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Preview: Blackwell Online - Books : Literary Criticism : English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh

Blackwell Online - Books : Literature : Literary Criticism : English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh



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Politics and Political Culture in the Court Masque

30 Jan 2015 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Sir James Knowles

£50.00   30 Jan 2015   Hardback   Palgrave Macmillan

Politics and Political Culture in the Court Masque considers the interconnections of the masque and political culture. It examines how masques responded to political forces and voices beyond the court, and how masques explored the limits of political speech in the Jacobean and Caroline periods.





John Nichols's The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth (v. 5)

23 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Nichols, John, 1745-1826.

£125.00   23 Jan 2014   Hardback   Oxford University Press

The fifth volume in this annotated collection of texts relating to the 'progresses' of Queen Elizabeth I around England provides 26 appendices, a detailed bibliography of primary and secondary sources, and the index to Volumes I to V.





John Nichols's The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth (v. 4)

23 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Nichols, John, 1745-1826.

£125.00   23 Jan 2014   Hardback   Oxford University Press

The fourth volume in this annotated collection of texts relating to the 'progresses' of Queen Elizabeth I around England includes accounts of dramatic performances, orations, and poems, and a wealth of supplementary material dating from 1596 to 1603.





John Nichols's The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth (v. 3)

23 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Nichols, John, 1745-1826.

£125.00   23 Jan 2014   Hardback   Oxford University Press

The third volume in this annotated collection of texts relating to the 'progresses' of Queen Elizabeth I around England includes accounts of dramatic performances, orations, and poems, and a wealth of supplementary material dating from 1579 to 1595.





John Nichols's The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth (v. 2)

23 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Nichols, John, 1745-1826.

£125.00   23 Jan 2014   Hardback   Oxford University Press

The second volume in this annotated collection of texts relating to the 'progresses' of Queen Elizabeth I around England includes accounts of dramatic performances, orations, and poems, and a wealth of supplementary material dating from 1572 to 1578.





John Nichols's The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth (v. 1)

23 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Nichols, John, 1745-1826.

£125.00   23 Jan 2014   Hardback   Oxford University Press

The first volume in this annotated collection of texts relating to the 'progresses' of Queen Elizabeth I around England includes accounts of dramatic performances, orations, and poems, and a wealth of supplementary material dating from 1533 to 1578.





John Nichols's The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth I

23 Jan 2014 00:00:00 GMT

(image) A New Edition of the Early Modern Sources

By Nichols, John, 1745-1826.

£495.00   23 Jan 2014   Paperback   Oxford University Press

Queen Elizabeth I often used the summer months to embark on tours - or 'progresses' - of England, when she and her courtiers visited towns, cities, universities, and her subjects. This annotated collection of texts relating to the progresses includes accounts of dramatic performances, orations, and poems, and a wealth of supplementary material.





The Anglo Saxon Literature Handbook

05 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Anglo-Saxon

By Mark C. Amodio

£55.00   05 Jul 2013   Hardback   John Wiley and Sons Ltd

The Anglo-Saxon Literature Handbook presents an accessible introduction to the surviving works of prose and poetry produced in Anglo-Saxon England, from AD 410-1066.





Truth and Consequences

30 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£58.50   30 Jun 2013   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





The Anglo Saxon Literature Handbook

17 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Anglo-Saxon

By Mark C. Amodio

£55.00   17 Jun 2013   Hardback   John Wiley and Sons Ltd

The Anglo-Saxon Literature Handbook presents an accessible introduction to the surviving works of prose and poetry produced in Anglo-Saxon England, from AD 410-1066.





Truth and Consequences

30 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£57.50   30 May 2013   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





The Anglo Saxon Literature Handbook

17 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Anglo-Saxon

By Mark C. Amodio

£21.99   17 May 2013   Paperback   John Wiley and Sons Ltd

The Anglo-Saxon Literature Handbook presents an accessible introduction to the surviving works of prose and poetry produced in Anglo-Saxon England, from AD 410-1066.





The Anglo Saxon Literature Handbook

17 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Anglo-Saxon

By Mark C. Amodio

£55.00   17 May 2013   Hardback   John Wiley and Sons Ltd

The Anglo-Saxon Literature Handbook presents an accessible introduction to the surviving works of prose and poetry produced in Anglo-Saxon England, from AD 410-1066.





