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Preview: Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Twist Image

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum



Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Blog is marketing and communications insights from the edge. Mitch Joel will unravel the complex world of digital marketing and social media with the perspective of a digital marketing agency. The Six Pixels Of Separat



Last Build Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2018 04:43:20 PST

 



Why Facebook Is Cleaning Up The Neighborhood

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 04:43:20 PST

Brands (and the people that work for them) are going apoplectic about where Facebook is headed next. Investors are a bit nervous, too. What sparked it all? Facebook founder and brainchild, Mark Zuckerberg, just published a long post about how Facebook will be changing in the next little while. Here is the TL;DR synopsis: less content from brands and news publishers in your news feed, and more content from family and friends. It boils down to an acceleration of a plan to quiet down the corporate pitches and news, especially fake news, to get back to letting friends hang with friends in a better neighbourhood. Here is Sire Zuck in his own words: "Video and other public content have exploded on Facebook in the past couple of years. Since there's more public content than posts from your friends and family, the balance of what's in News Feed has shifted away from the most important thing Facebook can do--help us connect with each other. We feel a responsibility to make sure our services aren't just fun to use, but also good for people's well-being." Wait, Facebook cares about our well-being? Maybe, but it also cares about making money and, in the long run, it knows it can ultimately charge a higher premium to advertisers if it bombards users with fewer unwanted pitches and fake news. So, it has to clean up the social community. Social makes us unhappy. Facebook knew it had a problem. Zuckerberg himself cites research that has been done (by Facebook and other sources) about the impact of social media on the population, and the results are not great. In December, Facebook admitted in a post titled, Hard Questions: Is Spending Time on Social Media Bad for Us? that it poses a mental health risk: "...when people spend a lot of time passively consuming information--reading but not interacting with people--they report feeling worse afterward...researchers hypothesize that reading about others online might lead to negative social comparison--and perhaps even more so than offline, since people's posts are often more curated and flattering." Of course, Facebook also makes the counterpoint; it's not all bad news and social media can actually help us feel better. The same research suggests that those "actively interacting with people" do feel better. No surprise there: the more in touch we are with family and friends (without the narcissism of selfies), the happier we are, and the more connected we feel to our personal community. So what is going on now that would convince Facebook to shift away from its recent role as a news publishing powerhouse? And why now?   How does this affect their stakeholders? Where does this leave a business that's been working hard over the past 10 years (or more) to get customers to "like" brands on Facebook, follow your posts and engage with them on the platform? And how, ask investors, will Facebook's stock hold up if it turns its back on all that revenue from publishers? The shares took a big hit on Friday on the news. The truth? These changes have been taking place for quite some time already. In fact, at the end of 2014, word began to spread that Facebook would be throttling organic content from brands to amp up more content from family and friends in the news feed. For brands that saw Facebook as a free content/advertising publishing platform, this was problematic. In fact, Facebook needed to do this. They are a data powerhouse and their numbers told them that engagement goes down as people's feeds get filled with brands constantly trying to pimp their wares. In a strategic move, organic reach (how far their content gets shared by people who mean it) for brands on Facebook has dropped to less than one per cent today. So, if a brand wants to reach an audience today, they have pay to promote and boost their content. A frustrating part is that Facebook is throttling back by deciding what a user wants to see. If a customer has already "liked" a corporate brand page on Facebook, isn't that an acknowledgement that they want to see content from a company? And, if a user tires of a brand's constant s[...]



The Energy Behind Cryptocurrency And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 05:31:47 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/387369179&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> This week we discussed:  Cryptocurrencies and their technology platforms (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) are tough to wrap our heads around - from understanding what they are to why the markets are going crazy over them. As governments try to figure out what do about bitcoin mining, Chinese companies have been eyeing Canada. Quebec, in particular. It turns out that cryptocurrency mining is a huge power suck. So, countries like China (where some of the largest mining farms are) are looking for other regions to continue their work. Cryptocurrency mining consume a lot of energy, because it uses computers to solve complex math puzzles to validate transactions in the cryptocurrency, which are written to the blockchain, or digital ledger (complex, like I said). The first miner to solve the problem is rewarded in bitcoin, and the transaction is added to the blockchain. Hydro Quebec described a potential sales pipeline of around thirty large cryptocurrency mines after a campaign by them to attract data centres to the province triggered a ton of interest from bitcoin miners. Manitoba wants in on it too. Interesting times. Last week talked about my Maclean's article, Why Facebook is cleaning up the neighborhood, about how Facebook will be amping up what we see from our friends and family, and throttling even more organic content from brands and corporate entities. Now, Facebook is about to launch a ranking tool to decide which news outlets are trustworthy. How will they do this? Complex algorithms? Hire thousands of people to monitor? Nope. Us. We will do it. Facebook announced last Friday that they will use surveys to rate news organizations and assign them trust score. Do we trust one large corporation to decide which news is trustworthy? Do we believe in the wisdom of the crowd? Robots can't take our jobs, right? Especially jobs that are more cerebral and less physical, right? Not so fast. Last week, an artificial intelligence program built by Alibaba and Microsoft beat humans on a Stanford University reading comprehension test. The scariest part of this news item? This quote: "Luo Si, the chief scientist of natural language processing at the Chinese company's AI research group, called the milestone 'a great honor,' but also acknowledged that it will likely lead to a significant number of workers losing their jobs to machines." Ouch.  App of the Week: Google Arts & Culture. Tags: advertising agency ai alibaba app of the week artificial intelligence automation bitcoin blockchain brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm content content marketing cryptocurrency cryptocurrency mining ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital ledger digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media ethereum facebook google google arts and culture guest contributor hydro quebec i [...]



