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Preview: Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Twist Image

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum



Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Blog is marketing and communications insights from the edge. Mitch Joel will unravel the complex world of digital marketing and social media with the perspective of a digital marketing agency. The Six Pixels Of Separat



Last Build Date: Tue, 23 May 2017 06:06:37 PDT

 



Thinking Content Marketing With Jay Acunzo - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Tue, 23 May 2017 06:06:37 PDT

Episode #567 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. This young man has lead an fascinating career, and he's just getting started. Jay Acunzo was head of content at HubSpot, a media strategist at Google and ran content marketing for a venture capital firm. If anyone has seen how content marketing has grown along with digital marketing, it's Jay Acunzo. He's an award-winning podcaster, keynote speaker, and a guy bothered by conventional thinking. Jay truly believes that the tried-and-true creates stale work. Now, as he's host of the popular audio documentary series, Unthinkable (of which I was honoured to be a guest), and Jay makes a living understanding what it takes to make the leap from average to exceptional. His work has been cited in courses at Harvard Business School, by writers at the Washington Post, Fast Company, Forbes, and by investors on Shark Tank. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #567. Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker content marketing david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook fast company forbes google harvard business school hubspot itunes j walter thompson jay acunzo jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast media media strategist mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast shark tank social media twitter unthinkable venture capital venture capital firm washington post wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #360

Thu, 18 May 2017 09:54:41 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  RFD: the alien abduction prophecy protocol - lcamtuf's blog. "Okay, let's say you're abducted by time-traveling aliens. They tell you about three future calamities -- and then let you go. What should you do? Bear with me here: If you tell the world you've been unprovably abducted by aliens, they ignore you. So you have to prove you're believable by predicting the first calamity in a very public way that can't be faked. Have I gone nuts? Well, maybe. But this though experiment explains some fundamental concepts in computer security. Plus, it's got some fairly creative hacks that readers have suggested." (Alistair for Hugh). Ten Year Futures - Benedict Evans. "Lately, a lot of my talks have been about what the future holds. I'm a big skeptic of futurism because we simply can't know how society will respond to a technology, and it's the societal response -- not the technological advancement -- that really shapes the future. But if you're going to try and guess, you could do worse than this piece by Benedict Evans. After all, he writes that Mobile Is Eating The World, and while he sees VR and autonomous vehicles as cool, in this piece he argues that the next decade's real transformations are TV and shopping, industries where tech changes haven't really come home to roost... yet. Sometimes we look too far to the future." (Alistair for Mitch). Singapore 'vending machine' dispenses Ferraris, Lamborghinis - Reuters. "Late capitalism strikes again." (Hugh for Alistair). When did we start shopping at stores? - J Stor. "How did we ship before Amazon? Oh yeah, stores. But have we always shopped at stores? (Answer: no)." (Hugh for Mitch). Simple math is why Elon Musk's companies keep doing what others don't even consider possible - Quartz. "One of the standout presentations at the TED conference this year was the interview with Elon Musk. It's almost impossible to imagine that this one person is paving the way for electric cars, autonomous cars, commercial space flight, making humans a multi-planetary species, attempting to reinvent traffic, hi-speed tubes to transport people, solar energy, and - probably - a bunch of other stuff that my brain is currently forgetting. He's doing this all. At once. Right now. Maybe it is all simple math. Maybe we all need more motivation? Oh, did I mention that we're almost the exact same age? That stresses me out." (Mitch for Alistair). An Algorithm Summarizes Lengthy Text Surprisingly Well - MIT Technology Review. "The good news is that when the robots and artificial intelligence really takes hold, we will all have much more time for activities of leisure, spending time with our family and focusing on work that really stimulates us. I, for one, was looking forward to that moment in time, so that I could read. I read a lot now. I want to read a lot more. Oh, what? Wait... you're saying that reading will also be taken over to artificial intelligence?...." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising agency alistair croll amazon benedict evans bit current bit north book a futurists manifesto brand business blog complete web monitoring digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog elon musk facebook [...]



How Does Snapchat Stay Relevant? Do You Trust YouTube? And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Tue, 16 May 2017 05:51:31 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Do you like YouTube? Do you hate YouTube? 4+ billion videos are viewed daily on their platform and yet, YouTube ranked dead last for consumer safety in BI Intelligence's 2017 Digital Trust survey. Only 4% of survey respondents feel that YouTube is the safest platform to participate in or post on, making it by far the least chosen option. Even Twitter, with serious trolling issues, and a not so warm and fuzzy outlook from analysts, is viewed as safer. In short: we hate it but we can't look away. As Facebook and Instagram replicate every feature of Snapchat in an effort to render it useless, Snapchat is fighting back, by changing the core of how it works. A new infinity icon will allow a photo or video message to be replayed forever until the receiver exits the conversation thread. Snapchat messages, called "snaps," could previously only be seen for up to 10 seconds before they disappeared. Is this is sign that Snapchat is scared of Facebook or, more likely, a new reality that it's going to be harder and harder to tell Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and even Twitter apart from one another? Tweets still matter. Just ask Carter Wilkerson, a 16-year-old high school junior in Reno, Nevada. Last week, he became the owner of history's most-retweeted tweet, knocking Ellen DeGeneres and her famous Oscars selfie off her perch. When he sent his fateful tweet on April 5, he thought it might be a fun joke for his friends. He asked Wendy's how many retweets it would take for him to get free chicken nuggets for life. Wendy's said 18 million. Het got 3.4 million and that was more than enough for Wendy's, Ellen and even a lot of money to some good charities. See, Twitter can still be used for good.  App of the Week: Mobile Pocket. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/322769658&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no">   Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week bi intelligence brand business blog business insider carter wilkerson chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media ellen degeneres facebook google guest contributor i heart radio instagram j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel mobile pocket montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte radio segment radio station six pixels of separation snapchat social media technology terry dimonte twitter wendys wpp youtube    chom 977 fm [...]



