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Preview: Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Twist Image

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum



Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Blog is marketing and communications insights from the edge. Mitch Joel will unravel the complex world of digital marketing and social media with the perspective of a digital marketing agency. The Six Pixels Of Separat



Last Build Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2017 08:12:33 PDT

 



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #369

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 11:52:20 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  All of my Issues With the "Goodnight Moon" Bedroom - The Ugly Volvo. "It turns out that I am not the only one with issues about this." (Alistair for Hugh). Cooking Lessons - The California Sunday Magazine. "Doing the right thing is hard and chewy. I found this story riveting; a celebrity chef tries to make a fast food joint that isn't bad for you, in Watts, home of the Crips. Like Jaimie Oliver fixing school lunches, but full of North America's social and racial issues." (Alistair for Mitch). From Cells To Cities - Waking Up With Sam Harris. "Fascinating interview with Geoffrey West, the theoretical physicist, who turned his attentions to biology, and developed mathematical models for how organisms scale, why they stop growing, and how/why they die. Interestingly, much of his work applies to cities as well as beings. One particularly mind-bending section focuses on why cities continue growing and don't die. The answer, according to West, is that cities grow to the point where they would die, but then humans develop a transformative innovation (think: plumbing/sewage systems; electricity; the Internet) that allows the system to to get bigger without failing. But, projecting out, West calculates that at a certain point, humanity will need to come up with such innovative revolutions not once a century or once a decade, but once every year, in order to avoid total collapse. Are you ready?" (Hugh for Alistair). A Minor History Of / Miniature Writing - Cabinet Magazine. "Tiny books, tiny writing... we've been doing it since at least 2060 BCE, and it's still pretty cool." (Hugh for Mitch). How Twitter Fuels Anxiety - The Atlantic. "It's easy to look around and be anxious about the world. It's easy to do that without social media. Now, add that into the mix. It's not that Twitter fuels anxiety (we've seen countless articles like this). It's about the digital pile-on where everyone has an opinion. If it's an issue that is personal, we have a bigger paradox going on here. We can connect to those who are like us, get help and build great connections and communities beyond our personal geography. Still, that could make things worse..." (Mitch for Alistair). Here (with 2 Years of Exhausting Photographic Detail) Is How To Write A Book - Ryan Holiday - Medium. "My buddy, Ryan Holiday, just published his latest book, Perennial Seller (you can hear us talk about it right here: Ryan Holiday Wants Brands To Be Perennial - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast). Like any smart author (and, he's one of the smartest), he is promoting the book by pushing out a lot of compelling content in compelling places. This is an exhaustive read about what it takes to create and write a great book (from his perspective). It's loaded with genius and great thinking. It's going to take you about forty minutes to read this, and it could well have been a book, in its own right. If you know someone who wants to write a book, send them this link as well." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising agency alistair croll bit current bit north book a futurists manifesto brand business blog cabinet magazine complete web monitoring digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook ge[...]



Ryan Holiday Wants Brands To Be Perennial - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Mon, 17 Jul 2017 05:39:46 PDT

Episode #575 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. He has quickly become one of the most interesting people that I know. Ryan Holiday is a strategist and writer. To me he is really becoming one of the best writers on the state of business and growth that there is. He seems to lead two lives. In one life, he's an astute marketer that has released bestselling books like Trust Me, I'm Lying and Growth Hacker Marketing. In another life (that he seems to running at the same time) he's taking ancient stoic philosophy and making it cool again with his wildly successful bestselling books, Ego Is The Enemy, The Obstacle Is The Way and The Daily Stoic. His book, The Obstacle Is The Way, has been translated into seventeen languages and has a cult following among NFL coaches, world-class athletes, TV personalities, political leaders, and others around the world. Now, he's back with a fascinating new book called, Perennial Seller - The Art of Making And Marketing Work That Lasts. I jumped at the opportunity to discuss this thinking in a world of Snaps, 140 characters, always-on marketing and more. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #575. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/333555749&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false"> Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog ego is the enemy facebook google growth hacker marketing itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast nfl perennial seller ryan holiday social media the daily stoic the obstacle is the way trust me im lying twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #368

Fri, 14 Jul 2017 14:13:28 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Nihilist Startup Haikus - McSweeney's Internet Tendency. "I'm going to wax poetic this week, because I had a couple of videos that, on rewatching, were way too dark. So, let's start with these short pieces on startup life, which should resonate pretty well. My favorite?SOW. ROI by EOD. OK LOL." (Alistair for Hugh). Ancient wisdom from the neural network - Lewis And Quark. "Seems like you can use machine learning to generate new ideas pretty easily these days. While many of the aphorisms this coding experiment generated were nonsense ('A fox smells it better than a fool's for a day'), a human editor could easily use this raw material to create new things that seemed genuinely original ('A good anvil does not make the most noise.') Putting to rest, perhaps, the question of creativity: The future is algorithm-augmented humans." (Alistair for Mitch). Umbrella-sharing startup loses nearly all of its 300,000 umbrellas in a matter of weeks - Shanghaiist. "How will you protect yourself from all the tech bubbles falling from the sky if your local uber-for-umbrellas stand has no umbrellas left because they've all been stolen?" (Hugh for Alistair). 2 Chickens Break Up Rabbit Fight - YouTube. "Maybe we just need to put the chickens in charge." (Hugh for Mitch). AI And 'Enormous Data' Could Make Tech Giants Harder To Topple - Wired. "More data means more performance. We are quickly leaving the world of 'big data' as we enter into the world of 'enormous data'. Now, if you follow this trail, and believe that data is the new oil (it's not just a turn of a phrase... think about it... it's true), we now have companies with 'enormous data'. So much so that it's going to be ever-harder to regulate, topple or understand the competitive landscape. Oh... this is one article that will boil your noodle." (Mitch for Alistair). How to Create a Perennial Bestseller - The Tim Ferriss Blog. "This is an epic guest post on Tim Ferriss' blog by my buddy, Ryan Holiday. Ryan is known as one of the people who is modernizing stoicism, and has many best sellers under his belt. His upcoming book, Perennial Seller, is coming out soon. Here's a massive and hugely insightful read about how to write a book that matters... and sells. This is his behind the scenes thinking and it's glorious." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yEd6TnP6fBI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Tags: advertising agency alistair croll big data bit current bit north book a futurists manifesto brand business blog complete web monitoring digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog enormous data facebook gigom harvard business school hugh mcguire human 20 iambic j walter thompson jwt lean analytics lewis and quark librivox link bait link exchange link sharing managing bandwidth marketing marketing agency marketing blog mcsweeneys mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel pand[...]



