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Preview: Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Twist Image

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum



Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Blog is marketing and communications insights from the edge. Mitch Joel will unravel the complex world of digital marketing and social media with the perspective of a digital marketing agency. The Six Pixels Of Separat



Last Build Date: Mon, 19 Jun 2017 07:10:26 PDT

 



Amazon Goes For Whole Foods (Not Slack), Netflix Kills Cable TV And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 07:10:26 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Late last week, there was buzzing that Amazon was about to buy Slack. Then, suddenly, it was announced that Amazon bought Whole Foods for close to $14 billion dollars. Why did the masters of online retail buy a brick and mortar organic food retail chain?  How about this for a staggering glimpse into how the media landscape has changed: last week it was confirmed that more people now subscribe to Netflix than cable TV in the US. This can (and will) have a dramatic impact on everything from how content is created to advertising.  App of the week: Meal Connect. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/328824576&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week apple brand business blog chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook google guest contributor i heart radio j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog meal connect mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte netflix radio segment radio station six pixels of separation slack social media technology terry dimonte twitter whole foods wpp  chom 977 fm [...]



All Things Growth Hacking With Sean Ellis - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 04:46:21 PDT

Episode #571 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. He's a consummate entrepreneur. Not just in starting businesses, but in thinking about how businesses can really (and strategically) acquire customers with a different angle than traditional marketing thinking. Sean Ellis is the founder and CEO of GrowthHackers. And, yes, he is the person who coined the now buzzy term, "growth hacking" back in 2010. Prior to GrowthHackers, Sean was head of marketing at LogMeIn and Uproar, when both companies went from launch to IPO. He is also the first marketer at Dropbox, Eventbrite, Lookout and Xobni. If that were not enough, Sean is also an angel investor and startup advisor. Recently, he published the business book, Hacking Growth. Enjoy the conversation...   You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #571. Tags: advertising advertising podcast angel investor audio blog blogging brand branding business business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog dropbox entrepreneur eventbrite facebook google growth hacker marketing growth hackers growth hacking growthhackers hacking growth itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast logmein lookout management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast sean ellis social media startup startup advisor traditional marketing twitter uproar wpp xobni [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #364

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 09:08:33 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Visualizing the Jobs Lost to Automation - Visual Capitalist. "This is a great way to understand the impact of technology on employment. A quick look will show you the massive shifts in jobs -- gone are those with specialization and repetition; arriving are those which encourage generalism and empathy." (Alistair for Hugh). How The Trendiest Grilled Cheese Venture Got Burned - Backchannel - Medium. "Ah, hubris. When you're wildly successful in a tech startup, why would your next venture be a grilled-cheese-and-soup franchise? I don't care if you have a revolutionary new toaster oven ('Not a sandwich press!' Kaplan retorted. 'This is two induction burners! Microwaves! Silpats!') It's still soup and a sandwich. Consume with a side of schadenfreude." (Alistair for Mitch). Solar Power Will Kill Coal Faster Than You Think - Bloomberg. "Well, look. It's not all bad. Turns out that the cost of solar energy is falling faster than anyone expected, and if trends continue, by 2020 solar will be cheaper than coal." (Hugh for Alistair). Redditors design worst volume sliders possible - Designer News. "Here's one for the designer in all of us." (Hugh for Mitch). Our sun likely had a twin called 'Nemesis' - Futurity. "Great. Our son has an evil twin and it's called 'Nemesis'. Just when you think you know everything about anything..." (Mitch for Alistair). Your Best Business Partner Is Your Polar Opposite; Here's How To Get Along With Them - Fast Company. "I've had the same three business partners for close to 15 years. I often joke that we get along so great because they hate everything that I have to do... and the feeling is mutual. Still, when I get asked about our very strong bond (we're not just business partners, but close friends), I often reflect on how it makes for a better work environment when your business partners don't have the same interests as you do. I've been lucky. This article picks at a couple of the reasons why and how we navigate our relationships... and how others can as well." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising agency alistair croll automation backchannel bit current bit north bloomberg book a futurists manifesto brand business blog complete web monitoring designer news digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook fast company futurity gigom harvard business school hugh mcguire human 20 iambic j walter thompson jwt lean analytics librivox link bait link exchange link sharing managing bandwidth marketing marketing agency marketing blog medium mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel pandemonio press books reddit resolveto six pixels of separation social media solve for interesting startupfest strata tilt the windmill visual capitalist year one labs    wpp [...]



Apple's HomePod, Tracking People And Keys And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 11:31:20 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Terry is back! Last week we talked up Apple's big WWDC event. This event doesn't usually talk up hardware (it's usually about the software), but the hot talk was all about the HomePod. A bluetooth winless speaker that can also listen and interacts with your voice. Will this disrupt everything from Sonos and Bose to Amazon's Alexa? Plus, what else was announced?  How do we feel about tracking our kids like we could track our keys? First came Tile and now Magpie. It's a great technology that really does help you track things that you lost, but it can be used to also keep an eye on things (like people). There is a lot of tech like this already on the market, but Magpie is not only new, it also has a built-in SIM card. This means it has an unlimited range and can work anywhere there's a cellular network (over 185 countries). to be exact.  App of the Week: Noizio. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/327739829&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> Tags: advertising agency alexa amazon amazon alexa app of the week apple apple wwdc bluetooth bose brand business blog chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook google guest contributor hardware homepod i heart radio j walter thompson jwt magpie marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte noizio radio segment radio station sim card six pixels of separation social media software software development sonos technology terry dimonte tile tracking twitter voice wireless speaker wpp wwdc  chom 977 fm [...]