Same Side Selling With Ian Altman - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 21 Jan 2018 11:12:32 PST

Episode #602 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/387023927&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Ian has become a good friend over the years. That should come as no surprise, once you listen to this show. Business leaders call on Ian Altman to modernize their sales and marketing. Ian's approach helps companies significantly grow sales by aligning their goals with current and emerging trends in buyer behavior. Seems like marketing chatter, but it's not. Ian brought the idea of Same Side Selling to the world, and now it's a common sales and marketing strategy for some of the best organizations. Ian is a multi-bestselling author (Same Side Selling, Upside-Down Selling and Same Side Improv), strategic advisor, and internationally sought keynote speaker. How does he do it? He's been successful at sales in services and technology companies for over two decades, and he draws on years of success and research on how customers make decisions. He shares how his clients have more than doubled their businesses following the same methods that he used to build his former company from zero to more than $1 billion in value. You can also find Ian's weekly articles on Inc. and Forbes. He is the host of the weekly podcast, Grow My Revenue Business Cast.The numbers are real and the strategy is sound. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #602. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business leader business podcast digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption forbes grow my revenue business cast ian altman inc innovation j walter thompson jwt keynote speaker leadership book leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast marketing strategy mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book podcast sales same side improv selling six pixels of separation strategy technology upside down selling wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #395

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 12:33:18 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Boxwars - YouTube. "I'm new to this, but it's been around for a while. It combines the best parts of renaissance fairs, burning man and cosplay. Make elaborate costumes (and aircraft carriers, and more) out of cardboard. Work for weeks on them. Then smash it all and have some beers. This made me inordinately happy." (Alistair for Hugh). Raising a Social-Media Star - The Atlantic. "My daughter came home from school last week saying one of her classmates had hundreds of followers. 'I want followers,' she opined, not really knowing what they were. We're raising kids in a weird world. Here's a good piece on being the parent of an online celebrity." (Alistair for Mitch). Babe, What Are You Doing? - Jezebel. "I've read more than I should have about Grace and Aziz Ansari. This is the first article that I think got to the nub of the uncomfortable issue, which is, regardless of what ' ide' you've landed on: we need to start to have sensible conversations about this uncomfortable stuff." (Hugh for Alistair). Globalization is stuck in a trap. What will it be when it breaks free? - The Globe And Mail. "Whether or not you agree with its conclusions, this is the best article I have read that explains the economic history, and present, of globalization, and where the Trump/Brexit movement comes from." (Hugh for Mitch).  TV, retail, advertising and cascading collapses - Benedict Evans. "I live a strange existence. The marketing, communications and media industry has given me so much joy (and such an amazing career). At the same time, it often feels like a house of cards that can collapse at any minute. Not because of the business, but because of how fast technology is being adopted by consumers, and how it (fundamentally) changes how they buy things... and what they engage with. It's easy to look at a specific channel or media outlet (as we often do), but what if it is all cascading in a very dangerous way?... which I hope that it is not!" (Mitch for Alistair). Why is the cover of Fire and Fury so ugly? - The Guardian. "Can you read this article and take it all in without pandering to a political side? It's very hard these days. Still, this was one of the more interesting reads on book design, why it matters, the effort that is put into this art form (and, make no mistake about it, it is a serious art form) and whether or not that even matters. If a book publisher knows that they have rocket ship on their hands, do they care about the cover? Put your politics aside and enjoy the ride..." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UPsQ5JI9B24" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen> Tags: advertising advertising agency alistair croll aziz ansari   benedict evans book a futurists manifesto book cover design book design book publisher book publishing boxwars brand burning man business blog business book business thinker communications cosplay digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption economics facebook globalization [...]



Facebook Made Some Big Changes And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:13:00 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/383915066&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> This week we discussed:  Facebook made a big move last week. Founder, Mark Zuckerberg said : "Video and other public content have exploded on Facebook in the past couple of years. Since there's more public content than posts from your friends and family, the balance of what's in News Feed has shifted away from the most important thing Facebook can do--help us connect with each other. We feel a responsibility to make sure our services aren't just fun to use, but also good for people's well-being." So, much more of our friends and family and a lot less of brands and fake news? Is this good news or bad news for users and businesses? My article on these Facebook changes in Maclean's: Why Facebook is cleaning up the neighbourhood. Speaking of Facebook... Companies using the company's ad platform to publicize job openings have (allegedly) been practising "Ageism."  Many companies (Verizon, Amazon, UPS and even Facebook, itself) are posting ads for jobs, but only letting those ads be seen by users 25 to 36 years old. Is that fair game? Or, is this simply another form discrimination? App of the Week: Evernote. Tags: ad platform advertising advertising agency ageism amazon app of the week   brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm content content marketing ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media evernote facebook guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt macleans mark zuckerberg marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte news feed radio segment radio station six pixels of separation social media technology terry dimonte ups verizon video wpp [...]



Dan Heath On The Power Of Moments - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 14 Jan 2018 15:02:41 PST

Episode #601 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/383578451&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> The Heath Brothers (Chip and Dan) write some of the most compelling business books that that world has ever read. To this day, Made To Stick remains a staple and masterclass in how a brand can (and should) tell a better story. From the massive success of that book to Switch (all about change) and then Decisive (all about how to make better choices)... their books are just so powerful. Most recently, I devoured their latest business book, The Power of Moments. Why do certain experiences have specific impact on our lives? How is it that an event that took place when we were a child could be a hardwired value set that we carry with us to this day? Is it all just chance and luck (nature) or is their an opportunity for us to create moments like this (nurture)? I had the pleasure of discussing this and much more with Dan Heath. Along with writing brilliant business books with his brother, Dan is also a Senior Fellow at Duke University's CASE center, which supports social entrepreneurs. At CASE, he founded the Change Academy, a program designed to boost the impact of social sector leaders. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #601. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business podcast case centre change academy chip heath dan heath decisive digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption duke university entrepreneur heath brothers innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership book leadership podcast made to stick management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book podcast six pixels of separation social entrepreneur storytelling switch the power of moments wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #394