The Power Of Curiosity And Hunches With Bernadette Jiwa - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 09 Jul 2017 09:56:00 PDT

Episode #574 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. When Seth Godin recommends a guest for your show, one should listen. In the decade-plus that Six Pixels of Separation has been running, Seth has never recommended a guest until now (and I am so grateful and thankful that he did!). I've been a fan and follower of Bernadette Jiwa for some time now. Most recently, Bernadette published her newest book, Hunch - Turn Your Everyday Insights Into The Next Big Thing. She is also the author of five other bestselling books (Meaningful, Marketing - A Love Story, Fortune Cookie Principle, Difference, and Make Your Idea Matter). Mostly, she helps companies design, build and grow a brand through the development of a true, powerful and meaningful story. She believes that the smallest insights (not always the data) is where the brand breakthrough resides. With that, intuition is more valuable than ever, but how do you nurture and cultivate that? Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #574. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/332379880&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false"> Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio bernadette jiwa blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher difference digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook fortune cookie principle google hunch itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast make your idea matter management podcast marketing marketing a love story marketing blog marketing podcast meaningful mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast seth godin social media twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #367

Fri, 07 Jul 2017 05:49:48 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Mobile Fact Sheet - Pew Research Center. "I love Pew's studies -- nonpartisan, interesting, and full of the kind of data that reveals just how much we're moving towards machine-in-the-loop humanity. But what's most glaring about this data is the digital divide, which splits smartphone owners by age, education, and more. If we're going to use tech to make a better society for everyone, we have some work to do." (Alistair for Hugh). When Soviet Gearheads Built The Sportscars They Couldn't Buy - Jalopnik. "If you want some power cars and can't buy things from the other side of the Iron Curtain, what are you gonna do? Well, they made six. But the audacity of building a sports car -- with a 30HP engine, no less! -- is awesome." (Alistair for Mitch).  In World's Best-Run Economy, House Prices Keep Falling - Because That's What House Prices Are Supposed To Do - Forbes. "Germany's approach to economics is so antithetical to the pure free-market fundamentalism that drives pretty much the rest of the western world. Their workers are among the highest paid, get oodles of vacation, good state supported health services and higher ed. And, it's German government policy to make sure that housing is inexpensive, ridiculously so compared with other Western countries. And yet, Germany is an economic powerhouse." (Hugh for Alistair). Meatballs - An Oral History - Vanity Fair. "What better time than July to revisit the most revolutionary work of Canadian cinematic brilliance of all time: Meatballs." (Hugh for Mitch). The meaning of life in a world without work - The Guardian. "Not that anyone needs to read another article about the future hopelessness of our species, as computers replace everything that we do, but here you go... I'm not sure how comfortable I might be, if we're going to be called 'the useless class' as the vast majority of 'work' will entail monitoring technology, much in the same way that Homer Simpson watches over the nuclear plant." (Mitch for Alistair). The Jeff Bezos Empire in One Giant Chart - Visual Capitalist. "Jeff Bezos is inching closer to toppling Bill Gates as the world's number one billionaire. It could have already happened why the time you read this. If you think that he made his fortune by selling books online, you would be sadly mistaken. He's an insane look at what Amazon's visionary has done to change the global economy. If you can read between the lines and imagine how these pieces might connect, it gets even more interesting..." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising agency alistair croll amazon bill gates bit current bit north book a futurists manifesto brand business blog complete web monitoring digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook forbes gigom harvard business school hugh mcguire human 20 iambic j walter thompson jalopnik jeff bezos jwt lean analytics librivox link bait link exchange link sharing managing bandwidth marketing marketing agency marketing blog meat[...]



More Than 25% Of The World's Population Is On Facebook And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Tue, 04 Jul 2017 06:08:21 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Facebook has done what many thought was impossible. Last week, Mark Zuckerberg announced that Facebook now has two billion monthly users. To put that into context, more than 25 percent of the entire world's population uses Facebook every month. The road to three billion is a much harder climb (we have to connect many parts of the world that fall into the digital "have-nots"). Seems like he is up for this challenge.  As Facebook races past two billion users, Google gets slapped with a $2+ billion fine over search results. The European Union is known to be tough on antitrust issues, so what was Google's mis-step on this one? The thing is this: if Google has to change how it works to appease the EU, it would mean that Amazon, Facebook and many others would also have to follow suit. It's very complex. Netflix just released something super-interesting. Choose your own adventure TV. Right now, you can check out Dreamworks Animation's Puss in Book: Trapped in an Epic Tale. The series has decision points that begin to pop up throughout the story, making the viewer choose between two options and ultimately changing the outcome. Right now, Netflix is focused on children's titles (next up will be Buddy Thunderstruck: The Maybe Pile in mid July), but Netflix is set on changing how we watch. First binge watching now choose your own adventure!  src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/331377458&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week apple binge watching brand buddy thunderstruck business blog chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media dreamworks dreamworks animation facebook google guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt mark zuckerberg marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte netflix puss in boots radio segment radio station six pixels of separation social media technology terry dimonte twitter wpp  chom 977 fm [...]



