubs and Bugs For Food

2013-10-27T08:28:52.964Z

Worms and Grubs are meaty and juicy packs of protein, ready to be eaten as part of any meal.  With the right spices and sauces they are delicious and very satisfying foods.  This discussion goes in detail on how to cultivate and care for them to use as food.   Here are some for sale at an outdoor market.    Crab, … Worms and Grubs are meaty and juicy packs of protein, ready to be eaten as part of any meal.  With the right spices and sauces they are delicious and very satisfying foods.  This discussion goes in detail on how to cultivate and care for them to use as food.   Here are some for sale at an outdoor market.    Crab,  Lobster and Shrimp are also bug-like crustaceans only dwell in the sea!  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockroaches_of_the_sea .  . . . ----------------- Worms for Nutrition and Protein Go to this page for a HUGE ZetaTalk Article on this topic!  http://www.zetatalk.com/index/blog0809.htm Earthworms are an excellent source of protein, reportedly 82% protein. Earthworms are also high in Omega 3 oil, the essential oil of ocean going fish, which reduces risk of heart disease. In short, they are an excellent food source! Where earthworms are noted for building soil from compost heaps, earthworms don't suffer from fungus, bacterial, or viral infections, multiply rapidly, and don't make noise or run off! How does one go about growing earthworms for food, a process called vermiculture. The worm to use is the red wriggler, as they take to compost piles and being handled. We at the Troubled Times nonprofit tried our hand at earthworm growing, trying the monster night crawlers, so much more protein per worm. We found all the night crawlers died out, and refused to be domesticated. . . Red wrigglers, on the other hand, thrived.  All kinds of vegetative trash will be turned into soil by these industrious little wrigglers. Red Wrigglers -------> --------------------------------------------- Protein of Worms over Livestock! http://news.discovery.com/earth/mealworms-beat-beef-as-sustainable-protein-20121220.htm Compared to a kilogram of edible protein in meat from cows, chickens or pigs, production of the same amount of mealworm protein emits fewer greenhouse gases and requires much less land to grow. The findings support the argument that environmentally conscious eaters may do well to include beetle larvae in their diets. “This study demonstrates that mealworms should be considered a more sustainable source of edible protein,” the team writes in a paper published yesterday in the journal PLoS ONE. The idea that insects may be more sustainable than livestock is not new. But the new study was the first to quantify the environmental impact of munching on mealworms compared to the consumption of more traditional livestock. To come up with hard numbers, biologists from Wageningen University in The Netherlands analyzed the production of two mealworm species at a local farm. They calculated protein content and assessed environmental effects by quantifying global warming potential, fossil energy use and land use. Compared to the production of milk or traditional meats, mealworms came out on top in most measures. . . Grunting: Bring out Worms from the Ground View this Worm Grunting Video http://www.zetatalk.com/food/tfood04r.htm I'm intrigued by two methods of "calling up" worms out of the ground, a process also known as Grunting. According to one book, take a seasoned piece of wood, about four feet long. It should be in the shape of a wedge, about two inches wide at the top and ½ inch wide at the bottom. Pound this wedge three feet into the ground. To create vibrations down the wedge and into the ground, rub a piece of tapered steel across the wood, just like you’re playing a violin. Some people make their “grunting bows” out of wood. These bows have lots of raised notches that vibrate when gently rubbed acro[...]