Fri, 12 Jan 2018 09:37:55 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  'This is like paradise': Seal Beach's pay-to-stay program actively markets its jail, attracting deep-pocketed offenders - Los Angeles Times. "Got money? Doing time? Has Seal Beach got a deal for you! The jail in a sunny part of LA is pretty comfy -- and if you can pay, you can serve your time there, turning incarceration into a sabbatical. 'Why spend your jail sentence of 365 days or less at county?' says one of their ads, promoting their computer rooms, clean beds, and flatscreen TVs. Have we reached peak capitalism yet?" (Alistair for Hugh). Games of Pawns - FBI. "What's spying? It's a slippery slope to recruitment, from writing articles to leaking information, and the FBI wants you to know what it looks like. This somewhat surreal film was produced by the FBI to shine a light on the Glenn Shriver case, showing how he was turned into an asset. It's got some strange mood music and weird production values -- but it's pretty entertaining. In this era of accusations of spying and collusion, it's also informative." (Alistair for Mitch). Zeus: The Apology - The New York Review of Books. "In the latest shock 'apology' for sexual harassment, Zeus, (former?) ruler of all the Olympian gods, cops to a whole host of bad behaviour. Will this mea culpa save his career? I don't think he's done enough." (Hugh for Alistair). Why dolphins are deep thinkers - The Guardian. "Octopi are my favourite sea creatures, but dolphins are pretty cool too." (Hugh for Mitch).  The secret lives of students who mine cryptocurrency in their dorm rooms - Quartz. "Some kids need to deliver pizza to pick up some extra beer money in college... others... well... they can become currently czars!" (Mitch for Alistair).  Want To Be The Best Writer On The Planet? Do These 27 Things Immediately - Ryan Holiday - Medium. "This is just a great (and huge) list of things for everyone to think about to tell a better story. Yes, Ryan Holiday is focusing on writing here (a real passion of ours as well), this content applies to anyone who is trying to tell a story... and ensure that it gets done. Just tons of gold and inspiration here." (Mitch for Hugh).  Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R8xlUNK4JHQ" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""> Tags: advertising advertising agency alistair croll book a futurists manifesto brand business blog business book business thinker content cryptocurrency digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption facebook fbi games of pawns glenn shriver hbs hugh mcguire iambik innovation j walter thompson jwt lean analytics librivox link link exchange los angeles times marketing marketing agency marketing blog medium mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel pandemonio pressbooks quartz resolve to [...]



Smart Women In The New Economy With Magdalena Yesil - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 07 Jan 2018 06:53:17 PST

Episode #600 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/380055830&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> She has one of the most illustrious and prolific careers as a venture capitalist in Silicon Valley. She's been in that business for close to three decades. She has, literally, seen it all as an entrepreneur, VC and board member. Her investing career started at US Venture Partners. She was the first investor and founding board member at Salesforce and the founder of Broadway Angels, a female group of angel investors. A technology pioneer, Magdalena Yesil founded three companies dedicated to commercializing Internet access, e-commerce infrastructure, and electronic payments. Her current company, DriveInformed, uses technology to bring trust and transparency to the auto finance industry. She is also an author. Her latest book, Power Up - How Smart Women Win in the New Economy was recently published. There would, literally, not be a commercialized Internet if Magdalena had not brought her vision to life. With that, here we are. In a situation where equal pay, harassment and more is still (sadly) the bane of our society when it comes to women. From #metoo and bro culture to today, Magdalena has more than a few thoughts on where technology is going and how important woman are (and will be) to its future and freedom. Enjoy the conversation...  You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #600. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast angel investing angel investor auto finance board member brand bro culture broadway angels business blog business book business conversation business podcast digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption driveinformed ecommerce electronic payments entrepreneur innovation internet access investing j walter thompson jwt leadership book leadership podcast magdalena yesil management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast metoo mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel new economy non fiction book podcast power up salesforce silicon valley six pixels of separation technology us venture partners vc venture capital venture capitalist wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #393

Sat, 06 Jan 2018 14:55:07 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The vintage beauty of Soviet control rooms - U Funk. "Love me some Bond Villain Architecture. Also, damn that's good clipart." (Alistair for Hugh). Utopia Inc. - Aeon. "I'm speaking at an event in Panama later this month called The Nature of Business. It's run by Geoversity, and it looks at lessons that businesses can take from nature. As the child of zoologists, I've always thought about biological systems. But I think the ' ustainability' narrative isn't well defined - a monopoly waist-deep in lobbyists seems pretty sustainable these days -- and it's critical to remember that nature has lots of nasty 'business models,' such as predation and parasitism. This has made me look at why organizations and movements of all shapes and sizes don't survive. This article (and another, an interview with John Turner in which he explains how much Silicon Valley was influenced by communes) fascinate me." (Alistair for Mitch). How One Las Vegas ED Saved Hundreds of Lives After the Worst Mass Shooting in U.S. History - Emergency Physicians Monthly. "This is an incredible story about the nuts and bolts of how four emergency doctors handled 250+ bullet wounds in a Las Vegas hospital after the mass shooting in October 2017." (Hugh for Alistair). Why Are You Even Reading That Tesla Announcement? - Bloomberg Gadfly. "I have a few shares of Tesla, and I'm a fan of the can-do chutzpah of Elon Musk (who went to Queens University, in Kingston, Ontario (!) while I was there-- tho I never met him). But things have been tough translating dreams to reality. Bloomberg crunches the numbers." (Hugh for Mitch). Chess's New Best Player Is A Fearless, Swashbuckling Algorithm - FiveThirtyEight. "It's a New Year! Is anyone else already fatigued over the constant editorializing on how algorithms are smarter than humans... will replace us humans... and more? I read articles like this, and all I can think to myself is: 'fine, I quit... algorithms... take me away...' And, I also think: 'If these algorithms are so good, why is programmatic advertising still so bad?'" (Mitch for Alistair). The 100 best nonfiction books of all time: the full list - The Guardian. "Not sure that I have much to add after a headline like this from a publication that I respect like The Guardian. So... get some reading done!" (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising advertising agency aeon algorithm alistair croll architecture automation bloomberg bloomberg gadfly book a futurists manifesto brand business business blog business book business model business thinker chess digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption elon musk emergency physicians monthly facebook fivethirtyeight geoversity hbs hugh mcguire iambik innovation j walter thompson john turner jwt las vegas lean analytics librivox link link exchange marketi[...]