Charlene Li On Disruption - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 11 Jun 2017 06:40:19 PDT

Episode #570 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Charlene Li is a Principal Analyst at Altimeter, a Prophet company. Many people know her best as the co-author of the groundbreaking book on digital marketing and social media, Groundswell (which was named one of the best business books in 2008). She is also the author of the New York Times bestsellers, Open Leadership and The Engaged Leader. Charlene is one of the foremost experts on business strategy and disruptive technology. She is a sought-after speaker and advisor to many top global companies. With that, she will soon publish her latest book, The Disruptor's Agenda. These days, you can't throw a business professional down a flight of stairs without the word "disruption" tumbling out of their mouth. Here's what disruption is, what it looks like and how to embrace to embrace it. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #570. Tags: advertising advertising podcast altimeter audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker charlene li david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog disruption facebook google groundswell innovation itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast new york times open leadership prophet social media the disruptors agenda the engaged leader twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #363

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 06:29:36 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Many pet rabbits will die in Second Life on Saturday - Rock Paper Shotgun. "Usually, the rabbit dying is a plot device on the aforementioned comedies. But the digital age is decidely weirder. Look no further than Second Life, where a trademark dispute and some Digital Rights Management means scores of digital bunny pets will enter hibernation, never to awaken, as their food goes offline. Now put on your Black Mirror futurist had, and consider: If your heirs don't pay your digital estate tax, will the AI-backed chatbot that simulates you based on a corpus of social media content go dark forever, depriving future generations of your natty wisdom and quick turns of phrase?" (Alistair for Hugh). The Internet Killed the Teen Sex Comedy - Mel Magazine - Medium. "Hard to think of the nineties as a time of innocence. But films like American Pie, coming-of-age fare where teens talked about taboos in hushed voices, are gone. Weaned on films like Porky's and Hot Dog -- with all of their misogyny, prejudice and misinformation -- it's hard to notice they vanished, or to call that innocence at all. John Hughes was a cornerstone of the eighties, but who needs a Breakfast Club when you can hear all about your classmates on a tiny screen?" (Alistair for Mitch). fotogenerator. "Would you like your doodle run through a neural network, to return back a computer's real-life nightmare vision of what you drew? I thought you might." (Hugh for Alistair). The Thoughts of a Spiderweb - Quanta Magazine. "Some time ago I shared a link with Mitch and Alistair about this astounding fact about octopuses (not, apparently, octopi): that 70% of their neurons are on their skin, not in their brains. Well, researchers here argue that a spider's webs can be considered an extension of their cognitive systems. This notion is current in philosophy of mind, as well as research into how animals ' hink' about their environment, in many cases not using neurons at all." (Hugh for Mitch). The 34 Best Mac Menu Bar Apps - Product Hunt - Medium. "Whenever I have the slightest issue with how my MacBook Pro is working, I figure that 'there's an app for that!' It's not so much going to a new app to solve a problem, but I love menu bar apps. Those tiny little applications that just seem to scratch an itch. Here's a great list of Mac menu bar apps. I, typically, would never share a list like this, but I could not believe how many greats one are here (that I had never heard of). Let the downloading begin!" (Mitch for Alistair). How 80-year-old Radio-Canada, the French-language arm of the CBC, is driving innovation from within - NiemanLab. "Innovation is a big, scary and often misunderstood word. There's no clarity on what innovation is or what a truly innovative organization looks like. For many traditional businesses in traditional industries, they tend to confuse the word 'disruption' for 'destruction'. Some businesses are truly innovative or - at least - really trying to accept that things have changed (and will continue to change). Here's a great example on one such organization, that also happens to be taking place in our own backyard." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: adverti[...]



The Real Retail Apocalypse (It's Not What You Think)

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 08:32:38 PDT

Much has been written about the demise of retail. Go ahead, Google it for yourself. You will find a lot of articles with super-scary headlines (The retail apocalypse has officially descended on America, Is American Retail at a Historic Tipping Point?, Brick-and-Mortar Stores Are Shuttering at a Record Pace, Amid Retail Funk, Macy's Says 'We're Not Dead', etc...). The problem? Antiquated business models? A lack of interest in traditionally strong retail brands? Too much retail real estate per square footage in comparison to population? The shift to ecommerce? The list is, sadly, endless. Still, if you scratch beneath the surface, it's clear that something else is brewing. A fundamentally new way to shop and for brands to engage consumers that does not rely (solely) on the traditional model of getting into a car and heading down to the local shopping district to buy stuff. In fact, one could argue that this new way of shopping also does not (solely) rely on clicking the "buy" button on a website. Consumer's buying behaviour has shifted and morphed, and it may no longer align to the retail models that currently exist. The reasons below, should feel more like opportunities than reasons that detail the end of retail.  So, what, exactly is going on when it comes to retail today? The Airbnb of shopping malls. It seems like more and more brands are experimenting with pop-up shops and store-in-store models. We also see trends around the food truck craze, tiny house movement and the Airbnb model as adding to this shift. Newer brands can experiment with physical retail space like never before. The need for a brand to be near the classically huge department stores to benefit from foot traffic is no longer the only model for retail success. In fact, the trend here is that real estate can (and has) become short-term, more fluid and more non-physical. Locations to sell can come and go. Fluid real estate will be a huge battleground for the entrenched retail brands and the entire real estate development side of the business. Will there be an Airbnb for retail? Will more brands look for pop-up shops and the ability to surprise and delight with short-terms leases over the traditional anchor model? Consumers seem to like this idea of roving and mobile physical retail experiences that are not always anchored to a shopping mall. The Oreo of retail. More and more brands are selling direct to customer. They are not ditching their retail partners as centres of sales and distribution, but they are paying close attention to how many major mass retailers are struggling and - in return - putting the squeeze on their vendors for everything (pricing, margins, supply chain assistance, guarantees, etc...). With this, brands are building alternative sales channels and, wisely, looking at ways to build a direct relationship with the customer and, in return, circumventing, the traditional retail model. Oreo started this with their Colorfilled initiative, and are now looking at how all of their other Mondelez brands might benefit. So, brands that customers could only find at a retail location have now become retailers in their own right. These are not just new retail channels, but brands are becoming a true competitor to retailers. The supplier becomes the competition.  Owning the customer. An extension of suppliers becoming retailers is how brands are now owning the customer more and more. Look no further than Dollar Shave Club being acquired by Unilever for one billion dollars. Unilever was buying a database of a very specific target audience. With that, they own the entire relationship with the customer. While subscription-based models are a part of this retail transformation, what's really happening is that consumers who get locked into these membership programs simply no longer need to go to the store. This is augmented by the brand's ability to leverage this relationship to cross-sell,[...]



