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Preview: Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Twist Image

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum



Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Blog is marketing and communications insights from the edge. Mitch Joel will unravel the complex world of digital marketing and social media with the perspective of a digital marketing agency. The Six Pixels Of Separat



Last Build Date: Fri, 02 Dec 2016 12:12:11 PST

 



The 15 Best Business Books Of 2016

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 12:12:11 PST

The time has come. What have you been reading? From my side of the bookmark, 2016 saw a slew of new and interesting business books for us to devour. Here are my personal top fifteen business books of 2016... in alphabetical order.... The Age of Discovery - Navigating the Risks and Rewards of Our New Renaissance by Ian Golden and Chris Kutarna. Welcome to the second big Renaissance of our existence. It's a great time to be alive, but it comes with challenges. Look for my conversation with Chris in the coming weeks on Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast. The Attention Merchants - The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads by Tim Wu. Brands don't want to just capture your attention, now they're also in the business of re-selling it. Welcome to the new world of messaging.   Blockchain Revolution - How the Technology Behind Bitcoin Is Changing Money, Business, and the World by Don Tapscott and Alex Tapscott. A new and disruptive technology explained by one of the industries Godfathers (and his brilliant son). You can also listen to my conversation with Alex and Done about the book, right here: SPOS #512 - Blockchain Revolution With Alex And Don Tapscott. Deep Work - Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport. Can you focus without distraction and get your important work done? Few can. Here's why... and how to fix it. Ego Is The Enemy by Ryan Holiday. Conquer your ego... this is where true "success" will lie for you. You can also listen to my conversation with Ryan about the book, right here: SPOS #525 - Ego Is The Enemy With Ryan Holiday. Hug Your Haters - How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers by Jay Baer. Eighty percent of companies say they deliver out­standing customer service, but only 8 percent of their customers agree. This book is how you close that gap. You can slo listen to my conversation with Jay about the book, right here: SPOS #507 - Jay Baer Wants You To Hug Your Haters. Illuminate - Ignite Change Through Speeches, Stories, Ceremonies, and Symbols by Nancy Duarte and Patti Sanchez. If you want to move people to embrace bold changes, you have to understand how to illuminate them with persuasive communication. You can also listen to my conversation with Nancy and Pattie about the book, right here: SPOS #520 - Illuminate With Nancy Duarte And Patti Sanchez. The Inevitable - Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future by Kevin Kelly. If you ask me which one book can put your ahead of the competition, in terms of where technology is going to take us, I would say, "this one!" You can also listen to my conversation with Kevin about the book, right here: SPOS #526 - Kevin Kelly On The Promise And Future Of Technology. Invisible Influence - The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior by Jonah Berger. There are subtle, secret influences that affect the decisions that we make. Do you know what they are? You can also listen to my conversation with Jonah about the book, right here: SPOS #519 - Invisible Influence With Jonah Berger. Originals - How Non-Conformists Move the World by Adam Grant. What is the best way to champion new ideas, go against the grain, battle conformity and drive it to market? This book is about original ideas and how to get allies behind it.  Simply Brilliant - How Great Organizations Do Ordinary Things in Extraordinary Ways by William C. Taylor. Fast Company co-founder looks at game-chasing innovations from companies and industries that will surprise and inspire you. It's not who you think! You can also listen to my conversation with Bill about the book, right here: SPOS #535 - Simply Brilliant With William C. Taylor.    TED Talks - The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking by Chris Anderson. A book that deconstructs what makes a great TED Talk, while, at the same time helping to make all of your presentations ideas worth spreading.    Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus - How Growth Became the Enemy of Prosperity by Douglas Rushkoff. Just because companies like Facebook, Google and Uber are worth billions of dollars, it doe[...]



The Life And (Working) Times Of Millennials

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 07:05:47 PST

You can't flick a screen these days without reading something about Millennials and the workplace. As a professional speaker, I get to see the types of topics that corporations are trying to tackle. You would be hard pressed to not see a conference or corporate event without some time allotted to Millennials, and how they're changing the face of work today. Who are they? What do they want? What do they believe in? Are they so different from adults of generations past? With that, this generation (and, by way of definition, most would agree that Millennials are people who are from the early-1980s as starting birth years and ending birth years ranging from the mid-1990s to early-2000s). It's a pretty broad timeframe, but that's what we're working with. So, what makes them so different? It depends on who you ask. Simon Sinek is a deep thinker and brilliant orator. Simon is the author of three best selling books, Start With Why, Leaders Eat Last, and his latest book, Together Is Better - A Little Book of Inspiration. His main fascination is how leaders and companies can make the greatest impact in the world. He looks for those with the capacity to inspire. Simon is also best known for popularizing the concept of "Why" with his first Ted Talk in 2009 (just his spoken words and a simple flip-chart). That talk (Simon Sinek - How great leaders inspire action) has become the third most watched talk of all time on TED.com. It has close to 30 million views. With that, Sinek took part in Inside Quest, which is a great content marketing platform created by Quest Nutrition that features the company's Co-founder and President, Tom Bilyeu, as the host. In the clip below, Simon defines Millennials, their challenge and how it affects the work that we do today. This is staggeringly smart stuff from Simon Sinek. Watch this: Simon Sinek on Millennials In The Workplace - Inside Quest. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hER0Qp6QJNU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> So, are Millennials that much different or have the rules of our society and work changed that much? Most business professionals will watch this clip, and think that Simon has his pulse on who Millennials are and what they're looking for. He does, but that was not my main takeaway. My main takeaway is this: this is not about how a certain generation was brought up, and what their expectations are. This is - one hundred percent - about how the rules of society and work have changed. It's about how the expectations of our society has shifted. How will public markets keep pushing on, when the workforce doesn't see revenue and pure wealth as the main reason to do something? Simon is most widely known for helping individuals and corporations to find their "Why"? After viewing this clip, it became abundantly clear that, perhaps, our society has yet to tackle this one question, and all of the complexities that it may imply. Regardless of a new generation coming into the workplace, what is the "why" of our society today... and moving forward? Tags: brand business business blog business book business culture business professional content content marketing digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog inside quest inspiration j walter thompson jwt leaders leaders eat last leadership marketing marketing blog millennials mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel motivation professional speaker quest nutrition simon sinek start with why ted ted talk together is better tom bilyeu work work culture working workplace    wpp [...]



