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Preview: Comments on: This is not a numbers business

Comments on: This is not a numbers business



Helping get ready for the 2020's: when self-driving cars, AI, cryptocurrencies, digital assistants, and XR (Augmented Reality AR / VR) will disrupt us.



Last Build Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2017 20:04:39 +0000

 



By: Olga

Mon, 05 Jun 2006 15:38:32 +0000

When you have something to say you have to say. Some people will use your experience and will have fewer troubles in their lives. Some will agree the others disagree but still they will have the information, the arguments to make decisions. And as more people will make reasoned decisions the whole society will benefit! It's terrible when people think only about money...



By: Olga

Mon, 05 Jun 2006 15:38:00 +0000

When you have something to say you have to say. Some people will use your experience and will have fewer troubles in their lives. Some will agree the others disagree but still they will have the information, the arguments to make decisions. And as more people will make reasoned decisions the whole society will benefit! It's terrible when people think only about money...



By: Marc Snyder

Tue, 11 Apr 2006 12:44:57 +0000

Just demonstrating the ease of commenting on a blog to a new client. Nothing to see. Keep on going. MS



By: Marc Snyder

Tue, 11 Apr 2006 12:44:00 +0000

Just demonstrating the ease of commenting on a blog to a new client. Nothing to see. Keep on going. MS



By: Betsy Aoki's WebLog : Passion and Teflon

Thu, 06 Apr 2006 02:52:00 +0000

[...] Passion and Teflon There are a couple of blogging discussions I see going on that have their own merits and are completely unrelated,  yet rattling in my brain this week. 1) the Rory/Dare/Eric discussion I'll roughly call "Your passion underwhelms me/enthusiasthma " about the use of both buzzwords and attitude around Microsoft or other such afflicted companies in order to terrorize everyone into feeling peer pressure to care. "As long as employees feel pressured to constantly overflow with passion, they’re going to be terrified to speak when it’s time to address what isn’t going so well. I’ve watched projects continue, and not with any great success, fueled mainly by passion. In those cases, yeah, people are being passionate, but they’re putting all this passion into things that aren’t really helping. They’ve been fooled by their own passion." And this is happening company-wide. It’s like open honesty and skepticism are getting brushed aside for passion. It’s spreading thanks to that other often celebrated social disease, the meme. It’s everywhere. And the word is used so often that it’s losing its meaning.." --Rory 2) the back and forth that's been going on between the Naked Conversations bloggers (Shel Israel, Robert Scoble) and the CTO of Amazon Werner Vogel. There's a bunch of passion going on about the two authors' visit to Amazon and the critique by Vogel is that there's no revenue-generating meat to the blogging evangelism, ala "where's the  beef?" The cheap and easy way to tie these two together into a blog post would be to take a shot at Scoble and Shel, say they were too passion-powered and had drunk too much of the blog Kool-Aid, and when they went to Amazon, maybe were too unchecked and passionate to convince the skeptic. I wasn't there so it would be easy to make up some sort of interpretatioin. :D But actually, I think something deeper just happened . Corporate blogging - when done in a progressive Cluetrain way - is actually a platform by which to be skeptical and challenging. Mini-Microsoft keeps Microsoft on its toes and I think that's entirely healthy. Scoble has had his fair share of unpopular stances which at other companies would be euphemistically called "career limiting."  If no one in the Amazon  Blog Triangle had been skeptical (of each other, or the blogging movement) there would have been no dialogue that as a bystander I found profoundly interesting. I'm kinda asleep in my corporate executive tracking; I didn't know much of Vogel before this exchange. Now I'm interested in him and his thoughts and how the dialogue progresses. It's a passionate skepticism that I'm seeing unfolding as both sides fence and debate. Don't get me wrong, I've seen the people Rory warns us about, who substitute passion for brains,hard math, or reality - but you've known that kind of person since high school and your mom warned you about them. :) What has led to the low points of my career morale hasn't been being surrounded by the passion credo zombies, who are easy to spot, but by the actual zombies...people who don't have the energy to even pretend they have passion, and instead use what little energy they have on just teflon. The people that Mini-Microsoft wants to fire but hey - surprise - they aren't just at Microsoft. These are folks who frankly need some sort of peer pressure passion system to "make" them even appear to care.  (Sort of like a barometric pressure, storm front or something). For many of them, that's called "money", but money and passion don't always go together (as your Mom told you about that guy the starving artist). The people who care the most about their work often say they would do it for less, just don't t[...]



By: The Bell Curve Scar

Sun, 02 Apr 2006 13:41:07 +0000

The business value of blogging In response to last week’s Scoble-Israel-Vogels story (summarized here), a few folks have posted on the value of blogging in the corporate setting. In this post, Tim Bray of Sun Microsystems provides one of the best (and simplest) explanations ...



By: torley.blog-city.com

Sun, 02 Apr 2006 13:09:58 +0000

Zulu I had (half of) a blog entry before this but I deleted it because I thot it was trash.(And yet, I haven't blogged in so long.)And yes, this Entry Title is inspired by Hybrid. We're out of the starting gates again:



By: cobolhacker.com » Amazon Needs to Blog? Who cares?

Sun, 02 Apr 2006 01:34:59 +0000

[...] A whole blogstorm has started up involving Scoble and Amazon.com’s CEO Werner Vogels about this very thing. Watching them dance around each other is amusing stuff, though as always, I wonder how Scoble gets any real work done. Ironically, Scoble doesn’t blog for the money or even to promote Microsoft, but yet he has co-authored a book about how businesses can use blogging to reach customers. I scratch my head, puzzled. Some people are going to get a rude surprise if they ever do figure out return on investment numbers. [...]



