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Preview: Comments on: The future of Moveable Type, Vox, TypePad, and Live Journal

Comments on: The future of Moveable Type, Vox, TypePad, and Live Journal



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By: The future of Moveable Type, Vox, TypePad, and Live Journal

Thu, 18 Oct 2007 05:49:30 +0000

[...] The future of Moveable Type, Vox, TypePad, and Live Journal [...]



By: Business Blogs: How to Build A Better Blog

Mon, 15 Oct 2007 19:50:19 +0000

Robert Scoble Interviews Six Apart CEO Through my Google alerts, I ran across a great interview Robert Scoble did with the CEO of Six Apart, Chris Alden, VP of Products, Michael Sippey, and Engineer David Recordon. Six Apart is the company that owns TypePad, Movable Type,



By: Marc’s Voice » Blog Archive » Pumpkin time and a week of Conferences

Mon, 15 Oct 2007 18:38:41 +0000

[...] Robert Scoble is finally discovering that perhaps six minute edits are more likely to get viewed tha... But I ain’t got no dam HOUR! [...]



By: Randy Willis

Mon, 15 Oct 2007 13:22:33 +0000

I found this post searching for info on the future of TypePad (I'm currently taking a serious look at Wordpress). I would also like to see TypePad keep a running/active list somewhere of future developments. BTW, is there a central place where TP users can suggests features? If not, I think that would be a good idea. Thanks!



By: Randy Willis

Mon, 15 Oct 2007 13:22:00 +0000

I found this post searching for info on the future of TypePad (I'm currently taking a serious look at Wordpress). I would also like to see TypePad keep a running/active list somewhere of future developments. BTW, is there a central place where TP users can suggests features? If not, I think that would be a good idea. Thanks!



By: Anil

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 05:50:54 +0000

BenB definitely. I think pretty much everything you've mentioned is on the roadmap for TypePad in the next little while, but to be honest, I don't know offhand the specific timing for the various parts. I totally agree we need to open up more about the roadmap for TypePad, and we're planning to start doing that over the next few weeks. If you're not already reading it, the best place to start is the Everything TypePad blog. One recent example is the massive improvements being made to things like comment publishing. That's just the first step in similar improvements that will be made across the service. Similarly, you can look at Apple's own web app directory to see that we're not just content that TypePad's got the best mobile experience of any blogging app, but that we're going to keep pushing the boundaries there to invent new things. Perhaps the simplest thing to point to is the influence that efforts like Vox have had on platforms like Movable Type. You can see how MT is using the asset/image/video management capabilities of a platform like Vox in combination with the scaling abilities of LiveJournal. We've already brought TypePad onto much the same technological platform as LiveJournal and Vox, and that means the next phase for TypePad will be realizing the fruits of those efforts. Until then, we've made it dead simple to post to TypePad from Vox, and there's a ton more features on the way.



By: Anil

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 05:50:00 +0000

BenB definitely. I think pretty much everything you've mentioned is on the roadmap for TypePad in the next little while, but to be honest, I don't know offhand the specific timing for the various parts. I totally agree we need to open up more about the roadmap for TypePad, and we're planning to start doing that over the next few weeks. If you're not already reading it, the best place to start is the Everything TypePad blog. One recent example is the massive improvements being made to things like comment publishing. That's just the first step in similar improvements that will be made across the service. Similarly, you can look at Apple's own web app directory to see that we're not just content that TypePad's got the best mobile experience of any blogging app, but that we're going to keep pushing the boundaries there to invent new things. Perhaps the simplest thing to point to is the influence that efforts like Vox have had on platforms like Movable Type. You can see how MT is using the asset/image/video management capabilities of a platform like Vox in combination with the scaling abilities of LiveJournal. We've already brought TypePad onto much the same technological platform as LiveJournal and Vox, and that means the next phase for TypePad will be realizing the fruits of those efforts. Until then, we've made it dead simple to post to TypePad from Vox, and there's a ton more features on the way.



By: BenB

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 05:16:39 +0000

Anil, Is there anything you can tell customers of Typepad what to expect? When to expect it? Anything?



By: BenB

Sun, 14 Oct 2007 05:16:00 +0000

Anil, Is there anything you can tell customers of Typepad what to expect? When to expect it? Anything?



By: Anil

Sat, 13 Oct 2007 22:20:43 +0000

"It’s a bit revisionist to call them social networking pioneers. Blogging, yes. But there’s not much of a social network component to it." I think that LiveJournal in particular (and to be clear -- this is both LJ before we acquired it and since it's been part of 6A) can be credibly described as the most pioneering social networking site. It was the first large-scale site to popularize fundamentals like being able to add friends, being able to aggregate friends activity on a single page, being able to discover content and connections through Interests, which work like tags, and having profile pages which show all your social connections. Just as importantly, fundamental technologies like memcached (which is used by nearly every social networking site), OpenID, and many other platform components were not just created at LiveJournal, but made open and free enough that dozens of other sites could adopt them to serve tens of millions more users. Oh, and yes, blogs are social platforms. Both Movable Type and LiveJournal were amongst the first blogging tools to power basic capabilities like comments. Just my opinion, of course. :)



By: Anil

Sat, 13 Oct 2007 22:20:00 +0000

"It’s a bit revisionist to call them social networking pioneers. Blogging, yes. But there’s not much of a social network component to it." I think that LiveJournal in particular (and to be clear -- this is both LJ before we acquired it and since it's been part of 6A) can be credibly described as the most pioneering social networking site. It was the first large-scale site to popularize fundamentals like being able to add friends, being able to aggregate friends activity on a single page, being able to discover content and connections through Interests, which work like tags, and having profile pages which show all your social connections. Just as importantly, fundamental technologies like memcached (which is used by nearly every social networking site), OpenID, and many other platform components were not just created at LiveJournal, but made open and free enough that dozens of other sites could adopt them to serve tens of millions more users. Oh, and yes, blogs are social platforms. Both Movable Type and LiveJournal were amongst the first blogging tools to power basic capabilities like comments. Just my opinion, of course. :)



By: Pete

Sat, 13 Oct 2007 18:52:30 +0000

Rarely do the providers of technology succeed in determining the final use of that technology. Web 2.0 is a perfect example of applying a label to something that is hardly even understood and is more spontaneous generation than planned. It's always about grabbing the tiger by the tail and appearing like the outcome was planned from the start.



By: Guest

Sat, 13 Oct 2007 18:52:00 +0000

Rarely do the providers of technology succeed in determining the final use of that technology. Web 2.0 is a perfect example of applying a label to something that is hardly even understood and is more spontaneous generation than planned. It's always about grabbing the tiger by the tail and appearing like the outcome was planned from the start.



By: Graeme Thickins

Sat, 13 Oct 2007 12:19:18 +0000

I agree with Ben (comment #4) -- they need to pick it up on the Typepad front. Not good to be stagnant. Typepad, we love you, but we want more, more, more... :-) Congrats to Chris on taking the CEO reins -- he's a great guy, and I look forward to seeing more of the good things he'll be doing there... Thanks for the post, Robert -- see you at The Palace next week?



By: Graeme Thickins

Sat, 13 Oct 2007 12:19:00 +0000

I agree with Ben (comment #4) -- they need to pick it up on the Typepad front. Not good to be stagnant. Typepad, we love you, but we want more, more, more... :-) Congrats to Chris on taking the CEO reins -- he's a great guy, and I look forward to seeing more of the good things he'll be doing there... Thanks for the post, Robert -- see you at The Palace next week?