In Defense Of Being Deeply Offended

Tue, 06 Jun 2017 15:19:26 PDT

It's happening a lot. It's happening a lot more than it should. It's an angrier world out there. Back in the sixties (I wasn't alive) the general protest of democratic populations (and those that were repressed) came from music and musicians (does anyone remember laughter?). Whether it was police brutality on campus, race riots, equal rights for women or the peace movement. The resistance to power came in song. Flower power, Woodstock and beyond created legendary rock stars, classic songs and our ability to reflect back on different times - whether we lived through it or lived through it vicariously through the music. Today, the general protest and resistance is not coming from music (sadly), but from comedians. Whether it's late night talk show hosts, stand-up comedians in a local club or some hot shot with a Netflix special. You don't even have to go that far back in time to see how parody or comedic news programs were actually delivering more facts blended with comedy than what the major networks were delivering in the 24 hour news cycle that is the cable news business. Many people turned to these comedians as news broadcasters. Audiences were looking for a depth of perspective and appreciated the irony of the comedy that is was shrouded in. Many non-comedy forms of news media and content would pull these comics in for additional perspective, to editorialize, to host their programs and more. The fine line between comedy, the news and reality television blurred... and then it disappeared.  Knives out. Whether it's on college campuses, YouTube or in the mass media, the nuanced shift from the music of the sixties to comedy as the new resistance has happened. We've gone from reporting the news to editorializing the news to everyone having opinions of the news on social media. This is not a criticism. It is a fact. Those with little media skills and an equally lacking amount of knowledge - as it pertains to how real journalism happens - are now calling the shots on what is fact, what is to be shared and what holds the moral highground. It's equally easy to dismiss everything that is put out there as a "right to freedom of speech." It's equally easily to dismiss everything that is put out there as, "you have the right to say what you want, but you have to face the consequences of your actions as well." It feels like everything is binary. Opinions are either good or bad. Content is either good or bad. Media is either good or bad. Advertising is either good or bad. With that, many will probably interpret these words as commentary on one moment in time or as an editorial political piece attempting to sway an opinion. It is not. It is about how all of us - knowingly and unknowingly - are silencing (or trying to silence) a lot of voices (especially those we don't like and don't agree with). We may think that this is the right thing to do, but consider the fact that it could be one of the worst things that we could do, in this day and age. It's about knowing the difference between art, creativity and news. You may not like this piece of art. You may find it truly offensive. You may find it hurtful, violently offensive or even repulsive. You may even question if it is art at all. This is fair and it's your right/opinion. But there is something that you can't question: the source of it. If it's coming from any kind of artist - in particular a professional artist with any kind of history - we want to be careful when we starting lumping them in with protesters, angry mobs, sociopaths, people on the brink, those with criminal intent, etc. While our eyes and brains may lump the two sources together, they are not one in the same. We can repudiate art. We can't ignore the source. By choice, people can vote with their wallets and feet. They can choose to not attend the shows and performances of the offending artists. We can not support their art [...]



What Is Apple Up To? Can Walmart Catch Amazon? And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 05 Jun 2017 08:45:24 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  This week Pierre Landry sits in for Terry DiMonte. This week will bring the "other" big Apple event and news to the world. The annual WWDC (World Wide Developer's Conference) takes place today until June 9th in San Jose. There is usually little talk of hardware (that's the big annual event that is held in September). Still, we will get Tim Cook's overview of business to date. What do we know? It's Apple... so, not much. There are expectations of the latest iOS software (iOS 11). The rumour mills is thinking that changes will be made to Apple Music, announcement of Apple's own unique TV programming (a la Netflix), and a lot of love for Siri. The biggest rumour is the launch of a possible "smart speaker" - one that users can not only stream music to, but that they can talk to and interact with it. We shall see...  Walmart is one of the few retailers that can compete with Amazon in the retail space. Still, it's a massive chasm between Amazon (whose stock rocked past $1000 this past week) and Walmart. Walmart continues to invest heavily in ecommerce and news broke last week that it is trying to turn its army of 1.5 million employees into delivery drivers as well. Good side hustle for employees or is this a disaster waiting to happen?  App of the week: Adobe Scan. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/326223135&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false"> Tags: adobe adobe scan advertising agency amazon app of the week apple apple music bluetooth brand business business blog chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media ecommerce facebook google guest contributor hardware i heart radio ios j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte netflix pierre landry radio segment radio station retail siri six pixels of separation smart speaker social media technology television terry dimonte tim cook tv tv programming twitter walmart world wide developer conference wpp wwdc    chom 977 fm [...]