The Realities Of Finding Your Passion With Corey Poirier - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 02 Jul 2017 04:49:51 PDT

Episode #573 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. I'm not sure that I have ever met someone who has had as many conversations and interviews as I have. I'm not sure that I have ever met someone who has had this many conversations with successful work individuals to figure out what makes them tick. This is the primary project that Corey Poirier is working on. His show, Conversations With Passion! and The Passion Cure features insights from the some of the world's most renown and sought after thinkers and doers. Over 3500 conversations later, and Corey's goal is to help entrepreneurs, business leaders, small business owners improve their life and/or business. He believes that finding your passion is the key (I am somewhat skeptical that passion is the answer). Corey is also a professional speaker and author. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #573. Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker conversations with passion corey poirier david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast social media the passion cure twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #366

Fri, 30 Jun 2017 05:51:13 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  How to Make $80,000 Per Month on the Apple App Store - Johnny Lin - Medium. "Nigerian spammers intentionally put words like ' Nigeria' in their scam emails, hoping to scare off all but the most gullible, because that way when someone replies they're very likely to send money to a scammer. Well, that mentality seems to have leaked into the App Store lately, and this explanation of predatory app developers is as disheartening as Mitch's link is feel-good." (Alistair for Hugh). De Blauwe Tas - Ikea - YouTube. "Don't mind me; there's just something in my eye." (Alistair for Mitch). Stupendous intelligence of honey badgers - The Times Literary Supplement. "I choose this article for its title alone. It's nasty!" (Hugh for Alistair). Prog Rock - The Music Genre That Won't Die - Longreads. "Hair + Jazz + Metal = Prog Rock. Listen up!" (Hugh for Mitch). A New Kind of Tech Job Emphasizes Skills, Not a College Degree - The New York Times. "I did one semester of college and dropped out. I was busy publishing music magazines, and I felt like I was better at the media business than I was at school. I've become, somewhat, known for saying that I never let school get in the way of my education. I probably lifted that line from somebody (and, if that someone is reading this, I apologize). Still, there is a shift afoot. What if that degree is valued less and less for better and more impressive vocations? How does that dent our world (once again)?" (Mitch for Alistair). Nowhere Mag - New Republic. "Monocle - the magazine - is a thing of beauty. Do you read it or just put it on a coffee table. The answer is not so obvious. This is a great profile on the magazine's founder, but it's a better read if you're interested in how to build and deliver on a brand promise. Fascinating." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_PmNXqt15hk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Tags: advertising agency alistair croll app app developer apple apple app apple app store bit current bit north book a futurists manifesto brand business blog complete web monitoring de blauw tas digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog education facebook gigom harvard business school heavy metal hugh mcguire human 20 iambic ikea j walter thompson jazz jwt lean analytics librivox link bait link exchange link sharing longreads managing bandwidth marketing marketing agency marketing blog media media business medium mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel monocle music music genre new republic pandemonio press books prog rock publishing resolveto six pixels of separation social media solve [...]



Becoming Facebook With Mike Hoefflinger - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 11:55:12 PDT

Episode #572 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. He was in the trenches when Facebook was really growing and figuring itself out. After working directly for Andy Grove at Intel and as general manager of the Intel Inside program, Mike Hoefflinger moved to Facebook to serve as Head of Global Business Marketing working with Sheryl Sandberg. During his nearly seven years there, the teams he built helped dramatically grow the advertising business during Facebook's unprecedented rise to global influence. Now, he is the executive-in-residence at XSeed Capital and the author of the bestselling business book, Becoming Facebook. How did Facebook disrupt the world, and what challenges helped it to define itself as a brand? Nobody knows the inside story on this massive company like Mike. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #572. Tags: advertising advertising podcast andy grove audio becoming facebook blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook google intel intel inside itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mike hoefflinger mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast sheryl sandberg social media twitter wpp xseed capital [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #365

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 07:31:07 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Not even wrong - ways to dismiss technology - Benedict Evans. "Benedict Evans is fast becoming one of my favorite writers and thinkers. He starts with a quote by Pauli, who, asked to review a paper of doubtable merit, opined, 'it's not even wrong.' By which he meant it lacks testability and provability entirely. He uses the quote in the context of predicting what will be a successful product in the future, applying two tests: Is there a roadmap to greatness and whether you're looking at the application that this technology is proposed to provide, and not the actual capability that has been created. I've been spending a lot of time thinking and working on discontinuous innovation, and Evans has added good stuff to the conversation here." (Alistair for Hugh). If Google Teaches an AI to Draw, Will That Help It Think? - The Atlantic. "Alexis Madrigal is one of my favorite tech writers; he doesn't jump into the fray early, but often waits until the real story unfolds. So, this is his first real dive into the realm of AI. And it comes with a familiar face: Douglas Eck, one of the subjects of his interview, spent time in Montreal and helped design the machine learning algorithms at Coradiant, a company I helped found, which pinpointed where problems were happening. This was back in 2007; if only I'd known to call it AI at the time." (Alistair for Mitch). The Origin of HyperCard in the Breakdown of the Bicycle for the Mind - Justin Falcone - CSS Conference Australia - YouTube. "A postmodern sort of thing: a 2016 presentation on 'hypermedia' from the perspective of 1990. Or vice versa?" (Hugh for Alistair). These Cities Are Replacing The Worst Kind Of Infrastructure With The Best - Fast Company - Co. Design. "What if we designed cities for people, not cars. Imagine if that were happening in... Dallas?" (Hugh for Mitch). Why Your Brain Hates Other People - Nautilus. "I consider my self a fairly open, honest, empathetic and caring human being. It bothers me (always) how quick I am to judge other people. I don't necessarily 'hate' other people, but my mind does try to decipher what makes us different over what might bring us closer together first. Is this who I really am? Apparently, it's not a nurture thing?..." (Mitch for Alistair). When pop stars have Instagram, they no longer need record labels - Quartz. "This is a compelling but not sustainable look at the music industry. And, in return, a smart read for any brand trying to create something that connects with an audience that is sustainable. How will brands build relationships with consumers? There's just too much going on now, and the duopoly of Google and Facebook continues to grow. I'm dying to see how this will all pan out!" (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8i60_REoeIY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Tags: advertising agency ai alexis madrigal alistair croll artificial intelligence benedict evans bit current bit north book a futurists manifesto brain [...]