Marketing And Influence Lessons From Terry O'Reilly - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 14 May 2017 05:29:53 PDT

Episode #566 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Terry O'Reilly is a legendary adman and radio broadcaster. In Canada, he is one of the most recognized authorities on great advertising, award-winning copywriting and host of two hit radio series. In 1990, he co-founded Pirate Radio & Television. He was won, literally, hundreds of awards for his writing and directing. He believes in the strength of powerful words, emotion in marketing and how to outsmart the competition without outspending them. He is author of two books, The Age of Persuasion and the recently published, This I Know - Marketing Lessons From Under The Influence. With that, most people know him as the host of the award-winning radio show, Under The Influence (which is the follow-up to this other radio hit series, The Age Of Persuasion). I consider myself very fortunate to call him a friend. Enjoy the conversation...  You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #566. Tags: adman advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker copywriter copywriting david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast pirate radio and television radio radio broadcaster radio series radio show social media terry oreilly the age of persuasion this i know twitter under the influence wpp   [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #359

Fri, 12 May 2017 07:28:53 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The Real Reason Chinatown Produce Is Crazy Cheap - Saveur. "In a talk on discontinuous innovation last week, I observed that a hamburger patty grown in a lab cost $325K in 2013 -- and just $12 in 2016. The world of food is changing radically, and with it the traditional distribution channels. If you've ever wondered how Chinatowns in North America manage to maintain a huge variety of produce, while also keeping costs down, here's your answer." (Alistair for Hugh). Inside a BDSM Dungeon with a Hillary Dom and a Guilty, Diaper-Clad Trump Voter - Vice Broadly. "Okay, this is decidedly not safe for work. But it definitely qualifies as interesting. And it's not really politics, in keeping with our promise to stay away from that stuff. But it is about atonement, and the pecadilloes of the human psyche. So yes, here is a story (with a film) about Trump supporters who are literally asking to be locked up and punished for their behavior. Few things have summed up the current psyche so well." (Alistair for Mitch). Power Lines in Anime - Tumblr. "The Internet eh? Here is an entire website dedicated to still of power lines and high tension wires from Anime." (Hugh for Alistair). Blade Runner: A Game-Chasing Science Fiction Classic - Cinephilia And Beyond. "This is almost certainly the most candy-filled article about Blade Runner you are likely to find, just in time for Blade Runner 2049." (Hugh for Mitch). The 'Billions' Exit Survey - The Ringer Staff - Medium. "I'm not much a television viewer anymore. I find it hard to follow shows and feel out of the loop when I miss an episode. Even recording them - or keeping them for later to binge watch - is impossible. The time never materializes for me. Plus, when given the choice, I'll choose a book over TV (or even a movie) any day. Not stating this to show off, but it's true. With that, I never miss an episode of Billions. It's brilliantly written and the dialogue and character development is both beautiful and deep. Here's a great little roundup of the show. I love Wags." (Mitch for Alistair). Craig Newmark Founded Craigslist To Give Back, Now He's A Billionaire - Forbes. "The story of Craigslist is a fascinating one. From what the business model did to dismantle the classified cash-cow that was the newspaper industry, to how honest, kind and sincere its founder, Craig Newmark, appears to be. Smartphones are changing the game now. Craigslist could be disrupted. Or will it be? There are a few startups that are enabling people to sell stuff locally and in the moment from their mobile devices. What is Craisglist all about? Will the company ever sell or go public (they say that they will not)? Here's a great read about an unlikely billionaire who just wants to be a good Internet citizen." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising agency alistair croll billions bit current bit north blade runner book a futurists manifesto brand broadly business blog cinephilia and beyond complete web monitoring craig nemark craigslist digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook forbes[...]



Is Technology Going To Make Us The Worst? And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Tue, 09 May 2017 10:22:50 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  This was a shorter version of our usual segment due to the vast flooding that is taking place in Montreal. Is it end of times? Between politics and artificial intelligence, it can easily feel this way. What seems like something out of an episode of Black Mirror comes Completed. It's being billed as "Yelp for professionals," but here's what it really does: it allows coworkers (and clients) to rate whether they like you or not. What do you think about that?  App of the Week: GarageBand, iMovie, Keynote, Pages, and Numbers for Mac and iOS are now all free! width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/321768085&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false"> Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week black mirror brand business blog chom fm completed ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook garageband google guest contributor i heart radio imovie ios j walter thompson jwt keynote linkedin mac marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte numbers pages radio segment radio station six pixels of separation social media technology terry dimonte twitter wpp yelp  chom 977 fm [...]



12 Powers Of A Marketing Leader With Thomas Barta - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 07 May 2017 05:53:03 PDT

Episode #565 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Thomas Barta recently co-authored the business book, The 12 Powers Of A Marketing Leader - How to succeed by building customer and company value. Barta is a former McKinsey Partner with over 20 years of marketing experience, and considered is a marketing leadership-pioneer. He speaks, writes, and conducts leadership workshops worldwide, while continuing his research into what works in business, leadership and marketing today. Barta's research-based concept of Marketing Leadership brings a new perspective to the world of marketing. It helps leaders develop a top-management view of the marketplace and the organization, so they can shape the C-suite agenda and drive profitable growth. Barta has consulted and been in marketing for over two decades, in 14 industries and in 45 countries. His clients include many of the world's most prominent companies, including over two dozen from the Fortune 500. Currently, he lives in Cologne, Germany. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #565. Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook fortune 500 google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing leader marketing leadership marketing podcast mckinsey mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast social media the 12 powers of a marketing leader thomas barta twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #358

Fri, 05 May 2017 13:13:42 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The Political Impossibility of What to Wear With Your Flak Jacket - Racked. "There is so much about this article that is of the times: War, a media culture, and the clashing of cultures and perceptions. 'You don't put stuff on your head if you're president,' President Obama told the US Naval Academy's football team after they offered him a custom helmet. That's politics 101.'" (Alistair for Hugh). This Lawsuit Goes to 11 - Bloomberg. "Looks like their suit goes to eleven. Decades after the mockumentary that inspired a generation of comedians into awkwardtainment, the people behind Spinal Tap decided they deserve some monies. Because of film industry shenanigans, they were denied revenue -- but they're going after it." (Alistair for Mitch). Roger Penrose On Why Consciousness Does Not Compute - Nautilus. "Brilliant physicist believes that the weirdness of (human) consciousness might be a fundamental property of the universe, and is most likely explained by quantum mechanics." (Hugh for Alistair). Can China Replace the West? - The New York Review of Books. "Here is a jaw-dropping set of statistics: In the year 2000, China's economy was about 12% the size of the US economy (measured by purchasing power parity). It was 50% by 2011. By 2014, China's economy was already the largest in the world. So, in the space of 15 years China has gone from a significant, but relatively small economy, to the largest in the world. That is extraordinary. What's going to happen next?" (Hugh for Mitch). Federal report: AI could threaten up to 47 percent of jobs in two decades - ArsTechnica. "We just want to ignore the things that we do not like. This is so upsetting. I know what you're thinking: This will also bring on new types of jobs and work. Has anybody really done a proper deep dive into this? If a human's future is simply managing the technology, that leaves some large and gaping holes in our society. So, as much as well like change, I wonder how true that is? What kind of world are we really creating, and do the inventors truly know what the invention will be used for?" (Mitch for Alistair). The psychological importance of wasting time - Quartz. "We tend to think that boredom is bad. That wasting time is... well... a waste of time. This was one of the big 'a-ha' moments that I had at the TED conference last week in Vancouver. If technology is training us that things never end (think about the infinite scroll of the newsfeed on Facebook or the choices you get on Netflix) and we never reach the 'end' of anything, we begin to train our minds and bodies to keep on keeping on. Not feeling like there is ever a break in anything, could create a very different type of human thinking being. I don't know about you, but the best of ideas typically find their way when I'm doing nothing at all. And, candidly, doing nothing at all stresses me out... apparently, I'm not the only one!" (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising agency ai alistair croll arstechnica artificial intelligence bit current bit north bloomberg book a futurists manifesto [...]



