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Preview: Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Twist Image

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum



Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Blog is marketing and communications insights from the edge. Mitch Joel will unravel the complex world of digital marketing and social media with the perspective of a digital marketing agency. The Six Pixels Of Separat



Last Build Date: Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:40:53 PST

 



Is The Bank Of Amazon Coming And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 05:40:53 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/401924214&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> This week we discussed:  Amazon keeps disrupting businesses. Last week we discussed the test launch of Shipping With Amazon designed to compete with UPS and FedEx. Then, later in the week, Amazon announced that it is partnering with Bank of America to expand its lending program for small businesses. This will allow Amazon to reduce risk by providing credit to more merchants. The invitation-only business will grant loans from $1000 - $750,000 for businesses that may have trouble getting a traditional business loan. Bank of Amazon, anyone?  Netflix charges a monthly fee and, of course, there are no TV commercials. It validates the model that people are willing to pay for content. Still, the Netflix effect is real. According to research from nScreenMedia, Netflix has taken anywhere from $3 billion to $6 billion per year off the table in TV advertising revenue, as a result of the viewing on its platform. In the past, such viewing would have gone to ad-supported TV networks. So, while TV advertising is not at risk from Netflix, the amount of TV viewed because of Netflix will impact the bottom-line. Fascinating.  Is your life not complete because it lacks emoticons for bagels, mango and lobster? Fear not! Fresh new emojis are on the way! The Unicode Consortium (that handles this sort of emoticon thing) will roll out 157 new ideograms this summer. You should have these non-verbal and non-word-based ways to communicate by June/July.  App of the Week: Facebook Local. Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week bank of america brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media emoji emoticon facebook facebook local fedex guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte netflix nscreenmedia radio segment radio station shipping with amazon six pixels of separation social media technology terry dimonte tv commercials unicode consortium ups wpp [...]



Become A Superconnector With Scott Gerber - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 04:14:24 PST

Episode #606 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/401424363&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Everywhere I look, I see the book Superconnector. Online, in bookstores at the airport. What kind of connector would I be without trying to pin down the bestselling book's author, Scott Gerber? Scott Gerber is CEO of The Community Company, an organization that builds and manages community-driven programs for media companies and global brands. He is also the founder of YEC, an invitation-only organization comprised of the world's most successful young entrepreneurs, and the co-author of Superconnector. He also wrote the book, Never Get a "Real" Job a few years back. Scott believes that we should never diminish the power of our social capital, and we should be constantly making deposits to ensure that the account keeps growing. How do you find purpose and value in your connections, in your network and in networking? Listen on. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #606. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business podcast connections digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption entrepreneur innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership book leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast media media company mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel network networking never get a real job non fiction book podcast scott gerber six pixels of separation social capital super connector superconnector the community company wpp yec [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #399

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 09:22:32 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The 11 cities most likely to run out of drinking water - like Cape Town - BBC. "Water's scarce, populations are rising, climate change is altering aquifers and patterns of water distribution. South Africa might be days from running out of water, but other parts of the world aren't far behind. To twist Gibson's words: The misery is here, it's just not evenly distributed." (Alistair for Hugh). Chinese cops are wearing glasses that can recognize faces - Technology Review. "Peter Thiel building offshore cities beyond the reach of the law. Fake videos indistinguishable from the truth. Ubiquitous social surveillance. It's dystopia week here in my head, so enough with funny videos and poetry: It's time for some properly Gibsonian future present to spill over into links. Chinese policing using facial recognition. This will happen in every country, soon. For now, if you want a glimpse of the commonplace tomorrow look at China today." (Alistair for Mitch). Sprawling Maya network discovered under Guatemala jungle - BBC. "Fascinating to think that the Mayan population, in a territory about the size of England, may have been ten times bigger than the UK's in 500AD, and perhaps half the population of all of Europe at the same time. New satellite imagery suggests a sprawling, bustling civilization of raised causeways, and significant cities in what is now Guatemalan jungle." (Hugh for Alistair). In Conversation: Erykah Badu - Vulture. "Kooky but great interview with Erykah Badu, 90s R&B iconoclast who still holds some sway." (Hugh for Mitch). No one's coming. It's up to us - Dan Hon - Medium. "This is a very rich and deep piece of thinking. Please make the time to soak it all in. We talk a lot about how we can create a better future by what we do with technology and commerce. In this essay, Dan Hon makes the case that we need some form of technological humanism. This flies in the face of rapid progress and ideologies like, 'move fast and break things'. This is as much about technology as it is about non-technology. Confused? Don't be. Read on..." Waiting For the Robot Rembrandt - Nautilus. "Many people believe that that the creative arts will never be overrun by artificial intelligence. I don't believe that to be true. I think it's just a matter of time. This doesn't mean that humans will be replaced by AI. It does mean that humans and AI will be producing a lot of art (from books to paintings to music and movies). It also means, that it may be hard for consumers to tell the difference. Many people think it's ridiculous that an artificial intelligence will be able to write a bestselling novel. I wonder, what makes us think that AI will stop prior to that point?" (Mitch for Hugh).   Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising advertising agency ai alistair croll artificial intelligence bbc book a futurists manifesto brand business blog business book business thinker climate change commerce dan hon digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption erykah badu facebook facial recognition fake news hbs hugh mcguire iambik innovation [...]