Amazon Goes For Whole Foods (Not Slack), Netflix Kills Cable TV And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 07:10:26 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Late last week, there was buzzing that Amazon was about to buy Slack. Then, suddenly, it was announced that Amazon bought Whole Foods for close to $14 billion dollars. Why did the masters of online retail buy a brick and mortar organic food retail chain?  How about this for a staggering glimpse into how the media landscape has changed: last week it was confirmed that more people now subscribe to Netflix than cable TV in the US. This can (and will) have a dramatic impact on everything from how content is created to advertising.  App of the week: Meal Connect. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/328824576&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week apple brand business blog chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook google guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog meal connect mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte netflix radio segment radio station six pixels of separation slack social media technology terry dimonte twitter whole foods wpp  chom 977 fm [...]



All Things Growth Hacking With Sean Ellis - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 04:46:21 PDT

Episode #571 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. He's a consummate entrepreneur. Not just in starting businesses, but in thinking about how businesses can really (and strategically) acquire customers with a different angle than traditional marketing thinking. Sean Ellis is the founder and CEO of GrowthHackers. And, yes, he is the person who coined the now buzzy term, "growth hacking" back in 2010. Prior to GrowthHackers, Sean was head of marketing at LogMeIn and Uproar, when both companies went from launch to IPO. He is also the first marketer at Dropbox, Eventbrite, Lookout and Xobni. If that were not enough, Sean is also an angel investor and startup advisor. Recently, he published the business book, Hacking Growth. Enjoy the conversation...   You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #571. Tags: advertising advertising podcast angel investor audio blog blogging brand branding business business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog dropbox entrepreneur eventbrite facebook google growth hacker marketing growth hackers growth hacking growthhackers hacking growth itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast logmein lookout management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast sean ellis social media startup startup advisor traditional marketing twitter uproar wpp xobni [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #364

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 09:08:33 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Visualizing the Jobs Lost to Automation - Visual Capitalist. "This is a great way to understand the impact of technology on employment. A quick look will show you the massive shifts in jobs -- gone are those with specialization and repetition; arriving are those which encourage generalism and empathy." (Alistair for Hugh). How The Trendiest Grilled Cheese Venture Got Burned - Backchannel - Medium. "Ah, hubris. When you're wildly successful in a tech startup, why would your next venture be a grilled-cheese-and-soup franchise? I don't care if you have a revolutionary new toaster oven ('Not a sandwich press!' Kaplan retorted. 'This is two induction burners! Microwaves! Silpats!') It's still soup and a sandwich. Consume with a side of schadenfreude." (Alistair for Mitch). Solar Power Will Kill Coal Faster Than You Think - Bloomberg. "Well, look. It's not all bad. Turns out that the cost of solar energy is falling faster than anyone expected, and if trends continue, by 2020 solar will be cheaper than coal." (Hugh for Alistair). Redditors design worst volume sliders possible - Designer News. "Here's one for the designer in all of us." (Hugh for Mitch). Our sun likely had a twin called 'Nemesis' - Futurity. "Great. Our son has an evil twin and it's called 'Nemesis'. Just when you think you know everything about anything..." (Mitch for Alistair). Your Best Business Partner Is Your Polar Opposite; Here's How To Get Along With Them - Fast Company. "I've had the same three business partners for close to 15 years. I often joke that we get along so great because they hate everything that I have to do... and the feeling is mutual. Still, when I get asked about our very strong bond (we're not just business partners, but close friends), I often reflect on how it makes for a better work environment when your business partners don't have the same interests as you do. I've been lucky. This article picks at a couple of the reasons why and how we navigate our relationships... and how others can as well." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising agency alistair croll automation backchannel bit current bit north bloomberg book a futurists manifesto brand business blog complete web monitoring designer news digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook fast company futurity gigom harvard business school hugh mcguire human 20 iambic j walter thompson jwt lean analytics librivox link bait link exchange link sharing managing bandwidth marketing marketing agency marketing blog medium mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel pandemonio press books reddit resolveto [...]



Apple's HomePod, Tracking People And Keys And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 11:31:20 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Terry is back! Last week we talked up Apple's big WWDC event. This event doesn't usually talk up hardware (it's usually about the software), but the hot talk was all about the HomePod. A bluetooth winless speaker that can also listen and interacts with your voice. Will this disrupt everything from Sonos and Bose to Amazon's Alexa? Plus, what else was announced?  How do we feel about tracking our kids like we could track our keys? First came Tile and now Magpie. It's a great technology that really does help you track things that you lost, but it can be used to also keep an eye on things (like people). There is a lot of tech like this already on the market, but Magpie is not only new, it also has a built-in SIM card. This means it has an unlimited range and can work anywhere there's a cellular network (over 185 countries). to be exact.  App of the Week: Noizio. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/327739829&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> Tags: advertising agency alexa amazon amazon alexa app of the week apple apple wwdc bluetooth bose brand business blog chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook google guest contributor hardware homepod i heart radio j walter thompson jwt magpie marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte noizio radio segment radio station sim card six pixels of separation social media software software development sonos technology terry dimonte tile tracking twitter voice wireless speaker wpp wwdc  chom 977 fm [...]