Truth and Consequences

15 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£57.50   15 May 2013   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Truth and Consequences

15 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£59.50   15 Apr 2013   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Truth and Consequences

15 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£55.95   15 Mar 2013   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Truth and Consequences

15 Feb 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£55.95   15 Feb 2013   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Bewilderments of Vision

08 Feb 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination & Literature, 1880 - 1914

By Dr. Oliver Tearle

£55.00   08 Feb 2013   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Truth and Consequences

15 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£55.95   15 Jan 2013   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Truth and Consequences

15 Dec 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£55.95   15 Dec 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Bewilderments of Vision

01 Dec 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination & Literature, 1880 - 1914

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Dec 2012   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Truth and Consequences

15 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£54.95   15 Nov 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Bewilderments of Vision

01 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination & Literature, 1880 - 1914

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Nov 2012   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Truth and Consequences

15 Oct 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£54.95   15 Oct 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Heroic Revivals from Carlyle to Yeats

05 Oct 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Geraldine Higgins

£40.00   05 Oct 2012   Hardback   Palgrave USA

This volume reassesses the aesthetic and political dimensions of the Anglo Irish Revival's heroic ideal, focusing on the diversity of the cultural landscape carved out by these writers and the implications of this ideal and the diverse cultural landscape for Irish modernity and politics.





Truth and Consequences

15 Sep 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£57.50   15 Sep 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Truth and Consequences

15 Aug 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£58.50   15 Aug 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





The Cambridge Introduction to Contemporary British Poetry

31 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By David Wheatley

£45.00   31 Jul 2012   Hardback   Cambridge University Press

An introduction to the traditions that make up British poetry since the Second World War.





Truth and Consequences

15 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£58.50   15 Jul 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Truth and Consequences

15 Jun 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£58.50   15 Jun 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Laudian and Royalist Polemic in Seventeenth-century England

30 May 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Career and Writings of Peter Heylyn

By Anthony Milton

£15.99   30 May 2012   Paperback   Manchester University Press

Looks at one of the most prolific and controversial polemical authors of the seventeenth century, whose writings lie at the heart of the rule of Charles I, the Civil War, and the restoration of Charles II. In the process, the author presents an important new interpretation of the origins and nature of Anglicanism and royalism.





Truth and Consequences

15 May 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£55.50   15 May 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Laudian and Royalist Polemic in Seventeenth-century England

01 May 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Career and Writings of Peter Heylyn

By Anthony Milton

£15.99   01 May 2012   Paperback   Manchester University Press

Looks at one of the most prolific and controversial polemical authors of the seventeenth century, whose writings lie at the heart of the rule of Charles I, the Civil War, and the restoration of Charles II. In the process, the author presents an important new interpretation of the origins and nature of Anglicanism and royalism.





Truth and Consequences

15 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£56.95   15 Apr 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





The Curtained Room

01 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Apr 2012   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Lucid Interval

20 Mar 2012 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£33.50   20 Mar 2012   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a significant number of writers and artists, an intimately interiorized condition, one which implicates their entire affective life. It is this subjectivized and "existential" madness that, in the Romantic period and subsequently, has been taken to express an "inner truth" in an increasingly secularized and alienating state of society.In taking these developments into account, Lucid Interval is able to arrive at a fresh understanding of the appearance in the modern period of such figures as Clare and de Nerval--writers who suffer madness as [...]



Truth and Consequences

15 Mar 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£56.95   15 Mar 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Lucid Interval

05 Mar 2012 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£34.50   05 Mar 2012   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a significant number of writers and artists, an intimately interiorized condition, one which implicates their entire affective life. It is this subjectivized and "existential" madness that, in the Romantic period and subsequently, has been taken to express an "inner truth" in an increasingly secularized and alienating state of society.In taking these developments into account, Lucid Interval is able to arrive at a fresh understanding of the appearance in the modern period of such figures[...]