Mr. Zuckerberg... Tear Down That Algorithm

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 08:46:55 PST

Every time that Facebook changes their news feed (and the algorithm that feeds it), Facebook changes. Some of those changes are for the good. Some of them make Facebook (somewhat) unusable for many users. Their most recent shift in the news feed was a big one. In what seems like the right play for the online social network, they wanted to throttle back on content from publishers and brands in the organic feed and amp up content from friends and family. With that, they also want to amplify the content from friends and family that is experiencing the most social interaction (the clarity of what this means is not finite. It could be likes and share, it could be comments and interactions between connections). We don't know the exact secret sauce here, and by the sounds of things, it's unclear what, exactly, Facebook means by these definitions as well. That's not be cynical of the social media platform, that is based on how Adam Mosseri, Facebook's head of News Feed, describes the past, current and possible future state of the news feed at the Code Media event that is currently underway. This is an important watch: Facebook's head of news partnerships & head of News Feed live from Code Media. src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dU-MIj5vEjU" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""> What does Facebook really want? Does it want advertising dollars? Does it want our personal data and interactions? Does it want to connect the world because of altruistic beliefs? Let's cut through the parlance and PR spin: Facebook is a business. Facebook provides its services for free to consumers. The consumer's data is the product (or, you are the product). The advertising (and enterprise solutions) is how Facebook makes it money. There's nothing wrong with this business model, so long as everyone engaged in it is clear in what the intentions are and that consent is given. It is the consent that makes things difficult. Sure, everything is laid out in the terms of service on Facebook. Sure, nobody should engage in Facebook without reading and understanding the terms of service. Sure, Facebook should not be held accountable if people don't read (or understand) their terms of service. Still, it's also easy to argue the other side of this: Consumers are not that media and technology literate. Consumers are very unclear what kind of data is being stored, used and sold to the highest bidder. Consumers are not great with the "fine print." And, ultimately, it's a free service... so whatevs, right? What do you really think of the new news feed. Is it good from a user perspective? Is it good from a brand perspective? Personally, I am spending more time than ever on Facebook. If we're connected, you might think the opposite. The bulk of my time on Facebook is currently being spent in private groups. This is not me thumbing my nose to public posts. This is not me trying to sound self-important. I have been fortunate to find several tribes that speak directly to my area of interest (from professional speaking and non-fiction writing to podcasting, marketing agency leadership and middle-aged people discussing eighties rock). I've never derived as much value from Facebook as I have in the past five years. With that, the current changes to the news feed have choked it down into a place where it feels like I am only seeing a handful of posts from a handful of people, and the content tends to not refresh but repeat itself through the week. In short, the new algorithm has made Facebook's news feed very bland and boring.  How can Facebook find the right balance? I would pay for a better Facebook. Would you? Chris Brogan posted this on Facebook (oh, the irony) just the other day: "I would pay Facebook $5/month to ALWAYS have 'most recent' and ALWAYS have 'turn off notifications'." Chris is not alone. I'm sure that there are, literally, millions of people who would pay for the same services. I've written and spoken about this new business model opportunity for[...]



The Gravity Of Elon Musk And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 04:13:28 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/398910207&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> This week we discussed:  Can we discuss Elon Musk? Did you see the launch of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy last week? Sure, we were laughing about his The Boring Company flamethrowers last week, but we have to give credit where credit is due. Tesla, SolarCity, space travel and more. If he's not our generation's Edison, da Vinci and Tesla... I do not know who is.  Many are calling for the government to step in and break up Amazon. The problem, of course, is that they are in so many businesses. From Whole Foods, to Amazon Web Services to announcing the launch of their own healthcare company, last week Amazon announced that it is launching a delivery service to compete against FedEx and UPS. Is there any business that Amazon can't disrupt? Montreal (my home and native land) had a moment of pride last week that went fairly unnoticed. Bill Gates (of Microsoft and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) announced that his new favourite book of all time is the soon to be released, Enlightenment Now. The author that book? Steven Pinker... a Montrealer (who definitely doesn't get enough credit on this side of the border). For years, people have asked Facebook for an "unlike" button. Well, now they are testing a "downvote" button in the hopes that the community can help them with everything from true and valuable content to bullying and fake news. Will this makes things right?  App of the Week: CBC Olympic Sports. Tags: advertising agency amazon amazon healthcare amazon web services app of the week aws bill gates brand business blog cbc olympic sports app chom 977 fm chom fm community ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media elon musk enlightenment now facebook falcon heavy fedex guest contributor healthcare i heart radio j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog microsoft mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte olympics radio segment radio station shipping with amazon six pixels of separation social media solarcity space travel spacex steven pinker technology terry dimonte tesla the boring company the gates foundation ups whole foods wpp [...]



Next Level Negotiation Skills With Chris Voss - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 11 Feb 2018 12:03:07 PST

Episode #605 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/397932393&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> His book is easily one of the best books that I have read in a very long time. The concept of negotiating has been a hot topic for authors and business speakers for a very long time. Still, Chris Voss is truly brilliant and his book, Never Split The Difference - Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It, is just chock full of genius from start to finish. Chris was the lead international kidnapping negotiator for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, as well as the FBI's hostage negotiation representative for the National Security Council's Hostage Working Group. Prior to becoming the FBI lead international kidnapping negotiator, Christopher served as the lead Crisis Negotiator for the New York City Division of the FBI. Christopher was a member of the New York City Joint Terrorist Task Force for 14 years. During Chris's 24 year tenure in the Bureau, he was trained in the art of negotiation by not only the FBI but Scotland Yard and Harvard Law School. He is also a recipient of the Attorney General's Award for Excellence in Law Enforcement and the FBI Agents Association Award for Distinguished and Exemplary Service. Chris currently teaches business negotiation in the MBA program as an adjunct professor at University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business and at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business. So, yeah, he knows a thing or two (or a million) about how to get things done. It's been a while since I was this nervous to speak with a book author (because I admire his work so much). Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #605. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business negotiation business podcast chris voss digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption FBI georgetown university harvard law school innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership book leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast marshall school of business mcdonough school of business mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel negotiating negotiation never split the difference non fiction book podcast scotland yard six pixels of separation university of southern california [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #398