What You See On Facebook Vs. What Is Really Happening

Fri, 05 May 2017 08:44:53 PDT

What you see on Facebook: 9:45 - Arrival at Montreal airport. Prime parking spot right in front. Clutch! Post that to Instagram.  10:15 - Whisk through the priority line at securing and enjoying the free food, beverages and magazines in the airport lounge. Do I post this to show off the lounge and my itinerant street cred? 11:00 - Flight from Montreal to Toronto in business class. My Briggs & Riley carry-on easily fits on all planes. Smooth. Lots of legroom and early boarding.  12:45 - Clear customs thanks to Nexus - Global Entry and enjoying the free food, beverages and magazines in the airport lounge. Run into a few marketing industry executives, who just so happen to be traveling to New Orleans too for the Collision conference.  14:00 - Casually stroll to the gate and run into the one and only Saul Colt, who is on the same flight. Total selfie moment.  14:30 - Flight to New Orleans. 17:00 - Black car service is waiting for me at baggage claim.  17:45 - Checked into the hotel and walking down Bourbon Street to catch the city's vibe.  18:00 - Stumble into a classic New Orleans street float and a marching band as their Jazz Fest unfolds. 18:30 - Nice steak dinner while quietly watching the news at the restaurant bar.  23:39 - Into bed and debating between watching the news or something on Netflix.  6:00 - Dial-in for my weekly CTRL ALT Delete segment on CHOM FM. 6:30 - Head to soundcheck for the speaking event. 8:00 - Meet the mayor of New Orleans, Mitch Landrieu, who is welcoming the attendees to New Orleans. 9:00 - Opening keynote for the largest association of newspapers in the United States.  10:00 - Black car limo service back to airport.  10:30 - See my "what you don't see" list... What you don't see: the struggle is real. 17:30 pm - Arrival in New Orleans after seven hours of travel on a Sunday. Missing a weekend day with my family hurts so much.  18:30 - Dinner alone at the restaurant bar. 23:45 - Struggle to fall asleep in another strange room, strange hotel and strange city. Aching to be home on a Sunday night with my family.  5:00 - Wake up call. 6:00 - Dial in for my weekly CHOM segment. 6:30 - AV check at venue. 9:00 - Presentation. 10:00 - Driver back to New Orleans airport. 12:30 - Flight from New Orleans to Washington. 15:30 - Arrival at IAD airport only to discover that my 17:00 flight to Montreal has now been delayed by 2.5 hours. I will not be having dinner with my family, bath time or help to put the kids to bed. 18:00 - Flight now delayed until 21:00.  21:30 - Flight is cancelled due to "air traffic control". 21:30 - Flight change to the next day at 3 pm out of DCA (everything else is booked). Looks like a long night and following day ahead for me. 21:45 - Flight change from DCA to Toronto with a 24:00 takeoff that gets me back home at 1:30 am. This would not have happened had I not looked at the board to see other departing flights this evening. The customer service people at the airline were none-to-thrilled to have undo everything again. 22:00 - Toronto flight now delayed until 23:30.  23:00 - Toronto flight now delayed until 24:19.  24:45 - Toronto flight takes off. No chance of making my connection in Montreal. Instead of enduring Pearson Airport congestion again tomorrow, I switch to Billy Bishop - Toronto Island Airport for the next morning. I am given the 9:15 am flight, but there are earlier options.  1:20 - Arrive in Toronto and notice that the Montreal connection flight has been delayed until 1:30 am. I miss connecting by 30 minutes.  1:45 - Clear customs. Ensure that my hotel room has been held. Head to the cab stand. There is a line over 75 people deep. I opt for the black car service. Sleep is greater than money, at this point.  2:45 - Head hits pillow.  6:00 - Wake-up in an attempt to make an earlier flight.  6:45 - Arrive at Billy Bishop airp[...]



TED Conference, Flying Cars, UberEATS And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 01 May 2017 15:20:15 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  I just got back from another awesome TED conference in Vancouver that featured a TED Talk by the Pope! What were some of the bigger themes, and how did Tesla's Elon Musk steal the whole show by demonstrating how we should think about our future together? We thought autonomous vehicles were a long ways away, and now they are being tested and used in several markets. What about flying cars? Uber is starting to share details about these sky cabs. Last week in Dallas, they held an Uber Elevate Summit and discussed how cities like Dallas and Dubai are primed testing grounds. The company is hoping to have a demonstration ready for 2020 and earmarked 2023 for putting them into service. It's not just Uber, last week Alphabet CEO, Larry Page, backed the flying car startup, Kitty Hawk, which showed a video of what the "car" might look like. It's The Jetsons!  Speaking of Uber, last Wednesday the company launched UberEATS here in town. Montrealers can now order meals, desserts and late-night snacks from more than 100 restaurants. Here's how it works: $4.99 delivery fee goes to UberEATS. A restaurant employee sees the order on an iPad and prepares the food. A delivery person, either an Uber driver or a bike courier, collects the food from the restaurant and delivers it to the customer. UberEATS said the meal should arrive at a customer's door no more than 35 minutes after the order is placed. Now there's more competition for services like Foodora and A La Carte Express.  App of the Week: Wish. Take a listen right here... src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/320405672&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/pope_francis_why_the_only_future_worth_building_includes_everyone" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" width="640" height="360" scrolling="no" frameborder="0"> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mMWh4W1C2PM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Tags: a la carte express advertising agency alphabet amazon app of the week autonomous vehicles brand business blog chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media elon musk facebook flying cars foodora google guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt kitty hawk larry page marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte radio segment radio station six pixels of separation sky cabs s[...]