The Curtained Room

01 Mar 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Mar 2012   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

24 Feb 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   24 Feb 2012   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Lucid Interval

17 Feb 2012 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£34.50   17 Feb 2012   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a significant number of writers and artists, an intimately interiorized condition, one which implicates their entire affective life. It is this subjectivized and "existential" madness that, in the Romantic period and subsequently, has been taken to express an "inner truth" in an increasingly secularized and alienating state of society.In taking these developments into account, Lucid Interval is able to arri[...]



Truth and Consequences

15 Feb 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£57.50   15 Feb 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Lucid Interval

02 Feb 2012 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£34.50   02 Feb 2012   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a significant number of writers and artists, an intimately interiorized condition, one which implicates their entire affective life. It is this subjectivized and "existential" madness that, in the Romantic period and subsequently, has been taken to express an "inner truth" in an increasingly secularized and alienating state of society.In taking these dev[...]



The Curtained Room

01 Feb 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Feb 2012   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

26 Jan 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   26 Jan 2012   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Lucid Interval

18 Jan 2012 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£34.50   18 Jan 2012   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a significant number of writers and artists, an intimately interiorized condition, one which implicates their entire affective life. It is this subjectivized and "existential" madness that, in the Romantic period and subsequently, has been taken to express an "inner truth" [...]



Truth and Consequences

15 Jan 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£57.50   15 Jan 2012   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Lucid Interval

03 Jan 2012 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£34.50   03 Jan 2012   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a significant number of writers and artists, an intimately interiorized condition, one which implicates their entire affective life. It is this subjectivized and "existential" madness that, in the Romantic period and su[...]



The Curtained Room

01 Jan 2012 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Jan 2012   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

28 Dec 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   28 Dec 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Lucid Interval

19 Dec 2011 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£33.50   19 Dec 2011   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a significant number of writers and artists, an intimately interiorized condition, one which implicates their entire affective life. It i[...]



Blackwell Guides to Literature: Modernism

08 Dec 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Modernism: Modernism

By Heesok Chang

£15.99   08 Dec 2011   Paperback   John Wiley and Sons Ltd

Presents a comprehensive introduction to English literary modernism for undergraduate readers.





Lucid Interval

02 Dec 2011 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£33.50   02 Dec 2011   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a significant number of writers and artists, an intimately interiorized condition, [...]



The Curtained Room

01 Dec 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Dec 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

29 Nov 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   29 Nov 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Lucid Interval

17 Nov 2011 00:00:00 GMT

Subjective Writing and Madness in HistoryBy George MacLennan£33.50   17 Nov 2011   Hardback   Associated University PressesThroughout history a number of writers have given utterance to their own extreme experiences of mental breakdown and madness. In a chronological study that ranges in time and place from medieval England and renaissance Italy to nineteenth-century France, George MacLennan examines the work of eight such writers, poets, or autobiographers, both well known and obscure: Thomas Hoccleve, Torquato Tasso, James Carkesse, John Bunyan, George Trosse, William Cowper, John Clare, and Gerard de Nerval.Michael Foucault once asked the tantilizing (sic) question, "How can language apply a single and identical discourse to poetry and madness?" Lucid Interval concerns itself with this question, broaching it in its cultural and historical dimensions and broadening its terms of reference to include the relationship between subjective writing, literature, and madness. While it is primarily concerned with modes of literary writing, this study draws on a growing body of research into the history of madness and its treatment, addressing topics in the fields of psychoanalytic theory as well as religious, social, and medical history.In recent years the topic of madness has received an increasing amount of attention from critics and historians. As one historian has complained, however, the experience of madness itself remains exiled to the margins of knowledge. No less importantly, no study yet seriously addressed the phenomenon to which Foucault drew attention in the early 1960s, namely the emergence in Western culture of a subjective literature of madness. This study seeks to comprehend the voices of those exponents of inner crisis and of madness who have expressed themselves in writing. It further considers the cultural conditions under which their discourses, in certain significant instances, acquire the status of "literature."MacLennan approaches the eight writers from a broadly sociohistorical viewpoint and takes into account relevant biographical and medical evidence, where available, examining their situations as revealed or mediated by their writings. Through a series of detailed analyses, he argues that these writings bear witness to a progressively increasing degree of psychological inwardness in Western culture. This is a process that affects both how madness is experienced by the individual and how it is expressed in subjective writing. By the late eighteenth century, madness becomes, for a[...]