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 07:10:33 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  No Filter - The Baffler. "'Instagram allows even the ugly to be beautiful and bad taste to masquerade as good.' I love me some grumpy. This is a look at the awful, beautiful world of Instagram poetry." (Alistair for Hugh). Craft Beer Is the Strangest, Happiest Economic Story in America - The Atlantic. "I was in Panama last week for a conference on business and sustainability. One of the topics was the inevitable concentration of companies into fewer, bigger competitors (because of economies of scale) and their exploitation of externalities (to capture profits at the expense of others.) But it turns out this doesn't happen everywhere--in craft beer, for example!" (Alistair for Mitch). CheXNet: an in-depth review - Luke Oakden-Rayner. "This one is not for the faint of heart. It's a detailed examination of the data behind some research claims about AI being used in a medical application, 'an algorithm that can detect pneumonia from chest X-rays at a level exceeding practicing radiologists.' The author of this post says, not so fast." (Hugh for Alistair). AI: Racing Towards The Brink - Sam Harris. "Sam Harris, who can veer towards dogmatism on some topics around politics and religion, is at his best talking about AI and human cognition. In this podcast, he interviews Eliezer Yudkowsky about what we really have to fear from AI (hint: it's not malicious terminator-style robots; it's probably far worse)." (Hugh for Mitch). We're 'addicted' to socializing--not our smartphones - Futurity. "Well, here's an interesting perspective. Maybe all of our smartphone addiction woes has little to do with the engineering of the software and much more to do with something a little more... shall we say... primal: our self-esteem? Maybe we're so attached to our smartphones not because of how the technology is programmed to make it a compulsion, but more to do with how we - as human beings - are evolving. According to this research, we are changing... and we are changing to be much more social by nature. So, it's now in our DNA to snoop on others and take selfies?" (Mitch for Alistair).  John Perry Barlow, 70, Dies; Championed an Unfettered Internet - The New York Times. "The three of us that share links here with the world come from a much more honest and pure internet. We were all there at the beginning. It was a very different time. We had hopes and dreams of open access for all... and place where diverse voices would be connected and heard. A place where anyone with a idea could spread it - for free - to the world. In a way, this world has come to be. In a way, this world looks nothing like those early days. John Perry Barlow was a huge part of what made us all want this internet to be so different. While his voice has been silenced, I'm hopeful that his idea will carry on, and that all of us will carry that torch forward on his behalf. RIP." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising advertising agency ai algorithm alistair croll artificial intelligence   book a futurists manifesto brand business business blog business book busines[...]



The Super Bowl Of Advertising And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 05:37:10 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/394803579&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> This week we discussed:  How is it possible that a concert goes on sale and every ticket is sold out within minutes? Welcome to the world of bots, automation and technology. This issue reared its ugly head again this week, when fans who attempted to get tickets to Elton John's upcoming Farewell Yellow Brick Road world tour noticed that the shows were sold out in a few minutes. What can be done? How is this even possible? It was Super Bowl weekend... so, who won (besides the Eagles)? In my world, it's not just about the teams on the field, but what happens in-between: the TV commercials (and how they extend online). Which brands ruled the mightiest of mighty in the ad industry's biggest moment?  Elon Musk does some wild and wacky stuff. It's not just about commercial spaceships or electric cars. But now, Musk is selling a flamethrower for his Boring company? No joke. Plus, because it's Musk, he sold 20,000 of them in short order at $500 a pop... that's $10 million dollars. Not a bad day at the office!  App of the Week: Google Flights can now predict your delays (before the airlines!). Tags: ad industry ads advertising agency ai app of the week artificial intelligence automation bots brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media elon musk elton john google google flights guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte philadelphia eagles radio segment radio station six pixels of separation social media spacex super bowl technology terry dimonte tesla the boring company tv ads tv commercials wpp [...]



Your Customer's Secret Lingo With Jeffrey Shaw - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 04 Feb 2018 10:38:56 PST

Episode #604 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/394442916&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Slowly and surely famed commercial photographer, Jeffrey Shaw, is becoming known at the "lingo guy." Who would have thought that a shy teenager hiding behind a camera and in a darkroom would wind up having a 31 year career as the go-to photographer for America's most affluent families? Of course, it then made perfect sense that the instincts and knowledge he gained could be shared with other entrepreneurs around the world as a business coach. That same shy kid is Jeffrey Shaw, who is also the host of the popular Creative Warriors podcast, and now the author of Lingo - Discover Your Ideal Customer's Secret Language and Make Your Business Irresistible. What is this language? Why does it matter for your brand? Do you know it? Listen in to find out. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #604. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business coach business conversation business podcast creative warriors creative warriors podcast digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption entrepreneur innovation j walter thompson jeffrey shaw jwt leadership book leadership podcast lingo management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book photographer photography podcast six pixels of separation wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #397