The Relevance Of Marketing Agencies With Peter Levitan - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 04 Jun 2017 04:02:47 PDT

Episode #569 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. When I think about the future of marketing agencies and what it will take for them to thrive and flourish, I think of Peter Levitan. Peter owned his own agency, he bought and sold three agencies, he worked for one of the largest advertising agencies in the world in New York and London, he's pitched (and won) large accounts all over the world, he's been client-side, and he currently consults and advises agencies of all stripes on how to win new business. If that were not enough, he wrote an incredible book on marketing agency business development (that I love and have re-read on many occasions) titled, The Levitan Pitch. Buy This Book. Win More Pitches. Do marketing agencies have a future? How is the competitive landscape changing? What value does an agency bring to a brand? Enjoy the conversation...  You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #569. width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/325976030&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false"> Tags: advertising advertising agency advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business development business podcast business thinker buy this book win more pitches david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing agency marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast peter levitan social media the levitan pitch twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #362

Thu, 01 Jun 2017 07:54:36 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The New Moats - Greylock Partners - Medium. "For decades, maybe centuries, businesses erected moats around themselves: Economies of scale, network effects, high switching costs, customer loyalty, deep IP. Today, those moats are easy to bridge. As this excellent strategy post argues, the future of advantage is a layer of intelligence between systems of engagement (the "front office") and systems of record (the "back office"). And this layer of intelligence is where most AI will really change who's leading entire industries." (Alistair for Hugh). The Beauty Contest That's Shaking Wall St. - The New York Times. "By most accounts, the US stock market is healthy. But it's also incredibly volatile at the moment. To understand why, realize that in a public market, a buyer doesn't have to buy the best stock -- they have to buy the stock everyone else will think is best. This collectivity drives cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, currently at stratospheric heights -- great for buyers, but hardly a currency for someone who pays 1 Bitcoin a month in rent. Turns out this public consensus isn't a new idea." (Alistair for Mitch). This Is What the Demise of Oil Looks Like - Bloomberg. "Traditional projections for oil consumption are bullish: we'll keep using more oil. But a combo of increased efficiency, the move to electric vehicles, and fuel switching (from coal to oil to natural gas to biofuels) could make for a radically different future." (Hugh for Alistair). Map: These are the cities that climate change will hit first - The Washington Post. "The map is not fine-tuned enough to confirm that Montreal gets hit same time as New York (2043). But, it's pretty clear that it does. What the map shows is estimates for 'climate departure', defined as the year in which 'the average temperature of its coolest year from then on is projected to be warmer than the average temperature of its hottest year between 1960 and 2005.' Miami looks like it might flip in 2033. Just doing some quick calculations, my kids will be in their prime, early thirties in 2043. I'll be 69. I wonder what life will be like then for all of us?" (Hugh for Mitch).  End-Times For Humanity - Aeon. "This essay sums up the entire sentiment felt at this past year's TED conference, and something that I have been grappling with, personally, for some time. To put it into naive terms: maybe we don't want to know as much as we know, and be as connected as we are? Perhaps by becoming so technically powerful, we starting to fracture when it comes to realizing just how fragile we are. One friend recently said to me that he feels like life is about all of us running through a minefield, at the highest speed possible, and it's just a question of when someone gets hit with something. Perhaps AI will teach us that ignorance is truly bliss?" (Mitch for Alistair). Welcome To Digital Detox Camp - The New Yorker. "Perhaps a little escapism is needed in your information diet this week? Just imagine... the horror... of being left alone with your thoughts, friendly conversation and the nature of things that won't be documented, published, shared and then analyzed by everyone (including yourself). Cue a[...]



Snoop Dogg's Robert "Bubby" Lewis - This Month's Groove - The No Treble Podcast

Sun, 04 Jun 2017 15:15:08 PDT

Episode #30 of Groove - The No Treble Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Some musicians struggle while trying to blend creativity and the electric bass. Robert "Bubby" Lewis is not one of those people. Whether it's his video game, manga, comic book, science fiction-inspired solo album, 1up!, or how he thinks about the world, Bubby is a creative force on the electric bass. This is (probably) one of the main reasons that Snoop Dogg scooped him up on the recommendation of Andrew Gouché. His career has been a rocket ship of excitement since then. The Flint, Michigan native (who now makes his home in Los Angeles) has played with everyone from Lupe Fiasco to Tha Dogg Pound. With hip-hop and R&B at his core, Bubby is a student of grooves and bass tones. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Episode #30 of Groove - The No Treble Podcast. src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/track=613637888/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/artwork=small/transparent=true/" style="border: 0; width: 100%; height: 120px;">Groove - Episode #30: Robert "Bubby" Lewis by No Treble Tags: 1up advertising advertising podcast andrew gouche audio bass podcast bass tone blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast comic books creativity david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog electric bass electric bass podcast facebook google groove groove no treble groove no treble podcast hip hop hiphop itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast lupe fiasco management podcast manga marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast music music podcast no treble no treble podcast rb robert bubby lewis science fiction snoop dogg social media solo album tha dogg pound twitter video games wpp [...]



How Does The "New Generation" Experience Brands?

Sat, 03 Jun 2017 05:16:32 PDT

TL;DR: they see a brand message. If it resonates, it worked. If it doesn't resonate, it didn't work. Maybe that's an over-simplification, but it feels true. Does this "new generation" of consumer not see the billboards as they cross through Time's Square? Are they blind to their Facebook feed? Do they not do searches on Google and see the paid search results? Do they never turn on a television, pick up a magazine, notice a brand embedded in a video game, see an email from a brand that they signed up for? Will they not sign-up to receive information from a brand that they are interested in? Will they be immune when a friend makes a recommendation? Do they only care if a message is from someone they like and respect on Snapchat? Do we over-complicate marketing more to validate our business models than to speak the truth about what gets attention? If this "new consumer" follows an influencer on Instagram, is the post of the influencer on behalf of a brand any different than when people from generations past saw a celebrity endorsing a brand in a print ad? Yes, we have more channels, more content as media, more connectedness and more of our media consumption is happening on a smartphone, but thinking that technology solves the attention challenge is not what will bring new business models forward. Too many pundits believe that marketing and advertising agencies are out of touch, because creativity is no longer the right business model. Too many pundits also believe that marketing and advertising agencies have lost the plot, because they have creativity but lack the business acumen to mix tight management while handling scopes of work. Too many pundits believe that marketing and advertising agencies are relics because the "big idea" now takes a backseat to data and technology. Everything is "with" not "instead of." When social media started taking hold, many of my peers believed that the end of traditional advertising (think thirty-second spot) was upon us. Content became media and that media format would replace the advertising format. I believed back then (as I do now) that everything is "with" not "instead of." Advertising will continue to be a very powerful model for business growth and success - not just for a brand to create attention, but for a brand to sell (and, if brand's stop selling we're going to have major global issues around countless social aspects of what makes us a functioning civilization). This idea is nothing new. With that, advertising has changed on many fronts, but here are the three primary ones: The scarcity model has shifted to one of abundance in a fragmented media planet with many more options that don't require the traditional content production flow of destination viewing (we must all watch NBC Thursday nights at 8 pm or we get our newpapers every morning). Content is 24/7 and so is advertising. There are more ways to create a message than ever before. It ranges from 140 characters to high-end video production (and everything in between). Plus, the creation of advertising can be done on a very simple laptop. Consumers (and not just new ones) are more skeptical of advertising and brands, because of exposure over time mixed with brand experiences that have not always delivered as advertised. Consumers don't believe ads, because they are inundated with them and they don't believe the hype. Don't confuse choice, always-available and skepticism for a consumer that does not want to be reached. The concept of the big idea is not flawed. The concept of the big idea as a value-add to a brand that is struggling to get awareness and sales is not flawed. Advertising continues to create new value for the brands that do it well (and, the brands that often do it well, are also the bran[...]