Better Brand Stories With Mark Evans - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 31 Dec 2017 04:10:08 PST

Episode #599 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/376929689&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> There is a real struggle in business today. Regardless of how far brands have travelled, when it comes to advertising, social media and content marketing, the vast majority of businesses today struggle with how to tell a great brand story. I've had the pleasure of knowing Mark Evans for a long while. We go all the way back to the early days of blogging (2003-ish). Back then, Mark held one of the most coveted roles in publishing, as the tech journalist for one of the largest national newspapers. As blogging took hold and social media transformed the media landscape, Mark did not just lie back and go quietly into the night. On the contrary, he embraced this new media. Now, he works as a consultant helping businesses to tell a better brand story. He's the author of Storytelling for Startups (which is going to be updated and renamed in 2018), and is an advisor to many other companies. Along with being an avid hockey and tennis player, he still writes... and even has one of Canada's leading newsletters on marketing. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #599. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast blog blogger blogging brand brand story business business blog business book business conversation business podcast content marketing digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption innovation j walter thompson journalism journalist jwt leadership book leadership podcast management podcast mark evans marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing newsletter marketing podcast media media landscape mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel new media newspaper non fiction book podcast publishing six pixels of separation social media startup storytelling for startups tech journalist technology journalist wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #392

Thu, 21 Dec 2017 14:46:07 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Octopuses and cuttlefish through alien eyes - Quartz - YouTube. "Since it's the holidays, I thought I'd take some time off from the deep thinking and social morality stuff, and share a couple of videos I found fascinating. The first is about sea creatures. It turns out that we don't see what many of them see, because we don't have the right lighting and frequencies. But a team of researchers has found ways to reveal what undersea creatures perceive through a special camera process. It's pretty cool. I love how tech extends our senses." (Alistair for Hugh). Teaching Artificial Intelligence to Run (NIPS 2017) - CrowdAI - YouTube. "You've seen lots of examples of how algorithms can learn by doing something over and over again. Even Google's best AI is bad at its first billion or so games of chess--it just plays games fast, relentlessly, and in parallel, with perfect recall. Getting an algorithm to learn about the real world (for example, having an AI figure out how to run) takes a lot of trial and error, and is hard to do physically. But a simulation is just the thing; here are the winners of the NIPS 2017 contest, showing algorithms that learned to run just based on the physical structure of the human body." (Alistair for Mitch). The Sucker, the Sucker! - London Review of Books. "Whenever I see an article about octopi, I submit it here. Octopi are so amazing." (Hugh for Alistair). Why you hate contemporary architecture - Current Affairs. "Again, the title says it all." (Hugh for Mitch). Why Facts Don't Change Our Minds - The New Yorker. "We want to blame fake news for all of our problems when it comes to stuff like the facts. Maybe it's not the news. Maybe it's us? In this intriguing piece, we start to learn a little bit more about how our minds work... and why facts don't always jive with what we believe. Sadly" (Mitch for Alistair). Requiem for the Mall - Popular Mechanic. "Amazon. Blame Amazon. All the woes of retail can be blamed on Amazon. Right? Wrong? The true North Star of retail is the shopping mall. Why do we go to the shopping mall? Well, in this super-fascinating read, you will uncover that our reason for going to the mall has changed dramatically over the years, and we're pointing the blame (possibly) to many of the wrong reasons why shopping malls are not what they once were. I'm a huge mall rat, so this continues to be a topic that depresses me. I do so love the smell of commerce in the morning." (Mitch for Hugh).  Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zoSsCNULS0Q" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rhNxt0VccsE" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen> Tags: advertising advertising agency ai algorithm alistair croll amazon architecture artificial intelligence   book a futurists manifesto brand business blog business book busine[...]



The Business Of Expertise With David C. Baker - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Mon, 25 Dec 2017 04:38:46 PST

Episode #598 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/374198123&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Sometimes you come across an individual (and a book) and it just mystifies you. How is it possible that you had not heard of this person's work before? That was my reaction when I was introduced to the work of David C. Baker. His book, The Business of Expertise is simply brilliant. In a world where self-proclaimed Gurus and Thought Leaders are everywhere (and including these titles on LinkedIn), the work of David could not have come at a better time. Just who is an expert? And, if you truly are an expert, how do you turn it into a true business and revenue opportunity (without looking like a jerk)? David has done the real work. He has worked with 750+ firms and in-house departments on helping individuals to figure out the true value of their expertise. If that were not enough, he's also the author of Managing (Right) for the First Time and Financial Management of a Marketing Firm. Not just one to work on marketing, David also teaches racing to expert motorcycle racers and flies 25 different types of airplanes and helicopters (no joke!). Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #598. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business podcast david c baker digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption financial management of a marketing firm innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership book leadership podcast LinkedIn management podcast managing right for the first time marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing industry marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book podcast six pixels of separation the business of expertise thought leader thought leadership wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #391

Thu, 21 Dec 2017 13:58:22 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Security robot bullied and forced off the street in San Francisco - Dezeen. "Here's an interesting dilemma: Do you feel bad for the robot that got smeared in feces and BBQ sauce? Or the homeless people it was automatically removing from the surrounding sidewalks? In an age of automation there are few easy answers." (Alistair for Hugh). Insurance Companies Are Now Offering Discounts if You Let Your Tesla Drive Itself - Futurism. "I've long maintained that insurance companies, despite their reputation as slow-moving, ponderous, risk-averse organizations, are actually a force for technology adoption. By quantifying risk they put a price on inaction -- so if some kind of new tech means less damages, they'll back it. This is true for everything from mining (why send a human to do work a drone can do below ground?) to governance (a CEO can't possibly parse all of the mishaps and wrongdoings of a global company) to tree felling (lumberjack is one of the deadliest jobs). So maybe the self-driving car doesn't catch on because it's desireable, but because it's negligent not to use it." (Alistair for Mitch). The Would-Be Amazon of Sex Toys Became the Radio Shack Instead - Bloomberg BusinessWeek. "Passing this along for no other reason than the headline." (Hugh for Alistair). Definitely Not A Top Ten List: The Best TV Shows of 2017 - The New Yorker. "Is it cheating to provide a best of list as a link at the end of the year? Well, I'm going to do it anyway: It seems like the stakes have gone up for TV shows... we're so inundated by... stuff... to read/watch/listen to, and we're all so busy, that OK stuff just doesn't make the cut. I mostly like the same kind of stuff Emily Nussbaum likes, and I'm looking forward to watching some of this over the holidays." (Hugh for Mitch).  Dozens of Companies Are Using Facebook to Exclude Older Workers From Job Ads - ProPublica. "Ageism is a thing. Some don't believe it to be true. I do. I see it - each and every day - from my perch in this melange between marketing and technology. Out with the old and in with the new. We blame Facebook for many of society's woes. Should we blame them for ageism too? Candidly, I'm not sure where I sit on this issue. If a company takes an ad out on Facebook for an entry level position, are they being blatantly unlawful because they are targeting this ad based on an individual's age? Tough call, but it's happening... and nobody is happy about it. Scrooge this." (Mitch for Alistair). If work dominated your every moment would life be worth living? - Aeon. "If there was one word that brewed to the top of the workspace lexicon this year, it would be 'hustle.' Everyone is all about the hustle. What? Don't have a hustle? What about a side hustle? Don't have one of those? You could be a sucker and on the losing end of the modern work ethos. That's me being sarcastic, but this theme is real. From connectivity and smartphones to this entrepreneurial positioning, we're constantly working. So... and here's the big question as the vast majority of us do take a few weeks to slow down and enjoy each other's company... if work is [...]