Fri, 02 Feb 2018 12:37:08 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  If they made a show called "White Mirror" that was about all the positive aspects of the human/technology relationship, what would be the plot of certain episodes? - Reddit. "I had other things to share, but Jeremy Edberg pointed me at this amazing Reddit thread. I've been writing short fiction a bit lately, and most of it, when it comes out of my head, is depressing and terrifying. Like, I thought for a week, wrote for twelve minutes, finished a short story and sat shaking and wanting to wash my hands. The first line was 'I was seven when my parents deleted my dog.' Well, it turns out other people don't like the doom and gloom. So, this thread is about all the good things technology could do, in response to the dismal future that Charlie Brooker has cooked up in Black Mirror. I'd watch that." (Alistair for Hugh). Flashmob recreates Rembrandt painting in Dutch shopping centre - The Guardian. "A great example of marketing done right. Imagine the coordination required for this--and the courage to pull it off." (Alistair for Mitch). We Measured Trump's First Year According To His Own Goals. Here's What We Found - FiveThirtyEight. "After the US election in 2016, Mitch, Alistair and I made a rule amongst ourselves, which was: no links about infuriating politics, especially about a certain leader of a significant North American country. All of us get enough of that elsewhere. I am on the wrong side of these rules, if you read them to the letter. But I think I am OK in spirit, because this isn't a political link, it's a data link. It contains a host of fascinating charts (about, eg: manufacturing employment, oil production, trade deficits, number of uninsured, etc) and analysis that show not just what has happened under the current administration, but how that data fits into the context of historical trends. A main finding: if you want to put more people out of work, elect a Bush." (Hugh for Alistair). The enduring appeal of conspiracy theories - BBC. "We live in the age of conspiracy theories. Here's why they won't go away." (Hugh for Mitch).    Tackling the Internet's Central Villain: The Advertising Business - The New York Times. "If it wasn't for advertising (or, the advertising business) we would not have any of the issues that we have in terms of fake news, cyber-bullying, the dark net, over-bloated social media networks by the billions, everyone selling stuff, selfies, and... everything else? Well, here's one way to make me want to question my very existence..." (Mitch for Alistair). The shift is real and it's forever (books by the numbers) - The Domino Project. "For the book nerds out there (you know who you are!). What does the book publishing world really need? Take a read and find out..." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. src="https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/world/video/2013/apr/05/flashmob-rembrandt-amsterdam-shopping-video" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising business alistair croll analytics bbc b[...]



Amazon's New Retail Stores And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Tue, 30 Jan 2018 12:06:03 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/392025522&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> This week we discussed:  Lots of information about Facebook and our health in the past few episodes. In fact, there's a big push around just how health mobile devices and social media are to our health (and our kids). Well, pushing this idea further, Salesforce founder, Marc Benioff suggests to The Guardian that maybe Facebook should be regulated like the cigarette industry. Everyone thought Amazon was going to kill retail stores. Well, Amazon has opened up their own book stores, they have kiosks and stores in many shopping malls, the acquired Whole Foods Market... and last week, they took things a step further with Amazon Go stores. In fact for retailers, this was a massive leap forward. No cashiers. No money. Just grab and go. So, what's it like?  App of the Week: Sworkit. Tags: advertising agency amazon amazon book store amazon go app of the week brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt marc benioff mark zuckerberg marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel mobile mobile device montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte radio segment radio station retail retailer salesforce six pixels of separation social media sworkit technology terry dimonte the guardian whole foods market wpp [...]



Building The Best Creative Teams With Todd Henry - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 28 Jan 2018 12:27:16 PST

Episode #603 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/390486999&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> There is no doubt that when it comes to writing business books on the creative process and how it flows in business today, Todd Henry is the gold standard. He bills himself as "an arms dealer for the creative revolution," and that's just one of his creative ways to describe what he really does. Todd writes amazing books, speaks internationally on creativity, leadership, productivity, and passion for work, while helping people and teams generate brilliant ideas. Candidly, I don't know many people as astute as Todd. His first book, The Accidental Creative (also the name of his incredible podcast) was followed by Die Empty (one of the best business book titles ever!), then came, Louder Than Words and now, Herding Tigers. Herding Tigers tackles one of the more complex challenges that organizations face today: How to be creative and lead creative teams by providing stability and challenges, so that the people on the team can do their best work. AI is not going to save your brand... how creative you are (and how creative your team is) just might. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #603. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast ai artificial intelligence brand business blog business book business conversation business podcast creative process creativity die empty digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption herding tigers innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership leadership book leadership podcast louder than words management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book podcast productivity six pixels of separation the accidental creative Todd Henry wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #396

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 09:43:40 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The Invasion of the German Board Games - The Atlantic. "I'm headed to Panama next week for a five-day event on the sustainability of business. While a lot of the Geoversity lineup has to do with nature and biology, there's an underlying theme I'm hoping to explore: Objective Functions. Life, for example, has an objective function of adaptivity and survival of the fittest. In an increasingly algorithmic age, the objective function we give to a machine--an AI, a robot--can send it off in perilously wrong directions (Nick Bostrom famously imagines an AI we tell to 'make paperclips' which, following these instructions to the letter, turns the entire universe into paperclips). A big part of these functions is the underlying game systems that make parties co-operate or compete. As part of the discussion, I'll be interviewing Ubisoft's VP of Editorial, Tommy François. He's been thinking a lot about games where bigger, better, faster isn't the only goal--and it seems like the Germans are a good model." (Alistair for Hugh). Taco Bell Made the Perfect Trailer for a Fake Movie About Why They've Never Sold Fries - AdWeek. "I never wondered why Taco Bell didn't have fries. But if you're gonna change up a menu, this is how you do it." (Alistair for Mitch). Can Planet Earth Feed 10 Billion People? - The Atlantic. "With all due respect to Will Rogers, I never met a doomsday apocalypse prediction I didn't like. Nukes? Climate Change? How about an oldie (but goodie): can we feed a global population that is expected to be twice what it was in 1987? We'll find out, sometime around 2050." (Hugh for Alistair). Philip K. Dick and the Fake Humans - Boston Review. "I love the first line of this article: 'This is not the dystopia we were promised.' Orwell and Huxley got it wrong, but Philip K. Dick's notions of the blurring lines between human and non-human, reality and non-reality (or competing realities), capture better the strange place we find ourselves in today." (Hugh for Mitch). Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders - Scientific American. "You know the saying, 'if you're the smartest person in the room... you're in the wrong room.' Still, being around people who are smart and super strong leaders is intimidating. Even after all of my years and all of my work experience, I can feel that way when confronted with acknowledged smart leaders. I often wonder, 'what do I have to add to this conversation?' But maybe that's all wrong? What if the smartest leaders are perceived as not that effective by the people who work for them? This is a fascinating read that flies in the face of conventional wisdom." (Mitch for Alistair). The Problem With Courting Amazon - The Atlantic. "Amazon has turned the hunt for their second HQ into a competition akin to how we watch cities try to lure the Olympics. Is this the right comparison? Which cities have truly benefited and flourished after hosting the Olympics? As a Montrealer, it's hard not to look at our Olympic Stadium (and all of the infrastructure that was put in place... and then subsequently neglected) and wonder about the tax payer's implications,[...]