How to grow Mushrooms

2013-09-16T05:27:56.200Z

How to grow  mushrooms Growing Oyster Mushroom can be an involved process. So, this is just an overview. More detailed posts on the whole process will follow soon.  Oyster mushrooms are the easiest of all mushrooms to grow, so we'll focus on them. There is a learning curve involved with mushroom growing.  However, the post-shift climate will be the perfect environment for them to thrive in. Knowing how to grow mushrooms should be useful during the first… How to grow  mushrooms Growing Oyster Mushroom can be an involved process. So, this is just an overview. More detailed posts on the whole process will follow soon.  Oyster mushrooms are the easiest of all mushrooms to grow, so we'll focus on them. There is a learning curve involved with mushroom growing.  However, the post-shift climate will be the perfect environment for them to thrive in. Knowing how to grow mushrooms should be useful during the first couple of years when your vegetables may not produce significant yields. This is especially true for those who may not be in the direct vicinity of volcanoes but still find their presence making for much gloomier skies than other parts of the world. Before we go any further let's look at what a mushroom is all about. Life Cycle of a Mushroom                   A Mushroom releases millions of spores instead of seeds to propagate itself.   Once the  mushroom spores are given a humid environment to grow in, they transform into cotton thread structures called mycelium.   This is what the growth cycle of a mushroom looks like  ------->     The mycelium is the equivalent to a plants roots. It spreads out digesting what it can (mainly fibre), and then fruits mushrooms when the conditions are right.     "Primordia" is the bunching up of mycelium that goes on to form mushrooms.     The primordia turns from little pins into mushrooms                                         Cloning Mushrooms A  mushroom is actually made out of the same cells that form its mycelium. If a small piece of mushroom or mycelium is cut and placed in a humid environment it will sprout more mycelium and produce mushrooms. This is the equivalent of cutting a stem from a plant and growing a second plant from it. Cloning mushrooms will form the bulk of the work involved with growing mushrooms. Before buying mushroom culture from a vendor, we'll practice cloning on store bought mushrooms. (More on this in later posts)   How mushroom "seedlings" (i.e. spawn) are started This is the "seedling stage" of mushroom growing. What you get from this stage is called spawn. Mycelium is initially grown in grain from a culture syringe you would buy.  The grain can be anything that at least has the bran on it. Any grain with its hull is fine as well. Mushrooms eat fibre, so polished rice will not work. Seeds from wild grass and plants is something you will be able to harvest in the aftertime. But before the shift,  wild bird seed is a cheaper alternative than grass seed or any other grain.                            Fruiting the mushrooms The grain spawn can eventually be added to straw (not hay), or any other brown plant material like yard debris (brown leaves) or lawn clippings that have been dried to a straw-like color.                   Alternative # 2 Instead of grain spawn, wooden dowels with mycelium spawn can also be purchased (or made). They are meant to be drilled into logs and fruited. Conifer wood cannot be used.                                             What mushrooms can I grow? Growing mushrooms can be a year round operation in the aftertime There are warm weather and cool weather mushrooms. Warm weather ones prefer 20 - 30 oC (70 - 86 oF) to fruit. Cool weather ones prefer 10-20 oC (50 - 70 oF) to fruit. In the vegetative state, when the myceli[...]



Zetatalk on aftertime survival

2013-05-30T08:49:30.405Z

I've condensed and edited zetatalk material that pertains to aftertime survival into a) a survival plan and b) aftertime nutrition. Hopefully this will be helpful to new ZT fans, and old ones who may not have visited ZT for a while. While its a tad too long, it covers all grounds. Immediate aftertime climate: Previous climate... will only be extreme where ice packs linger or the ground is deeply frozen. Elsewhere warming or… I've condensed and edited zetatalk material that pertains to aftertime survival into a) a survival plan and b) aftertime nutrition. Hopefully this will be helpful to new ZT fans, and old ones who may not have visited ZT for a while. While its a tad too long, it covers all grounds. Immediate aftertime climate: Previous climate... will only be extreme where ice packs linger or the ground is deeply frozen. Elsewhere warming or cooling to temperatures appropriate to the new longitude occur within days. Placement on the day or night side of the Earth...effect dissipates within days...Dust filled clouds are low to the ground, and create a constant gloom. Rain occurs almost continuously. Where sunlight cannot penetrate and seldom manages to peek through this dense cloud cover. http://zetatalk.com/poleshft/p58.htm[Pre-poleshift climate's] influence is unlikely to last thus, for more than a week or two, with pockets of lingering heat or cold in the ground, not the air. Thus, the climate change should be assumed to be the target climate, not the climate being left behind. http://www.zetatalk.com/xtime/x29.htmNote:The earth will resume its august/september position. Given that much of the first months will have precipitation heavy with ash, after 4 months it is plausible that parts of the southern hemisphere not downwind from volcanoes may find weeds struggling through.Survival Plan:Humans of good heart concerned with survival through the cataclysms are advised to...Put your money into land and stable structures, documentation on the technologies and scientific knowledge of today, and apparatus with which to grow hydroponic vegetables and tanks for fish and crustaceans on the nutrients from recycled sewage. http://zetatalk.com/poleshft/p16.htm We advise thinking about Third World conditions and adaptations...This is where humans fail the most in planning for the shift, and life afterwards. They think of their life now, and come down from that. They should start with life with nothing, but bugs and sucking dirty water up from the ground with their hands. No clothes. No heat. Nothing. Then add what is needed most, and first. http://zetatalk.com/poleshft/p135.htmyou should anticipate failure in restarting your gardens and herds and flocks. The best plan is a broad plan, so that a failure does not devastate. http://www.zetatalk.com/poleshft/p168.htm The skies clear first where this dust is in the high altitudes, not in the wind-drift from fresh ash just raised. 5 years after the shift, even 2 years after the shift, some sporadic sunlight will warm the Earth... 10 years after the shift, many parts of the globe will consider themselves back to normal, although their memory will be failing them in this regard. .. Edibility and availability of native weeds depends upon the location, entirely. In some parts of the world, life will virtually close down. This is near volcanoes, under the drifting ash, or where polar cold descends. In other parts of the world, there will within two years be abundant grasses or weeds.  In areas not in the path of volcanic ash, but affected by the overall gloom, one might estimate a 50% reduction in sunlight and crop success. For instance, if a crop needed strong sunlight to flourish, it might barely get to producing seed before the season ends. In nature, this would reproduce the weed, but for crops, it would not be a return. Survivors will soon find [...]