The Mobile Commerce Chicken And Egg Conundrum

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 05:02:49 PST

This was a big week for shopping. Unless you have been living under a rock in North America, we had both Black Friday and Cyber Monday take place this past week. Beyond the riot police and YouTube filming of customer stampedes, fisticuffs and people behaving badly, these two days act as a key indicator as to how the holiday shopping season is going to roll out. Obviously, this is even-more closely monitored, as it also provides a peek into the wealth of nations. Just how much people are spending is directly related to the overall economy and beyond.  Well, we're spending... but how are we buying? As a business professional, who gets up in front of large audiences to talk about consumers and their shifting buying habits, there is some data that points to a large opportunity, wrapped in one of the biggest consumer shifts in buying that our world has ever seen. Let's put this all into context. AdWeek published the news item, Cyber Monday Sales Totaled $3.45 Billion, Which Set a New Ecommerce Record Up 12% year-over-year. Adobe stated that $3.45 billion was spent online for Cyber Monday alone. This is a 12%+ year-over-year spike. Impressive. The same report from Adobe also stated that for the first 28 days in November, that four-week period showed closed to $40 billion in digital sales. In fact, only one day this month generated less than $1 billion in online revenue. Billion is the new million. It's true. We toss around the number "billion" like it's any other "million." These amounts are staggering. Period. Full stop. Still, this is not where it could be. The number could be a lot higher. For years, I've been on a "mobile-first" rant. In short: your mobile experience should be better than your desktop experience (think about Instagram, Snapchat, Tinder, Uber and beyond). It also means that your mobile experience should not be a less-than experience from your desktop. It's an area that brands are failing at. It's an area that is costing brands huge revenue. If brands are ever going to actualize their true market opportunity, the time has come (and, maybe, passed) to ensure that your mobile experience is not a watered-down version of your desktop website, or a responsive design without the usability and experience that mobile does provide. Your consumers are used to apps and smartphones and more. They're living it. Your brands are failing them. The argument against mobile-first. Too many brands believe that mobile traffic is not significant enough for them to make the full-on mobile-first leap. That, for some reason, their consumers are different. Their consumers don't follow the macro trends, growth, usage and penetration of smartphones. Hey, it's your head and your sand, if you ask me. MediaPost published the news item, Cyber Monday Breaks Records, Hits $3.4B in Online Revenues, that boasted similar numbers from the AdWeek piece. Still, the quote that we should all pay attention to is this one: "Mobile drove 47% of visits to retail websites, about 38% came from smartphones and 9% from tablets. Smartphones also drove purchases with 22% share, compared with 9% from tablets. Conversions were well above holiday averages, with smartphones at 2.8%, tablets at 5.1% and desktops at 6.3%, compared to holiday averages of 1.3%, 2.9% and 3.2%, respectively... The average order value (AOV) on iOS smartphones came in at $141, which remained slightly higher compared with Android smartphones at $128." TL;DR: Smartphones were used in one out of every three purchases. That's staggering. Many would see this as a massive sign. Mobile continues to grow in marketshare. Mobile still has a long way to go, until it can catch-up and surpass desktop usage. That's not the sign it signals to me. Mobile is not being given a real chance to shine and prove its dominance. And that, dear brand people, falls directly on our shoulders. Yesterday, Research Brief published, Mobile Smartphone Shoppers Struggling With Navigation. Guess what? Mobile devices accounted for one-third of every sale on Cyber [...]



Waze Does Display Advertising Right

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 13:26:27 PST

There was a time when I thought all display advertising was "meh."  I have reasons (and deep) rationale to think this way. Few were around selling banner ads when they first came out, like I did. I was on the front lines of the dot com boom, bust and echo. I was there when search engine marketing first became a thing. I was there when the IAB came online, and standards became part of the formalization and validation of this advertising channel. This was before search engine marketing became the online advertising juggernaut that it is. Back then display (known as banner advertising) was much bigger than search. Now, it's becoming abundantly clear: publishers can't get off of the drug of display advertising. Still, consumers are pushing back with ad blocking, and marketers need a place to park the massive ad spend from dollars that are shifting over to digital. From brands to media companies to publishers, I have spent the vast part of the past two decades selling, promoting and watching this form of online advertising evolve. From the initial promise of performance and analytics, to its current state of branding. Most of the time, display advertising is an afterthought.  As online advertising evolves, my feelings have changed as well (I trust that yours have as well). Display units have become a necessary but complex part of publishing, and have not adjusted to replace the dollars that publishers have lost in their other traditional business models. Candidly, I had accepted them for what they are. That is until I started using the mobile app and awesome navigation tool, Waze (which was acquired by Google for over $1 billion in 2013).  Waze does display advertising right.  Like most display advertising formats, I was initially frustrated by the interruptive nature of Waze's display advertising. After about ten minutes, I was in awe by how well done it is... and, more importantly, by how well done it will be, as it evolves and matures. Waze takes display advertising, and adds two components to it that make it so glorious. It's not only relevant and powerful, but perhaps one of the smartest applications of display advertising online that I have come across: It's only there when you're not moving. Waze is great. Waze is free. It amazes me, because of what the typical cost of navigation systems have been in the past, and also because of the high level of user-generated value that is layered on top of it. Road closings, accidents, where the cops are hanging out, and more... in real time. This is the type of app that I (and many others) would probably be willing to spend some serious dollars on. So, if the "cost" of usage Waze is advertising, I'm willing to power through it. There are tons of dubious ways that Waze could have deployed an ad platform (banners along the bottom, interruption interstitials as you tap in your coordinates, etc...). The first thing they do brilliantly, is that you only see an ad when your car is at a red light or stopped for a longer period of time. At first, it was still an interruption model, but as soon as I realized how the creative was being initiated (and how it gracefully departs when the vehicle moves), it felt like a really smart execution. It's hyper-local... or, at least, it can/should be. Almost all of the ads are relevant to where you are or what you're doing. Gas stations, fast food dining, local merchants and more. If there is a lack of local advertising, Waze adds in a major chain (think fast food, gas stations, etc...). So, the ads are (or can be) super relevant, super local and super useful. This part is not perfect, but you can see that it can be, from the advertiser's perspective (being able to target specific types of drivers in a range of distance from their business). Plus, it tells you how far that advertiser is from your current location, and wisely allows you to add them as a stop along your way. What makes a great ad? Relevant, timely, easy and valuable. Waze's advertising platform is n[...]



Facebookers Are 2.5 Times More Likely To Read Fake News Plus More - The Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 11:39:34 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio broadcasting out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry and Heather B. morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Last week we had a deep discussion about fake news, and whether Facebook should be held accountable for the spreading of it. Well, here's some interesting data: It turns out that Facebookers are 2.5 times more likely to read fake news. Also, super-interesting, Millennials are least prone to do that sharing!  Let's not get too excited about those millennials! According to another study this week, researchers were "shocked" by how many students failed to effectively evaluate the credibility of news items. The students displayed a "stunning and dismaying consistency" in their responses, the researchers wrote, getting fooled over and over. They weren't looking for high-level analysis of data but just a "reasonable bar" of, for instance, telling fake accounts from real ones, activist groups from neutral sources and ads from articles. More than 80 percent of middle schoolers believed that 'sponsored content' was a real news story. "Many assume that because young people are fluent in social media they are equally savvy about what they find there," the researchers wrote. "Our work shows the opposite." Ugh.  What if you no longer needed Yelp and other recommendations for dinner, because real data lives in unique places? Well, Business Insider just published an article titled, The top 9 most popular restaurants in New York City, according to Uber. It got me thinking: Uber could have seriously interesting and divergent business models that we've never even thought of. Including the fact that it might become the best recommendation engine any of us could have ever imagined... without the need for anybody to review, rate or say anything. App of the week: The Companion app. Take a listen right here. Tags: app of the week brand business blog business insider chom 977 fm chom fm companion app content marketing ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook fake news guest contributor heather beckman i heart radio j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing blog millennials mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry and heather b native advertising news radio segment radio station recommendation engine social media soundcloud sponsored content technology terry dimonte twitter uber wpp yelp [...]