Should Kids Be Banned From Smartphones And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 18 Dec 2017 07:39:27 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/371220476&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> This week we discussed:  If there's one thing that frustrates me more than anything, it's very young children with their own smartphones and tablets. We have no idea what the longterm effects that these screens will have on our children. Regardless of the science, what about the social issues? There is a reality: if kids don't use/learn on screens, we may be limiting their future, but... still. Where do you sit on this? Last week, the French government said that it will ban students from using mobile phones in primary, junior and middle school. Is this the right move? Which other countries will follow France?  Is Facebook a good or bad idea this holiday season (or any time, really)? Well, Facebook just came out and admitted that it's not all that good for your mental health, believe it or not. Researchers for the social network admitted that studies have found that spending time on Facebook "passively consuming information" can leave people "feeling worse", but they also argued that part of the solution is to engage and interact more with people on Facebook. So, here's the real question: How many people really engage and interact vs. Passively consume posts? This does not bode well for us. App of the Week: Calm. Tags: advertising agency app of the week brand business blog calm calm app chom 977 fm chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook google guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel mobile device mobile phone montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte radio segment radio station science six pixels of separation smartphone social media social network tablet technology terry dimonte twitter wpp [...]



Find Your Potential With Mark Sanborn - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 17 Dec 2017 11:40:15 PST

Episode #597 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/370857530&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Have you read the book, The Fred Factor? It's one of those massive business book must-haves (like Who Moved My Cheese? And The Tipping Point). It has sold close to two million copies. The author is Mark Sanborn. I've been a fan of his work for a long time, but never had the chance to have a conversation with him (until now). He's written a ton of bestsellers since then (You Don't Need A Title To Be A Leader, Encore Effect, Fred 2.0 and many more). Most recently, this top-rated speaker and consultant published his latest, The Potential Principle. It's an amazing read and an important topic. What is your true potential? Do you know? Are you truly working it? How is that working out for you? In this episode, Mark discusses the power of our potential and why we should not squander it. Enjoy the conversation...     You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #597. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast brand business blog business book business conversation business podcast digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption encore effect fred 20 innovation j walter thompson jwt keynote speaker leadership book leadership podcast management podcast mark sanborn marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel non fiction book podcast public speaker six pixels of separation speaker the fred factor the potential principle the tipping point who moved my cheese wpp you dont need a title to be a leader [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #390

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 13:24:35 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  1000 different people, the same words - Kieran Snyder - Medium. "Mining data for people's personalities is an interesting hobby. In this analysis, AI company, Textio, looked at how companies' job description wordings have underlying patterns, and what they say about that company's culture. 'When your PR talks about work/life balance, but your team consistently advertises jobs that are work hard/play hard, your team is the one telling the truth.'" (Alistair for Hugh). Well-Kept Gardens Die By Pacifism - LessWrong. "In this time of political and social controversy, it's important to remember that no universally tolerant society can survive. Specifically, to remain tolerant, it must be intolerant of one thing: Intolerance. This is from 2009, but never more relevant. 'The thing about online communities, though, is that you can't rely on the police ignoring you and staying on the job; the community actually pays the price of its virtuousness.'" (Alistair for Mitch). How the Index Card Cataloged the World - The Atlantic. "The digital age is in so many ways a perfecting of a simple technical invention: the index card. But where did the index card come from? Turns out Linnaeus, the guy who first systematized genetic heredity, more or less invented index cards in the process." (Hugh for Alistair).  New York City Wants to Audit the Powerful Algorithms That Control Our Lives - Gizmodo. "I'm not sure how much good this would do, but the more people talk about, and try to understand the ways in which algorithms are and will shape our lives, the better." (Hugh for Mitch). AI isn't just compromising our privacy--it can limit our choices, too - Quartz. "Technology scares us. It's a fact. We're humans. Fire bad. Anything new freaks us out. Plus, unlike when we discovered fire, we've also learned, have grown, become more educated and learned from our mistakes. Of have we? In this fascinating piece, an argument is made: will our free choice be taken away as artificial intelligence delivers on its promise? Before you go screaming, take a second to consider this notion. If AI can truly deliver, in theory, it should know us better than we know ourselves, and the output of it will be either the best decision for us, or the one that makes the most sense. If that is true, where does choice go?" (Mitch for Alistair). Norway becomes first country to end national radio broadcasts on FM - The Guardian. "Norway is the first country in the world to shut down national broadcasts of it's FM network. No, radio ins't dead in Norway. They have, simply, completed the transition to digital radio. What are they left with? Better sound quality, more channels, much more functionality and, according to them, at an eight of the cost of FM radio. To me, this smells less like the shift from traditional to digital, and more like a country self-aware enough to ditch legacy technology when something better is right in front of them. When will other countries follow suit? It's hard to complain about a media channel (and their performa[...]