Charlene Li On Disruption - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 11 Jun 2017 06:40:19 PDT

Episode #570 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Charlene Li is a Principal Analyst at Altimeter, a Prophet company. Many people know her best as the co-author of the groundbreaking book on digital marketing and social media, Groundswell (which was named one of the best business books in 2008). She is also the author of the New York Times bestsellers, Open Leadership and The Engaged Leader. Charlene is one of the foremost experts on business strategy and disruptive technology. She is a sought-after speaker and advisor to many top global companies. With that, she will soon publish her latest book, The Disruptor's Agenda. These days, you can't throw a business professional down a flight of stairs without the word "disruption" tumbling out of their mouth. Here's what disruption is, what it looks like and how to embrace to embrace it. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #570. Tags: advertising advertising podcast altimeter audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker charlene li david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption facebook google groundswell innovation itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast new york times open leadership prophet social media the disruptors agenda the engaged leader twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #363

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 06:29:36 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Many pet rabbits will die in Second Life on Saturday - Rock Paper Shotgun. "Usually, the rabbit dying is a plot device on the aforementioned comedies. But the digital age is decidely weirder. Look no further than Second Life, where a trademark dispute and some Digital Rights Management means scores of digital bunny pets will enter hibernation, never to awaken, as their food goes offline. Now put on your Black Mirror futurist had, and consider: If your heirs don't pay your digital estate tax, will the AI-backed chatbot that simulates you based on a corpus of social media content go dark forever, depriving future generations of your natty wisdom and quick turns of phrase?" (Alistair for Hugh). The Internet Killed the Teen Sex Comedy - Mel Magazine - Medium. "Hard to think of the nineties as a time of innocence. But films like American Pie, coming-of-age fare where teens talked about taboos in hushed voices, are gone. Weaned on films like Porky's and Hot Dog -- with all of their misogyny, prejudice and misinformation -- it's hard to notice they vanished, or to call that innocence at all. John Hughes was a cornerstone of the eighties, but who needs a Breakfast Club when you can hear all about your classmates on a tiny screen?" (Alistair for Mitch). fotogenerator. "Would you like your doodle run through a neural network, to return back a computer's real-life nightmare vision of what you drew? I thought you might." (Hugh for Alistair). The Thoughts of a Spiderweb - Quanta Magazine. "Some time ago I shared a link with Mitch and Alistair about this astounding fact about octopuses (not, apparently, octopi): that 70% of their neurons are on their skin, not in their brains. Well, researchers here argue that a spider's webs can be considered an extension of their cognitive systems. This notion is current in philosophy of mind, as well as research into how animals ' hink' about their environment, in many cases not using neurons at all." (Hugh for Mitch). The 34 Best Mac Menu Bar Apps - Product Hunt - Medium. "Whenever I have the slightest issue with how my MacBook Pro is working, I figure that 'there's an app for that!' It's not so much going to a new app to solve a problem, but I love menu bar apps. Those tiny little applications that just seem to scratch an itch. Here's a great list of Mac menu bar apps. I, typically, would never share a list like this, but I could not believe how many greats one are here (that I had never heard of). Let the downloading begin!" (Mitch for Alistair). How 80-year-old Radio-Canada, the French-language arm of the CBC, is driving innovation from within - NiemanLab. "Innovation is a big, scary and often misunderstood word. There's no clarity on what innovation is or what a truly innovative organization looks like. For many traditional businesses in traditional industries, they tend to confuse the word 'disruption' for 'destruction'. Some businesses are truly innovative or - at least - really trying to accept that things have changed (and will continue to change). Here's a[...]



The Real Retail Apocalypse (It's Not What You Think)

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 08:32:38 PDT

Much has been written about the demise of retail. Go ahead, Google it for yourself. You will find a lot of articles with super-scary headlines (The retail apocalypse has officially descended on America, Is American Retail at a Historic Tipping Point?, Brick-and-Mortar Stores Are Shuttering at a Record Pace, Amid Retail Funk, Macy's Says 'We're Not Dead', etc...). The problem? Antiquated business models? A lack of interest in traditionally strong retail brands? Too much retail real estate per square footage in comparison to population? The shift to ecommerce? The list is, sadly, endless. Still, if you scratch beneath the surface, it's clear that something else is brewing. A fundamentally new way to shop and for brands to engage consumers that does not rely (solely) on the traditional model of getting into a car and heading down to the local shopping district to buy stuff. In fact, one could argue that this new way of shopping also does not (solely) rely on clicking the "buy" button on a website. Consumer's buying behaviour has shifted and morphed, and it may no longer align to the retail models that currently exist. The reasons below, should feel more like opportunities than reasons that detail the end of retail.  So, what, exactly is going on when it comes to retail today? The Airbnb of shopping malls. It seems like more and more brands are experimenting with pop-up shops and store-in-store models. We also see trends around the food truck craze, tiny house movement and the Airbnb model as adding to this shift. Newer brands can experiment with physical retail space like never before. The need for a brand to be near the classically huge department stores to benefit from foot traffic is no longer the only model for retail success. In fact, the trend here is that real estate can (and has) become short-term, more fluid and more non-physical. Locations to sell can come and go. Fluid real estate will be a huge battleground for the entrenched retail brands and the entire real estate development side of the business. Will there be an Airbnb for retail? Will more brands look for pop-up shops and the ability to surprise and delight with short-terms leases over the traditional anchor model? Consumers seem to like this idea of roving and mobile physical retail experiences that are not always anchored to a shopping mall. The Oreo of retail. More and more brands are selling direct to customer. They are not ditching their retail partners as centres of sales and distribution, but they are paying close attention to how many major mass retailers are struggling and - in return - putting the squeeze on their vendors for everything (pricing, margins, supply chain assistance, guarantees, etc...). With this, brands are building alternative sales channels and, wisely, looking at ways to build a direct relationship with the customer and, in return, circumventing, the traditional retail model. Oreo started this with their Colorfilled initiative, and are now looking at how all of their other Mondelez brands might benefit. So, brands that customers could only find at a retail location have now become retailers in their own right. These are not just new retail channels, but brands are becoming a true competitor to retailers. The supplier becomes the competition.  Owning the customer. An extension of suppliers becoming retailers is how brands are now owning the customer more and more. Look no further than Dollar Shave Club being acquired by Unilever for one billion dollars. Unilever was buying a database of a very specific target audience. With that, they own the entire relationship with the customer. While subscripti[...]