Why Facebook Is Cleaning Up The Neighborhood

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 04:43:20 PST

Brands (and the people that work for them) are going apoplectic about where Facebook is headed next. Investors are a bit nervous, too. What sparked it all? Facebook founder and brainchild, Mark Zuckerberg, just published a long post about how Facebook will be changing in the next little while. Here is the TL;DR synopsis: less content from brands and news publishers in your news feed, and more content from family and friends. It boils down to an acceleration of a plan to quiet down the corporate pitches and news, especially fake news, to get back to letting friends hang with friends in a better neighbourhood. Here is Sire Zuck in his own words: "Video and other public content have exploded on Facebook in the past couple of years. Since there's more public content than posts from your friends and family, the balance of what's in News Feed has shifted away from the most important thing Facebook can do--help us connect with each other. We feel a responsibility to make sure our services aren't just fun to use, but also good for people's well-being." Wait, Facebook cares about our well-being? Maybe, but it also cares about making money and, in the long run, it knows it can ultimately charge a higher premium to advertisers if it bombards users with fewer unwanted pitches and fake news. So, it has to clean up the social community. Social makes us unhappy. Facebook knew it had a problem. Zuckerberg himself cites research that has been done (by Facebook and other sources) about the impact of social media on the population, and the results are not great. In December, Facebook admitted in a post titled, Hard Questions: Is Spending Time on Social Media Bad for Us? that it poses a mental health risk: "...when people spend a lot of time passively consuming information--reading but not interacting with people--they report feeling worse afterward...researchers hypothesize that reading about others online might lead to negative social comparison--and perhaps even more so than offline, since people's posts are often more curated and flattering." Of course, Facebook also makes the counterpoint; it's not all bad news and social media can actually help us feel better. The same research suggests that those "actively interacting with people" do feel better. No surprise there: the more in touch we are with family and friends (without the narcissism of selfies), the happier we are, and the more connected we feel to our personal community. So what is going on now that would convince Facebook to shift away from its recent role as a news publishing powerhouse? And why now?   How does this affect their stakeholders? Where does this leave a business that's been working hard over the past 10 years (or more) to get customers to "like" brands on Facebook, follow your posts and engage with them on the platform? And how, ask investors, will Facebook's stock hold up if it turns its back on all that revenue from publishers? The shares took a big hit on Friday on the news. The truth? These changes have been taking place for quite some time already. In fact, at the end of 2014, word began to spread that Facebook would be throttling organic content from brands to amp up more content from family and friends in the news feed. For brands that saw Facebook as a free content/advertising publishing platform, this was problematic. In fact, Facebook needed to do this. They are a data powerhouse and their numbers told them that engagement goes down as people's feeds get filled with brands constantly trying to pimp their wares. In a strategic move, organic reach (how far their content gets shared by people who mean it) for brands on Facebook has dropped to less than one per cent today. So, if a brand wants to rea[...]



The Energy Behind Cryptocurrency And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 05:31:47 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/387369179&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> This week we discussed:  Cryptocurrencies and their technology platforms (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) are tough to wrap our heads around - from understanding what they are to why the markets are going crazy over them. As governments try to figure out what do about bitcoin mining, Chinese companies have been eyeing Canada. Quebec, in particular. It turns out that cryptocurrency mining is a huge power suck. So, countries like China (where some of the largest mining farms are) are looking for other regions to continue their work. Cryptocurrency mining consume a lot of energy, because it uses computers to solve complex math puzzles to validate transactions in the cryptocurrency, which are written to the blockchain, or digital ledger (complex, like I said). The first miner to solve the problem is rewarded in bitcoin, and the transaction is added to the blockchain. Hydro Quebec described a potential sales pipeline of around thirty large cryptocurrency mines after a campaign by them to attract data centres to the province triggered a ton of interest from bitcoin miners. Manitoba wants in on it too. Interesting times. Last week talked about my Maclean's article, Why Facebook is cleaning up the neighborhood, about how Facebook will be amping up what we see from our friends and family, and throttling even more organic content from brands and corporate entities. Now, Facebook is about to launch a ranking tool to decide which news outlets are trustworthy. How will they do this? Complex algorithms? Hire thousands of people to monitor? Nope. Us. We will do it. Facebook announced last Friday that they will use surveys to rate news organizations and assign them trust score. Do we trust one large corporation to decide which news is trustworthy? Do we believe in the wisdom of the crowd? Robots can't take our jobs, right? Especially jobs that are more cerebral and less physical, right? Not so fast. Last week, an artificial intelligence program built by Alibaba and Microsoft beat humans on a Stanford University reading comprehension test. The scariest part of this news item? This quote: "Luo Si, the chief scientist of natural language processing at the Chinese company's AI research group, called the milestone 'a great honor,' but also acknowledged that it will likely lead to a significant number of workers losing their jobs to machines." Ouch.  App of the Week: Google Arts & Culture. Tags: advertising agency ai alibaba app of the week artificial intelligence automation bitcoin blockchain brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm content content marketing cryptocurren[...]