Content Marketing 2018 - The Next Chapter

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 07:47:35 PST

What is the future of the content marketing industry? As the saying goes, "change is the only constant" and that applies just fine when it comes to understanding the future of the content marketing industry. One of the people who has been leading the content marketing charge is my friend, founder of Content Marketing Institute and Content Marketing World, Joe Pulizzi (he's also the author of several incredible bestselling books including his latest, Killing Marketing, and who can forget Epic Content Marketing and Content Inc.?). This is Joe's last year at the helm of this business (he sold the business to UBM in June 2016), and it's a bittersweet moment for me. I've known Joe since, basically, day one. I have been a speaker at nearly every single one of his events, and have been a massive evangelist for him and his business. Joe is always there for me... for this community. He's one of the good ones. We need to celebrate people like him much more often. One of the many favourite emails to get from Joe is his annual request to take part in the Content Marketing Institute's predictions for the coming year. Welcome to 2018 Content Marketing Predictions. From their announcement: "In 60+ Predictions on Content Marketing in 2018, some of our favorite content marketing colleagues and compatriots share their thoughts on what it takes to build an audience; how advanced technologies and newer techniques - like AI, voice-enabled search, and virtual reality - will impact the content landscape; how troubling trends like 'fake news" and data breaches will add complexity to the marketing equation and more." Where do I stand? Here was my prediction: "I believe 2018 will be the year where brands publish more and more content natively on external platforms. I have been seeing this trend of 'hub + hub' versus 'hub + spoke' for some time, but it's becoming more and more apparent that brands will be publishing less and less content on their own platforms (or using their platforms more like archives)."  It's true: this is the changing landscape of content marketing today. It looks like this prediction is becoming more of a reality. How did this massive change happen? The Six Pixels of Separation content strategy that Mirum has been nurturing and developing since 2003 has been challenged more than ever before. In short: Getting you (and people who have never heard of us) to sit up and take notice is getting harder and harder. Most consumers no longer venture out to explore corporate websites and blogs. They live and breathe in social media spaces like Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, LinkedIn, YouTube and beyond. From a purely text-based content consumption perspective, they're more inclined to stay within LinkedIn or read in spaces like Medium. Consumers will still stay true to both the major publication publishers as well as their trusted trade and industry publications. So, what happens when your company posts a brilliant article to the corporate blog? Candidly, it's getting harder (and more expensive - in terms of time and money) to get consumers to head over there, consume and care. Time and time again, brands are arriving at the same reality: if they post the same article on Facebook, LinkedIn, Medium or their industry trade publication's website, it gets tons of heat, attention and care. This is where content distribution strategies trumps content marketing. This is also an indicator that buckling down on your owned property (instead of growing your reach and attention where the consumers are) could be a more costly (and risky) proposition. The value, of course, is now coming from those brands that hav[...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TwistImage/~5/ahDCqlpT74k/2018-content-marketing-predictions-final-11_29-17.pdf




Do We Blame The Algorithms When Advertising Goes Wrong?

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 06:02:54 PST

When things go wrong in advertising, it looks like brands are throwing the algorithms under the bus. And you thought it was just the agencies who took the brunt of the damage when mistakes are made? It is not. Look no further than Internet Radio to see how this is unfolding. Internet radio has consistently been an area of high growth in advertising spend (and based on the success of podcasts, connected speakers, voice platforms and the troubles of terrestrial radio, it doesn't look like it is going to be slowing down any time soon). Still, Internet Radio is not podcasting. In fact, it works almost exactly like terrestrial radio. It has scheduled programming, measurable audience, and time slot ad buys. The big difference (or value for brands) is the simplicity of digital insertions (the publishers can drop ads in and out with ease across multiple shows over date and time). But, there's one fatal flaw that many brands haven't considered: it's largely a wild west on the content front. Without knowing it, many brands are unwittingly sponsoring some fairly unsavory shows including those supporting racism or even terrorist thinking. So, is this a wake up call about the medium or another example of marketer laziness with programmatic buying? How should brands proceed? Is it easier to keep making the same mistake over and over again (while blaming the algorithms) or do we have a deeper problem going on here? You may want to listen to this: Beancast - Episode #476 - So Very Gassy. This week, I discussed this topic along with Emily Binder (Beetle Moment Marketing), Kate O'Neill (K.O.Insights) and host Bob Knorpp on the very excellent BeanCast Podcast (which I've been fortunate to be a guest on in the past). We didn't just tackle the current problem of Internet Radio advertising. In this episode, we also discussed brands and their inability to truly be friends in social media, ads.cert and what this means for the digital advertising business, and Facebook's new Messenger For Kids apps.  Take a listen and jump into the fray... width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/368943953&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Tags: ad buy ad cert advertising advertising agency advertising spend algorithm app audience bean cast podcast beancast beetle moment marketing bob knorpp brand business blog connected speaker content content marketing digital advertising digital insertions digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption Emily binder facebook facebook messenger for kids innovation internet radio j walter thompson jwt Kate oneill ko insights marketer marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing technology messenger messenger for kids mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel mobile app podcast programmatic programming publisher radio six pixels of separation social media technology voice wpp [...]



Future Proof With Minter Dial - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 10 Dec 2017 04:30:50 PST

Episode #595 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/367516745&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> Back in early 2002, when I first got started in this agency business, I was networking as much as possible. One of the first major local executives that I met was Minter Dial. A man with an international reputation who was senior leadership at L'Oreal. We became friends, but Minter moved on. I believe that Minter and I bonded so well, because we were both interested in very divergent cultural spaces, while developing very corporate lives at the same time. To give you some context, Minter Dial is an American, with French citizenship, born in Belgium, educated in England, living in France and married with two children. He is the author and producer of the award-winning documentary film and book, The Last Ring Home. A personal and moving story that traces the lives of his grandfather and grandmother through WWII. The film, which has won multiple awards, including Best Foreign Film, Best Documentary and Best Screenplay, was shown on PBS in May of this year. On the professional front - after a 16-year international career with the L'Oréal Group -- including nine assignments in France, UK, USA and Canada -- Minter launched The Myndset Company, a boutique agency providing business speaking and consultancy on leadership, branding and digital strategy. Most recently, Minter co-authored (with Caleb Storkey), Futureproof - How to get your business ready for the next disruption. The book explores the three core mindsets and twelve disruptive technologies that brands must have to grow and succeed... and to get ready for the next disruption. Enjoy the conversation...    You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #595. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast   brand branding business blog business podcast business speaking caleb storkey culture digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast digital strategy disruption disruptive technology documentary future proof futureproof innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership leadership podcast loreal management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast minter dial mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel pbs podcast six pixels of separation speaking technology the last ring home the myndset company wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #389