Gardening from scratch - a beginners guide

2013-05-26T21:02:27.753Z

A beginners guide to Gardening. Have added several 5' x 13' plant beds to a garden.  Starting from scratch using only the minimal of tools, a shovel, rake and a home made soil sieve.  Also using kitchen scraps to make a compost heap, along with grass cuttings and any spare soil from different areas of the garden. … A beginners guide to Gardening. Have added several 5' x 13' plant beds to a garden.  Starting from scratch using only the minimal of tools, a shovel, rake and a home made soil sieve.  Also using kitchen scraps to make a compost heap, along with grass cuttings and any spare soil from different areas of the garden.  This is where the sod was  taken off and placed in different areas of the garden.  The soil has never been worked, and had to be dug by shovel to turn it over. next, the soil was dug up and passed through a sieve to aerate it and get rid of any surface weeds.   and the next stage was to add other top soil which had been sitting out for a couple of years, the three types of soil used was the original, which is slightly grey in colour (yellow card) and the compost (green card) and the top soil ( blue card) The tools used were rudimentary, and because there wasn't any wheel barrow, have used a plastic flower pot instead.  This works quite well, and builds up muscle.the sieve was put onto two upturned containers and worked through with the hands or a garden trowel.  the sieve was made of four pieces of wood and really find wire mesh about 1 cm diameter holes.  The garden centre thought it strange to ask for a 2 foot square piece of wire... but it was cheap and didn't want the whole role.  The completed garden bed with a loose stone wall and loose brick planters.The total time it took from start to finish was approximately 12-14 hours of work with minimal equipment. This is half way through the process, the three extra beds took two weeks. Two other beds are done and are 13 x 5 as well.  Each bed will be fertilized with kitchen food, and compost from the compost heap at the end of October trenches will be built in each one and food waste will be placed in the shallow trench.  This will be covered once the frosts start freezing the ground and then covered over to break down over the winter.  Once Spring comes the beds will be turned over once more.  With the addition of extra soil in the fall to each bed they will be about 6 inches above ground so any settling will keep the beds at ground level or there abouts rather than sinking into the ground - at least that is the general idea... Here are the beds half way through...   And here are the finished beds - all material was found on site, the only thing that was bought was the material to stop the weeds from growing up through the gravel. some trees in the back ground are only a year old, everything seems to grow really fast during the summer months.  We have one tree that grows 6 feet in one year and is notoriously hard to get rid of, its Carraganon, and grows wild here on the prairies.  It's invasive but excellent for fencing, coverage for just about anything else except eating!   The beds are planted on the sides with what ever was found in the garden, the first bed has concrete breeze blocks excellent for using for potted plants as well, the second is made from stones found in the garden, and the third is made from lumps of sod from the beds ithemselves.  These are laid out at an angle and laid on top of the weed sheet and built into an informal wall about 6 to 8 inches high. Over the winter it settled and produced a hard surface along the edge of the bed. Three extra beds were made and using the same process as above.  The beds have the hoola hoops and tomato cages to put the plastic over them to help prevent the seedlings from dying if the weather changes suddenly. [...]