Same Side Selling With Ian Altman - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 21 Jan 2018 11:12:32 PST

Episode #602 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/387023927&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Ian has become a good friend over the years. That should come as no surprise, once you listen to this show. Business leaders call on Ian Altman to modernize their sales and marketing. Ian's approach helps companies significantly grow sales by aligning their goals with current and emerging trends in buyer behavior. Seems like marketing chatter, but it's not. Ian brought the idea of Same Side Selling to the world, and now it's a common sales and marketing strategy for some of the best organizations. Ian is a multi-bestselling author (Same Side Selling, Upside-Down Selling and Same Side Improv), strategic advisor, and internationally sought keynote speaker. How does he do it? He's been successful at sales in services and technology companies for over two decades, and he draws on years of success and research on how customers make decisions. He shares how his clients have more than doubled their businesses following the same methods that he used to build his former company from zero to more than $1 billion in value. You can also find Ian's weekly articles on Inc. and Forbes. He is the host of the weekly podcast, Grow My Revenue Business Cast.The numbers are real and the strategy is sound. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #602. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business leader business podcast digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption forbes grow my revenue business cast ian altman inc innovation j walter thompson jwt keynote speaker leadership book leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast marketing strategy mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book podcast sales same side improv selling six pixels of separation strategy technology upside down selling wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #395

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 12:33:18 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Boxwars - YouTube. "I'm new to this, but it's been around for a while. It combines the best parts of renaissance fairs, burning man and cosplay. Make elaborate costumes (and aircraft carriers, and more) out of cardboard. Work for weeks on them. Then smash it all and have some beers. This made me inordinately happy." (Alistair for Hugh). Raising a Social-Media Star - The Atlantic. "My daughter came home from school last week saying one of her classmates had hundreds of followers. 'I want followers,' she opined, not really knowing what they were. We're raising kids in a weird world. Here's a good piece on being the parent of an online celebrity." (Alistair for Mitch). Babe, What Are You Doing? - Jezebel. "I've read more than I should have about Grace and Aziz Ansari. This is the first article that I think got to the nub of the uncomfortable issue, which is, regardless of what ' ide' you've landed on: we need to start to have sensible conversations about this uncomfortable stuff." (Hugh for Alistair). Globalization is stuck in a trap. What will it be when it breaks free? - The Globe And Mail. "Whether or not you agree with its conclusions, this is the best article I have read that explains the economic history, and present, of globalization, and where the Trump/Brexit movement comes from." (Hugh for Mitch).  TV, retail, advertising and cascading collapses - Benedict Evans. "I live a strange existence. The marketing, communications and media industry has given me so much joy (and such an amazing career). At the same time, it often feels like a house of cards that can collapse at any minute. Not because of the business, but because of how fast technology is being adopted by consumers, and how it (fundamentally) changes how they buy things... and what they engage with. It's easy to look at a specific channel or media outlet (as we often do), but what if it is all cascading in a very dangerous way?... which I hope that it is not!" (Mitch for Alistair). Why is the cover of Fire and Fury so ugly? - The Guardian. "Can you read this article and take it all in without pandering to a political side? It's very hard these days. Still, this was one of the more interesting reads on book design, why it matters, the effort that is put into this art form (and, make no mistake about it, it is a serious art form) and whether or not that even matters. If a book publisher knows that they have rocket ship on their hands, do they care about the cover? Put your politics aside and enjoy the ride..." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UPsQ5JI9B24" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen> Tags: advertising advertising agency alistair croll aziz ansari   benedict evans book a futurists manifesto book cover design book design [...]



Facebook Made Some Big Changes And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:13:00 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/383915066&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> This week we discussed:  Facebook made a big move last week. Founder, Mark Zuckerberg said : "Video and other public content have exploded on Facebook in the past couple of years. Since there's more public content than posts from your friends and family, the balance of what's in News Feed has shifted away from the most important thing Facebook can do--help us connect with each other. We feel a responsibility to make sure our services aren't just fun to use, but also good for people's well-being." So, much more of our friends and family and a lot less of brands and fake news? Is this good news or bad news for users and businesses? My article on these Facebook changes in Maclean's: Why Facebook is cleaning up the neighbourhood. Speaking of Facebook... Companies using the company's ad platform to publicize job openings have (allegedly) been practising "Ageism."  Many companies (Verizon, Amazon, UPS and even Facebook, itself) are posting ads for jobs, but only letting those ads be seen by users 25 to 36 years old. Is that fair game? Or, is this simply another form discrimination? App of the Week: Evernote. Tags: ad platform advertising advertising agency ageism amazon app of the week   brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm content content marketing ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media evernote facebook guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt macleans mark zuckerberg marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte news feed radio segment radio station six pixels of separation social media technology terry dimonte ups verizon video wpp [...]