In Defense Of Being Deeply Offended

Tue, 06 Jun 2017 15:19:26 PDT

It's happening a lot. It's happening a lot more than it should. It's an angrier world out there. Back in the sixties (I wasn't alive) the general protest of democratic populations (and those that were repressed) came from music and musicians (does anyone remember laughter?). Whether it was police brutality on campus, race riots, equal rights for women or the peace movement. The resistance to power came in song. Flower power, Woodstock and beyond created legendary rock stars, classic songs and our ability to reflect back on different times - whether we lived through it or lived through it vicariously through the music. Today, the general protest and resistance is not coming from music (sadly), but from comedians. Whether it's late night talk show hosts, stand-up comedians in a local club or some hot shot with a Netflix special. You don't even have to go that far back in time to see how parody or comedic news programs were actually delivering more facts blended with comedy than what the major networks were delivering in the 24 hour news cycle that is the cable news business. Many people turned to these comedians as news broadcasters. Audiences were looking for a depth of perspective and appreciated the irony of the comedy that is was shrouded in. Many non-comedy forms of news media and content would pull these comics in for additional perspective, to editorialize, to host their programs and more. The fine line between comedy, the news and reality television blurred... and then it disappeared.  Knives out. Whether it's on college campuses, YouTube or in the mass media, the nuanced shift from the music of the sixties to comedy as the new resistance has happened. We've gone from reporting the news to editorializing the news to everyone having opinions of the news on social media. This is not a criticism. It is a fact. Those with little media skills and an equally lacking amount of knowledge - as it pertains to how real journalism happens - are now calling the shots on what is fact, what is to be shared and what holds the moral highground. It's equally easy to dismiss everything that is put out there as a "right to freedom of speech." It's equally easily to dismiss everything that is put out there as, "you have the right to say what you want, but you have to face the consequences of your actions as well." It feels like everything is binary. Opinions are either good or bad. Content is either good or bad. Media is either good or bad. Advertising is either good or bad. With that, many will probably interpret these words as commentary on one moment in time or as an editorial political piece attempting to sway an opinion. It is not. It is about how all of us - knowingly and unknowingly - are silencing (or trying to silence) a lot of voices (especially those we don't like and don't agree with). We may think that this is the right thing to do, but consider the fact that it could be one of the worst things that we could do, in this day and age. It's about knowing the difference between art, creativity and news. You may not like this piece of art. You may find it truly offensive. You may find it hurtful, violently offensive or even repulsive. You may even question if it is art at all. This is fair and it's your right/opinion. But there is something that you can't question: the source of it. If it's coming from any kind of artist - in particular a professional artist with any kind of history - we want to be careful when we starting lumping them in with protesters, angry mobs, sociopaths, people on the brink, those with criminal intent, etc. While our eyes and brains may lump t[...]



What Is Apple Up To? Can Walmart Catch Amazon? And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 05 Jun 2017 08:45:24 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  This week Pierre Landry sits in for Terry DiMonte. This week will bring the "other" big Apple event and news to the world. The annual WWDC (World Wide Developer's Conference) takes place today until June 9th in San Jose. There is usually little talk of hardware (that's the big annual event that is held in September). Still, we will get Tim Cook's overview of business to date. What do we know? It's Apple... so, not much. There are expectations of the latest iOS software (iOS 11). The rumour mills is thinking that changes will be made to Apple Music, announcement of Apple's own unique TV programming (a la Netflix), and a lot of love for Siri. The biggest rumour is the launch of a possible "smart speaker" - one that users can not only stream music to, but that they can talk to and interact with it. We shall see...  Walmart is one of the few retailers that can compete with Amazon in the retail space. Still, it's a massive chasm between Amazon (whose stock rocked past $1000 this past week) and Walmart. Walmart continues to invest heavily in ecommerce and news broke last week that it is trying to turn its army of 1.5 million employees into delivery drivers as well. Good side hustle for employees or is this a disaster waiting to happen?  App of the week: Adobe Scan. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/326223135&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false"> Tags: adobe adobe scan advertising agency amazon app of the week apple apple music bluetooth brand business business blog chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media ecommerce facebook google guest contributor hardware i heart radio ios j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte netflix pierre landry radio segment radio station retail siri six pixels of separation smart speaker social media technology television terry dimonte tim cook tv tv programming twitter walmart world wide developer conference wpp wwdc    chom 977 fm [...]



The Relevance Of Marketing Agencies With Peter Levitan - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 04 Jun 2017 04:02:47 PDT

Episode #569 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. When I think about the future of marketing agencies and what it will take for them to thrive and flourish, I think of Peter Levitan. Peter owned his own agency, he bought and sold three agencies, he worked for one of the largest advertising agencies in the world in New York and London, he's pitched (and won) large accounts all over the world, he's been client-side, and he currently consults and advises agencies of all stripes on how to win new business. If that were not enough, he wrote an incredible book on marketing agency business development (that I love and have re-read on many occasions) titled, The Levitan Pitch. Buy This Book. Win More Pitches. Do marketing agencies have a future? How is the competitive landscape changing? What value does an agency bring to a brand? Enjoy the conversation...  You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #569. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/325976030&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false"> Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business development business podcast business thinker buy this book win more pitches david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast peter levitan social media the levitan pitch twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #362