Finding What Fascinates With Julie Klam - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 27 Nov 2016 14:43:38 PST

Episode #542 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Our team at Mirum has launched a interesting program for InterContinental Hotels & Resorts. It's a series that takes places across multiple InterContinental properties to tell stories that will get consumers excited about what travel brings into their lives (beyond visiting a different city or country). The first part of this program has been focused on the theme of "fascination." With that, our team connected with famed bestselling author, Julie Klam, at the InterContinental New York Barclay's Gin Parlour for a conversation about the power of fascination. Truthfully, I had nothing to do with this project, but jumped at the opportunity to have Julie on this show. I've been a fan of her work for a long time. Julie Klam interned at Late Night with David Letterman and went on to write for the likes of Rolling Stone, Harper's Bazaar, and The New York Times Magazine. She also worked on the VH1 television show Pop-Up Video, where she earned an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Special Class Writing. She's the author of many narrative non-fiction books like Friendkeeping, Love At First Bark, You Had Me At Woof and Please Excuse My Daughter. Her next book, The Stars In Our Eyes, will look at celebrities, memes and what makes us all so enraptured by those who have influence. So what makes us fascinated? Do we all have the same ability to capture attention like celebrities? Where do great stories come from? Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #542. Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog emmy Facebook fascinate fascination friendkeeping google harpers bazaar influence influencers intercontinental intercontinental hotels iTunes j walter thompson julie klam jwt late night with david letterman leadership podcast love at first bark management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog please excuse my daughter rolling stone social media the new york times magazine the stars in our eyes twitter vh1 vh1 pop up video wpp you had me at woof [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #336

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 08:19:21 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The code I'm still ashamed of. - Bill Sourour - Medium. "We live in an era of algorithms, and they will increasingly decide who gets fed, paroled, promoted, or educated. It's a huge ethical challenge for us, because code is esoteric, inaccessible, and often a black box that knows no mercy or gray areas. In this post, Bill Souror confesses to a crime: Writing software that harmed, or even killed, other people in the hope of turning a profit. His story became a kind of confessional for developers working on questionable software everywhere. What have we wrought?" (Alistair for Hugh). This $5 Device Can Hack Your Password-Protected Computers In Just One Minute - The Hacker News. "By now you've heard this story. Most people have. It's a physical exploit that tricks your computer into thinking the USB is an Internet connection; followed by a spoof of every major website out there, so it can harvest your login cookie, so an attacker can pretend to be you online. And a bunch of other, smaller, hacks, cleverly stitched together. But that's only part of the story: I interviewed Alasdair Allan (who, years ago, discovered iPhones were tracking your location all of the time) in preparation for Pandemon.io, a conference I'm running next February. Alasdair said this: ' n the past, a great deal of computer security has assumed that the end user will have no physical access to the computer. That if an attacker has physical access, then there is no way to stop them compromising what security does exist. But the whole point of the Internet of Things is that they're physical things. So physical access to Internet of Things devices is a real problem, and for hackers, a real opportunity.' That's a seriously important observation -- we've gone from security that assumed the computer wasn't touched, to computers designed to be touched, without updating how we keep hackers out." (Alistair for Mitch). Ringside With Steve Bannon at Trump Tower as the President-Elect's Strategist Plots "An Entirely New Political Movement" - The Hollywood Reporter. "What to make of the fact that the best insight into Steve Bannon, the alt-right maven and man behind Trump's victory, and likely behind his presidency, comes from the Hollywood Reporter? The article tip-toes around some of the truly awful stuff that came out of Brietbart, but it gives a good sense of where Bannon will try to push the Trump presidency. We live in interesting times." (Hugh for Alistair). Global Trumpism - Foreign Affairs. "I'm going to try very, very hard not to send too many political links in the next while, since I just find it all too depressing. But please indulge me while I get this out of my system. This article, which I agree with, suggests that Trump's nationalism is an unsurprising response to neoliberalism. And, yes, the world order will be shaken greatly by this shift." (Hugh for Mitch). Tech giants rush to invest in Montreal artificial intelligence research lab - CBC. "This could well be one of those scenarios when you start thinking about an area of technology and suddenly, it's all that you see. Artificial intelligence seems to be on the rise. But, now, I see it everywhere. Especially here, in our hometown of Montreal. I'd love to know why, how and when our ci[...]



What Problems Are You Solving?

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 09:00:02 PST

Disruption. Automation. Innovation. People are no longer terrified that their jobs are going to be shipped overseas. Oh, don't be fooled. There's still that. Now, technology is also threatening to have our jobs (yes, all of our jobs) become obsolete through automation. There are two divergent trains of thought on the topic of automation, artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics. On the one hand, you have those who believe that the future will be without jobs for most of us, as these technologies and innovations take hold. Clearly, this will reach that tipping point when it is cheaper and less time consuming for a computer and/or robot to do your work. On the other hand (and, the hand that I prefer), you have those who believe that the marvels of technology and innovation will provide a platform where human beings may no longer have jobs (as we have known them to date), but will be working alongside these technologies, in truly valuable and important work. Both point to a very different world than the one we're presently in. In this excellent TEDx Talk, Tim O'Reilly (founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media and the man behind the reshaping of how technology has changed business) takes a look at what comes after a world in which he coined the terms "open source software," "Web 2.0" (and identified countless other movements in our world that were shaped by technology). Titled, Why we'll never run out of jobs, Tim asks one, critical question, to those who are concerned about what kind of work they will do in the future... "What problems are you solving?" The future will require people who have courage. The future will require people who can be either entrepreneurs or those that are entrepreneurial. Instead of focusing on what has changed or how things are changing, the future will be set for those who are willing to accept that there is so much work to still do. Those who are ready, willing and able to think about, create and build what's next (funny enough, our tagline - and battlecry - at Mirum is "Let's make what's next."). Aritficial intelligence, automation and machine learning should not replace us. First, we must define and solve these global problems. And, who better to accomplish this task than you? These future technologies should be created to help us... and not hinder us. How will we all be active participants in helping this challenge become a reality? Our true opportunity.  The true opportunity here is to understand that we shape our economy... not the computers and algorithms. So, the one true opportunity here is for all us to be the ones who really do update the rules of business today (and moving forward). Tim's message is true. Tim's message is powerful: great, big and new technology should make us all much better, not replaceable. Watch this: Why we'll never run out of jobs - Tim O'Reilly - TEDxSanFrancisco.  width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xRmQTWpkaVU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Tags: ai algorithm artificial intelligence automation brand business blog digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption economy employment entrepreneur innovation j walter thompson job jwt machine learning marketing marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel ml open source software oreilly media problem solving robotics technology ted ted talk tedx tedx talk tim oreilly web 20 work  wpp [...]