Dan Heath On The Power Of Moments - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 14 Jan 2018 15:02:41 PST

Episode #601 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/383578451&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> The Heath Brothers (Chip and Dan) write some of the most compelling business books that that world has ever read. To this day, Made To Stick remains a staple and masterclass in how a brand can (and should) tell a better story. From the massive success of that book to Switch (all about change) and then Decisive (all about how to make better choices)... their books are just so powerful. Most recently, I devoured their latest business book, The Power of Moments. Why do certain experiences have specific impact on our lives? How is it that an event that took place when we were a child could be a hardwired value set that we carry with us to this day? Is it all just chance and luck (nature) or is their an opportunity for us to create moments like this (nurture)? I had the pleasure of discussing this and much more with Dan Heath. Along with writing brilliant business books with his brother, Dan is also a Senior Fellow at Duke University's CASE center, which supports social entrepreneurs. At CASE, he founded the Change Academy, a program designed to boost the impact of social sector leaders. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #601. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business podcast case centre change academy chip heath dan heath decisive digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption duke university entrepreneur heath brothers innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership book leadership podcast made to stick management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book podcast six pixels of separation social entrepreneur storytelling switch the power of moments wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #394

Fri, 12 Jan 2018 09:37:55 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  'This is like paradise': Seal Beach's pay-to-stay program actively markets its jail, attracting deep-pocketed offenders - Los Angeles Times. "Got money? Doing time? Has Seal Beach got a deal for you! The jail in a sunny part of LA is pretty comfy -- and if you can pay, you can serve your time there, turning incarceration into a sabbatical. 'Why spend your jail sentence of 365 days or less at county?' says one of their ads, promoting their computer rooms, clean beds, and flatscreen TVs. Have we reached peak capitalism yet?" (Alistair for Hugh). Games of Pawns - FBI. "What's spying? It's a slippery slope to recruitment, from writing articles to leaking information, and the FBI wants you to know what it looks like. This somewhat surreal film was produced by the FBI to shine a light on the Glenn Shriver case, showing how he was turned into an asset. It's got some strange mood music and weird production values -- but it's pretty entertaining. In this era of accusations of spying and collusion, it's also informative." (Alistair for Mitch). Zeus: The Apology - The New York Review of Books. "In the latest shock 'apology' for sexual harassment, Zeus, (former?) ruler of all the Olympian gods, cops to a whole host of bad behaviour. Will this mea culpa save his career? I don't think he's done enough." (Hugh for Alistair). Why dolphins are deep thinkers - The Guardian. "Octopi are my favourite sea creatures, but dolphins are pretty cool too." (Hugh for Mitch).  The secret lives of students who mine cryptocurrency in their dorm rooms - Quartz. "Some kids need to deliver pizza to pick up some extra beer money in college... others... well... they can become currently czars!" (Mitch for Alistair).  Want To Be The Best Writer On The Planet? Do These 27 Things Immediately - Ryan Holiday - Medium. "This is just a great (and huge) list of things for everyone to think about to tell a better story. Yes, Ryan Holiday is focusing on writing here (a real passion of ours as well), this content applies to anyone who is trying to tell a story... and ensure that it gets done. Just tons of gold and inspiration here." (Mitch for Hugh).  Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R8xlUNK4JHQ" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""> Tags: advertising advertising agency alistair croll book a futurists manifesto brand business blog business book business thinker content cryptocurrency digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption facebook fbi games of pawns glenn shriver hbs hugh mcguire iambik innovation j walter thompson jwt lean analytics librivox li[...]



Smart Women In The New Economy With Magdalena Yesil - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 07 Jan 2018 06:53:17 PST

Episode #600 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/380055830&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> She has one of the most illustrious and prolific careers as a venture capitalist in Silicon Valley. She's been in that business for close to three decades. She has, literally, seen it all as an entrepreneur, VC and board member. Her investing career started at US Venture Partners. She was the first investor and founding board member at Salesforce and the founder of Broadway Angels, a female group of angel investors. A technology pioneer, Magdalena Yesil founded three companies dedicated to commercializing Internet access, e-commerce infrastructure, and electronic payments. Her current company, DriveInformed, uses technology to bring trust and transparency to the auto finance industry. She is also an author. Her latest book, Power Up - How Smart Women Win in the New Economy was recently published. There would, literally, not be a commercialized Internet if Magdalena had not brought her vision to life. With that, here we are. In a situation where equal pay, harassment and more is still (sadly) the bane of our society when it comes to women. From #metoo and bro culture to today, Magdalena has more than a few thoughts on where technology is going and how important woman are (and will be) to its future and freedom. Enjoy the conversation...  You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #600. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast angel investing angel investor auto finance board member brand bro culture broadway angels business blog business book business conversation business podcast digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption driveinformed ecommerce electronic payments entrepreneur innovation internet access investing j walter thompson jwt leadership book leadership podcast magdalena yesil management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast metoo mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel new economy non fiction book podcast power up salesforce silicon valley six pixels of separation technology us venture partners vc venture capital venture capitalist wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #393

Sat, 06 Jan 2018 14:55:07 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The vintage beauty of Soviet control rooms - U Funk. "Love me some Bond Villain Architecture. Also, damn that's good clipart." (Alistair for Hugh). Utopia Inc. - Aeon. "I'm speaking at an event in Panama later this month called The Nature of Business. It's run by Geoversity, and it looks at lessons that businesses can take from nature. As the child of zoologists, I've always thought about biological systems. But I think the ' ustainability' narrative isn't well defined - a monopoly waist-deep in lobbyists seems pretty sustainable these days -- and it's critical to remember that nature has lots of nasty 'business models,' such as predation and parasitism. This has made me look at why organizations and movements of all shapes and sizes don't survive. This article (and another, an interview with John Turner in which he explains how much Silicon Valley was influenced by communes) fascinate me." (Alistair for Mitch). How One Las Vegas ED Saved Hundreds of Lives After the Worst Mass Shooting in U.S. History - Emergency Physicians Monthly. "This is an incredible story about the nuts and bolts of how four emergency doctors handled 250+ bullet wounds in a Las Vegas hospital after the mass shooting in October 2017." (Hugh for Alistair). Why Are You Even Reading That Tesla Announcement? - Bloomberg Gadfly. "I have a few shares of Tesla, and I'm a fan of the can-do chutzpah of Elon Musk (who went to Queens University, in Kingston, Ontario (!) while I was there-- tho I never met him). But things have been tough translating dreams to reality. Bloomberg crunches the numbers." (Hugh for Mitch). Chess's New Best Player Is A Fearless, Swashbuckling Algorithm - FiveThirtyEight. "It's a New Year! Is anyone else already fatigued over the constant editorializing on how algorithms are smarter than humans... will replace us humans... and more? I read articles like this, and all I can think to myself is: 'fine, I quit... algorithms... take me away...' And, I also think: 'If these algorithms are so good, why is programmatic advertising still so bad?'" (Mitch for Alistair). The 100 best nonfiction books of all time: the full list - The Guardian. "Not sure that I have much to add after a headline like this from a publication that I respect like The Guardian. So... get some reading done!" (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising advertising agency aeon algorithm alistair croll architecture automation bloomberg bloomberg gadfly book a futurists manifesto brand business business blog business book business model business thinker chess digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketin[...]