7 Steps To A Better Interview

Wed, 31 May 2017 12:12:01 PDT

Candidly, there's a lot more than seven, but its a start. I can't tell you how many interviews I've been involved with since the mid-eighties, but it has got to be in the thousands. This is not meant to brag. It's a fact. Just look at my Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast (which has been running for over a decade with close to 570 episodes) or Groove - The No Treble Podcast (which has been happening for over two years). I spend a lot of time on either side of the mic. I've interviewed rock stars, business leaders, marketing experts, bestselling authors, and more for close to thirty years. I've also been interviewed countless times over the years for TV, print, radio, online, etc... The only thing that I love more than a great conversation is sharing the content of that conversation with an audience. Last week, Mark Schaefer published an article titled, 5 Steps to conduct a superior podcast interview, and he was kind enough to name me as one of "the best interviewers" (Thanks, Mark!). With that, I thought I would add on to his article with what I think makes for a great interview. 7 steps to a better interview: It's not an interview. Kill that word. You're not trying to interview anyone. You're trying to have a conversation. You're trying to connect. Think about it less as something that has to turn into a piece of content and more like a coffee date. If you're going to waste anyone's time (including your own) for a coffee, make it count. Interviewing them won't make it count. Having an awesome conversation will be memorable, valuable and something that everyone will want to make happen again. If you don't like coffee, consider this a first date. The idea is to get to a second date (because it was so engaging that they want one). Create familiarity. Going in cold sucks. It puts the person leading the conversation (aka - The Interviewer) at a deficit. Familiarity can be anything from a mutual friend to a shared hobby. It can be something as simple as their interest in a particular sports team or author. You have to dig a little harder to find out this information, but it's usually readily available. LinkedIn can also be of enormous help if they guest is not a major celebrity (most people have a profile and connections). Don't have any questions ready. This one really freaks people out, but I never ever have a list of questions. At most, I have a few lines written down about areas of interest that I would like to discuss/explore. Remember, it's not an interview... it's a conversation. Remember, it's a coffee... not an inquisition. Your job before the conversation is to do the heavy lifting (aka - the research). Dig deep, read a lot, take notes and prep. Learn about them. Know them. Then, when it's time for the conversation, be like a pipe that is about to burst with areas of conversation about the person and their work. Take notes. Whether it's in person or remotely, I always have a large notepad right by my side to take notes. As the conversation blossoms, they should provide new areas of conversation or concepts that need to be expanded upon. Don't be afraid to take notes. But, do not have the notes as a barrier between you and your guest. Don't refer to the notes and create moments of awkward pause (no second dates happen this way). By the end of a good conversation, I usually have a page or two of notes. Ultimately, that winds up looking a lot like a list of questions that most journalists use to guide the conversation. Ultimately, it provides a good reference when creating the content that supports the conversation. Never interrupt. It's not what you think. This is, actually, a technical piece of advice - especially if you (or someone else) has to transcribe t[...]



For The Love Of Marketing, Let's Stop Talking About Artificial Intelligence

Wed, 31 May 2017 18:03:53 PDT

Artificial intelligence is going to change everything. It's going to change business. It's going to change marketing. The problem is that we can't skip steps and suddenly claim that all brands are AI-first (as brands like Google and Salesforce are stating). Sure, it's commonplace to want to future-proof your business, put a stake in the ground and claim that you are technologically miles ahead of the competition. Still, the marketplace does not lie. The truth is in the marketing. The reality of what consumers see, touch and do with a brand is evident - no matter what a Chief Marketing Officer says at your local industry conference from the stage during a keynote address. If every brand is embracing artificial intelligence, where are the signs of simple (and great) personalization in the work today? How can any brand claim to be leading (or tinkering) with artificial intelligence, when the vast majority of their marketing materials are either not personalized at all or hauntingly poor at understanding even the basic information of their customer (gender, geographic location, last item(s) purchased, intent to purchase again, etc...)? This is not a criticism of any specific brand, but an overall indictment against our industry. It is an industry that loves to toss around buzzwords, make impressive PowerPoint decks, get lots of ink in the industry trade publications and - in general - bang a loud drum. Still, where is the proof that brands have mastered personalization - let alone have the capabilities to leverage artificial intelligence to build better engines of marketing and communications?  Great personalization is like common sense... it's not all that common. A quick test: when a company lays claim to leveraging artificial intelligence to build better customer experiences, go ahead and do three things:  Sign up to their basic e-newsletter. Do some generic searches on their website. Bonus points if you add something to you shopping cart and abandon it before making a purchase. Do some searches for the brand on Facebook, LinkedIn or any other social media space. What happens next? Over time, is that newsletter adapting to your choices, your basic information and/or your true needs? Did those general searches suddenly trigger a ton of retargeted ads that haunt you for months, constantly and consistently? Are you suddenly seeing that brand (or their competitor) showing up much more in your social media feeds? If you are, it's safe to assume that the vast majority of brands are practicing traditional advertising strategies in these hyper-powerful digital channels. They're vying for the customer's attention, because that customer - at some point in time - raised their hand. The thing is this: that hand could have been raised for a myriad of reasons. The customer could have a complaint about the brand, they may be a repeat customer, they may be doing research for a friend, and on and on. If artificial intelligence were at play, the messaging would adapt in a much more profound way to the customer's desires and interactions. If basic personalization were are play, the messaging would be more specific and would not dampen the customer's content experience. An opportunity for marketing to be great. That's the real point here. Digital marketing was not created as another channel to annoy consumers with messaging that they don't want. Artificial intelligence, personalization, targeting, retargeting and more is an incredible opportunity for brands to build a better (and more direct) relationship with their customers, and engage those consumers that may be interested in the brand in a more value-based and personal way. It seems like marketers are very e[...]