Thu, 01 Jun 2017 07:54:36 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The New Moats - Greylock Partners - Medium. "For decades, maybe centuries, businesses erected moats around themselves: Economies of scale, network effects, high switching costs, customer loyalty, deep IP. Today, those moats are easy to bridge. As this excellent strategy post argues, the future of advantage is a layer of intelligence between systems of engagement (the "front office") and systems of record (the "back office"). And this layer of intelligence is where most AI will really change who's leading entire industries." (Alistair for Hugh). The Beauty Contest That's Shaking Wall St. - The New York Times. "By most accounts, the US stock market is healthy. But it's also incredibly volatile at the moment. To understand why, realize that in a public market, a buyer doesn't have to buy the best stock -- they have to buy the stock everyone else will think is best. This collectivity drives cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, currently at stratospheric heights -- great for buyers, but hardly a currency for someone who pays 1 Bitcoin a month in rent. Turns out this public consensus isn't a new idea." (Alistair for Mitch). This Is What the Demise of Oil Looks Like - Bloomberg. "Traditional projections for oil consumption are bullish: we'll keep using more oil. But a combo of increased efficiency, the move to electric vehicles, and fuel switching (from coal to oil to natural gas to biofuels) could make for a radically different future." (Hugh for Alistair). Map: These are the cities that climate change will hit first - The Washington Post. "The map is not fine-tuned enough to confirm that Montreal gets hit same time as New York (2043). But, it's pretty clear that it does. What the map shows is estimates for 'climate departure', defined as the year in which 'the average temperature of its coolest year from then on is projected to be warmer than the average temperature of its hottest year between 1960 and 2005.' Miami looks like it might flip in 2033. Just doing some quick calculations, my kids will be in their prime, early thirties in 2043. I'll be 69. I wonder what life will be like then for all of us?" (Hugh for Mitch).  End-Times For Humanity - Aeon. "This essay sums up the entire sentiment felt at this past year's TED conference, and something that I have been grappling with, personally, for some time. To put it into naive terms: maybe we don't want to know as much as we know, and be as connected as we are? Perhaps by becoming so technically powerful, we starting to fracture when it comes to realizing just how fragile we are. One friend recently said to me that he feels like life is about all of us running through a minefield, at the highest speed possible, and it's just a question of when someone gets hit with something. Perhaps AI will teach us that ignorance is truly bliss?" (Mitch for Alistair). Welcome To Digital Detox Camp - The New Yorker. "Perhaps a little [...]



Snoop Dogg's Robert "Bubby" Lewis - This Month's Groove - The No Treble Podcast

Sun, 04 Jun 2017 15:15:08 PDT

Episode #30 of Groove - The No Treble Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Some musicians struggle while trying to blend creativity and the electric bass. Robert "Bubby" Lewis is not one of those people. Whether it's his video game, manga, comic book, science fiction-inspired solo album, 1up!, or how he thinks about the world, Bubby is a creative force on the electric bass. This is (probably) one of the main reasons that Snoop Dogg scooped him up on the recommendation of Andrew Gouché. His career has been a rocket ship of excitement since then. The Flint, Michigan native (who now makes his home in Los Angeles) has played with everyone from Lupe Fiasco to Tha Dogg Pound. With hip-hop and R&B at his core, Bubby is a student of grooves and bass tones. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Episode #30 of Groove - The No Treble Podcast. src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/track=613637888/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/artwork=small/transparent=true/" style="border: 0; width: 100%; height: 120px;">Groove - Episode #30: Robert "Bubby" Lewis by No Treble Tags: 1up advertising advertising podcast andrew gouche audio bass podcast bass tone blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast comic books creativity david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog electric bass electric bass podcast facebook google groove groove no treble groove no treble podcast hip hop hiphop itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast lupe fiasco management podcast manga marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast music music podcast no treble no treble podcast rb robert bubby lewis science fiction snoop dogg social media solo album tha dogg pound twitter video games wpp [...]



How Does The "New Generation" Experience Brands?

Sat, 03 Jun 2017 05:16:32 PDT

TL;DR: they see a brand message. If it resonates, it worked. If it doesn't resonate, it didn't work. Maybe that's an over-simplification, but it feels true. Does this "new generation" of consumer not see the billboards as they cross through Time's Square? Are they blind to their Facebook feed? Do they not do searches on Google and see the paid search results? Do they never turn on a television, pick up a magazine, notice a brand embedded in a video game, see an email from a brand that they signed up for? Will they not sign-up to receive information from a brand that they are interested in? Will they be immune when a friend makes a recommendation? Do they only care if a message is from someone they like and respect on Snapchat? Do we over-complicate marketing more to validate our business models than to speak the truth about what gets attention? If this "new consumer" follows an influencer on Instagram, is the post of the influencer on behalf of a brand any different than when people from generations past saw a celebrity endorsing a brand in a print ad? Yes, we have more channels, more content as media, more connectedness and more of our media consumption is happening on a smartphone, but thinking that technology solves the attention challenge is not what will bring new business models forward. Too many pundits believe that marketing and advertising agencies are out of touch, because creativity is no longer the right business model. Too many pundits also believe that marketing and advertising agencies have lost the plot, because they have creativity but lack the business acumen to mix tight management while handling scopes of work. Too many pundits believe that marketing and advertising agencies are relics because the "big idea" now takes a backseat to data and technology. Everything is "with" not "instead of." When social media started taking hold, many of my peers believed that the end of traditional advertising (think thirty-second spot) was upon us. Content became media and that media format would replace the advertising format. I believed back then (as I do now) that everything is "with" not "instead of." Advertising will continue to be a very powerful model for business growth and success - not just for a brand to create attention, but for a brand to sell (and, if brand's stop selling we're going to have major global issues around countless social aspects of what makes us a functioning civilization). This idea is nothing new. With that, advertising has changed on many fronts, but here are the three primary ones: The scarcity model has shifted to one of abundance in a fragmented media planet with many more options that don't require the traditional content production flow of destination viewing (we must all watch NBC Thursday nights at 8 pm or we get our newpapers every morning). Content is 24/7 and so is advertising. There are more ways to create a message than ever before. It ranges from 140 characters to high-end video production (and everything in between). Plus, the creation of advertising can be done on a very simple laptop. Consumers (and not just new ones) are more skeptical of advertising and brands, because of exposure over time mixed with brand experiences that have not always delivered as advertised. Consumers don't believe ads, because they are inundated with them and they don't believe the hype. Don't confuse choice, always-available and skepticism for a consumer that does not want to be reached. The concept of [...]