Better Brand Stories With Mark Evans - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 31 Dec 2017 04:10:08 PST

Episode #599 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/376929689&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> There is a real struggle in business today. Regardless of how far brands have travelled, when it comes to advertising, social media and content marketing, the vast majority of businesses today struggle with how to tell a great brand story. I've had the pleasure of knowing Mark Evans for a long while. We go all the way back to the early days of blogging (2003-ish). Back then, Mark held one of the most coveted roles in publishing, as the tech journalist for one of the largest national newspapers. As blogging took hold and social media transformed the media landscape, Mark did not just lie back and go quietly into the night. On the contrary, he embraced this new media. Now, he works as a consultant helping businesses to tell a better brand story. He's the author of Storytelling for Startups (which is going to be updated and renamed in 2018), and is an advisor to many other companies. Along with being an avid hockey and tennis player, he still writes... and even has one of Canada's leading newsletters on marketing. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #599. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast blog blogger blogging brand brand story business business blog business book business conversation business podcast content marketing digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption innovation j walter thompson journalism journalist jwt leadership book leadership podcast management podcast mark evans marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing newsletter marketing podcast media media landscape mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel new media newspaper non fiction book podcast publishing six pixels of separation social media startup storytelling for startups tech journalist technology journalist wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #392

Thu, 21 Dec 2017 14:46:07 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Octopuses and cuttlefish through alien eyes - Quartz - YouTube. "Since it's the holidays, I thought I'd take some time off from the deep thinking and social morality stuff, and share a couple of videos I found fascinating. The first is about sea creatures. It turns out that we don't see what many of them see, because we don't have the right lighting and frequencies. But a team of researchers has found ways to reveal what undersea creatures perceive through a special camera process. It's pretty cool. I love how tech extends our senses." (Alistair for Hugh). Teaching Artificial Intelligence to Run (NIPS 2017) - CrowdAI - YouTube. "You've seen lots of examples of how algorithms can learn by doing something over and over again. Even Google's best AI is bad at its first billion or so games of chess--it just plays games fast, relentlessly, and in parallel, with perfect recall. Getting an algorithm to learn about the real world (for example, having an AI figure out how to run) takes a lot of trial and error, and is hard to do physically. But a simulation is just the thing; here are the winners of the NIPS 2017 contest, showing algorithms that learned to run just based on the physical structure of the human body." (Alistair for Mitch). The Sucker, the Sucker! - London Review of Books. "Whenever I see an article about octopi, I submit it here. Octopi are so amazing." (Hugh for Alistair). Why you hate contemporary architecture - Current Affairs. "Again, the title says it all." (Hugh for Mitch). Why Facts Don't Change Our Minds - The New Yorker. "We want to blame fake news for all of our problems when it comes to stuff like the facts. Maybe it's not the news. Maybe it's us? In this intriguing piece, we start to learn a little bit more about how our minds work... and why facts don't always jive with what we believe. Sadly" (Mitch for Alistair). Requiem for the Mall - Popular Mechanic. "Amazon. Blame Amazon. All the woes of retail can be blamed on Amazon. Right? Wrong? The true North Star of retail is the shopping mall. Why do we go to the shopping mall? Well, in this super-fascinating read, you will uncover that our reason for going to the mall has changed dramatically over the years, and we're pointing the blame (possibly) to many of the wrong reasons why shopping malls are not what they once were. I'm a huge mall rat, so this continues to be a topic that depresses me. I do so love the smell of commerce in the morning." (Mitch for Hugh).  Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zoSsCNULS0Q" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rhNxt0VccsE" frameborder="[...]



The Business Of Expertise With David C. Baker - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Mon, 25 Dec 2017 04:38:46 PST

Episode #598 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/374198123&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Sometimes you come across an individual (and a book) and it just mystifies you. How is it possible that you had not heard of this person's work before? That was my reaction when I was introduced to the work of David C. Baker. His book, The Business of Expertise is simply brilliant. In a world where self-proclaimed Gurus and Thought Leaders are everywhere (and including these titles on LinkedIn), the work of David could not have come at a better time. Just who is an expert? And, if you truly are an expert, how do you turn it into a true business and revenue opportunity (without looking like a jerk)? David has done the real work. He has worked with 750+ firms and in-house departments on helping individuals to figure out the true value of their expertise. If that were not enough, he's also the author of Managing (Right) for the First Time and Financial Management of a Marketing Firm. Not just one to work on marketing, David also teaches racing to expert motorcycle racers and flies 25 different types of airplanes and helicopters (no joke!). Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #598. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business podcast david c baker digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption financial management of a marketing firm innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership book leadership podcast LinkedIn management podcast managing right for the first time marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing industry marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book podcast six pixels of separation the business of expertise thought leader thought leadership wpp [...]