Marketing Trends And Innovations WIth Piers Fawkes - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 30 Apr 2017 03:58:40 PDT

Episode #564 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Piers Fawkes spends - what seems like - an awesome amount of time searching out trends, building data, publishing reports and curating news from around the world. There is a focus and his work does split off into business related verticals like design, travel, retail, advertising and more. Still his daily e-newsletters provide a vast swath of perspective, ideas and demonstrates the true creativity in business of our world today. I have long been a fan of his company, PSFK. And, along with running an incredible conference (check out PSFK 2017), Piers also recently published a report on marketing titled, The Future Of Advertising. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #564. Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker curation david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast marketing report mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast piers fawkes psfk psfk conference retail social media travel trend trend curation trend hunting trend reports twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #357

Fri, 28 Apr 2017 19:19:10 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  I built a robot to apply to thousands of jobs at once - here's what I learned - Fast Company. "It's not just blue-collar jobs that have to worry about automation. In fact, much recent research suggests white-collar ones are more vulnerable, because code can be upgraded faster than machines, and simply put, code makes fewer mistakes. Or does it? In this piece, the author sends out hundreds of job applications automatically -- and comes to some disheartening conclusions about how badly hirers have automated their side of the job-search bargain." (Alistair for Hugh). Leningrad - Kolshik - Vimeo. "Just amazing. It's like a music video and detective story. Fantastic and you have to watch it a few times to figure out what the hell is going on. Talk about massive outcomes from tiny starting conditions." (Alistair for Mitch). Tire ski jump - YouTube. "They really put the most extraordinary things on TV in Japan." (Hugh for Alistair). You can write hit songs like the Chainsmokers if you follow this snarky video's instructions - Mashable. "Hilarious instructional video on how to make a hit song. Easy peasy!" (Hugh for Mitch). What Makes a Genius? - National Geographic. "I love deep pieces like this. Is it nature? Is it nurture? A combination? Can you really 'make' a genius? How do we define it? This is a long and thoughtful and powerful read about certain individuals who really do make a dent in the universe. With that, is there a science behind how they pull it off? Is there something new that we need to know about how a genius comes to be?" (Mitch for Alistair). How eBooks lost their shine: 'Kindles now look clunky and unhip' - The Guardian. "I thought that more and more people were just using the Kindle app (or other reading apps) on their smartphones, instead of carrying around another device. It seems like mobile screens are getting bigger and bigger while costing less and less. Is it just the device? Now we're seeing the sales of eBooks take a little dive (so it's not the device?). Is it phones or - gasp - is it that people are reacting to the idea of reading extra longform content on their smartphones? People love and want paper books now more than ever? Things are starting to get confusing... and interesting in the world of book publishing. Read on, and don't think that this article is about the end of books. That is hardly the case." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/204150149" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0"> Leningrad - Kolshik from FancyShot on Vimeo. src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/f62Z8Ev9OXA" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0"> src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wyydWaVyJB8" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0"> Tags: >alistair croll advertising agency ai amazon amazon kindle artificial intelligence automation bit current bit north book book a futurists manifesto book publishing brand business blog chainsmoker[...]



Virtual, Augmented And Mixed Reality With Shel Israel And Robert Scoble - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 23 Apr 2017 04:18:25 PDT

Episode #563 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. The future of us humans connecting to technology will not be about the web or mobile. It will all take place in some kind of virtual reality. That future is happening faster than most of us would care to admit. Whether it will be virtual, augmented or mixed reality... that is yet to be defined. We're at that unique moment in time. Remember when we were not sure if the web was going to be called the Internet, the information superhighway, the web, etc...? Two thinkers and doers on this, exact, subject are Shel Israel and Robert Scoble. They have teamed up (again) to co-author their latest business book, The Fourth Transformation -- How Augmented Reality and Artificial Intelligence Will Change Everything. The book looks (deeply and intelligently) at what we're in the midst of right now, and where technology is really taking us. In fact, they're so bullish on this space, that they've partnered to launch a consultancy business called, Transformation Group. With that, many will also recognize these two digital futurists as the co-authors of Naked Conversations and Age Of Context. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #563. Tags: advertising advertising podcast age of context ai ar artificial intelligence audio augmented reality blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook futurist google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast mixed reality mobile mr naked conversations robert scoble shel israel social media technology the fourth transformation transformation group twitter virtual reality vr web wpp   [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #357

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:39:06 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Jungletown - Viceland. "Documentary filmmaker Ondi Timoner first showed up at Startupfest, a conference I chair, years ago, working on a film about a founder and his quest to build the next Facebook. She adapted that into a video series; she'd had success with things like We Live In Public and won at Sundance. This year, I launched a conference in Panama, and found out Ondi had been working on a show there too. It's about a bunch of kids who try to set up a sustainable village in the jungle. Its announcement sparked a Twitter firestorm -- is this white privilege writ large, or a slow descent into Lord Of the Flies? Whatever it becomes, with Ondi at the helm, it's likely to be an interesting ride." (Alistair for Hugh). The Master Would Approve: The Cast of MST3K on the Surreal Joys of its Return - Paste Quarterly. "When I first moved to San Diego in 1995, I was confronted by a bizarre wave of US shows: Aeon Flux on MTV stands out, as does MST3K. Over the years, I eschewed MP3s, but scoured torrent sites for episodes of this weird, hackneyed, subversive program. And now, after much Kickstarter and some Netflix support, it's back. Here's what it was, how it happened, and why you might like it." (Alistair for Mitch). The Other President - This American Life. "A fascinating insight into Putin's (former) chief propagandist, who implemented a program of 'managed democracy'." (Hugh for Alistair). What is Technology Doing to Us? - Sam Harris Podcast. "I've been enjoying listening to Sam Harris' long conversations with smart people lately. This fascinating discussion with Tristan Harris (former Design Ethicist at Google) projects out the impacts of the 'persuasion technology' that underpins, well, just about every consumer-facing tech/web business. The impacts are profound, especially when you consider the enlightenment concepts of democracy, free will, and rational decision-making driving society." (Hugh for Mitch). "Mission-driven" leaders are losing their mystique - Quartz. "Silicon Valley is learning something, as a journalist, that I have known since the late eighties: words matter. You can't be out in the world with a mission statement about making dents in the universe, if there's a ton of activating happening at the c-level and management team that says otherwise (and makes you look bad). Living and breathing a mission-driven business isn't easy, but technology puts you under the scrutiny and microscope of everyone. More than that, when one domino falls, it makes everybody, everywhere look for the next one. It's corrosive and the valley better beware." (Mitch for Alistair). The Oral History Of TED, A Club For The Rich That Became A Global Phenomenon - Wired. "As someone who has been attending the TED conference for close to a decade, it's tough to read that headline. I'm not sure that it's a club for the rich, so much as it is a place for people who will spend a lot to invest in themselves. That's my take. Still, on Monday, I will make my annual pilgrimage to the TED conference in Vancouver. As usual, the energy is high and I can't wait to have my[...]