7 Steps To A Better Interview

Wed, 31 May 2017 12:12:01 PDT

Candidly, there's a lot more than seven, but its a start. I can't tell you how many interviews I've been involved with since the mid-eighties, but it has got to be in the thousands. This is not meant to brag. It's a fact. Just look at my Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast (which has been running for over a decade with close to 570 episodes) or Groove - The No Treble Podcast (which has been happening for over two years). I spend a lot of time on either side of the mic. I've interviewed rock stars, business leaders, marketing experts, bestselling authors, and more for close to thirty years. I've also been interviewed countless times over the years for TV, print, radio, online, etc... The only thing that I love more than a great conversation is sharing the content of that conversation with an audience. Last week, Mark Schaefer published an article titled, 5 Steps to conduct a superior podcast interview, and he was kind enough to name me as one of "the best interviewers" (Thanks, Mark!). With that, I thought I would add on to his article with what I think makes for a great interview. 7 steps to a better interview: It's not an interview. Kill that word. You're not trying to interview anyone. You're trying to have a conversation. You're trying to connect. Think about it less as something that has to turn into a piece of content and more like a coffee date. If you're going to waste anyone's time (including your own) for a coffee, make it count. Interviewing them won't make it count. Having an awesome conversation will be memorable, valuable and something that everyone will want to make happen again. If you don't like coffee, consider this a first date. The idea is to get to a second date (because it was so engaging that they want one). Create familiarity. Going in cold sucks. It puts the person leading the conversation (aka - The Interviewer) at a deficit. Familiarity can be anything from a mutual friend to a shared hobby. It can be something as simple as their interest in a particular sports team or author. You have to dig a little harder to find out this information, but it's usually readily available. LinkedIn can also be of enormous help if they guest is not a major celebrity (most people have a profile and connections). Don't have any questions ready. This one really freaks people out, but I never ever have a list of questions. At most, I have a few lines written down about areas of interest that I would like to discuss/explore. Remember, it's not an interview... it's a conversation. Remember, it's a coffee... not an inquisition. Your job before the conversation is to do the heavy lifting (aka - the research). Dig deep, read a lot, take notes and prep. Learn about them. Know them. Then, when it's time for the conversation, be like a pipe that is about to burst with areas of conversation about the person and their work. Take notes. Whether it's in person or remotely, I always have a large notepad right by my side to take notes. As the conversation blossoms, they should provide new areas of conversation or concepts that need to be expanded upon. Don't be afraid to take notes. But, do not have the notes as a barrier between you and your guest. Don't refer to the notes and create moments of awkward pause (no second dates happen this way). By the end of a good conversation, I usually have a page or two of notes. Ultimately, that winds up looking a lot like a list of questions that most journalists us[...]



For The Love Of Marketing, Let's Stop Talking About Artificial Intelligence

Wed, 31 May 2017 18:03:53 PDT

Artificial intelligence is going to change everything. It's going to change business. It's going to change marketing. The problem is that we can't skip steps and suddenly claim that all brands are AI-first (as brands like Google and Salesforce are stating). Sure, it's commonplace to want to future-proof your business, put a stake in the ground and claim that you are technologically miles ahead of the competition. Still, the marketplace does not lie. The truth is in the marketing. The reality of what consumers see, touch and do with a brand is evident - no matter what a Chief Marketing Officer says at your local industry conference from the stage during a keynote address. If every brand is embracing artificial intelligence, where are the signs of simple (and great) personalization in the work today? How can any brand claim to be leading (or tinkering) with artificial intelligence, when the vast majority of their marketing materials are either not personalized at all or hauntingly poor at understanding even the basic information of their customer (gender, geographic location, last item(s) purchased, intent to purchase again, etc...)? This is not a criticism of any specific brand, but an overall indictment against our industry. It is an industry that loves to toss around buzzwords, make impressive PowerPoint decks, get lots of ink in the industry trade publications and - in general - bang a loud drum. Still, where is the proof that brands have mastered personalization - let alone have the capabilities to leverage artificial intelligence to build better engines of marketing and communications?  Great personalization is like common sense... it's not all that common. A quick test: when a company lays claim to leveraging artificial intelligence to build better customer experiences, go ahead and do three things:  Sign up to their basic e-newsletter. Do some generic searches on their website. Bonus points if you add something to you shopping cart and abandon it before making a purchase. Do some searches for the brand on Facebook, LinkedIn or any other social media space. What happens next? Over time, is that newsletter adapting to your choices, your basic information and/or your true needs? Did those general searches suddenly trigger a ton of retargeted ads that haunt you for months, constantly and consistently? Are you suddenly seeing that brand (or their competitor) showing up much more in your social media feeds? If you are, it's safe to assume that the vast majority of brands are practicing traditional advertising strategies in these hyper-powerful digital channels. They're vying for the customer's attention, because that customer - at some point in time - raised their hand. The thing is this: that hand could have been raised for a myriad of reasons. The customer could have a complaint about the brand, they may be a repeat customer, they may be doing research for a friend, and on and on. If artificial intelligence were at play, the messaging would adapt in a much more profound way to the customer's desires and interactions. If basic personalization were are play, the messaging would be more specific and would not dampen the customer's content experience. An opportunity for marketing to be great. That's the real point here. Digital marketing was not created as another channel to annoy consumers with messaging that they don't want. Artificial intelligence, personalization, targeti[...]