Creativity Is Alive And Well

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 12:24:43 PST

Don't worry, the robots and artificial intelligence-driven creatives will have a hard time doing this. The rock band OK Go make some of the most astonishing and creative music videos. In fact, I'd argue that they are much more than just "music videos," but rather engines that inspire creativity - on many different levels. Many believe that we live in a world, where it is increasingly difficult to do anything that is original. How does a brand create a message that can cut through the many levels of noise that we're all exposed to? Is it even possible to have viral video breakthrough without spending a ton of money on media? Well, OK Go did it in only 4.2 seconds. Still, what makes this so creatively exciting, is that they took this 4.2 seconds of rapid-fire explosions and slowed it down to match the four-plus minutes of the band's song, The One Moment. It's amazing how they did it (and they explain it, in detail, right here: Background Notes And Full Credits For The One Moment Video). For those who don't want to click over for the full-rundown, the TL;DR is this: math. New and improved with... salt? The big winner in this video (from a marketing perspective) will, ultimately, be Morton Salt. Yes... a salt company. Apparently, Morton Salt has a new initiative titled, #WalkHerWalk (a CSR program to support a group of young people, who are making a positive difference in the world by tackling some tough issues that we all face). The brand collaborated (paid? sponsored? supported?) this video. I believe, the payoff on views and attention will be well-worth whatever deal was brokered behind the scenes. Let's see if this is true... or if there is a backlash (which, again, might still give the brand countless impressions, PR attention and more).  Well, here is your moment of creative zen... OK Go - The One Moment. src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fokgo%2Fvideos%2F10153836041340683%2F&show_text=0&width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allowFullScreen="true"> Tags: ai artificial intelligence brand brand message business blog creative creativity csr digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog impression j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing blog media mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel morton salt music video ok go pr public relations robotics robots the one moment video viral video walkherwalk  wpp [...]



The Thing About Disruption

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 11:16:30 PST

How good is your brand when it comes to disruption? For my money, disruption is the current big bad wolf of business today. It's everywhere. B2B, B2B, small, medium and large enterprises. Everyone is feeling the huffing, puffing and heavy breathing of disruption on their shoulders. I often laugh when reading articles in places like Fast Company about these major brands, who insist that they could never be disrupted, because they are too busy, disrupting themselves. There's a really fast, simple and easy litmus test to see if this is true: simply go and check out their website on a mobile device. Look and see how many apps this brands has published. Try to connect with them on one of the many social media channels, and pay attention to how long it takes them to respond (if they even respond at all). The disruptors are starting in those arenas as most brands have either fallen behind or are racing to catch up.  Brands are a little delusional. Brands should be less delusional. Being disruptive in your industry means that you are doing something completely different from what you are presently doing, and the results are pacing at a better clip than your current business model. Go for it. Please. List below the major brands that have truly disrupted themselves. You can probably list them on the hands of a bad high school woodshop teacher (to steal a classic joke from Dennis Miller). Why? It's like asking newspaper publishers why they didn't embrace the Internet sooner or why companies like Yellow Pages allowed Google to overtake these mighty institutions. Disruption is hard, because it means that you, in effect, are doing something completely different from what you had been doing to date, and this new effort is the one that will become the industry standard. Uber didn't become another kind of taxi company. Tinder isn't just another online dating site. Ask any entrepreneur, this is not easy. Especially, when there is a legacy of success, growth and opportunity. It's hard to kill your darlings, while they're still developing into darlings.  I'm bullish that more and more industries will be disrupted. I'm bearish on the current slew of industry leaders that are able to make that leap. History doesn't tell a kind story here. Still, a few days ago, eMarketer published this fascinating article: CMOs Are Safeguarding Their Businesses from Market Disruptors. This is what the Chief Marketers Officers believe: "During February and March 2016, Accenture surveyed 847 CMOs and 535 CEOs worldwide about the impact of disruptive growth on their businesses. According to the data, 97% of respondents said they are placing emphasis on safeguarding their business from new competitors that have not traditionally been a part of their industry. The research, though, also revealed a slight divide on just how much of a priority this is for CMOs; while 43% agreed it's greatly taken into account, another 54% said only to some extent." 97% of Chief Marketing Officers believe that they are safeguarding their brands from new competitors. Because they're buying startups? Because they are developing new products and services? I find this hard to believe. Innovation is not the same as disruption. Have we seen instances when buying an emerging startup has stopped an industry from being disrupted? If yes, was it something that stuck? Have we seen instances when launching new products and services has stopped an industry from being disrupted? Isn't disruption an inevitability? What do these safeguards look like? Especially if, as a consumer, we're not seeing them currently in the marketplace? Disruption is a tough one to beat. 97% percent think they're focused on it. Do you agree?  Tags: accenture b2b b2c brand business blog business model ceo [...]