C2 MTL Rocks, Apple Patents A Pizza Box And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Mon, 29 May 2017 05:47:06 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  This week Pierre Landry sits in for Terry DiMonte. Almost 6000 people attended the 3-day creativity and commerce conference known as C2 MTL last week. I managed to attend a lot of it. It was sold out. Is this $3000+ event worth it? How was the content? What were the major themes?  Facebook is getting bigger and much more powerful. They know more about you than most realize. Last week, the BBC reported on a new external research report that looked at how Facebook operates and controls your data: "from the links we post on Facebook, to the pages we like, to our online behaviour in many other corners of cyber-space that are owned or interact with the company (Instagram, WhatsApp or sites that merely use your Facebook log-in) - could all be entering a giant algorithmic process." All of it owned by one company: Facebook.   Apple takes everything seriously. Including it's pizza. It turns out, a patented pizza box to ensure great taste and a lack of sogginess is just another one of the perks that Apple delivers.  App of the Week: Spinner. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/325016441&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no"> Tags: advertising agency app of the week apple bbc brand business blog c2 mtl c2mtl chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook fidget spinner google guest contributor i heart radio instagram j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte pierre landry radio segment radio station six pixels of separation social media spinner technology terry dimonte twitter whatsapp wpp  chom 977 fm [...]



Branding, Belief And Keates With Tom Asacker - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 28 May 2017 10:25:09 PDT

Episode #568 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Tom Asacker is one of my favourite voices on the subject of branding and what corporations do to make consumers believe in their products and services. He is the bestselling author of The Business of Belief, Opportunity Screams, A Little Less Conversation and A Clear Eye for Branding. All of them are groundbreaking books that will help business leaders rethink business and communication for this new age of abundance. His first book, Sandbox Wisdom, was a heartwarming story about a CEO's search for meaning and success in the world of business and work. Now, Tom is back is a very ambitious (and honest) effort called, I Am Keats (it's not what you think). Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #568. Tags: a clear eye for branding a little less conversation advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook google i am keats itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast opportunity screams sandbox wisdom social media the business of belief tom asacker twitter wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #361

Sat, 27 May 2017 16:53:03 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  Price-bots can collude against consumers - The Economist. "One of the checks and balances of democratic capitalism is anti-trust. The idea that the free market is efficient, and produces the most people with the most things for the least money, depends on a few, large players not concentrating power and taking excessive profits. It's why the Department of Justice broke AT&T up into regional operating companies -- and why they prosecute organizations that collude to raise prices. But what if collusion happens automatically? As this Economist article points out, algorithmic pricing and online transparency may lead to monopolies despite our best efforts. Yet another robot apocalypse to worry about." (Alistair for Hugh). The Window of Bacon Fat - Now I Know. "It ain't Kosher, but it's marketing. Every notice bacon looks like red meat in the store, but white fat in the pan? Turns out there's a law because of that. When vendors tried to put their best side forward, they were hiding the greasy truth -- and the government stepped in. Overreach? Antitrust? Or just consumer protection? Whatever the case, there's a law about that package of bacon. Now if someone can just get an AI to fix it." (Alistair for Mitch).  Japan's "Superhuman" Athletes - Reuters. "Oh, Japan." (Hugh for Alistair). A Brief Rant On The Future Of Interaction Design - Worry Dream. "I like to read everything Brett Victor writes." (Hugh for Mitch). Are You A Self-Interrupter? - Nautilus. "How do you feel about people who interrupt you in a conversation? It could be your kids, a work colleague, a parent or a friend. We all know one person like this (some of us know many people like this). They're just not listening. They're thinking of what they want to say now/next. What if we're doing this to ourselves? All of the time. Do you hate yourself just a little bit more about now?" (Mitch for Alistair). These Powerful Art Illustrations Show How Backwards Society Really Is - Anonymous. "Maybe it's my heavy metal upbringing, but I've always had a taste for art that is more subversive and obvious in pointing out our human flaws. The more it makes me squirm - or makes me feel uncomfortable - the more I can't look away... and the more that I like it. He's a slew of artwork that this will make you think twice. Promise. It's very punk too." (Mitch for Hugh).  Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Facebook, in the comments below or wherever you play. Tags: advertising agency alistair croll anonymous att bit current bit north book a futurists manifesto brand brett victor business blog complete web monitoring digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog economist facebook gigom google harvard business school hugh mcguire human 20 iambic interaction design j walt[...]