The Pending Influencer Marketing Bubble

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 06:40:43 PDT

If you're looking for growth in the marketing industry, look no further than influencer marketing. The global advertising business will see a slight slowdown in 2017, according to Magna. The industry will only grow by 3.7% with total advertising revenue expected to reach $511 billion. That's over half a trillion dollars. The slowdown could be related to a lack of "big events" like a major political campaign or the Olympics (which usually pushes incremental ad spend). We're also seeing something else happen: the chairs on the deck are being shuffled around. Ad spend is bleeding from traditional media channels and being reallocated to digital. Digital budgets will see double-digit growth and will become the top media category this year, over-taking television advertising sales for the first time ever. Every other media category will not feel this kind of wind in their sails.   This is a big deal, but it does not tell the story... It's not just money going from tv ads and newspapers over to Google and Facebook. Influencer marketing has shifted from the new and shiny bright object to becoming the fastest growing channel in digital marketing today. TL;DR: brands love paying influencers hefty fees to get them to shill their wares. For every advancement that we're seeing in the marketing technology world (think marketing automation, programmatic, artificial intelligence, self-serve tools, etc...), there's a hot new startup replicating these platforms specifically for influencer marketing. There are multiple and big agencies who have one sole focus: connect brands to influencers. And, of course, influencers are loving it. In the past short while, we've seen companies like Google, Twitter and Adobe make acquisitions of businesses in the influencer marketing space. It still seems to be heating up, with no signs of slowing down. Even Amazon has been (somewhat) quietly renaming their affiliate marketing program as an influencer marketing platform (and targeting some of the influencers with larger followings to create more traction and opportunities).  If everything is so exciting in influencer marketing, why is there a pending bubble to burst? Influencers build significant audiences. It's not just a consumer watching a piece of media. Fans of influencers are (usually) "all in." They're attracted to these influencers for a myriad of reasons (the influencer's knowledge, likeablity, how the influencer is a part of the community rather than someone pushing content down to an audience, etc...). Influencer marketing is working, because the relationship between the content creator and the fans is built on trust, and how close the influencer gets to the audience. This makes things (somewhat) tenuous for brands. The brand is not just running a pre-roll ad before the content. For a true influencer marketing campaign to work, the influencer has to really believe in the brand and be able to create content that is reflective of both the brand's needs and the audience's receptiveness to this content. Brands need to tread carefully here, but the influencer is really the one who has to be the most careful. Any mis-step, any sign of shilling without belief in the product/service, and it could cost them audience, growth and long-term staying power. You would think that this would make influencer marketing one of the most powerful forms of marketing and endorsement.  Yes... and no. It's not that money corrupts. It is that money can skew things. Influencers can be quite convincing. Influencers can be quite manipulative. Even with full transparency that the content is sponsored (an ad), money can sway influencers. This is especially true in more mature influencer marketing [...]



The Audience (Formerly Known As The Audience)

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 06:48:15 PDT

Who is your audience? On my early morning drive to the airport, I caught the tail-end of Howard Stern interviewing Sheryl Crow. Crow was live and in the studio promoting her upcoming album. The constant reflections and self-commentary on how she's just a middle-aged white woman, were both self-deprecatinglty funny and illuminating. Even rock stars question their own relevancy every now and again (maybe brands should come at it with the same self-reflection and humour?). As the interview was winding down, Stern asked Crow who this album was created for? Without missing a beat, Crow responded: "who knows who my audience is anymore?" It wasn't meant to be sarcastic. It wasn't meant to be self-deprecating. Creatively, Sheryl Crow is in a place, where she's writing and creating the music that she wants. Her sentiment was meant to mean that if the music feels right, it will find an audience, but it did give pause. Do you know who your audience is anymore? At a recent speaking event, the Chief Marketing Officer pulled me aside to ask for some advice. The company was launching a new product aimed at business travellers, and was curious about the best travel apps for these types of consumers. Immediately, a persona of the modern business traveller was being compiled in my mind's eye... Male. White. Middle-aged. Salt and pepper hair (male pattern baldness). Business suit. Shined shoes. Tumi briefcase. Travelpro carry-on roller (4 wheeler). Bose noise-cancelling headphones. iPhone but PC laptop. Funky socks. Interesting glasses. Airline status luggage tags. Lounge access. Do you see this modern business traveller persona in your mind's eye? I imagined this individual pulling into the airport in their Audi and whisking through security with their Global Entry. Back to this morning and Sheryl Crow. As I sat in the airport lounge (the modern business traveller's home away from home), I reflected on my conversation with this CMO and looked around. There must have been about 150 modern business travellers in the mist. Maybe four of them looked like the persona above. In fact, even if closer to eighty percent of them matched the persona above, I wondered how many of their personal interests, traits and purchasing habits were similar? I'm guessing close to zero beyond their own self-image desires to look like this "modern business traveller." Personas and analytics are not the audience. Is it possible that personas and your analytics are not your audience? Is it possible that it's getting harder and harder to gather up all of your audience members, and paint a brush of similarity across them all? Think about the last concert that you went to. Think about your last shopping experience. Diversity isn't just about how brands hire or how your kid's playground looks at recess. With so much access to information, connectivity, global marketplaces and more, perhaps everyday is a winding road (as Sheryl Crow sings) when trying to figure out who your true audience is? Who is my audience? Often, before I start recording my podcast, this is the question that a guest will ask me. I'd like to think that the audience for Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is senior marketing professionals and the senior leadership of large national and multi-national brands. This is what the persona and analytics would lead me to believe. Then, the reality of emails and meeting people out in the wild and in their protein forms completely cracks that model. In fact, many brand leaders act surprised when they meet their consumers, mostly because they look nothing like the personas that were built and are being marketed against.  New thinking around audienc[...]