We Are Not (That) Social Media

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 10:17:24 PST

Social media was not supposed to act like traditional media. In fact, one could argue that everything we thought was possible about connectivity and social media could best be understood by reading the business book classic, The Cluetrain Manifesto. The anchor quote from that book was, "markets are conversations." Let's roll with that. Would you agree that if you were to split up your marketing efforts by traditional media and social media that your social media activity acts like a conversation? Before we go any further... I would guess that most brands have abandoned ship on this concept. It's a well known turn-of-phrase that social media is anything but social. And, to truly get any results of marketing efficacy, you have to embrace the fact that social media is now a paid media channel. In other words... no reach or amplification without paying for it. That may sound depressing. Still, can anyone truly argue with this sentiment? For over a decade, I have been writing posts, here on this blog (going into my fourteenth year, to be exact). Through that time, the sentiment of all things related to Six Pixels of Separation (the blog, the podcast, writing for other publications, radio appearances, public speaking, business books, etc...) has been that the content you consume from me should incite you to create a better brand for yourself and/or open up your thinking in a way that would enable you to add your own commentary. Why? Why was I breaking the golden rule of social media so early on? Simply put: I wanted to add my voice to the discourse without the gatekeepers. I did not have faith that a true community or conversation was actually taking place. A community is not having a lot of followers. For me, a true community would only arise when others who I am connected to started connecting to one another. When those individuals have voices that are equal to mine... and beyond. That's a tall order, when I'm the one creating the text, images, audio and video. Yes, we are all here for a similar reason. Yes, by the pure definition of the word "community" we are a social group who have common interests. Still, just how social are we? In terms of conversation, what do we really have? Candidly, we see a lot of content with some likes, shares and comments. Is that actually a conversation? Seems more like differing levels of engagement, over actual conversation. What if social media is no longer social media?  That's the other side. I used to be a journalist and a publisher of magazines. Pre-social media, if you had ideas to share, you needed someone else's platform... because they owned the audience. They were - as Seth Godin best describes them - the "gatekeepers." Social media got rid of the gatekeepers. Actually, that's not true. The gatekeepers still exist. They've just moved from owning what content is published (think about magazines, newspapers, radio stations and television networks) to owning the platform where everyone is a publisher (think Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google and Snapchat). So, the media channels evolve with how people use them. Suddenly celebrities, politicians, business leaders and others realize the power has shifted. Suddenly, they test their newfound ability to have a direct relationship with their fans, followers, etc... It's powerful. Some become influencers on this platform. These platforms wind up creating celebrities on their own. It's a fascinating social experiment. We trust someone with a verified account and followers because... well, they have a verified account and followers. Now, people like me (and you) no longer need the "permission" of your industry's top trade publication to get your message out. When done well, you become a media channel on your own.  The (social) media is now messy.  The problem, of course,[...]



Fake News On Facebook And Happiness Without Social Media - The Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 12:45:57 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio broadcasting out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry and Heather B. morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Facebook is being (partly) blamed for President-Elect Donald Trump's victory. The problem? Fake news. What is this? How big of a problem is it, really? How has Facebook reacted? Maybe we should not be so worried about what Facebook does with fake news. Maybe we should just not be on Facebook? Well, science may say that if you want to be happier, one of the best things that you can do for yourself, is to not be on Facebook?  App of the week: Open Table. Take a listen right here. Tags: app of the week apple brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook fake news guest contributor heather beckman iPhone iPhone 7 j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry and heather b open table radio segment radio station social media soundcloud technology terry dimonte twitter wpp  wpp [...]



Confessions Of A Recovering Advertising Professional With Alex Bogusky - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 20 Nov 2016 10:32:52 PST

Episode #541 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. You can't turn down the chance to have a chat with legendary advertising professional, Alex Bogusky. Yes, he was on the cover of Fast Company magazine. Yes, he's been called the Steve Jobs of advertising. Alex joined famed ad agency, Crispin and Porter, in 1989. In just five years, the agency was renamed Crispin Porter + Bogusky and grew to more than 1000 employees with billings over one billion dollars. Under Alex's leadership, the agency became the most awarded advertising agency in the world. They are the only agency to have won the Cannes Advertising Grand Prix in all five catagories. Adweek named him "Creative Director of the Decade" in 2010. That's when he retired from advertising to focus on consumer advocacy, angel investing and the venture capital space. Based on Boulder, Colorado, Alex is involved in many new businesses and ventures. So, does he miss our world? Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #541. Tags: ad week advertising advertising agency advertising podcast advertising professional alex bogusky angel investing audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast cannes advertising consumer advocacy creative director crispin porter bogusky david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog Facebook fast company fearless cottage google iTunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog social media steve jobs twitter venture capital wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #335

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 08:44:51 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  An Integrated Perspective On The Future Of Mobility - McKinsey - Bloomberg. "This big report from McKinsey is packed with data and speculation about what a mobile-first market looks like. Holy epic resource, Batman." (Alistair for Hugh). Media in the Age of Algorithms - Tim O'Reilly - Medium. "With pundits and pollsters licking their wounds, and Facebook on the defensive about fake news, everyone's weighing in. In this piece, Tim O'Reilly discusses what algorithmic news may mean for the future. As another writer put it, ' ave we ever decided personalized news is a good thing?' And yet, personalization is the core of ad-tech, and targeting, and the economic underpinnings of the Internet. What have we wrought?" (Alistair for Mitch). Public In/Formation - Places Journal. "It's been hard, this past week, for some of us to find things to be positive about. To find inspiration. Which is why this article was a little oasis for me. Humans have gone through some ups and downs over the centuries. But a constant has been libraries and librarians, who one way or another have maintained knowledge and access to knowledge. They continue to be guiding lights." (Hugh for Alistair). Titanpointe - The NSA's Spy Hub in New York, Hidden in Plain Sight - The Intercept. "If librarians want you to know things about the world, the NSA wants to know things about you. Here's where some of that knowing, apparently, happens." (Hugh for Mitch). Your Filter Bubble Is Destroying Democracy - Wired. "There are so many issues about the media that are colliding at once. We have filter bubbles, where people are only seeing information from those with shared values (or, like them). We are seeing the hollowing out of real journalism (see: collapse of the newspaper industry, etc...). We are seeing president-elects tweeting out information that is more opinion than fact, but expected to be taken by the general population as 'straight from the horse's mouth'. This article describes part of the problem. It's a big problem. This is only a fraction of it. The world is fine for people like you, me and everybody reading this. The world is terrifying for those who don't understand media, what's happening to it and how bad it really is getting. We need journalism now more than ever. Even the media savvy folks (like all of us) are going to start to lose out, when we can no longer hunt for quality, because it does not exist." (Mitch for Alistair). Amazon's Next Big Move: Take Over The Mall - MIT Technology Review. "Famed thinker, author, journalist and all-around big brain, Nicholas Carr, goes shopping at an Amazon store. So, can this retail giant actually make the physical experience something truly unique, inspiring and in-line with the big brand that they created online? Read on..." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: alistair croll amazon bit current bit north bloomberg book a futurists manifesto [...]


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TwistImage/~5/9M_wilZwWA0/BNEF_McKinsey_The-Future-of-Mobility_11-10-16.pdf




What About Bob? (RIP Bob Goyetche)