Thinking Content Marketing With Jay Acunzo - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Tue, 23 May 2017 06:06:37 PDT

Episode #567 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. This young man has lead an fascinating career, and he's just getting started. Jay Acunzo was head of content at HubSpot, a media strategist at Google and ran content marketing for a venture capital firm. If anyone has seen how content marketing has grown along with digital marketing, it's Jay Acunzo. He's an award-winning podcaster, keynote speaker, and a guy bothered by conventional thinking. Jay truly believes that the tried-and-true creates stale work. Now, as he's host of the popular audio documentary series, Unthinkable (of which I was honoured to be a guest), and Jay makes a living understanding what it takes to make the leap from average to exceptional. His work has been cited in courses at Harvard Business School, by writers at the Washington Post, Fast Company, Forbes, and by investors on Shark Tank. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #567. Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker content marketing david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook fast company forbes google harvard business school hubspot itunes j walter thompson jay acunzo jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast media media strategist mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast shark tank social media twitter unthinkable venture capital venture capital firm washington post wpp [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #360

Thu, 18 May 2017 09:54:41 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  RFD: the alien abduction prophecy protocol - lcamtuf's blog. "Okay, let's say you're abducted by time-traveling aliens. They tell you about three future calamities -- and then let you go. What should you do? Bear with me here: If you tell the world you've been unprovably abducted by aliens, they ignore you. So you have to prove you're believable by predicting the first calamity in a very public way that can't be faked. Have I gone nuts? Well, maybe. But this though experiment explains some fundamental concepts in computer security. Plus, it's got some fairly creative hacks that readers have suggested." (Alistair for Hugh). Ten Year Futures - Benedict Evans. "Lately, a lot of my talks have been about what the future holds. I'm a big skeptic of futurism because we simply can't know how society will respond to a technology, and it's the societal response -- not the technological advancement -- that really shapes the future. But if you're going to try and guess, you could do worse than this piece by Benedict Evans. After all, he writes that Mobile Is Eating The World, and while he sees VR and autonomous vehicles as cool, in this piece he argues that the next decade's real transformations are TV and shopping, industries where tech changes haven't really come home to roost... yet. Sometimes we look too far to the future." (Alistair for Mitch). Singapore 'vending machine' dispenses Ferraris, Lamborghinis - Reuters. "Late capitalism strikes again." (Hugh for Alistair). When did we start shopping at stores? - J Stor. "How did we ship before Amazon? Oh yeah, stores. But have we always shopped at stores? (Answer: no)." (Hugh for Mitch). Simple math is why Elon Musk's companies keep doing what others don't even consider possible - Quartz. "One of the standout presentations at the TED conference this year was the interview with Elon Musk. It's almost impossible to imagine that this one person is paving the way for electric cars, autonomous cars, commercial space flight, making humans a multi-planetary species, attempting to reinvent traffic, hi-speed tubes to transport people, solar energy, and - probably - a bunch of other stuff that my brain is currently forgetting. He's doing this all. At once. Right now. Maybe it is all simple math. Maybe we all need more motivation? Oh, did I mention that we're almost the exact same age? That stresses me out." (Mitch for Alistair). An Algorithm Summarizes Lengthy Text Surprisingly Well - MIT Technology Review. "The good news is that when the robots and artificial intelligence really takes hold, we will all have much more time for activities of leisure, spending time with our family and focusing on work that really stimulates us. I, for one, was looking forward to that moment in time, so that I could read. I read a lot now. I want to read a lot more. Oh, what? Wait... you're saying that reading will also be taken over to artificial intelligence?...." (Mitch f[...]



How Does Snapchat Stay Relevant? Do You Trust YouTube? And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Tue, 16 May 2017 05:51:31 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  Do you like YouTube? Do you hate YouTube? 4+ billion videos are viewed daily on their platform and yet, YouTube ranked dead last for consumer safety in BI Intelligence's 2017 Digital Trust survey. Only 4% of survey respondents feel that YouTube is the safest platform to participate in or post on, making it by far the least chosen option. Even Twitter, with serious trolling issues, and a not so warm and fuzzy outlook from analysts, is viewed as safer. In short: we hate it but we can't look away. As Facebook and Instagram replicate every feature of Snapchat in an effort to render it useless, Snapchat is fighting back, by changing the core of how it works. A new infinity icon will allow a photo or video message to be replayed forever until the receiver exits the conversation thread. Snapchat messages, called "snaps," could previously only be seen for up to 10 seconds before they disappeared. Is this is sign that Snapchat is scared of Facebook or, more likely, a new reality that it's going to be harder and harder to tell Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and even Twitter apart from one another? Tweets still matter. Just ask Carter Wilkerson, a 16-year-old high school junior in Reno, Nevada. Last week, he became the owner of history's most-retweeted tweet, knocking Ellen DeGeneres and her famous Oscars selfie off her perch. When he sent his fateful tweet on April 5, he thought it might be a fun joke for his friends. He asked Wendy's how many retweets it would take for him to get free chicken nuggets for life. Wendy's said 18 million. Het got 3.4 million and that was more than enough for Wendy's, Ellen and even a lot of money to some good charities. See, Twitter can still be used for good.  App of the Week: Mobile Pocket. src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/322769658&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no">   Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week bi intelligence brand business blog business insider carter wilkerson chom fm ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media ellen degeneres facebook google guest contributor i heart radio instagram j walter thompson jwt marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel mobile pocket montreal radio morn[...]



Marketing And Influence Lessons From Terry O'Reilly - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 14 May 2017 05:29:53 PDT

Episode #566 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Terry O'Reilly is a legendary adman and radio broadcaster. In Canada, he is one of the most recognized authorities on great advertising, award-winning copywriting and host of two hit radio series. In 1990, he co-founded Pirate Radio & Television. He was won, literally, hundreds of awards for his writing and directing. He believes in the strength of powerful words, emotion in marketing and how to outsmart the competition without outspending them. He is author of two books, The Age of Persuasion and the recently published, This I Know - Marketing Lessons From Under The Influence. With that, most people know him as the host of the award-winning radio show, Under The Influence (which is the follow-up to this other radio hit series, The Age Of Persuasion). I consider myself very fortunate to call him a friend. Enjoy the conversation...  You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #566. Tags: adman advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker copywriter copywriting david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing podcast mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast pirate radio and television radio radio broadcaster radio series radio show social media terry oreilly the age of persuasion this i know twitter under the influence wpp   [...]



Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #359

Fri, 12 May 2017 07:28:53 PDT

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see? My friends: Alistair Croll (Solve for Interesting, Tilt the Windmill, HBS; chair of Strata, Startupfest, Pandemonio, and ResolveTO; Author of Lean Analytics and some other books), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist's Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person "must see". Check out these six links that we're recommending to one another:  The Real Reason Chinatown Produce Is Crazy Cheap - Saveur. "In a talk on discontinuous innovation last week, I observed that a hamburger patty grown in a lab cost $325K in 2013 -- and just $12 in 2016. The world of food is changing radically, and with it the traditional distribution channels. If you've ever wondered how Chinatowns in North America manage to maintain a huge variety of produce, while also keeping costs down, here's your answer." (Alistair for Hugh). Inside a BDSM Dungeon with a Hillary Dom and a Guilty, Diaper-Clad Trump Voter - Vice Broadly. "Okay, this is decidedly not safe for work. But it definitely qualifies as interesting. And it's not really politics, in keeping with our promise to stay away from that stuff. But it is about atonement, and the pecadilloes of the human psyche. So yes, here is a story (with a film) about Trump supporters who are literally asking to be locked up and punished for their behavior. Few things have summed up the current psyche so well." (Alistair for Mitch). Power Lines in Anime - Tumblr. "The Internet eh? Here is an entire website dedicated to still of power lines and high tension wires from Anime." (Hugh for Alistair). Blade Runner: A Game-Chasing Science Fiction Classic - Cinephilia And Beyond. "This is almost certainly the most candy-filled article about Blade Runner you are likely to find, just in time for Blade Runner 2049." (Hugh for Mitch). The 'Billions' Exit Survey - The Ringer Staff - Medium. "I'm not much a television viewer anymore. I find it hard to follow shows and feel out of the loop when I miss an episode. Even recording them - or keeping them for later to binge watch - is impossible. The time never materializes for me. Plus, when given the choice, I'll choose a book over TV (or even a movie) any day. Not stating this to show off, but it's true. With that, I never miss an episode of Billions. It's brilliantly written and the dialogue and character development is both beautiful and deep. Here's a great little roundup of the show. I love Wags." (Mitch for Alistair). Craig Newmark Founded Craigslist To Give Back, Now He's A Billionaire - Forbes. "The story of Craigslist is a fascinating one. From what the business model did to dismantle the classified cash-cow that was the newspaper industry, to how honest, kind and sincere its founder, Craig Newmark, appears to be. Smartphones are changing the game now. Craigslist could be disrupted. Or will it be? There are a few startups that are enabling people to sell stuff locally and in the moment from their mobile devices. What is Craisglist all about? Will the company ever sell or go public (they say that they will not)? Here's a great read about an unlikely billionaire who just wants to be a good Internet citizen." (Mitch for Hugh). Feel free to share these links and add your picks on Twitter, Face[...]



Is Technology Going To Make Us The Worst? And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Tue, 09 May 2017 10:22:50 PDT

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It's not a long segment - about 5 to 10 minutes every week - about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you're interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what's going on in the digital world. I'm really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel. This week we discussed:  This was a shorter version of our usual segment due to the vast flooding that is taking place in Montreal. Is it end of times? Between politics and artificial intelligence, it can easily feel this way. What seems like something out of an episode of Black Mirror comes Completed. It's being billed as "Yelp for professionals," but here's what it really does: it allows coworkers (and clients) to rate whether they like you or not. What do you think about that?  App of the Week: GarageBand, iMovie, Keynote, Pages, and Numbers for Mac and iOS are now all free! width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/321768085&color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false"> Tags: advertising agency amazon app of the week black mirror brand business blog chom fm completed ctrl alt delete ctrl alt delete with mitch joel digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog digital media facebook garageband google guest contributor i heart radio imovie ios j walter thompson jwt keynote linkedin mac marketing marketing agency marketing blog mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum canada mirum in canada mitch joel mitchjoel montreal radio morning show mornings rock with terry dimonte numbers pages radio segment radio station six pixels of separation social media technology terry dimonte twitter wpp yelp  chom 977 fm [...]



12 Powers Of A Marketing Leader With Thomas Barta - This Week's Six Pixels Of Separation Podcast

Sun, 07 May 2017 05:53:03 PDT

Episode #565 of Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to. Thomas Barta recently co-authored the business book, The 12 Powers Of A Marketing Leader - How to succeed by building customer and company value. Barta is a former McKinsey Partner with over 20 years of marketing experience, and considered is a marketing leadership-pioneer. He speaks, writes, and conducts leadership workshops worldwide, while continuing his research into what works in business, leadership and marketing today. Barta's research-based concept of Marketing Leadership brings a new perspective to the world of marketing. It helps leaders develop a top-management view of the marketplace and the organization, so they can shape the C-suite agenda and drive profitable growth. Barta has consulted and been in marketing for over two decades, in 14 industries and in 45 countries. His clients include many of the world's most prominent companies, including over two dozen from the Fortune 500. Currently, he lives in Cologne, Germany. Enjoy the conversation... You can grab the latest episode of Six Pixels of Separation here (or feel free to subscribe via iTunes): Six Pixels of Separation - The Mirum Podcast #565. Tags: advertising advertising podcast audio blog blogging brand branding business blog business book business podcast business thinker david usher digital marketing digital marketing agency digital marketing blog facebook fortune 500 google itunes j walter thompson jwt leadership leadership podcast management podcast marketing marketing blog marketing leader marketing leadership marketing podcast mckinsey mirum mirum agency mirum agency blog mirum blog mirum podcast social media the 12 powers of a marketing leader thomas barta twitter wpp [...]