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On campus, but out of class: an investigation into students' experiences of learning technologies in their self‐directed study

2009-09-26T12:29:17-00:00

ALT-J, Vol. 16, No. 1. (1 March 2008), pp. 5-14, doi:10.1080/09687760701850166

This paper presents an investigation into how students studying at university engage actively with learning technology in their self?directed study time. The case study surveyed 250 students studying at undergraduate and postgraduate level from a purposive sample of departments within one institution. The study has also conducted focus groups and a number of in?depth follow?up interviews with respondents to the survey. In this article we explore three emerging aspects of the learning experience, namely student expectations of the technology, their lecturers' engagement with technology and how the technology might support processes of transition in higher education. One key implication is that more academic guidance is needed on what and how to use the technology effectively for independent learning, even where ICT skills levels are high. The study also identifies the significant role that the lecturer plays in facilitating students' use of technology. The findings of this study will be of interest to those working to incorporate learning technologies more effectively in higher education, in particular for those who are looking to improve the engagement of students in self?directed learning. This paper presents an investigation into how students studying at university engage actively with learning technology in their self?directed study time. The case study surveyed 250 students studying at undergraduate and postgraduate level from a purposive sample of departments within one institution. The study has also conducted focus groups and a number of in?depth follow?up interviews with respondents to the survey. In this article we explore three emerging aspects of the learning experience, namely student expectations of the technology, their lecturers' engagement with technology and how the technology might support processes of transition in higher education. One key implication is that more academic guidance is needed on what and how to use the technology effectively for independent learning, even where ICT skills levels are high. The study also identifies the significant role that the lecturer plays in facilitating students' use of technology. The findings of this study will be of interest to those working to incorporate learning technologies more effectively in higher education, in particular for those who are looking to improve the engagement of students in self?directed learning.
Frances Deepwell, Samina Malik



Podcasting syndication services and university students: Why don't they subscribe?

2009-06-30T12:05:25-00:00

The Internet and Higher Education, Vol. 12, No. 1. (12 January 2009), pp. 53-59, doi:10.1016/j.iheduc.2008.10.001

Partly owing to the status of podcasting as a buzzword and subject of much recent media attention, educational technology researchers and practitioners have been using the term very loosely. Few studies have examined student perceptions and uptake of “podcasting” in the true sense of the word, whereby a syndication protocol such as Really Simple Syndication (RSS) is used to allow students to subscribe to podcast feeds or channels, facilitating the automatic download of new content as it becomes available. The small number of studies that have covered this aspect of podcasting suggest that students generally do not tend to make use of this functionality, but instead prefer to simply download the media files manually. By drawing on research into the usage of RSS and podcasting both inside and outside the field of education, as well as extant literature on university students' usage patterns and behaviors with respect to information and communications technologies (ICTs) and the Internet, the authors postulate a number of possible reasons why podcasting syndication services have not experienced substantial levels of uptake among students to date. They argue that it is premature to dismiss RSS as a distribution mechanism for digital audio content in teaching and learning, and describe a number of examples of educational applications that could potentially make the use of such services worthwhile and valuable to both teachers and students. The authors conclude with suggestions for research to test the theories set forth in the article.
Mark Lee, Charlynn Miller, Leon Newnham



Academic podcasting: quality media delivery.

2007-03-29T00:18:40-00:00

AMIA Annu Symp Proc (2006)

A video podcast of the CME-approved University of Utah Department of Biomedical Informatics seminar was created in order to address issues with streaming video quality, take advantage of popular web-based syndication methods, and make the files available for convenient, subscription-based download. An RSS feed, which is automatically generated, contains links to the media files and allows viewers to easily subscribe to the weekly seminars in a format that guarantees consistent video quality.
JS Tripp, SL Duvall, DL Cowan, AW Kamauu



Podcasting in academia: a new knowledge management paradigm within academic settings

2007-03-29T00:17:48-00:00

In Proceedings of the 2006 ACM SIGMIS CPR conference on computer personnel research: Forty four years of computer personnel research: achievements, challenges & the future (2006), pp. 314-317, doi:10.1145/1125170.1125241

Podcasting represents a new and exciting learning paradigm within an academic setting. Materials such conference reports, research manuscripts, and course lectures can be recorded as audio and video files and delivered to subscribing users automatically. A minimum skills and effort is requiring for involved parties to accomplish the knowledge transaction. The ease of use and seamless transaction between users enable more efficiency in resource consumption. Minimal time and effort is wasted for both knowledge distribution and acquisition. In addition, podcasting can be utilized in various types of knowledge management practices including, a collaborative and social networking activities. This paper provides a technological overview of podcasting, and examines the potential podcasting usage within educational settings, podcasting contributions to academia, and future podcasting research suggestions.
Peter Ractham, Xuesong Zhang



JISC LXP Student experiences of technologies Final report

2007-03-28T21:38:15-00:00


Gráinne Conole, Maarten de Laat, Teresa Dillon, Jonathan Darby