Fri, 08 Dec 2017 07:37:47 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Postmortem: Every Frame a Painting - Tony Zhou - Medium. "The YouTube channel Every Frame A Painting has been doing visual storytelling for years now. And, with this post, they wrapped things up. 'My name is Tony and my name is Taylor, and this concludes Every Frame a Painting.' I hadn't been following their story, but if you're a creative type working today, this is a fascinating read -- and I have a few hours of videos to catch up on." (Alistair for Hugh). I Made My Shed the Top Rated Restaurant On TripAdvisor - Vice. "If true, this is a scathing indictment of ratings sites. If not, it's the best example of trolling I've seen on the Internet in recent years. Either way, you need to see this -- if only for the behind-the-scenes photos of food staging." (Alistair for Mitch). Is There a Limit to Scientific Understanding? - The Atlantic. "Science is still pretty bad at describing real complexity, and still terrible at explaining our own brains. Maybe that's a constraint of human consciousness, and a limit of our ability to truly understand the world around us." (Hugh for Alistair). Kick Against the Pricks - The New York Review of Books. "Laura Kipnis pulls no punches in this snarky and wise overview of the spate of powerful men falling on their, er, swords. The article is more remarkable in its shading beyond black and white." (Hugh for Mitch).  Ambient AI Is About to Devour the Software Industry - Technology Review. "Amazon. Oh, Amazon. When you mix artificial intelligence and machine learning into cloud platforms, something really big is/will happen. Not enough people get it, understand it or are ready for the ramifications. From this article: 'This shift promises to be the biggest transition for the software world in decades. The easy availability of on-demand machine learning, combined with tools for automating the design and training of AI models, should, in fact, have an increasing impact on overall economic productivity, according to some economists.' It's not about new software. Not at all. As the article surmises: '...cloud-based machine learning is about to take the software industry by storm--and, by extension, to rewire the entire economy.' Yes, the entire economy." (Mitch for Alistair). 'Let the soul dangle': how mind-wandering spurs creativity - Aeon. "If all you are ever doing is transitioning from deep work into a Facebook feed, into YouTube, into dinner, into Netflix and beyond, you are busy trying to fill your day. Being active is so important. No doubt. But what about just letting your mind wander? How about just giving yourself a beat... a long beat... a long walk... or just do nothing. Literally, nothing. Not even a meditation or mindfulness session. Nothing. Just put your mind out on a clothesline and do nothing until it dries. What could happen? Perhaps... maybe... a massive breakthrough?" (Mitch for Hugh).  Feel free to share these links and add your pic[...]



The Legendary John Patitucci On This Month's Groove - The No Treble Podcast

Fri, 08 Dec 2017 07:54:56 PST

John Patitucci is this month's conversation on Groove - The No Treble Podcast. You can listen the new episode right here: Groove - The No Treble Podcast - Episode #36 - John Patitucci. Who is John Patitucci? What has not been said about the bass playing of John Patitucci? The Brooklyn native started playing the bass when he was twelve years old and has not stopped since. He was a member of three Chick Corea groups: the Elektric Band, the Akoustic Band, and the quartet. While he often switches between the acoustic and electric bass, most of us know him for his groundbreaking work with the six string bass. Patitucci truly is the triple threat: a killer live performer, an amazing studio musician, and a much sought-after teacher. He was the artistic director of the Bass Collective, was involved with the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, he started the Online Jazz Bass School, and was more recently appointed artist in residence at Berklee College of Music. In 2015, the documentary Back In Brooklyn came out and covered not only the recording of his solo disc, Brooklyn, but it was a phenomenal look back on his incredible career. John is busier than ever these days. The multi-Grammy winner most recently toured with The John Patitucci Electric Guitar Quartet, which happened around the same time as the 2015 recording of another trio, Children of the Light. We're honored that John took the time to chat with us. Enjoy the conversation... Listen in: Groove - The No Treble Podcast - Episode #36 - John Patitucci. style="border: 0; width: 100%; height: 120px;" src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/track=2462437368/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/artwork=small/transparent=true/" seamless>Groove - Episode #36: John Patitucci by No Treble What is Groove - The No Treble Podcast? This is an ambitious effort. This will be a fascinating conversation. Our goal at Groove is to build the largest oral history of bass players. Why Groove? Most of the content about the bass revolves around gear, playing techniques, and more technical chatter. For us, bassists are creative artists with stories to tell. They are a force to be reckon with. These are the stories and conversation that we will capture. To create this oral history of why these artists chose the bass, what their creative lives are like, and where inspiration can be found. Tags:   back in brooklyn bass bass collective bass player bass player podcast bass podcast bassist berklee college of music brooklyn chick corea chick corea akoustic band chick corea elektric band chick corea quartet children of the light digital marketing education electric bass electric bass podcast fretless bass grammy groove groove no treble groove no treble podcast groove podcast john patitucci mitch joel mitchjoel music podcast musician no treble no treble podcast online jazz bass school performance six pixels of separation studio musician teacher the john patitucci electric guitar quartet thelonius monk institute of jazz [...]



Into The Speaker Lab With Grant Baldwin - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 03 Dec 2017 03:46:12 PST

Episode #594 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/364311566&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> The number one question that people ask me is: how did you become a professional speaker? I don't believe that my story is replicable. Not because I am special (I am not). I just had many lucky breaks happen together in a short period of time. Here's one thing that I have learned over the years: the best speakers do not just get up on stage and deliver. They are not individuals with birth-given skills. The ability to communicate to an audience (and, that's anyone from the boardroom to the convention centre) is a learnable skill. Grant Baldwin does this for a living. A former Bible college youth pastor, Grant now helps people become speakers... and become better speakers. His company, The Speaker Lab, has a whole mess of tools, podcasts, workshops, training and more (including his free speaker workshop and free speaker fee calculator). In this episode, we break it down for anyone and everyone who wants to deliver in front of an audience. And, whether you eagerly want to get up on stage or are dreading it, the skillset of public speaking is critical to your success (and your brand's). Enjoy the conversation...  You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #594. Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast audience brand business blog business podcast communication digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing podcast disruption grant baldwin innovation j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel podcast presentation professional speaker public speaking six pixels of separation speaker speaker fee speaker training speaking speaking podcast the speaker lab the speaker lab podcast wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #388