By: Dmad

Sat, 01 Apr 2006 23:50:02 +0000

@35, Its probably no surprise that even many of MS's own internal PSS folks use google to find KB articles and other support info.



By: Dmad

Sat, 01 Apr 2006 23:50:00 +0000

@35, Its probably no surprise that even many of MS's own internal PSS folks use google to find KB articles and other support info.



By: John C. Welch

Sat, 01 Apr 2006 17:48:42 +0000

Robert, I can tell you that in the IT industry, no, blogging is not doing squat to restore the trust that Microsoft pissed away. In fact, sometimes it may make things worse, because it can look like a blatant attempt to mislead and distract from the meat of things. It's handy in that it maybe gives us another way to get things done, or maybe pick up a tip we wouldn't have gotten otherwise, but if you think that blogging alone is going to make Microsoft a trustable entity, even on a purely professional basis, then I would recommend you stop drinking so much. Here's an example. You, and Microsoft talk all this crap about how you want to dominate the search space, yet the TechNet/support base/MSDN search engines suck, and have sucked for years. Where's the dogfooding? Why is it that I can get better results from Google than the KB search? Why should I take MSN search seriously when the company that writes it isn't using it? Why should I take "dogfooding" seriously when you don't do it yourselves? The Amazon thing also implies a different relationship with Amazon than with a company like Microsoft. I go to Amazon to buy stuff. I don't need employee opinions on them, they're worthless if I don't know the employee. When I want to find a particular book or video game, I don't want blogs, ratings, and the other crapola. I want: 1) I want to find what I am looking for as fast as possible 2) I want to buy that thing in a fast, efficient manner and LEAVE. Everything about Amazon needs to help with that. The only blogging I would want might revolve around system status, (DVD store's down, should be up in an hour) or new features If I can go in, get what I want, and leave in under ten minutes, Amazon is working *perfectly*. Amazon's a middleman, not an end node. Blogging would only confuse that.



By: John C. Welch

Sat, 01 Apr 2006 17:48:00 +0000

Robert, I can tell you that in the IT industry, no, blogging is not doing squat to restore the trust that Microsoft pissed away. In fact, sometimes it may make things worse, because it can look like a blatant attempt to mislead and distract from the meat of things. It's handy in that it maybe gives us another way to get things done, or maybe pick up a tip we wouldn't have gotten otherwise, but if you think that blogging alone is going to make Microsoft a trustable entity, even on a purely professional basis, then I would recommend you stop drinking so much. Here's an example. You, and Microsoft talk all this crap about how you want to dominate the search space, yet the TechNet/support base/MSDN search engines suck, and have sucked for years. Where's the dogfooding? Why is it that I can get better results from Google than the KB search? Why should I take MSN search seriously when the company that writes it isn't using it? Why should I take "dogfooding" seriously when you don't do it yourselves? The Amazon thing also implies a different relationship with Amazon than with a company like Microsoft. I go to Amazon to buy stuff. I don't need employee opinions on them, they're worthless if I don't know the employee. When I want to find a particular book or video game, I don't want blogs, ratings, and the other crapola. I want: 1) I want to find what I am looking for as fast as possible 2) I want to buy that thing in a fast, efficient manner and LEAVE. Everything about Amazon needs to help with that. The only blogging I would want might revolve around system status, (DVD store's down, should be up in an hour) or new features If I can go in, get what I want, and leave in under ten minutes, Amazon is working *perfectly*. Amazon's a middleman, not an end node. Blogging would only confuse that.



By: Vijay

Sat, 01 Apr 2006 09:48:53 +0000

Spot on! ROI isn't everything...that's why we are called human. Working in customer service has taught me to listen and understand the customer before attempting to deliver any product or service. Comments are the voices that help a blog stay true to its soul and links create a support system helping everyone stay True and stay Connected. Now...that's more important than ROI can be at any point. If this sounds silly, maybe you'll find my computer problem cartoons better( at http://spaces.msn.com/sillygloop/ ) Blog on!



By: Vijay

Sat, 01 Apr 2006 09:48:00 +0000

Spot on! ROI isn't everything...that's why we are called human. Working in customer service has taught me to listen and understand the customer before attempting to deliver any product or service. Comments are the voices that help a blog stay true to its soul and links create a support system helping everyone stay True and stay Connected. Now...that's more important than ROI can be at any point. If this sounds silly, maybe you'll find my computer problem cartoons better( at http://spaces.msn.com/sillygloop/ ) Blog on!



By: Gary Wisniewski

Sat, 01 Apr 2006 08:22:18 +0000

Of course it's a number's business! Even people are a numbers business. I like friends. If I have no friends, the number is zero. If I have some good friends the number is non-zero. It matters. Maybe I want to get more contacts in my business life. I buy a better business suit (or cool new sneakers maybe in your case) because conventional wisdom tells me that if I look better, the number of contacts I have will increase. We have no "conventional wisdom" in blogging, so of course people are going to ask about the numbers. And of course you CARE about the numbers! Don't tell me you don't. You talked last month about "tips to get on the A-list". No, no, let's talk about the A-list again, please!. But my point was that your post was full of TECHNIQUES designed to INCREASE the visibility of your blog, and get bigger numbers. Is it just accident that you know these things? You do many of them yourself! And, you observe how these techniques work for others. Face it, you care about the numbers. Maybe you care about people too. I know you do, in fact. And I know you genuinely did START blogging for the reasons you describe. But, also, wasn't it because it was a "cool way" to communicate and because you "believed in it" and over time wasn't it also because you felt "MORE PEOPLE SHOULD DO IT". Numbers. You can still be honest, ethical, and genuine while measuring how well you're doing at it.