Truth and Consequences

15 Nov 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£58.95   15 Nov 2011   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





The Curtained Room

01 Nov 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Nov 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

31 Oct 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   31 Oct 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Truth and Consequences

15 Oct 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£58.95   15 Oct 2011   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





'Confessional' Writing and the Twentieth-century Literary Imagination

07 Oct 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Miranda Sherwin

£50.00   07 Oct 2011   Hardback   Palgrave Macmillan

Far from being a unique, defining property of the confessional poets, confessionalism is a central trope of American literature. This book examines confessional writing not as a private, apolitical art, but rather one that demonstrates an engagement with the politics of literary influence, of gender relations, and of American culture more broadly.





The Curtained Room

01 Oct 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Oct 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

30 Sep 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   30 Sep 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





'Confessional' Writing and the Twentieth-century Literary Imagination

30 Sep 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Miranda Sherwin

£50.00   30 Sep 2011   Hardback   Palgrave Macmillan

Far from being a unique, defining property of the confessional poets, confessionalism is a central trope of American literature. This book examines confessional writing not as a private, apolitical art, but rather one that demonstrates an engagement with the politics of literary influence, of gender relations, and of American culture more broadly.





Ulysses and Us

02 Sep 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   02 Sep 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





'Confessional' Writing and the Twentieth-century Literary Imagination

02 Sep 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Miranda Sherwin

£50.00   02 Sep 2011   Hardback   Palgrave Macmillan

Far from being a unique, defining property of the confessional poets, confessionalism is a central trope of American literature. This book examines confessional writing not as a private, apolitical art, but rather one that demonstrates an engagement with the politics of literary influence, of gender relations, and of American culture more broadly.





The Curtained Room

01 Sep 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Sep 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

05 Aug 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   05 Aug 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





The Curtained Room

01 Aug 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Aug 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

08 Jul 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   08 Jul 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





The Curtained Room

01 Jul 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Jul 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Truth and Consequences

15 Jun 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£55.95   15 Jun 2011   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Ulysses and Us

10 Jun 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   10 Jun 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





The Curtained Room

01 Jun 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Jun 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Truth and Consequences

15 May 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£55.95   15 May 2011   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Ulysses and Us

13 May 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   13 May 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





The Curtained Room

01 May 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 May 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

15 Apr 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   15 Apr 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





The Curtained Room

01 Apr 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Apr 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Ulysses and Us

18 Mar 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   18 Mar 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Truth and Consequences

15 Mar 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£56.50   15 Mar 2011   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





The Curtained Room

01 Mar 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Mar 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Romanticism and Gender

25 Feb 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Anne Kostelanetz Mellor

£23.99   25 Feb 2011   Paperback   Taylor & Francis Ltd

Taking twenty women writers of the Romantic period, "Romanticism and Gender" explores a neglected period of the female literary tradition, and for the first time gives a broad overview of Romantic literature from a feminist perspective.





Ulysses and Us

18 Feb 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   18 Feb 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Politics, Religion and the Song of Songs in Seventeenth-century England

18 Feb 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Rewriting the Bride

By Elizabeth Clarke

£50.00   18 Feb 2011   Hardback   Palgrave Macmillan

This book explores the use of the Biblical text of the Song of Songs in seventeenth-century England.





Truth and Consequences

15 Feb 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£57.50   15 Feb 2011   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Charles O'Conor of Ballinagare

01 Feb 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Luke Gibbons, Kieran O'Conor

£50.00   01 Feb 2011   Hardback   Four Courts Press Ltd

"Charles OConor of Ballinagare (171091) was one of 18th-century Irelands greatest scholars, who wrote in both Irish and English. His work was clearly influenced by the Enlightenment and he regularly corresponded with the important intellectual and cult





The Curtained Room

01 Feb 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Feb 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





The Fiction of Emyr Humphreys

30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Contemporary Critical Perspectives

By Linden Peach

£18.99   30 Jan 2011   Paperback   University of Wales Press

An introduction to the work of one of Wales's leading writers, highlighting his importance to contemporary critical and cultural agendas such as issues of identity, nation, environment and religious conflict.