What Makes A Great Brand?

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 11:37:07 PDT

Not a good brand. Not a successful brand... a great brand? In fact, before attempting to answer this question, it's probably important to define what, exactly, a brand is? For me a brand is the complete experience and manifestation that a company produces, and how it is then internalized by the consumer. Candidly, that's a little bit vapid when you consider that piles of business books and courses have been written and conducted to explain what a true brand is. Still, the brand is the experience that a consumer has when it comes to product, price, promotion and place. Now, what brand is truly "great" in your estimation?  It's not always the biggest, the most profitable or the most well known. One could argue that you would need to hit those three mountaintops to be considered "great," and that's fair enough. Does size make a brand great? I know many great brands that many of you would question. Some think Apple is a great brand. Many hate it. Same could be said for just about any brand. Still... let's push on this together: What makes a great brand? Let's make a list of what makes a brand great... How it makes a consumer feel. How it is mission-based and driven. How it is on the consumer's side. How trustful it is. How its inspires confidence. How it handles customer support. How it aligns with consumer's values. How it prices itself in relation to perceived value. How well it communicates. How well it knows its customers. How unique it is in relation to its competitors. How well it demonstrates its passion. How consistent it is. How well distributed it is in its market. Any more to add? Candidly, many of the answers that we give to this idea of "what makes a brand great?" Feels more tactical and post-purchase, than what got them to be considered great in the first place. Is a great brand one that understands the power of innovation while injecting a lot of money to make their products/services known? That's not always the case. We have seen countless instances, when the 800 pound gorilla of any given industry has attempted to introduce a new brand... and failed spectacularly. These are companies with hefty research and development teams and the funds to push an idea through to the market and still... crickets and tumbleweeds.  There's something about great brands that many of us don't want to/never will admit... Often what makes a brand great is simply tapping into the zeitgeist at the time and a lot of luck. Chief Marketing Officers, brand architects and marketing professionals don't like to talk about it/admit it, because it diminishes their impact, and continues the human narrative that we're all in deep control of the outcomes in our lives (not to get too spiritual, but we're often not in control). This is not hyperbole when it comes to building a great brand. It is fact. I spent over a decade speaking to rock stars and musicians. If I had one genuine curiosity at the time, it was why them... and not someone else? This is where I netted out: it's not always tangible, definable or something that went according to plan. Sometimes, it just worked (most often, it did not). When this happens, there is no formula, prescription or reasoning. These bands (and, yes, bands are very similar to brands), just happened to hit a weird intersection between capturing the zeitgeist and lots of luck. How is this possible? Throughout my years as a music writer and publisher of music magazines, I have seen countless amazing bands with major record deals, massive production budgets, a hit producer on their album, amazing support tours for when they were road-ready, the best managers in the business. and m[...]



The Business Of Addictive Technology With Adam Alter - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 16 Apr 2017 04:50:35 PDT

Episode #562 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. When a business and marketing professional asks me which thinker and author they should be paying more attention to, I immediately respond with Adam Alter. His first book, Drunk Tank Pink, was a fascinating journey into the relationship between the forces of our environment and how it shapes the outcomes of our lives. His latest book, Irresistible, looks at how addictive all of our technology is, and why businesses need for it to be this way (and how they keep us hooked). Adam is an Associate Professor of marketing and psychology at NYU's Stern School of Business and psychology department. His research focuses on the intersection of behavioral economics, marketing, and the psychology of judgment and decision-making. He's also an all-around nice guy. So, put your iPhone down and enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #562. Tags: adam alter advertising advertising podcast audio behavioural economics blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog drunk tank pink facebook google irresistible itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast marketing professional marketing professor mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast nyu psychology social media social psychology stern school of business technology technology addiction twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #356

Fri, 14 Apr 2017 01:48:04 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Appearing in Stock Photos Was the Biggest Mistake of My Life - Vice. "This title says it all; but the reasons why are worth considering. It isn't just that royalty-free clipart is common; it's also that there is a demand for a specific face to represent grimaces and regret (which this guy has); and that in a connected world, news of our fame leaks back to us in ways it once didn't. Also, it's pretty funny. Would you want to be the face of genital diseases in Brazil?" (Alistair for Hugh). Is Lo-Fi House the First Genre of the Algorithm Age? - Thump - Vice. "Alistair's Law of Music Backlash writ large. As we try to train algorithms (like the one Hugh shared below of Bob Ross deep-dreamed into madness) to get better and better at things humans do, humans like what's flawed and distorted. It's a Wabi-sabi for the digital age. And some of its first offspring are trends like glitch (in audio, visuals, and advertising)--and lo-fi house, which was shaped by algorithms such as YouTube's recommendations. Mitch, I know this isn't bass or metal, but it's still for you." (Alistair for Mitch). Deeply Artificial Trees - artBoffin - Vimeo. "What is this? What is it? My God. What what is it? This is, if I understand correctly, a neural network-generated video of Bob Ross painting; or, the most hellish version of David Lynch's nightmares." (Hugh for Alistair). Just a clown singing Pinball Wizard to the tune of Folsom Prison Blues - BoingBoing. "Clown. Pinball Wizard. Folsom Prison Blues. Nightmares." (Hugh for Mitch). Consumers Starting To Buy More Through Voice Assistants - MediaPost. "How often do you think about your own conspicuous consumption? Maybe it's no longer just about buying expensive items to display wealth and income rather than to cover your real needs? Maybe it's just about getting more stuff, instead of stuff that you really need? If you think about it, these voice assistants are making it ever-more easy for everyone to act like an old school king. Simply wave your fingers in the air and ask for something... and it arrives. Sometimes that stuff will be there within a few hours. We invent technology and often don't know what it will be used for. After reading this, think about how much stuff we'll simply ask for versus the stuff that we actually need." (Mitch for Alistair).  A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel - Harvard Business Review. "Facebook's job is to keep you coming back. The people you are connected to on Facebook have a job too. Their job is (mostly) to make you feel like you're not living up to your full potential, because everything that everyone else posts is the life that they want you to think that they're living. Only the good stuff. The result: we're all much more miserable. And, the more you use it, the worse you feel (unless you've done a little bit of work on yourself, how you feel, how you think and how you manage your life). It's a misery o[...]