Hydroponics/ Aquaculture/ Fishing

2013-05-01T07:13:06.679Z

src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/oDYeffYcVkY?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560">

SUITABLE for green leafies.

For plant nutrients, you can use compost tea. Plenty of info on that on youtube as well.

http://www.youtube.com/user/mhpgardener?feature=watch

**edited title**

src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/oDYeffYcVkY?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560">

SUITABLE for green leafies.

For plant nutrients, you can use compost tea. Plenty of info on that on youtube as well.

http://www.youtube.com/user/mhpgardener?feature=watch

**edited title**




Vertical Aquaponic System

2012-07-26T02:57:42.378Z

This vertical aquaponic system not only grows vegetables horizontally, but also vertically without soil in columns above a fish tank. It is a water-efficient and space-saving way to garden and raise fish. By growing vertically, you can produce about twice the amount of plants as you can… This vertical aquaponic system not only grows vegetables horizontally, but also vertically without soil in columns above a fish tank. It is a water-efficient and space-saving way to garden and raise fish. By growing vertically, you can produce about twice the amount of plants as you can with a hydroponic system of the same area. One five-foot tower can produce more than 200 heads of lettuce per year. And it uses a small fraction of the water needed to grow crops in soil. The aquaponic system puts fish waste to work as fertilizer for crops. A small pump draws nutrient-rich water from the fish tank to the tops of the vertical columns. The water trickles down through the roots of the plants, gathering oxygen from the air as it falls back into the tank. The system is mostly enclosed, with little to no waste. You will have to replace lost water as needed, power the pumps and feed the fish. MATERIALS You can use the following materials or improvise with whatever you're able to scavenge. Pipes 15-20 ft. of 4-inch diameter PVC or ADS Four 4-inch elbows Four 4-inch T connectors Misc Two 50-gallon drums 15-20 feet of PEX tubing, or aquarium air tubing Plastic cups Strips of porous cloth, such as burlap Scrap wood Electrical tape or duct tape Pumps The pump size depends on how much flow is required for your system as well as your power source.  Unless you're running off an inverter for AC power, you'll most likely be relegated to using a solar powered pump or a marine bilge pump that operates on 12VDC battery power. How to Size a Hydroponic Water Pump This system can aerate itself but it will yield more if the tank water is aerated.  An aquarium air pump and air stone in each water tank should suffice. Tools Drill 1-inch hole saw 3-inch hole saw ========================================================================== Step 1 Cut the pipe into six 1-foot sections for the sides and two 14-inch sections for the ends. Drill two 3-inch-diameter holes in each of the 1-foot side pieces. Drill a 1-inch-diameter hole into the side of one of the end pieces. Tip: You can use any kind of durable plastic or pipe, not just what's pictured.     Step 2 Assemble the pieces with electrical tape. Step 3 Cut the vertical pipes to the length that suits you. Drill 1-inch-diameter holes in the vertical pipes, evenly spaced. Insert the vertical pipes as shown. (The photo on the right shows the mostly finished structure to give you an idea of how it looks.) Step 4 Punch small holes in the bottoms of the plastic cups and place them in the holes you drilled in the side pipes. Cut a piece of 1-inch-diameter pipe to insert into the 1-inch hole in the end pipe to make a drain. The drain should pour into one of the 50-gallon drums. Step 5 You can use two 50-gallon drums like these or any other kind of container that holds water for fish. Cut the tops off below the rims. You could even scale this down and put it on top of an indoor aquarium.  Step 6 Place the assembled garden structure on top of the drums. (Seen from two slightly different angles.) Step 7 Adjust the structure's balance and support its joints with wooden boards. You could tilt the structure slightly toward the drainpipe to improve the water flow.  Most systems will have vertical columns of equal height, but these are cut at different heights to show the range of options available. Final Steps (Not pictured) Start the seedlings in some form of growing medium in the cups an[...]