Ulysses and Us

21 Jan 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   21 Jan 2011   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Truth and Consequences

15 Jan 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Literary and Cultural Essays on Modern Ireland

By Harry Thayer Mahoney, Marjorie Locke Mahoney

£55.95   15 Jan 2011   Hardback   Academica Press

Expands and enhances Professor Foster's well known work, Colonial Consequencs (Dublin, 1991). Covering both cultural and literary topics, the book discusses science and Oscar Wilde, Yeats and Nothern nationalism, the plays of Martin McDonagh and the Field Work phenomena.





Royal Romances

14 Jan 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Sex, Scandal, and Monarchy in Print, 1780-1821

By Kristin Samuelian

£52.50   14 Jan 2011   Hardback   Palgrave Macmillan

This text explores the reception of the royal family during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and its representation in fiction, poetry, and the popular press. Samuelian finds that popular response to the royal family has reflected the public's belief in their right of access to the private life of royalty.





Royal Romances

07 Jan 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Sex, Scandal, and Monarchy in Print, 1780-1821

By Kristin Samuelian

£52.50   07 Jan 2011   Hardback   Palgrave Macmillan

This text explores the reception of the royal family during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and its representation in fiction, poetry, and the popular press. Samuelian finds that popular response to the royal family has reflected the public's belief in their right of access to the private life of royalty.





Reframing 'A Portrait of the Artist'

01 Jan 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) James Joyce's Evolution in Design

By Stephen McLaren

£49.95   01 Jan 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

The artistic aspirations of Stephen Dedalus have for decades been read ironically. This title argues that this critical stance has obscured our understanding of James Joyce's philosophical and artistic themes: the nature of the artist, the artistic process, the evolution of artistic consciousness.





The Curtained Room

01 Jan 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) Hallucination and Late-Victorian Writing

By Oliver Tearle

£55.00   01 Jan 2011   Hardback   Sussex Academic Press

According to Oscar Wilde, 'the primary aim of the critic is to see the object as in itself it really is not'. Through a series of close and often unusual readings, this book endeavours to develop Wilde's remark into a detailed and creative theory of reading. It focuses on a series of neologisms from writing of the period.





Milton's Selected Poetry and Prose

01 Jan 2011 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By John Milton

£9.99   01 Jan 2011   Paperback   WW Norton & Co

About the Series: No other series of classic texts equals the caliber of the Norton Critical Editions. Each volume combines the most authoritative text available with the comprehensive pedagogical apparatus necessary to appreciate the work fully. Careful editing, first-rate translation, and thorough explanatory annotations allow each text to meet the highest literary standards while remaining accessible to students. Each edition is printed on acid-free paper and every text in the series remains in print. Norton Critical Editions are the choice for excellence in scholarship for students at more than 2,000 universities worldwide.





Ulysses and Us

24 Dec 2010 00:00:00 GMT

(image) The Art of Everyday Life in Joyce's Masterpiece

By Declan Kiberd

£21.00   24 Dec 2010   Hardback   WW Norton & Co

Why James Joyce's great modernist masterpiece is a book that can teach ordinary people to live better lives.





Twelfth Night

22 Dec 2010 00:00:00 GMT

(image) New Critical Essays

By Schiffer, James

£75.00   22 Dec 2010   Hardback   Taylor & Francis Ltd

Offers a range of approaches to 'Twelfth' 'Night', including its critical reception, performance history, and relation to early modern culture. This book provides introduction that surveys the play's critical reception and performance history, while individual essays explore a variety of topics relevant to a full appreciation of the play.





Ovid and the Politics of Emotion in Elizabethan England

19 Dec 2010 00:00:00 GMT

(image) By Cora Fox

£50.00   19 Dec 2010   Hardback   Palgrave Macmillan

This book reveals how imitations of Ovid's works helped to redefine emotional experience and the political efficacy of emotional expression in late sixteenth-century England.





Twelfth Night

16 Dec 2010 00:00:00 GMT

(image) New Critical Essays

By Schiffer, James

£75.00   16 Dec 2010   Hardback   Taylor & Francis Ltd

Offers a range of approaches to 'Twelfth' 'Night', including its critical reception, performance history, and relation to early modern culture. This book provides introduction that surveys the play's critical reception and performance history, while individual essays explore a variety of topics relevant to a full appreciation of the play.