Fidget Marketing For A World That Won't Stop Moving

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 16:37:01 PDT

How should brands connect to consumers who just can't stop moving? Social psychology and marketing professor, Adam Alter, has a new book out. It's called, Irresistible - The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked (you can check out my conversation with Adam right here: The Business Of Addictive Technology With Adam Alter - Episode #562 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast). It's not just technology and how these developers engage, connect and ensure that consumers come back that should be worrying. It is also who we are (all) becoming - as a society. It's no longer a question of how healthy/unhealthy it is for us to be so constantly and consistently connected to technology, it's also about how we just can't stop doing something... anything at all times. Keep moving. Keep busy. It's more than a habit. On one hand, we're seeing an increased interest in mindfulness practice and meditation (look no further than the mass success of apps like Headspace). On the other side, we're neck-deep in a culture of people (and this is affecting kids too) that just can't stop doing something/moving. For kids with more severe issues like ADHD, etc... there was this little toy called the fidget cube and fidget spinner that took off on Kickstarter. The lore goes that kids who fell on a spectrum would fidget with these devices, and that would both calm them down and help them to focus. Now, these toys/devices have crossed over to the mainstream. Everybody wants them. Not just kids. The hottest toy going these days are fidget spinners. You can find them cheapish ($5 - $10 range) but they also can quickly move into the $25 - $75 range as well. It would be easy to dismiss this craze as something that could become the next Yo-Yo. After watching these fidget spinners take off in popularity with elementary school kids and move up to adults who are, simply, looking for something to fidget with at all times, it should give us all pause. Always fidgeting. Whether it's thumbing through a newsfeed, responding to text messages or incessantly checking out iPhone for updates, that digital desire to always be flicking, fondling, clicking and tugging at your smartphone is now transcending digital with a new-ish version of the stress ball... and the real concern should be the habit-forming nature of how these young kids (and adults) always need something to do. Much has been written on the subject of stillness (here's a great primer from Pico Iyer's excellent TED Talk, The Art of Stillness), but what seems like a innocuous gift to a kid, or just following along with what's hot in toys today, could well be programming the next generation to always be moving, doing, etc... A tougher environment for business to come.  We see the process of selling and marketing to consumers as "moments in time." The concept that while consumers are watching (or engaging with) media, we can get our brand messaging in front of them. Brands work on the newer digital platforms by being present should a consumer be searching or chatting with another consumer about a brand, a competitor or looking at a catagory for a potential purchase. We know that we're already in the age of distraction, but what if this shifts to the age of fidgeting? A place where these is never a moment when a consumer is doing nothing at all. A place where consumers are always doing something else. A place where consumers are constantly fidgeting. Is the future about fidget marketing? Will brands be faced with new challenges as they try to get their messaging [...]



Automated Creativity Is Inevitable (And A Good Idea) - Strategy Magazine Column

Thu, 13 Apr 2017 08:55:45 PDT

You can't throw a marketing professional down a flight of stairs these days without the words "artificial intelligence" tumbling out of their mouth. We've seen a slew of announcements about just how much artificial intelligence is going to be used to replace all of us protein-based, left-and-right-brain-evolved monkeys in marketing today. Still, there seems to be this top-level thinking that artificial intelligence will never be smart enough to replace the creativity and human insights that truly make our work sing in the marketplace. What makes us so confident? This isn't about a dystopian science fiction narrative, the inevitable moment where we switch on SkyNet. This also isn't about the futurist's Pollyanna glee over that moment when Star Trek's Holodeck goes from virtual reality to reality, and suddenly nobody wants to leave the hot sex fantasy of virtual worlds. Maybe we've all spent too much time watching Westworld? Maybe it's just me? Coca-Cola's global senior digital director, Mariano Bosaz, recently did an interview with AdWeek during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. He talked about breaking the age-old process of creative briefs, pitching ideas and producing content for experimenting with "automated narratives" (quick, get that title on your business card, before everyone else does). Bosaz believes that artificial intelligence can do simple content activities like update social media platforms and choose music for video content. His is a long-term vision for the industry, but it could come sooner than most people anticipate. AI is already doing the work of creatives in other arenas, from composing music to bots writing all kinds of weather reports and basic sports journalism. Companies like Tronc (formerly Tribune Publishing) will be using artificial intelligence to ramp up video production from a few hundred to two thousand videos a day. It's not hyperbole. There's technology, distribution and a plan at play here. Still, great content and advertising won't ever become the job of artificial intelligence... will it? Could AI ever create something as mesmerizing as a Monet, as touching as a chorus from Dylan or as cutting as the words of Twain? It could. Look at it this way. Currently, many people are scared about relinquishing their driving to a computer. But as someone who had the pleasure of taking a joyride in a Google autonomous vehicle on an open road in a populated city, my first reaction was: I never want a human being to drive another car again, including me. Being privy to exactly how much the computer can "see", parse and react to in relation to our simple brains made it evident just how transformative that technology could be. Think about the sheer number of cultural and artistic inputs that artificial intelligence can consume, parse and remix to come up with variations on a creative brief. It's fair to argue that they could be better at understanding and emoting than humans with that many inputs. Artificial intelligence is not going to affect every part of business and then just stop when it comes to creativity. The wheels are already in motion. So let's think about it in terms of the here and now. If bots are currently (and successfully) writing articles (and humans are none the wiser), what kind of baseline creative content could machines produce for your brand today? Think about all the different iterations on an email newsletter for targeting. Is there part of your creative process that is both repetitive and time-consuming that simple AI techno[...]