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 07:52:19 PST

Do you like the Six Pixels of Separation Podcast? If you do, you have to give a little credit for its existence to Bob Goyetche. A kind, warm and loving human being, who sadly and suddenly passed away last Friday.  Let's go back in time. September 2006 (over ten years ago). Long before we all had Facebook to connect, the word got out that an unconference called, Podcamp Boston, would be taking place over a weekend just outside of Boston. At that point in time, the Six Pixels of Separation podcast was only a few months old. Candidly, I felt like I was falling behind everyone else. At that point, there was already a "holy trinity" of marketing and communications podcasts that were happening (Joseph Jaffe's Across The Sound, Neville Hobson and Shel Holtz's For Immediate Release and Terry Fallis and David Jones' Inside PR). If you were in our space, you listened to these shows. Religiously. I was the new kid on the block. I thought this PodCamp weekend would be rocket fuel for my podcast. There was so much I did not know. From the gear to record a show, to the best hosting and beyond. Well, it turns out that this road trip from Montreal to Boston would be one of the most pivotal moments in my professional and personal life. Was anyone going to be there?  The unconference wave was in full-effect. These self-organized meet-ups, where agendas and speakers were formed once everyone was in the room were all the rage. Still, I was booking hotels and taking on 10 hours of driving, without having any clarity that people would actually showed up. I knew a few people from Montreal (Julien Smith and Hugh McGuire). I knew two of the organizers of the event (Chris Brogan and Christopher S. Penn). You may recognize these names now. Back then, who knew? It turns out that this event really was ground zero for the podcasting and social media community (and many of the luminaries who are now attached to it and, somewhat, famous because of it). The list of attendees is, literally, now a who's who of the biggest names in blogging, social media, podcasting and beyond. Many have gone on to build not only significant relationships while meeting at PodCamp, but large and powerful businesses as well. It's a strange thing. And, without exaggeration, it was our own little Woodstock moment. Especially, when I look back at the pictures, and reflect on how many of these people have not just ascended in their respective professions and podcasting, but the lifelong friendships that were made. To this day, I count this event as the place that I met some of my closest friends. It was crazy... in every sense of the word. This is where I first met Bob Goyetche... in his protein form. I knew who he was. We were connected online. I knew his work. Bob was one of the podcasting pioneers. He started back in 2004 with The Bob And AJ Show as well as the CatFishShow (his wife's podcast). He founded ROGIC - one of Canada's first podcast networks. By PodCamp Boston, Bob was doing another weekly show called, Canadian Podcast Buffet with his co-host Mark Blevis. From there, Mark and Bob launched their own event, Podcasters Across Borders, which I attended multiple times. I remember meeting Bob at PodCamp Boston (there are photos of this online... somewhere) and thinking to myself two things: If everyone is as nice and sincere as this guy, I think I found a real community that I want to stay connected to and invested in. I have no chance of making a run at my own podcast, look at how far behind I am! Bob had a handful of shows and had been doing it for years. Lessons learned. Friendships developed.  As with all events like this, people get busy. Lives get filled. Work takes up more time. Chi[...]



Don't Kill Them With Kindness

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 08:19:20 PST

How does your brand build a relationship with your customers? There's been a long-standing saying. It goes like this: Kill them with kindness. The brands who are nice, likeable, transparent and direct will win. It seems right. It feels right. It may be the wrong way to go. Case in point: My car lease was up recently. Like many of us, the process of buying or deciding on a new car is complex. While we're all looking for the right car at the best price, I've also decided that a high level of service is critical for my personal choice. I want an engaged sales rep, a smart and empathetic service experience and the like. Now, in the world that we live, it's not hard to see how these dealers rank, which sales reps to connect with (or avoid). Candidly, my experience was great. I'm satisfied.  Still, they want more. I was told by sales rep that I would be receiving a post sale survey by email, and that it's very important that I fill it out. They then quipped that a "10/10 would be great and a 9/10 is considered a failure." At first, I thought it was a toss-away line, they then went on... and asked me to commit that I would respond with a 10/10 for them and, if not, what they could do (live and in that moment) to get me there. I was taken aback, so I just confirmed that everything was fine. Like the rest of us, the emails pile in, and we tend to move matters like this down by the bottom. Sure enough, the follow-up survey came in. I took a quick peak, and they were requesting 30-45 minutes of my time. Yikes. I didn't have time. The email sat there. A few days later a follow-up email. A day after that, another one. The next day, a call from the dealership. Another email. Then, a call from the sales rep asking when I might have the time to complete the survey, and how important it was to them. I felt guilty. Finally got to it. Then after 15 minutes, I realized there was no end in sight to the questions and details that they were requesting. I abandoned. More emails. More calls. The calls were not annoying. The emails were not rude. They were gracious, thankful and kind. Still. Eventually, I got through this survey. What came next shocked me. Two emails thanking me for completing it, and asking if there was anything else they could help with. That was then followed up by three phone calls (one from the dealership, one from the sales rep and one from the store manager). Sometimes being overly kind is just as bad as being bad. There is some kind of strange sales and marketing strategy in play. It's actually, less of a "play" and more of a playbook. All digital communications and physical contact is following a script. You can feel it. You can sense it. It doesn't make the brand look kind and caring. It makes it look like they're trying to check some arbitrary internal boxes to ensure that they maintain their rating, and that bonuses can then be pursued. The effort didn't seem to benefit the customer. It seemed to be in place as an engine of internal validation. Too bad. Don't confuse the brand needs from the consumer needs. Surveys and follow-ups should be in place to better understand how to serve the consumer. Every touchpoint is an opportunity to build loyalty. If the real intent is selfish and, ultimately, to serve the brand, it will be noticeable. Brands often reach out in an effort to be helpful and kind. Often, the consumer finds it annoying and overbearing. Marketing is an orchestra. It's many instruments that need to play in sync in order for it to be pleasing and engaging for the audience. It's not easy. This brand did nothing "wrong." They're probably more engaged in customer service than most brands out there. Still, n[...]



When Everybody Gets It Wrong

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 07:26:06 PST

Individuals get it wrong. Brands get it wrong. What happens when everybody gets it wrong? Let's start here: this is not a show about politics. Let's be honest: this is a show about politics. There has been nothing more polarizing than Brexit and the Trump Campaign, when it comes to our world this past year. If you can put politics aside (which is not easy), what happened here? The data, the analytics, the analysts, the pundits, the media and more. Like many, the armchair quarterbacks are abound. Those who were pro-Trump are now inflating their own tires, many who never expressed an opinion are now saying that they nailed it. Still, the vast majority of people, brands, analysts and media did get these two events wrong. Very wrong. What does this mean? Without a doubt, branding, marketing and communications in our digital age played a vital role in this outcome. How the presidential candidates were positioned, leveraged their own platforms and worked with agencies that brought us to this surprising conclusion. On this week's Beancast, I joined host Bob Knorpp and guests Farrah Bostic (founder of The Difference Engine) and Sloane Kelley (Senior Director of Content at the PGA Tour) to discuss how everything went in the polar opposite direction of what we were told, what the marketing lessons were, what they mean for brands going forward and what we can all learn about building, scaling and proving your brand value in our complicated marketplace. We tried (desperately) to not get too political.  Take a listen: Beancast - #424 - We Got It Wrong. Tags: analyst analytics beancast bob knorpp brand branding brexit business blog communications content content marketing data digital age digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog farrah bostic j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing blog media mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel opinion pga tour political politics pundit sloane kelley the difference engine  wpp [...]