Fri, 01 Dec 2017 08:49:08 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS, chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO, Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Pentagon Tiling Proof Solves Century-Old Math Problem - Quanta Magazine. "I found this more interesting than I expected to. It presages a future where humans figure a thing out gradually, then a machine helps test the rules the mathematician set out." (Alistair for Hugh). Film Crit Hulk SMASH: Let's Talk About "Pickle Rick" - Birth. Movies. Death. "It's easy to dismiss Rick and Morty as a puerile sequel to shows like Archer and South Park. But like those shows, there's a lot beneath the surface. And the Pickle Rick episode is a heady does of existentialism, epistomology, and nihilism. Even if you don't watch it, reading this review will give you a sense of how profound it is; the closing war of words between Rick and the therapist is university-level philosophy. From a man in a pickle roach rat body on a couch." (Alistair for Mitch). Big Money Rules - The New York Review of Books. "I worry about the future for my kids. Looking at a collection of factors changing in the world -- AI, concentration of digital power, and the scale of control that wealth (partly due to the preceding factors) can now exert on our societies, I see a future where the comfortable middle class existence is a harder path to find. And, if you lean to another vision of the future, fighting for it is, I think, going to become more difficult. To cheer you up before the holidays, here is part of the story." (Hugh for Alistair). This Surreal Shot of Jupiter's Clouds Is Exactly What We Need Right Now - Gizmodo. "It seems like the future is going to require a bit more buddhism, a bit more 'we are but insignificant specs in the universe' thinking... and these pics of Jupiter might help." (Hugh for Mitch). Jimmy Iovine Breaks Down What's Wrong With the Music Business, Warns Against Overoptimism in Streaming: 'They're Not Making Money' - Billboard. "I read all music business industry pieces with a grain of salt. I was there. From the beginning. I watched CDs come in and then digital downloads. I was in the industry. I left it for a very specific reason: the music industry was pushing back (hard) against technology, while - at the same time - I had a deep desire to push forward with technology. This is a great piece, because those days are done and we are where we are. In reading this, you may be fooled into thinking that this is just about the music industry. It is not. Everything Jimmy talks about in here is happening/going to happen to your brand and your industry. Enjoy the ride..." (Mitch for Alistair). The quitting economy - Aeon. "Do you believe that a big part of what makes a company great is the people that work for it? Do you believe that a big part of what makes a company great is when the people that work there are loyal to the brand? What have we become? Here's the premise: Business is a mess. Nobody is safe. Employees know thi[...]



Mini Gift Guide For The Tech Traveller's Business Person In Your Life

Fri, 08 Dec 2017 11:36:10 PST

Normally, I shy away from gift guides. This year is different. I travel about 150,000 miles per year (for some that's insane, for other that's called "February"). With that, I am always super specific about the gear that I travel with. Because I never check bags, everything must be super lightweight, ultra durable, multi-purpose and truly functional for heavy usage. Over the years, I've often had the question: "Where did you get that?," while sitting in airports, hotel lobby's or just over lunch with a friend. I quickly realized that I, in fact, am a huge nerd and love scouting out the latest and greatest in tech and travel gadgets that can make your business trip that much more pleasant. Let's level set first. Before rattling off some of the best gadgets, it's important to note that I travel with a MacBook Pro (the new one that is USB C only) and the iPhone X. I travel, mostly, domestically in North America and I have a physical aversion to checking any luggage. So, I pack light and wear similar clothes (black only!). With that, here's my mini gift guide for the tech traveller's business person in your life... Anker PowerCore Fusion 5000 2-in-1 Portable Charger and Wall Charger. A killer little travel device that enables me to leave all of the Apple charger bricks at home for the smartphones and tablets and - at the same time - this also double as a portable charger for your smartphone. I can't thank Scott Stratten enough for introducing me to this device. I also love how it plugs directly into the wall and recharges the battery, while being able to handle two USB devices. Simply brilliant. This literally took me from four separate charging devices/portable batteries down to just one. Poweradd 2-Outlet Mini Travel Surge Protector. This is another "must have" device. I picked up a portable and mini travel size power bar at a trade show booth for free. I loved it. It eventually died, and I replaced it with this one... and I am glad that I did. This has room for a few devices to plug in, plus two USB ports. If you have ever been to a hotel, airport lounge or airport lobby, you know how scare, hard to find and tight the spaces are to actually plug anything in. This one is so well designed, that it even plugs perfectly into that pesky little outlet that are in the base of hotel room lamps on the night table. Frequent flyers also know how tough it can be to get those Apple chargers into in the in-seat plugs (if you're lucky enough to have one). This cures all. I love the way the chord wraps and hides itself, and I'm a huge fan of the little green power light as well. You have no idea how often I plug something into a random wall on the road, and I don't know if the socket is dead, if it's the charger, etc... This lets you know when it's actually getting power. This gets you from one plug to two plus two USB ports. Anble 4-in-1 USB Type C to HDMI, DVI and VGA Converter. If you have to give a business presentation, you need to have one of these. While my primary dongles to attach my laptop to projectors are the official ones from Apple, I always want to have a back up (especially because these new MacBook's are using USB C, and very few AV teams carry this new format/dongle). With that, I always want a backup. This is it. It's an all-in-one, so I would not trust it as the only solution, but it's great for a backup. The bonus of this one is that it also has DVI. DVI is a format I don't see often (and Apple doe[...]



Holiday Tech Gift Guide And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 27 Nov 2017 10:54:50 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on i Heart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/361650761&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"> This week we discussed:  I'm always asked about different and unique gadgets. The holidays are upon us and people might want to pick up some cool tech for their loved ones. Here are some great ideas in the $20 - $150 range: Anker PowerCore Fusion 5000 ($35).  Logitech Spotlight ($150). Anker Wireless Charger PowerPort ($25), Beats x ($150).  Amazon Echo Dot ($50). Netflix really introduced us to binge-watching, and it became a new way to watch TV. Well, it just introduced a stunning new habit. Last week a study came out, and it found that more people are watching Netflix outside their homes. About 67% of people now watch movies and TV shows in public, according to an online survey it commissioned of 37,000 adults around the world. Most popular places? Planes and buses. With that, 26% of respondents also said that they watch at work. Productivity continues to go down the drain... or in the stream?  App of the Day: Amazon Prime Video. Tags: advertising agency alexa amazon amazon alexa amazon echo amazon echo dot amazon prime music amazon prime video anker app app of the week apple beats beats x binge watching brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media echo facebook google guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt logitech marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel mobile device montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte netflix radio segment radio station six pixels of separation social media technology terry dimonte twitter wpp [...]