Be The Brand That You Wish To See In The World

Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:18:34 PDT

Brands have done a wonderful job of stepping in it over the past little while, haven't they? Usual gaffs and poor advertising judgment aside, brands may have crossed a new line when they are physically accosting and having their paid customers roughed up and out of the brand experience. Not sure a brand wants to be known as the new "Fight Club"... unless they're putting out a sequel to the 1999 blockbuster film. And with that, comes many things: excuses, apologies, adapting policies, legalese, public relations, spin, consumer backlash, social media armchair quarterbacking, memes (oh, the memes), and the general piling-on of traditional media and the late night show crews. It's enough to make a brand want to curl up in a corner and die... for a little while.  Many pundits point to the stock market as an indicator of just how much value/money a brand pays when they make silly (and super huge stupid) mistakes. The next day's markets are not a true indicator. One needs to look out (about a month) to see if there truly is any lingering impact, or if the corporation lives to tell the tale of another stellar quarter. The bigger the brand (and the bigger the gaff), the less we have (historically) seen any kind of longterm impact. The big behemoths have resilience, don't they? This is a generality (and there are exceptions to the rule, of course), but it's true. One airline's massive public relations and business scandal today is hardly even mentioned on the next quarterly earnings calls. If you're a consumer advocate, that can be a depressing fact. If you're a brand, it gives them carte blanche to make massive mis-steps, correct as they go, and hope that the market's memory is short.  Is this the way that consumer's really want brands to be? There seems to be common thread throughout many of these mistakes that can easily be summed as: "it is legal?". There are rules and regulations in place. With that, mistakes are human nature so long as they don't cross the rule of law. In the UFC-like clip from the major airline this week, there is that same underlying statement hidden with the brand's apology. This is all legal (unfortunate, but within their legal rights to remove the passenger). Here's a pretty clear and simple rule for a brand that is looking to trascend the ordinary, and move from good to great (as the saying goes): If all a brand is looking to do is stay within the legal bounds of what is acceptable, it's going to be a tough slog towards greatness.  Oversold, overbooked, or even having a clause that allows a paying customer to removed so that an employee can take their spot is not going to be compared against whether a brand lobbied government or created a loophole to make this a legal practice. Your consumer is not a lawyer or a government official. They are your paying customers. They come first. Always. Period. Just because your industry has a set of laws, legislations, regulations and more, it does not mean that the brand's job is to get as close to the edge of that law as possible without falling into the abyss. To be a brand that cares... you need to be a brand that is better than the law.  Why not simply ignore those laws, regulations and legislations? Know them. Ensure that your people know them, but let your brand be the one that puts the consumer first. Let your brand be the one that doesn't need those rules or laws, because you would never - as a practice of buisness - get close to what is being considered offside.  Who would not want to be [...]



Transform Your Digital Marketing - Live (And Free) In Montreal This Wednesday

Tue, 11 Apr 2017 11:49:55 PDT

I will be speaking live in Montreal this coming Wednesday... and it's free. I am often asked when I will be speaking live in Montreal. Candidly, it does not happen often. And, when it does, it's usually a private corporate event that is not open to the public. So, if you're interested in seeing my latest keynote presentation (and what I've been thinking about when it comes to disruption, marketing innovation and the future of business), you are more than welcome to join me on Wednesday, April 12th, 2017 at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (1379 Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal, Quebec). There is one catch: You must register. Why is my presentation and this live event open to the public and free? It turns out that KPI Digital (an IBM partner company), the APCM (Association des Professionnels de la Communication et du Marketing), AMR (Association du Marketing Relationnel) and the Canadian Marketing Association have all come together to host, sponsor and bring this event to Montreal.  Space is limited. It's not a huge venue, so if you are interested, please do register. The event will take place from 5:30 - 7:30 pm this coming Wednesday. I will be speaking for about an hour. Here's what I will be talking about: "We live in a culture of change. Most brands are overwhelmed by the massive shifts they have to make to their business models. Disruption is everywhere. Digital transformation is imperative. We live in the Uber-ization of everything. There are several new (and dramatic) realities that will force businesses to rethink many of their commonly held beliefs about what works in business today, and what the future may look like. Interestingly, this is less about the evolution of technology and much more about how consumers have become that much more efficient in this very different landscape. Bring an open mind, because the world continues to change and challenge brands like never before. The new leadership is being a digital leader. This is your compass." Transform your brand and your digital marketing this coming Wednesday night in Montreal. I hope to see you there! Register here: Transform Your Digital Marketing Strategy With Mitch Joel (President, Mirum) Live In Montreal. (Please note: the registration website is in French, but my presentation will be 100% in English). Tags: advertising agency amr apcm brand business business blog business model business transformation canadian marketing association cma culture digital leader digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital marketing strategy digital transformation disruption future of business ibm ibm partner innovation j walter thompson jwt keynote keynote presentation kpi digital marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing innovation mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal montreal marketing online culture presentation six pixels of separation technology transformation uber wpp [...]



Amazon Is Eating Retail, Uber Is In Hot Water (Again) And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 10 Apr 2017 08:28:40 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Amazon is eating everything. Literally. They're calling it "the Amazon effect." Just this week, the Payless shoe chain filed for bankruptcy, Ralph Lauren said it will close its flagship Fifth Avenue Polo store, Rue21 is preparing to file for bankruptcy as well. Hudson's Bay Company didn't mince words about their retail challenges last week, and Bloomberg is reporting that we could see over 50 retailers file for bankruptcy this year alone.  Uber is back in the news. It's not good news. Now, the company is involved in a class action suit over the use of "sophisticated" software that was able to defraud not just the drivers, but us passengers as well. It was filed in federal court in Los Angeles last week. And, if proven to be true, paints a terribly anti-Silicon Valley view of this company as it continues to struggle with good values and ethics in business.  This Wednesday evening, I will be giving my latest keynote presentation (for free) here in Montreal. I rarely do events that are open to the public. It's part of a Canadian Marketing Association event in partnership with KPI Digital. It's from 5:30 - 7:30 pm at Musee des Beaux Arts, and anybody is welcome to come but they have to register here. App of the Week: Postepic. Take a listen right here... src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/316998269&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week bloomberg brand business blog canadian marketing association chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook google guest contributor hudsons bay company i heart radio j walter thompson jwt kpi digital marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte payless shoes polo radio segment radio station ralph lauren retail retailer rue 21 rue21 silicon valley six pixels of separation social media technology terry dimonte twitter uber wpp  chom 977 fm  postepic [...]



Reengineering Retail With Doug Stephens - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 09 Apr 2017 04:30:16 PDT

Episode #561 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Doug Stephens is one of the world's foremost retail industry futurists. His work and thinking has influenced some of the world's best-known retailers, agencies and brands. Prior to founding Retail Prophet, Doug spent over 20 years as a professional in the retail industry. He is the author of two business books: The Retail Revival - Re-Imagining Business for the New Age of Consumerism and his latest, Reengineering Retail - The Future of Selling in a Post-Digital World. The world of retail is facing disruption, innovation and digitization all at once. Is this the end or just the beginning of retail? Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #561. Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker consumer consumerism david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital world digitization disruption Doug Stephens facebook futurist google innovation itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast post digital world reengineering retail retail retail futurist retail industry retail prophet selling social media the retail revival twitter wpp [...]