Bring Magic To Your Business With Magician Jay Sankey - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 13 Nov 2016 10:56:33 PST

Episode #540 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. I have been blown away by Jay Sankey. He's a magician who has managed to do some pretty amazing and impossible things. I'm not just talking about the 700-plus illusions he has invented over his incredible career. I'm not just talking about the fact that David Copperfield, Criss Angel and David Blaine have performed his illusions. He knows so much about business, marketing and storytelling that this could be one of the important things any business professional might listen to this year. (and that's not hyperbole) With close to 200,000 subscribers to his Sankey Magic YouTube channel, Jay has broken down the wall between the audience and the mystic of magic. He doesn't just perform on YouTube, he shows everyone how the magic is done. It's brilliant. He's also the founder of Inside Deception - the world's number one training site for magic, mentalism, performance and more. Within this show, you learn the power of telling a story, persuasion, creating tension, presentation skills, comedy, diversion tactics and more. It's simply... amazing. If you're still not sold, you must see his video of how he outsmarted Penn and Teller for their TV show, Fool Us. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #540. Tags: advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast comedy criss angel david blaine david copperfield david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook fool us google illusion illusionist inside deception iTunes j walter thompson jay sankey jwt leadership podcast magic magician management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mentalism mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog penn and teller performance persuasion presentation skills sankey magic social media storytelling twitter wpp youtube youtube channel   [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #334

Fri, 11 Nov 2016 08:41:27 PST

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:   Are You Lost In The World Like Me - Moby & The Void Pacific Choir. "It's been an historic week. Many of the changes we've seen this electoral cycle, on both sides of the house, come from a social-first world, and the fact that we're living squarely in an attention economy. Here's a music video animated by Steve Cutts that sums up how a large part of the world is feeling these days." (Alistair for Hugh). If Satan was a web developer - imgur. "Think your user interface is bad? It could be much worse. This is a bit lightweight as a link, but it cracked me up." (Alistair for Mitch). Looking Back with Leonard Cohen - The New Yorker Radio Hour. "I'm only providing one link this week. It's been too hard to concentrate. Hard to take it all in. Hard to even seek out wisdom, let alone find it. Leonard Cohen died yesterday, yet another sadness to go on to the growing pile of sadnesses and horror we've seen in 2016. Listening to Leonard Cohen sing is always soothing; listening to him talk even more so. Maybe that can help, a little. Here's his last interview, with David Remnick of The New Yorker." (Hugh for Mitch and Alistair). Star Wars Fan Film Hoshino Is About A Blind Jedi And It Is Incredible - Dark Side Of The Force. "This week, I choose happiness, creativity and stuff that will make you smile and (maybe) laugh. As we all nerd out on the upcoming Star Wars movie (Rogue One), check out this fan-made 7-minute epic about a Jedi. Wow. Talk about inspiring creativity. I am blown away. Hoshino for the win!" (Mitch for Alistair). The Surreal, Singular Relevance of Blazing Saddles in 2016 - Paste Magazine. "File this under funny things that could never be done in 2016. I can't believe my parent's let me watch Mel Brooks movie when I was a little kid. Blazing Saddles was, always, one of my faves. It's so not PC... which, candidly, is so not like me. This movie was over-the-tip ridiculous... and hilarious. Here's a great editorial on the film and Brooks. I haven't seen Blazing Saddles in decades... time to fire it up... if I I/you dare." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VASywEuqFd8" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0"> src="https://www.wnyc.org/widgets/ondemand_player/wnyc/#file=/audio/json/682207/&share=1" width="100%" height="130" scrolling="no" frameborder="0"> src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/G7-n36MBs1A" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0"> Tags: alistair croll amazon bit current bit north blazing saddles book a futurists manifesto complete web monitoring dark side of the force david remnick facebook gigot hoshino hugh mcguire human 20 iambic imugr j walter thompson jwt lean analytics [...]



Let's Venture Into The Things That We Do Not Know

Fri, 11 Nov 2016 09:46:47 PST

Shhhh.... it has been a week. Just... shhhh... and watch this. Trust me. I think we can all try this. Alone. Together. As a community. What do you/me/us have to lose? Here is The beauty of what we will never know by Pico Iyer at TED. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Nh-TVcNFtVI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Tags: brand business blog digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel pico iyer ted ted talk    wpp [...]



The Void That Twitter Could Leave

Fri, 11 Nov 2016 10:36:46 PST

Dear Twitter, please don't go. These are dangerous times for Twitter. The public markets are no longer in love (their market cap has been dropping). Their leadership is changing (it is being questioned and executives have been departing). Their users are curious (yes, there are millions of people still looking at Twitter daily, but are they really using it?). Many have written about the struggles of Twitter. Should it be acquired? Can it ever regain its pace of growth? Is there are place for Twitter or have Instagram and Snapchat become the darlings of the day? Is Twitter really a feature and not a platform? There's more. It goes on. What Twitter does. Twitter is the "now" feed. Facebook is the "now-ish" feed. There is something strangely smart about the Twitter algorithm that allows it to be a quick burst into what's happening now. Search your city, follow a brand, check out a news source, see what's happening while you're at that conference. Case in point: this week, I presented at Hubspot's massive Inbound event. Apparently, there were close to 19,000 attendees at this sold-out event. Who is there? What's happening? What's happening now? What did I miss? Sure, Facebook might provide some of these insights. I would have to be following/friends with people who are attending, or brands that are taking part (you don't see much in your feed beyond that). Still, Facebook's newsfeed isn't really live and in the moment. Their algorithm curates your friends, throttles the brand page content and while it is fresh... it is not now. By simply looking on Twitter for either mentions of me or the hashtag #INBOUND16, you can see the pulse of the event, the feedback, and more unfold before your very eyes. Most people don't use Twitter this way. This is Twitter's true gold. From what the data suggests, people hop on Twitter and flick through the feed. What are my friends saying, what are celebrities saying and what are the brands that I follow saying? They're not really creating their own tweets, they're hardly retweeting, and if there's something meaty within a tweet, they're more likely to leave Twitter, check out that piece of content and (here's where the irony is) share it on Facebook. For users like me, it's all about the search. For the vast majority, it's all about the being a voyeur. Twitter is less about engaging and connecting in 140 characters (or images or video), and much more about a news ticker that crawls along your life, in a more personalized and customized way than the annoying ones that we see scrolling across the bottom of our screens, when we're watching CNN.  The data is gold. The real time is gold.  What would be the substitute for this real time news ticker, that is customized for us around the people we're interested in, the brands we want to connect with and the celebrities that we want to creep on? Better than that, what will substitute as the place that people (like you and me) can go to for a better understanding of what's happening in the now? Would Facebook take this idea and create a separate tab that opens up the content hose, so that you can see both your friend's and brand's status updates, while being able to search through it for events in the now? It seems easy enough. It seems to make perfect sense. They're not doing it.  Let's not let Twitter go. Many of my peers believe that Twitter won't go away simply because it is too engrained in our lives. I don't comply with this thinking. Twitter is susceptible to going away like anything/everything else in our w[...]



Samsung Brand Challenges, Instagram Goes After Amazon and Apple Is A Dongle Company - The Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Wed, 09 Nov 2016 08:33:29 PST

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio broadcasting out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry and Heather B. morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  If you thought the whole Samsung Note 7 debacle was bad enough, the company just announced that a recall of close to 3 million Samsung washing machines after reports of... wait for it... explosions. Phones, washing machines... if the TVs come next, what is this brand to do?  What is Instagram? Many of us would say that it is one of the largest (and most popular) places to create and share images/videos. Over half a billion people use it. It is owned by Facebook. What if I told you that there's a thriving global marketplace on Instagram (that the brand has yet to acknowledge)? Now, what if I told you that Instagram is finally waking up to this, and it's going to start allowing people to both identify and eventually purchase products that they come across in photos from brands in their feed. Can Instagram make a run at Amazon?  Last week, I told you how excited I was about Apple's new line of MacBook Pro computers. I bought mine. I'm still waiting on it. Well, imagine my surprise when I found out that every single connecting cable and dongle that I have won't work on this new computer? The MacBook Pro only has Thunderbolt 3 ports, which are based on the new USB-C standard, and used for everything from video output to charging the computer. So... I'm not the only one with countless chargers and dongles that are now useless. Plus, buying new ones are quite expensive. Apple's solution? After hearing enough complaints, they've decided to slash the price on accessories that use the new type of plugs. Many journalist are making the claim that Apple is in the dongle and charger business, and no longer in the computer manufacturing business.  App of the week: Must. Take a listen right here. Tags: amazon app of the week apple brand business blog chom 977 fm chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media dongles facebook guest contributor heather beckman instagram iPhone iPhone 7 j walter thompson jwt macBook macBook pro marketing marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry and heather b must must app radio segment radio station samsung samsung note 7 samsung washing machines social media soundcloud technology terry dimonte twitter wpp    wpp [...]



How To Live A Good Life With Jonathan Fields - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 06 Nov 2016 03:41:57 PST

Episode #539 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. I love this guy. What more can I say? Everything he puts out into the world, I feel like I want to connect with more. From the guests on his amazing show, Good Life Project Radio, to his company, Good Life Project. He puts together an amazing summer camp experience for adults (Camp Good Life Project) and just published an incredibly powerful book, How To Live A Good Life. Prior to this book, Jonathan Fields, also wrote the book, Uncertainty, and has published a lot of content around doing great work by being good people. Like I said, there's nothing not to like about his thinking. Over the years, Jonathan has become a true friend and is, usually, my first port of call when I am feeling challenged, stressed or unfocused. He is Sage-like in his wisdom. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #539. Tags: advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast camp good life project david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook good life project good life project radio google how to live a good life iTunes j walter thompson jonathan fields jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog social media twitter uncertainty wpp   [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #333

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 18:37:36 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Eastern promise: gender lessons from the Islamic world - The Engineer. "This seemed like a good share during a week leading up to a general election in the US. ' he high GDP countries in the Gulf tend to have female representation up to 60 per cent in fields such as electrical engineering, computer engineering, chemical engineering and bioengineering.' Why is that?" (Alistair for Hugh). Why It's So Hard To Make A Video Game - Waypoint. "I grew up in an innocent time, where a solo designer could make a game for decent money. They were things of love, from Jordan Mechner's extraordinary Karateka to the weirdness of the Beagle Brothers and the frustration of Lode Runner. But things changed. If you're willing to go the indie road (shout-out to the amazing documentary Indie Game here) your chances of success are slim. It boils down to creativity on a schedule -- something I know you're used to in the agency world, Mitch -- and maybe, just maybe, gives the reader a bit of appreciation for the dependencies under the covers." (Alistair for Mitch). Here's Where the World's Best Chefs Love to Eat - Bloomberg. "When I travel for work, I occasionally splurge on great food. Here's a list of restos I'd love to try." (Hugh for Alistair). Incredible photographs show daily life in the coldest city on earth - Lonely Planet. "Winter is coming." (Hugh for Mitch).  Scientists Hook Up Brain to Tablet--Paralyzed Woman Googles With Ease - Singularity Hub. "Technology is going to enable medical breakthroughs that would have otherwise been the stuff of dreams... or science fiction. I'm optimistic about our future, so long as I can keep focusing on news items like this one, articles that are fascinating like this... and avoid anything related to politics." (Mitch for Alistair). Inside the final days of Borders' bankruptcy -- and what Mike Edwards learned as its last CEO - Retail Dive. "I don't like what's happening to bookstores, magazine shops, publishing in general. I see it shrinking... before my very eyes. Many people think it's about indie shops versus the big retailers. Be careful where one lays the blame. A great read and perspective." (Mitch for Hugh).  Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: alistair croll amazon beagle brothers bit current bit north bloomberg book a futurists manifesto book store bookstore borders complete web monitoring documentary facebook gigot google hugh mcguire human 20 iambic indie game j walter thompson jordan mechner jwt karate lean analytics librivox link bait [...]



Is Silicon Valley Losing Its Shine And Innovation?

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 13:07:53 PDT

There's gold in them there hills... In another time, people put their lives at risk to head out to the wild west. The risk? The reward? Gold! Opportunity... a new life... the richness. Sounded so exciting. For the past few decades a similar gold rush has been taking place out west in Silicon Valley. All you need is MacBook, a Moleskine, an idea and a rented garage, and you could be the next Google... Facebook... whatever. Valuations on tech companies created both public market bubbles, and a flood of cash to the small, few who were brave enough to code and build a business. Still, to this day, many people dream of building (or working for) one of these unicorns (a company with a valuation north of a billion dollars). Many have tried to capture this experience on film. Many have failed.  The Down Round. TechCrunch recently published this short documentary called, The Down Round. It's six episodes and clocks in at under hour. From their website:  "Silicon Valley is like no other place in the world right now. The Bay Area has been booming with ideas and innovation for the past decade. But in 2016, the IPO market wilted and unicorns suddenly had to prove their worth. Startups that had raised hundreds of millions of dollars began shuttering and investors are nervous. In 'The Down Round' series, we talked to entrepreneurs and venture capitalists about what happened and what's next for startups, real estate and Silicon Valley as a whole." TL;DR: There is lot of problems brewing out West. Please watch and share this series... The Down Round - TechCrunch. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLHRxVckaE8dYwkKpobd_PqxPXXIObtoEP" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Tags: bay area brand business business blog business model digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog documentary entrepreneur facebook google idea innovation investing investor ipo market j walter thompson jwt macBook marketing marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mitch joel mitchjoel moleskine silicon valley startup tech company tech startup techcrunch techcrunch the down round technology the down round unicorn venture capital venture capitalist  wpp [...]